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AwlGrip Guide Coat


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#1 Anonymous Anarchist

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:34 AM

Trying to finally get topsides right. Well primed with 545 and sanded out with 320 on a long board. Now I'd like to spray on a guide coat and sand it down with my longboard before taking the plunge with final finish.

What's the best stuff to use?

Is there something shiny that makes it easy to spot ripples?

Can I ignore this last step with good conscience?

aa

#2 F_L

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 01:42 PM

What color is the 545? I use grey. It goes from a semigloss dark grey to a matte light grey when sanded. No guide coat needed.
Fred

#3 Five Guys Named Moe

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 06:21 PM

What color is the 545? I use grey. It goes from a semigloss dark grey to a matte light grey when sanded. No guide coat needed.
Fred


The gloss sort of does go away.

Aren't there two colors of 545? Go with another coat of white or whatever you don't have underneath?

#4 the truth.

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 10:17 AM

Black car paint aerosol. Shows everything unfair up.

#5 FOP

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 08:27 PM

Stick with F_Līs advise Posted Image

#6 Mauney Motorsports

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 04:13 AM

Matte black automotive rattle can. Stand back and wave the can at the surface, splattered dots not zebra lines. Try to avoid heavy coverage. Take the guess work out of the effort, guide coating is an excellent idea. Some use Dupont or similar Tire Black, won't clog the paper.
Thick, straight, high quality paint stir sticks make great "blocking" tools. Wrap an entire sheet of paper carefully around the stick and tear used sections as needed. Works wet or dry.
Do guide coat.

#7 VERGE

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 08:13 AM

3M make a powder guide coat you dust across the surface. No waiting for paint to dry. Automotive refinishing suppliers will have this.
International paints also make a liquid guide coat, funny blue green colour.

#8 danaes

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:12 PM

3M make a powder guide coat you dust across the surface. No waiting for paint to dry. Automotive refinishing suppliers will have this.
International paints also make a liquid guide coat, funny blue green colour.


ok .thanks a lot .Posted Image

#9 VERGE

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 07:58 AM

LINKY

INTERNATIONAL PAINTS

3M PRODUCT

#10 Anonymous Anarchist

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Posted 16 April 2012 - 12:50 PM

I'm the original poster, and thought I'd give an update.

I did initial sanding using primer gloss as a rough guide, then continued with a dusting of graphite (3M mystery powder). This revealed several holidays I missed with my first effort, and also some dimples on the order of 3" diameter, one or two coats of paint deep.

Conclusion - use a guide coat.

aa

#11 mab17a

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 03:31 PM

This page will attempt to answer these common questions about guide coat use in boat refinishing.


Can I do without using a guide coating?

Guide coat is a tool, and not required for ant kind of pre-paint set up.

guide coat tells you when to stop sanding, not using it causes you to do 3 things:

1. not sand enough

2. sand just right

3. sand too much

You won't know which of the three pertain to you until you start painting, you'll know if something is wrong right away on the first coat, and then it's too late. To be clear ,we are talking about proper block sanding, not just roaming around with sand paper in a random pattern,


what is it?, "why should I use it?. " Is one type better than another?" "

1.What is it?

Guide coat is a film of contrasting color that when applied over a repaired area, will get in to all the scratches, pinholes and flaws in the surfaces that that are being repaired . As the guide coat is block sanded it will make the high and low areas stand out and be easily seen, and also tell you weather or not the surface is flat and straight and that any contours are the proper shape. If a whole boat is primed it will insure that when the final sanding is done , any missed areas can easily be seen.



2.Why should I use it.

Guide coat is the simplest and most inexpensive way to insure a high quality finished paint job, it will speed up the straightening and set up time on any refinishing project. If you have ever seen a beautiful classic boat with a great looking custom paint job , then you looked a little closer and down the side to see what resembles a wavy washboard with sanding scratches and pin holes, you will understand why you should use guide coat.



3. Why is one type better than another?



Guide coat usually comes in aerosol cans or in dry powder form. You can make your own by spraying a thin coat of a different color primer or paint over the boat. Making your own is the least desirable method, As it is messy, time consuming and can cause problems like clogged sandpaper , over spray. and worst of all paint reactions. Unless you are a pro and know which paints are compatible , Do not make your own!. Take this advice from someone who has painted hundreds of cars , boats and trucks over the past 35 years. since homemade guide coat is sprayed and therefore is in the seams and all the hard to reach places everywhere on the boat, if it reacts, it's hell to fix, a horrible nightmare!. The aerosol guide coat comes in different colors will not react and is the least expensive way to go, however the can nozzle tends to clog , the surrounding areas need to be masked, the cans spray an uneven pattern (especially when trying to spray on an overall job) and some brands will actually clog sandpaper , leak and run out of propellent. Dry powder works the best , it is wiped on with an applicator and can be sanded right away with wet or dry sandpaper. Masking is not required. and the dry powder forms a very thin and even film that will never clog sandpaper, effect adhesion or react with any paint system known. The powder goes a long way and can be used freely over large areas, quick and easy. The powder is safe to use and washes off with soapy water. Guide coat varys in price ,I have found the best prices on ebay and amazon. These are some of the manufactures of guide coating. blackjack guide coat , 3M, Sem, Upol, PPG

#12 Mr. Fixit's brother,, Mr. Fixit

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 04:59 PM

I've had good success using the polyester primer such as Duratec and using red(or blue) catalyst vs clear catalyst for a slight color variation between coats




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