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#1 Heriberto

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:32 PM

I have an application where I have lots of serial and USB data to input to a computer. Apparently there are devices that you plug in your USB and it adds it as an IP address. This might be really handy for a lot of applications. I'm looking at it because I get conflicts between devices on the USB bus, as well as running out of ports.

Has anyone used these on a boat?

#2 allen

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 01:48 PM

There are serial to USB converters that work well. I use this one on my boat. But I have the feeling I don't understand your question so maybe this is not what you are looking for.

Allen
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#3 knobblyoldjimbo

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 09:58 PM

that you plug in your USB and it adds it as an IP address


I think that device is called a computer!

With this device you'd write a program that pulls all the data in and sends it out in a stream of IP packets that another computer on the network will understand.

You might also write a program that makes a stream of output data using your own nmea type strings which, again, gets read by another computer on the network. XML was also designed to perform this way although I'm not so sure it can work with data streams (rather than data files that have termination codes).

#4 Heriberto

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:23 PM

that you plug in your USB and it adds it as an IP address


I think that device is called a computer!

With this device you'd write a program that pulls all the data in and sends it out in a stream of IP packets that another computer on the network will understand.

You might also write a program that makes a stream of output data using your own nmea type strings which, again, gets read by another computer on the network. XML was also designed to perform this way although I'm not so sure it can work with data streams (rather than data files that have termination codes).


No. AnywhereUSB is a brand of USB server that you can plug USB and RS232 appliances in and it gives them an IP address that you can supposedly use them remotely just like you would if they were plugged in your computer. So if you have a laptop that only has one USB port, and had lots of things to plug in (software dongle, gps, remote keyboard, remote mouse, remote touchscreen, DVD drive, data acquisition boxes, etc. individually or all at the same time), you could plug them into the USB server device and they would be recognized the same way, but without the conflicts on the USB bus.

If you have used one, could you give some feedback?

#5 -Julian-

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:31 PM

that you plug in your USB and it adds it as an IP address


I think that device is called a computer!

With this device you'd write a program that pulls all the data in and sends it out in a stream of IP packets that another computer on the network will understand.

You might also write a program that makes a stream of output data using your own nmea type strings which, again, gets read by another computer on the network. XML was also designed to perform this way although I'm not so sure it can work with data streams (rather than data files that have termination codes).




that you plug in your USB and it adds it as an IP address


I think that device is called a computer!

With this device you'd write a program that pulls all the data in and sends it out in a stream of IP packets that another computer on the network will understand.

You might also write a program that makes a stream of output data using your own nmea type strings which, again, gets read by another computer on the network. XML was also designed to perform this way although I'm not so sure it can work with data streams (rather than data files that have termination codes).


No. AnywhereUSB is a brand of USB server that you can plug USB and RS232 appliances in and it gives them an IP address that you can supposedly use them remotely just like you would if they were plugged in your computer. So if you have a laptop that only has one USB port, and had lots of things to plug in (software dongle, gps, remote keyboard, remote mouse, remote touchscreen, DVD drive, data acquisition boxes, etc. individually or all at the same time), you could plug them into the USB server device and they would be recognized the same way, but without the conflicts on the USB bus.

If you have used one, could you give some feedback?



Just a simple computer (embedded systems)... I know those work alright for printers, I have no experience with them for other devices and certainly no experience with them on boats.
Good luck.

-J


EDIT>>> Also worth pointing out, If you are already having port mapping troubles, it probably wont make things any better to add more complications to fix it. It has serious potential to fail either quite often, or unexpectedly at the worst possible moment.

#6 P2 Marine

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 11:43 PM

I've had good luck using a USB hub and virtual COM ports . Try Franson Gate, I think that's the one Nobeltec packs with the VNS software. I also think you can get it for free, but couldn't find the free download from their site. If that doesn't work for you Google says there is a lot of free virtual COM port software out there.

I use it for sorting out incoming data from B&G, two GPS's, DSC from the VHF and an AIS receiver. I can then run Nobeltec VNS and Expedition at the same time from virtual ports and rarely experience conflicts or crashes.

Cheers,
Rob

Edit... Found the link to it on the EXP website: http://gpsgate.com/p.../gpsgate_client

#7 Ocean View

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 01:46 AM

No. AnywhereUSB is a brand of USB server that you can plug USB and RS232 appliances in and it gives them an IP address that you can supposedly use them remotely just like you would if they were plugged in your computer. So if you have a laptop that only has one USB port, and had lots of things to plug in (software dongle, gps, remote keyboard, remote mouse, remote touchscreen, DVD drive, data acquisition boxes, etc. individually or all at the same time), you could plug them into the USB server device and they would be recognized the same way, but without the conflicts on the USB bus.<br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: verdana, arial, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); "><br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: verdana, arial, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">If you have used one, could you give some feedback?


I've used a number of the digi RS232 to IP (RJ45 Ethernet) products and assume the Anywhere USB would work the same way.

You need to connect the Anywhere device to the RJ45 Ethernet port of your PC.

It will then set up a series of "virtual" com /usb ports on the PC.

You then connect all your peripherals to the Anywhere device - and map them through to the respective "Virtual RS232 / USB port" shown on the PC.

The "virtual" ports are very usable ports - with flow control etc and are talking to your PC via IP through the RJ45 ethernet port of the PC.

Ie
It connects and mixes the data into an IP signal at the Anywhere device

And then fans it back out at your PC via the RJ45 Ethernet port - As bunch of "virtual ports" that you can monitor/control.

Trust that helps.

#8 WHL

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 02:41 AM

I've had good luck using a USB hub and virtual COM ports . Try Franson Gate, I think that's the one Nobeltec packs with the VNS software. I also think you can get it for free, but couldn't find the free download from their site. If that doesn't work for you Google says there is a lot of free virtual COM port software out there.

I use it for sorting out incoming data from B&G, two GPS's, DSC from the VHF and an AIS receiver. I can then run Nobeltec VNS and Expedition at the same time from virtual ports and rarely experience conflicts or crashes.

Cheers,
Rob

Edit... Found the link to it on the EXP website: http://gpsgate.com/p.../gpsgate_client

+ 1 on that. I use GPS Gate too. Very easy. I take a feed from a mux into a USB 4 port hub, or a direct feed from a NMEA Talker into the hub, then create a number of virtual ports, some for importing the same NMEA data into multiple concurrent apps (e.g. Expedition, Ocens/GMN XGate (to add positions data to outgoing email via satphone), Ocens GRIB Explorer/MetMapper/WeatherNet, or alternate low overhead nav/charting package like Maptech's Offshore Navigator. I can then export data to the additional ports on the hub, in addition to the 3 USB ports in the PC. I have had a total of 10 ports up and running between the PC's and Hub's real ports and the GPS Gate Virtual Ports. I wasn't limited to 10, but had no need for more.

BTW, if you use the Ocens/GMN email and weather service, their XGate gateway can also create virtual ports, however Franson's GPS Gate is much better in that you don't need to be running the Email Gateway to have the virtual ports established.

#9 nixon

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 05:38 AM

USB to IP and serial to IP gateways work well. It is a pretty standard IT thing these days - has been around for quite a while in the industrial IT world and now in general IT environments. Used for data acquisition and things like license dongles for virtual servers. There is even an RFC (an IT standard) covering the protocols and so on. Just find one designed for the marine world and you should be fine.

Someone mentioned the Fransom software - we use their client software to take one direct usb connection to the computer and split it to several nav programmes. Absolutely 100% reliable in 4 years of use - never failed once.

#10 Heriberto

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 02:48 PM

Thanks all. It's actually going into this system first:

Posted Image

We've tried USB hubs, but when you have several mission critical high data flow USB appliances they wind up with conflicts on the USB bus which just isn't as robust as Ethernet.

In this rig there is a Siemens PLC system controlling hydraulics/pneumatics, with an ethernet box that allows it to be controlled remotely, a XP "man-machine interface" industrial touch screen computer that has "virtual" buttons to control the hydraulics. This system is also networked to the data acquisition computer (also XP), which is hooked up to the various sensors. They all interact, so that things on the PLC affect the data acquisition, and things in the data acquisition affect the PLC operation (emergeny stops, alarms, etc.). So a pretty complicated setup.

Then sailing-wise, I'm looking into ways of dealing with B&G's connectivity limitations. Without breaking the bank at the B$G store....

#11 nixon

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Posted 27 March 2012 - 04:07 AM

Well it looks like you are trying to do it properly!

I have worked with Digi products before in a non-sailing context - have been very happy. They have an Anywhere/USB product. 5 separate USB inputs, 2 RJ-45 Ethernet uplinks, dual power supplies. All the good stuff. http://www.digi.com/...ywhereusb#specs. Smaller models too.

There are a number of industrial systems that need USB or Serial to IP gateways - you should be able to find one that meets your requirements.

#12 Heriberto

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 06:05 PM

Damn.

I literally had to drive 14 hours round-trip to fucking Omaha to replace a USB dongle in one of my rigs because the dongle and/or the port had a bad or worn connection. Then when I get there and go to replace them, more freaking USB port conflicts that have to be resolved and change all the damn com ports.

FUCK!

There has GOT TO BE A BETTER CONNECTOR! It almost makes me long for the DB9 days. At least those could get screwed in place. These USB connectors, one little bump and it breaks the connection and you are hosed.

#13 Heriberto

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 06:14 PM

No. AnywhereUSB is a brand of USB server that you can plug USB and RS232 appliances in and it gives them an IP address that you can supposedly use them remotely just like you would if they were plugged in your computer. So if you have a laptop that only has one USB port, and had lots of things to plug in (software dongle, gps, remote keyboard, remote mouse, remote touchscreen, DVD drive, data acquisition boxes, etc. individually or all at the same time), you could plug them into the USB server device and they would be recognized the same way, but without the conflicts on the USB bus.<br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: verdana, arial, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); "><br style="color: rgb(28, 40, 55); font-family: verdana, arial, tahoma, sans-serif; font-size: 13px; line-height: 20px; background-color: rgb(250, 251, 252); ">If you have used one, could you give some feedback?


I've used a number of the digi RS232 to IP (RJ45 Ethernet) products and assume the Anywhere USB would work the same way.

You need to connect the Anywhere device to the RJ45 Ethernet port of your PC.

It will then set up a series of "virtual" com /usb ports on the PC.

You then connect all your peripherals to the Anywhere device - and map them through to the respective "Virtual RS232 / USB port" shown on the PC.

The "virtual" ports are very usable ports - with flow control etc and are talking to your PC via IP through the RJ45 ethernet port of the PC.

Ie
It connects and mixes the data into an IP signal at the Anywhere device

And then fans it back out at your PC via the RJ45 Ethernet port - As bunch of "virtual ports" that you can monitor/control.

Trust that helps.


Thanks to you and Nixon, et. al. That does help.

The GPSGate and other software solutions are interesting and probably work well for other applications, but in this case I need a hardware fix.

#14 duncan (the other one)

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 09:47 PM

Damn.

I literally had to drive 14 hours round-trip to fucking Omaha to replace a USB dongle in one of my rigs because the dongle and/or the port had a bad or worn connection. Then when I get there and go to replace them, more freaking USB port conflicts that have to be resolved and change all the damn com ports.

FUCK!

There has GOT TO BE A BETTER CONNECTOR! It almost makes me long for the DB9 days. At least those could get screwed in place. These USB connectors, one little bump and it breaks the connection and you are hosed.


Sounds like you need some of these.
http://www.te.com/catalog/minf/en/779

Posted Image

#15 Heriberto

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Posted 31 March 2012 - 11:12 PM

I wish more equipment used that stuff. I do have one piece of equipment that uses the Bulgin version.

#16 Sailabout

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 01:13 AM

any reason all your connectivity isnt serial?

#17 Sailabout

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 04:02 AM

Windows (32/64bit) can have over 200 serial ports, if you run out thats a lot of IO?

#18 Heriberto

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 04:04 PM

Windows (32/64bit) can have over 200 serial ports, if you run out thats a lot of IO?


I think I said it incorrectly and it is more a timing issue. I get "USB buffer overrun" errors and ours (and our vendor's) speculation is USB 2.0 speed is a requirement for some of my hardware. I don't know how it works exactly, if you have too many appliances on the USB bus does it slow the throughput of each appliance to USB 1.1 or slower? I know that if I plug them into USB 1.1 ports they don't work right. Unfortunately I just looked at the specs and the AnywhereUSB only supports USB 1.1 speed for USB 2.0 appliances.

The search continues.

The other issue I had was with a serial gps (the Garmin 17HVS or whatever they are calling it now). A lot of computers these days don't have a DB9 serial port, you can use serial to USB adapters and that is what we ended up doing, but before that we tried adding an internal serial card. Direct path to BSOD.

I am hearing Win7 is more stable for all of this than XP. True?

#19 Sailabout

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 11:13 PM

There are tons of XP out there doing industrial process monitoring but all that I see use serial boards say like rocket port adapters and use rs485 for the speed so up to 10mb of data
On ships the IMO standard is nmea0183 so all rs485 as its very reliable
I would guess if you need more data speed you need to convert to ethernet.
A cruise ship would have something like 40,000 items monitored in their vessel management systems.

#20 Heriberto

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Posted 01 April 2012 - 11:46 PM

Actually, the equipment I use is also used offshore. A. P. Van den Berg cone penetration testing equipment. Offshore it is used to test seabed sediments for platforms cables and dredging. I am often surprised by the lack of certain robustness in the onshore systems. I imagine there are tradeoffs....

#21 Sailabout

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 09:58 AM

yes true as some are governed by IMO and class and lots are a free for all
I work in the DP side

#22 BalticBandit

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 02:31 PM

Actually, the equipment I use is also used offshore. A. P. Van den Berg cone penetration testing equipment. Offshore it is used to test seabed sediments for platforms cables and dredging. I am often surprised by the lack of certain robustness in the onshore systems. I imagine there are tradeoffs....

The biggest tradeoff is cost. Enough power to drive lots of devices? Means a more expensive power supply that is wasted if you only drive 4 devices
Harsh Conditions protected? that means different glues and solders in the circuit board which is... More expensive
Watertight connectors? More expensive
Corrosion resistant components? More expensive..

etc. etc.

Now as to the device you are looking at

If you look at the datasheet on the concentrator you were looking at - it does NOT assign an IP address per device, rather there is an IP address for ALL the devices and these devices are then accessed the way you would access any "served" device. So it isn't really "USB over IP". What it really is - is what someone earlier described as "A PC that you plug the devices into and which uses an OS to share the devices". Its just that it is a very low cost PC (rack slot) and the OS has been pared down to do just that one thing.

USB 1.1 vs. 2.0 issues - a lot of that has to do with how the 2.0 device implements its "down protocol" - and how robust the 1.1 receiver is to data overrun errors. Theoretically it all works. In practice USB is used in either a dedicated manner for mission critical devices, or else it is considered a "consumer device" and data loss is considered "acceptable".

Dunno what to tell you about what you are trying to do. Other than you might consider looking at various industrial PLCs. Which while more expensie ARE more robust (except when Stuxnet II goes "into the wild") http://ab.rockwellau.../Micro-and-Nano
http://www.automation.siemens.com/mcms/programmable-logic-controller/en/simatic-s7-controller/Pages/Default.aspx
http://hpsweb.honeywell.com/Cultures/en-US/Products/Systems/ModularSystems/default.htm

#23 Heriberto

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 05:39 PM


Actually, the equipment I use is also used offshore. A. P. Van den Berg cone penetration testing equipment. Offshore it is used to test seabed sediments for platforms cables and dredging. I am often surprised by the lack of certain robustness in the onshore systems. I imagine there are tradeoffs....

The biggest tradeoff is cost. Enough power to drive lots of devices? Means a more expensive power supply that is wasted if you only drive 4 devices
Harsh Conditions protected? that means different glues and solders in the circuit board which is... More expensive
Watertight connectors? More expensive
Corrosion resistant components? More expensive..

etc. etc.

Now as to the device you are looking at

If you look at the datasheet on the concentrator you were looking at - it does NOT assign an IP address per device, rather there is an IP address for ALL the devices and these devices are then accessed the way you would access any "served" device. So it isn't really "USB over IP". What it really is - is what someone earlier described as "A PC that you plug the devices into and which uses an OS to share the devices". Its just that it is a very low cost PC (rack slot) and the OS has been pared down to do just that one thing.

USB 1.1 vs. 2.0 issues - a lot of that has to do with how the 2.0 device implements its "down protocol" - and how robust the 1.1 receiver is to data overrun errors. Theoretically it all works. In practice USB is used in either a dedicated manner for mission critical devices, or else it is considered a "consumer device" and data loss is considered "acceptable".

Dunno what to tell you about what you are trying to do. Other than you might consider looking at various industrial PLCs. Which while more expensie ARE more robust (except when Stuxnet II goes "into the wild") http://ab.rockwellau.../Micro-and-Nano
http://www.automation.siemens.com/mcms/programmable-logic-controller/en/simatic-s7-controller/Pages/Default.aspx
http://hpsweb.honeywell.com/Cultures/en-US/Products/Systems/ModularSystems/default.htm


Wow, ok, very informative.

Actually, I already have Simatic PLC controls in there that control the hydraulics and pneumatics. That is a separate system (by the same manufacturer, Dutch, so Siemens....), the data acquisition is separate (mostly). The box I'm going to try now is this one from Aaxeon.

Posted Image

At $170 it is very affordable too.

#24 Heriberto

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 06:38 PM

I wonder if you could plug something like this directly into a wifi AP box to broadcast gps, B&G, and other data to multiple sources? Several cool things about it, including a 7-24V DC input....

#25 Ocean View

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Posted 02 April 2012 - 11:29 PM

I wonder if you could plug something like this directly into a wifi AP box to broadcast gps, B&G, and other data to multiple sources? Several cool things about it, including a 7-24V DC input....



Suggest you download the manual first - it operates the same way as the digi product and uses a HUB Server APP to manage the USB devices attached to it.
We use these sort of products for industrial projects and as mentioned above - they tend to either fan out the ports via software on the PC - or are individual usb to ethernet adaptors that do the conversion on a one to one basis. ie USB device to IP address. Serial device to IP Address.
When using the hubs that require software - you can sometimes run into issues with an emulated port running on the same box not being recognised.

And if you looking for this in a mission critical monitoring environment - I'd suggest go for the higher end range of gear as noted above by "BalticBandit" to get some reliability into your solution.


The lower the price of the device
The more chance it has of not always doing the same thing - all the time
Which typically occurs just about the same time you really need it to work. Posted Image

#26 Heriberto

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 03:47 PM

I wonder if you could plug something like this directly into a wifi AP box to broadcast gps, B&G, and other data to multiple sources? Several cool things about it, including a 7-24V DC input....



Suggest you download the manual first - it operates the same way as the digi product and uses a HUB Server APP to manage the USB devices attached to it.
We use these sort of products for industrial projects and as mentioned above - they tend to either fan out the ports via software on the PC - or are individual usb to ethernet adaptors that do the conversion on a one to one basis. ie USB device to IP address. Serial device to IP Address.
When using the hubs that require software - you can sometimes run into issues with an emulated port running on the same box not being recognised.

And if you looking for this in a mission critical monitoring environment - I'd suggest go for the higher end range of gear as noted above by "BalticBandit" to get some reliability into your solution.


The lower the price of the device
The more chance it has of not always doing the same thing - all the time
Which typically occurs just about the same time you really need it to work. Posted Image


I don't know if this is giving out trade secrets, but do you have examples of companies that make appliances that don't rely on software and do the conversion on a one-to-one basis? That do as you say, USB to IP address, serial to IP address?

Thanks!

#27 Sailabout

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Posted 03 April 2012 - 11:11 PM

digi.com
comtrol.com

#28 Ocean View

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 12:39 AM

As he said Posted Image

Typically the digi range does what we need.

#29 Monkey

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 05:05 AM

Thanks all. It's actually going into this system first:

Posted Image

We've tried USB hubs, but when you have several mission critical high data flow USB appliances they wind up with conflicts on the USB bus which just isn't as robust as Ethernet.

In this rig there is a Siemens PLC system controlling hydraulics/pneumatics, with an ethernet box that allows it to be controlled remotely, a XP "man-machine interface" industrial touch screen computer that has "virtual" buttons to control the hydraulics. This system is also networked to the data acquisition computer (also XP), which is hooked up to the various sensors. They all interact, so that things on the PLC affect the data acquisition, and things in the data acquisition affect the PLC operation (emergeny stops, alarms, etc.). So a pretty complicated setup.

Then sailing-wise, I'm looking into ways of dealing with B&G's connectivity limitations. Without breaking the bank at the B$G store....

Since you've already gone the PLC route, why run the data acquisition through a Windows machine? A few I/O's fed to the PLC would be more reliable. I HATE getting Microsoft involved as a middle man when it's not necessary. To be fair, not knowing the gear involved, im not sure if this is possible.

Edit: who created that system? The data flow issues you're having make me curious.

Edit again: the more I re-read your description of the system, the more it annoys me. Maybe I'm missing something, but I'd probably get fired if I dumped a set up like that on a production line at work.

#30 Sailabout

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:40 AM

everythings running on windows ( usually XP) BUT they use very little windows functions to stay out of trouble

#31 bob d

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 04:39 AM


I wonder if you could plug something like this directly into a wifi AP box to broadcast gps, B&G, and other data to multiple sources? Several cool things about it, including a 7-24V DC input....



Suggest you download the manual first - it operates the same way as the digi product and uses a HUB Server APP to manage the USB devices attached to it.
We use these sort of products for industrial projects and as mentioned above - they tend to either fan out the ports via software on the PC - or are individual usb to ethernet adaptors that do the conversion on a one to one basis. ie USB device to IP address. Serial device to IP Address.
When using the hubs that require software - you can sometimes run into issues with an emulated port running on the same box not being recognised.

And if you looking for this in a mission critical monitoring environment - I'd suggest go for the higher end range of gear as noted above by "BalticBandit" to get some reliability into your solution.


The lower the price of the device
The more chance it has of not always doing the same thing - all the time
Which typically occurs just about the same time you really need it to work. Posted Image


I don't know if this is giving out trade secrets, but do you have examples of companies that make appliances that don't rely on software and do the conversion on a one-to-one basis? That do as you say, USB to IP address, serial to IP address?

Thanks!


Not specifically your application, but given my experience you might want to take a look at the MOXA line. We use their devices on two serial systems (12K+ devices) where we have both RS-232 and RS-485/4W mixed. The MOXA device uses virtual COM ports via the USB port. Ran successfully on XPPro sp3. Now running on Win7x86. Far more robust than either digi or comtrol. We tested both and they failed, miserably.

If you PM me, I can suggest a vendor who has very good service and prices. And no, it ain't my brother-in-law.

#32 Heriberto

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 06:40 PM


Thanks all. It's actually going into this system first:

Posted Image

We've tried USB hubs, but when you have several mission critical high data flow USB appliances they wind up with conflicts on the USB bus which just isn't as robust as Ethernet.

In this rig there is a Siemens PLC system controlling hydraulics/pneumatics, with an ethernet box that allows it to be controlled remotely, a XP "man-machine interface" industrial touch screen computer that has "virtual" buttons to control the hydraulics. This system is also networked to the data acquisition computer (also XP), which is hooked up to the various sensors. They all interact, so that things on the PLC affect the data acquisition, and things in the data acquisition affect the PLC operation (emergeny stops, alarms, etc.). So a pretty complicated setup.

Then sailing-wise, I'm looking into ways of dealing with B&G's connectivity limitations. Without breaking the bank at the B$G store....

Since you've already gone the PLC route, why run the data acquisition through a Windows machine? A few I/O's fed to the PLC would be more reliable. I HATE getting Microsoft involved as a middle man when it's not necessary. To be fair, not knowing the gear involved, im not sure if this is possible.

Edit: who created that system? The data flow issues you're having make me curious.

Edit again: the more I re-read your description of the system, the more it annoys me. Maybe I'm missing something, but I'd probably get fired if I dumped a set up like that on a production line at work.


Yeah, don't get me wrong, basically, I agree with you, however it isn't my choice how they do this part of it, I'm just trying to make it more robust than it had been.

I'm starting to think the main problem is the @#$%^!! software protection dongle (CodeMeter specifically) that is causing the majority of problems. I hate those damn things, and since you need to buy tens of thousands of dollars of their shit to even need to run the software, what is the damn point? Maybe they are using another vendor's data acquisition drivers?

Don't get it.

Anyway, thanks all for the advice, Bob D, I'm going to look into that. We are also looking at doing some more interesting stuff to be hardware neutral (if not independent), like setting it to run on a VM, which would make backing up and crash retrieval easier. Unfortunately, when you are operating off 12 and/or 24VDC inverters, it's hard to get enough power. Or rather, you can never have enough power....

#33 Sailabout

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 12:20 AM

to me its the USB part that is not robust, if you can do multiport serial to serial/pci card or ip it never goes wrong.
Only thing you need to be careful with is update rate via anybodies concentrator if timing is an issue with your kit?
Many of them will only run at the speed of the slowest feed

#34 Heriberto

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 02:32 AM

I'm wondering about that too, whether it is the USB on your motherboard that may only support the throughput of the slowest device on that particular bus.

I just got this box and tested the current draw (for potential future boat use). Right now it is 0.008amp at 12 volt.... I need to plug in a few appliances and hook it into a wireless AP to see what it does in anger....

#35 Sailabout

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 02:01 AM

no its the concentrator not the connection technology to your pc, some state it in their documentation

#36 Heriberto

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 06:55 PM

Well, overall, I was very, very pleased with this unit from Aaxeon, but it didn't take me long to realize I was doin' it rong. I was able to get it to recognize any USB device as an IP address mapped to a com port, and it could properly read anything that was a USB device inputting data (like a data stick, camera, or gps), but it would lock up if I tried to use an control device (mouse or keyboard) over the IP connection to control the computer,

I don't know if this is a universal problem for USB over IP, or just the software of this unit, but my guess is the former.




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