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VOR Leg 6


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#701 starrchallenge

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 02:01 PM

Great job Puma. Fantastic race to follow. Wow after some of the past ports Miami seems to not care very much. Figure next edition they should sail into New York City and give the sponsors some proper exposure in the Big Apple. Mazarati pictures look awesome. Talk about Monkey Marketing.

#702 armchairair

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 02:49 PM

Below is a "comment" that I sent to VOR last night in response to their article announcing that the Race Village in Miami was "temporarily" closed. The "temporary" time was of pretty great significance to we who had traveled from MAINE to participate. At this point they have NOT published it. I wonder why.
USA was sorely UNDER represented and there was a fairly marginal crowd (especially compared to Itajai and NZ!!!) to welcome #1 PUMA and the rest of the VOR racers to Miami. Even so, Puma's arrival was timed perfectly for greetings, interviews and awards BEFORE the forecast thundershowers.
Just as number 2 finisher, Camper, was about to arrive at the dock a powerful storm with high winds and even hail passed thru. We all ran to available cover. It was quite scary for a while. Indeed some of the temporary structures took quite a wipping and a fair area of the village became an inches deep pool. But all were safe and the faithful fans prevailed.
Soon the sun was back out and Camper pulled up to the dock to rounds of cheers. As a shower once again threatened, the indigenous dancers and musicians, spectators and sailors were directed inside the Volvo race building for cover once again. The gift bags and bottles of champagne were carried across the "pond" and it appeared that the iconic award ceremony and champagne "shower" would be imminent.
But suddenly all present were told to immediately LEAVE!!!!! the grounds!!!! at aprox. 5:00pm. Could our faithfulness and endurance not be rewarded with the short and simple award ceremony for team Camper??? We are feelin' pretty UNLOVED!!!! You NEED US VOR!!!! We are your fans! By then the danger of the storm had passed!
We have been following this race from day one... and for years before. This is the first time we have traveled the 3000 miles to see the teams and experience the race village. Have you let us down or has Miami/USA let you down?
Then when we returned shortly before 10 pm to welcome Groupama and Telephonica to the US, we -YOUR FANS (few as we are!) were barred at the gate from entry! So we walked down the opposite side of the inlet and CHEERED for the finishing boats from there!!!! All 5 of us.
You probably won't publish this as a comment, but I hope that you take note that Your fans are feeling pretty neglected and sad. We are few but we are passionate- we are your ambassadors! Show us some LOVE!!! Pretty please????

#703 umpire

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 03:11 PM

Below is a "comment" that I sent to VOR last night in response to their article announcing that the Race Village in Miami was "temporarily" closed. The "temporary" time was of pretty great significance to we who had traveled from MAINE to participate. At this point they have NOT published it. I wonder why. USA was sorely UNDER represented and there was a fairly marginal crowd (especially compared to Itajai and NZ!!!) to welcome #1 PUMA and the rest of the VOR racers to Miami. Even so, Puma's arrival was timed perfectly for greetings, interviews and awards BEFORE the forecast thundershowers. Just as number 2 finisher, Camper, was about to arrive at the dock a powerful storm with high winds and even hail passed thru. We all ran to available cover. It was quite scary for a while. Indeed some of the temporary structures took quite a wipping and a fair area of the village became an inches deep pool. But all were safe and the faithful fans prevailed. Soon the sun was back out and Camper pulled up to the dock to rounds of cheers. As a shower once again threatened, the indigenous dancers and musicians, spectators and sailors were directed inside the Volvo race building for cover once again. The gift bags and bottles of champagne were carried across the "pond" and it appeared that the iconic award ceremony and champagne "shower" would be imminent. But suddenly all present were told to immediately LEAVE!!!!! the grounds!!!! at aprox. 5:00pm. Could our faithfulness and endurance not be rewarded with the short and simple award ceremony for team Camper??? We are feelin' pretty UNLOVED!!!! You NEED US VOR!!!! We are your fans! By then the danger of the storm had passed! We have been following this race from day one... and for years before. This is the first time we have traveled the 3000 miles to see the teams and experience the race village. Have you let us down or has Miami/USA let you down? Then when we returned shortly before 10 pm to welcome Groupama and Telephonica to the US, we -YOUR FANS (few as we are!) were barred at the gate from entry! So we walked down the opposite side of the inlet and CHEERED for the finishing boats from there!!!! All 5 of us. You probably won't publish this as a comment, but I hope that you take note that Your fans are feeling pretty neglected and sad. We are few but we are passionate- we are your ambassadors! Show us some LOVE!!! Pretty please????


I do hope you get a response from VOR on this, sounds like you deserve one.

#704 clamslapper

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 03:28 PM

Here goes Ian Walker, throwing Farr Yacht Design -- implicitly -- under the bus. Is this what you must do if you get hosed on a leg? ... tell the world your boat is slow rather than admit that the people in it have something to do with success? ... seems like a common tactic.

In Azzam's case, I am pretty dubious. Can't the guy just accept that his crew is not as talented as the others? Yes, the thing has been a cow on certain points of sail, but so have most of the other boats. Ian, IT'S NOT ABOUT THE BOAT!!!





It all comes down to speed, Walker reckons.

“It’s just been a tale of bleeding miles,’’ he said. “The fleet spent a lot of time in similar wind, sailing the trade winds, sailing a very similar strategy and for whatever reason we weren’t sailing as fast as the other boats.

“Day in, day out those miles add up. It puts a lot of pressure on Jules (Salter) and myself to try and pull a rabbit out of a hat and try to find something extra and make up for that. It puts a lot of pressure on us just to stay in touch with everyone let alone to try and make any gains.”

The need for speed forced the crew to take two risks; packing a minimal amount of food in a bid to save weight, which resulted in some very hungry crewmen, and some roll-the-dice moves in the Caribbean, Walker said.

“As the leg went on we took more and more risk to try and get a bit of leverage to try and get back to Groupama, that didn’t work out for us in the end,’’ Walker said.

“The other option was to just follow in their wake and just lose more miles, so that makes it a very difficult place for us.

“I think anybody following the race would see we have a speed issue and it’s an issue that we see pretty much on all points of sail, some more than others. It’s not to say we didn’t make any mistakes, but I’m sure all the boats out there made mistakes at some point during the leg.”


#705 armchairair

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 03:31 PM

I've also posted it on their facebook page. I'll be intereseted to see if they respond there too. Otherwise I will try further up the "foodchain" for at least an acknowledgement. Thanks for your affermation

Below is a "comment" that I sent to VOR last night in response to their article announcing that the Race Village in Miami was "temporarily" closed. The "temporary" time was of pretty great significance to we who had traveled from MAINE to participate. At this point they have NOT published it. I wonder why. USA was sorely UNDER represented and there was a fairly marginal crowd (especially compared to Itajai and NZ!!!) to welcome #1 PUMA and the rest of the VOR racers to Miami. Even so, Puma's arrival was timed perfectly for greetings, interviews and awards BEFORE the forecast thundershowers. Just as number 2 finisher, Camper, was about to arrive at the dock a powerful storm with high winds and even hail passed thru. We all ran to available cover. It was quite scary for a while. Indeed some of the temporary structures took quite a wipping and a fair area of the village became an inches deep pool. But all were safe and the faithful fans prevailed. Soon the sun was back out and Camper pulled up to the dock to rounds of cheers. As a shower once again threatened, the indigenous dancers and musicians, spectators and sailors were directed inside the Volvo race building for cover once again. The gift bags and bottles of champagne were carried across the "pond" and it appeared that the iconic award ceremony and champagne "shower" would be imminent. But suddenly all present were told to immediately LEAVE!!!!! the grounds!!!! at aprox. 5:00pm. Could our faithfulness and endurance not be rewarded with the short and simple award ceremony for team Camper??? We are feelin' pretty UNLOVED!!!! You NEED US VOR!!!! We are your fans! By then the danger of the storm had passed! We have been following this race from day one... and for years before. This is the first time we have traveled the 3000 miles to see the teams and experience the race village. Have you let us down or has Miami/USA let you down? Then when we returned shortly before 10 pm to welcome Groupama and Telephonica to the US, we -YOUR FANS (few as we are!) were barred at the gate from entry! So we walked down the opposite side of the inlet and CHEERED for the finishing boats from there!!!! All 5 of us. You probably won't publish this as a comment, but I hope that you take note that Your fans are feeling pretty neglected and sad. We are few but we are passionate- we are your ambassadors! Show us some LOVE!!! Pretty please????


I do hope you get a response from VOR on this, sounds like you deserve one.

I've also posted it on their facebook page. I'll be interested to see if they respond there too. Otherwise I will try further up the "food-chain" for at least an acknowledgement. Thanks for your affirmation. Another 15 min. and getting thru the Camper awards is all that it would have taken to keep me and I think most, happy. It as as if they had not thought about what might happen and have a plan in action in the case of a severe thunderstorm or other such event and just shot from the hip and panicked... sort of after the fact.




#706 freddy

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 03:39 PM

Here goes Ian Walker, throwing Farr Yacht Design -- implicitly -- under the bus. Is this what you must do if you get hosed on a leg? ... tell the world your boat is slow rather than admit that the people in it have something to do with success? ... seems like a common tactic.

In Azzam's case, I am pretty dubious. Can't the guy just accept that his crew is not as talented as the others? Yes, the thing has been a cow on certain points of sail, but so have most of the other boats. Ian, IT'S NOT ABOUT THE BOAT!!!





It all comes down to speed, Walker reckons.

“It’s just been a tale of bleeding miles,’’ he said. “The fleet spent a lot of time in similar wind, sailing the trade winds, sailing a very similar strategy and for whatever reason we weren’t sailing as fast as the other boats.

“Day in, day out those miles add up. It puts a lot of pressure on Jules (Salter) and myself to try and pull a rabbit out of a hat and try to find something extra and make up for that. It puts a lot of pressure on us just to stay in touch with everyone let alone to try and make any gains.”

The need for speed forced the crew to take two risks; packing a minimal amount of food in a bid to save weight, which resulted in some very hungry crewmen, and some roll-the-dice moves in the Caribbean, Walker said.

“As the leg went on we took more and more risk to try and get a bit of leverage to try and get back to Groupama, that didn’t work out for us in the end,’’ Walker said.

“The other option was to just follow in their wake and just lose more miles, so that makes it a very difficult place for us.

“I think anybody following the race would see we have a speed issue and it’s an issue that we see pretty much on all points of sail, some more than others. It’s not to say we didn’t make any mistakes, but I’m sure all the boats out there made mistakes at some point during the leg.”




I think you are 100% wrong here - the boat is plain slow. Ian has some seriously good people on that boat who have won the VOR on boats like Ericsson, ABN AMRO etc. They know what they are doing. And he is right that for sure, you will start to make mistakes if the guy next to you is reaching along 0.75kts quicker....you try different things, trim, sails, tactics that you know in your mind are probably not right, but it is hard to just sit there being smoked.....

And I admire Ian for trying to remain upbeat and positive, which must be bloody hard.....

#707 Anthonyvop

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 04:16 PM

Below is a "comment" that I sent to VOR last night in response to their article announcing that the Race Village in Miami was "temporarily" closed. The "temporary" time was of pretty great significance to we who had traveled from MAINE to participate. At this point they have NOT published it. I wonder why. USA was sorely UNDER represented and there was a fairly marginal crowd (especially compared to Itajai and NZ!!!) to welcome #1 PUMA and the rest of the VOR racers to Miami. Even so, Puma's arrival was timed perfectly for greetings, interviews and awards BEFORE the forecast thundershowers. Just as number 2 finisher, Camper, was about to arrive at the dock a powerful storm with high winds and even hail passed thru. We all ran to available cover. It was quite scary for a while. Indeed some of the temporary structures took quite a wipping and a fair area of the village became an inches deep pool. But all were safe and the faithful fans prevailed. Soon the sun was back out and Camper pulled up to the dock to rounds of cheers. As a shower once again threatened, the indigenous dancers and musicians, spectators and sailors were directed inside the Volvo race building for cover once again. The gift bags and bottles of champagne were carried across the "pond" and it appeared that the iconic award ceremony and champagne "shower" would be imminent. But suddenly all present were told to immediately LEAVE!!!!! the grounds!!!! at aprox. 5:00pm. Could our faithfulness and endurance not be rewarded with the short and simple award ceremony for team Camper??? We are feelin' pretty UNLOVED!!!! You NEED US VOR!!!! We are your fans! By then the danger of the storm had passed! We have been following this race from day one... and for years before. This is the first time we have traveled the 3000 miles to see the teams and experience the race village. Have you let us down or has Miami/USA let you down? Then when we returned shortly before 10 pm to welcome Groupama and Telephonica to the US, we -YOUR FANS (few as we are!) were barred at the gate from entry! So we walked down the opposite side of the inlet and CHEERED for the finishing boats from there!!!! All 5 of us. You probably won't publish this as a comment, but I hope that you take note that Your fans are feeling pretty neglected and sad. We are few but we are passionate- we are your ambassadors! Show us some LOVE!!! Pretty please????


F.Y.I.

The VOR Village is in a Public Park. Because of this they have to abide by certain rules dictated by the Local Government. One rule is once a "Severe Weather Alert" is issued all operations must be shut down and the park evacuated.

So it wasn't the VOR people's call.

#708 Dave S

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 04:58 PM

Here goes Ian Walker, throwing Farr Yacht Design -- implicitly -- under the bus. Is this what you must do if you get hosed on a leg? ... tell the world your boat is slow rather than admit that the people in it have something to do with success? ... seems like a common tactic.

In Azzam's case, I am pretty dubious. Can't the guy just accept that his crew is not as talented as the others? Yes, the thing has been a cow on certain points of sail, but so have most of the other boats. Ian, IT'S NOT ABOUT THE BOAT!!!





It all comes down to speed, Walker reckons.

“It’s just been a tale of bleeding miles,’’ he said. “The fleet spent a lot of time in similar wind, sailing the trade winds, sailing a very similar strategy and for whatever reason we weren’t sailing as fast as the other boats.

“Day in, day out those miles add up. It puts a lot of pressure on Jules (Salter) and myself to try and pull a rabbit out of a hat and try to find something extra and make up for that. It puts a lot of pressure on us just to stay in touch with everyone let alone to try and make any gains.”

The need for speed forced the crew to take two risks; packing a minimal amount of food in a bid to save weight, which resulted in some very hungry crewmen, and some roll-the-dice moves in the Caribbean, Walker said.

“As the leg went on we took more and more risk to try and get a bit of leverage to try and get back to Groupama, that didn’t work out for us in the end,’’ Walker said.

“The other option was to just follow in their wake and just lose more miles, so that makes it a very difficult place for us.

“I think anybody following the race would see we have a speed issue and it’s an issue that we see pretty much on all points of sail, some more than others. It’s not to say we didn’t make any mistakes, but I’m sure all the boats out there made mistakes at some point during the leg.”




I think you are 100% wrong here - the boat is plain slow. Ian has some seriously good people on that boat who have won the VOR on boats like Ericsson, ABN AMRO etc. They know what they are doing. And he is right that for sure, you will start to make mistakes if the guy next to you is reaching along 0.75kts quicker....you try different things, trim, sails, tactics that you know in your mind are probably not right, but it is hard to just sit there being smoked.....

And I admire Ian for trying to remain upbeat and positive, which must be bloody hard.....

Don't think he's throwing FYD under the bus either. Could be the hull; could be the rig; could be the sails; could be the foils; could be some poor tradeoffs made at the design stage. All he says is that the boat is slow, which is in complete agreement with what a lot of people on here have been saying for a long time.

If the crew were the problem, we'd see the boat getting hosed in difficult conditions or making consistently poor tactical calls. Seems like a lot of this leg has been a drag race in relatively benign conditions, which is exactly when boatspeed is king.

#709 PonderousPelican

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 05:39 PM

http://www.livestrea...m/marquis_miami
A webcam that keeps panning around the race village.
Shows each of the boats and then goes looking at the bushes for a while then back to the boats.

#710 Raked aft \\

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 05:46 PM

Here's a quick poll on leg 6 ave speed for PUMA.
You could do the math and get the right answer (cheating), but I'm more curious about your gut feel response based
on just following the leg. let's here your guesses...

A ) 17.4 kts
B ) 14.7 kts
C ) 10.2 kts
D ) 8.7 kts
E ) 7.1 kts

Thanks!

#711 oioi

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 05:54 PM

Here goes Ian Walker, throwing Farr Yacht Design -- implicitly -- under the bus. Is this what you must do if you get hosed on a leg? ... tell the world your boat is slow rather than admit that the people in it have something to do with success? ... seems like a common tactic.

In Azzam's case, I am pretty dubious. Can't the guy just accept that his crew is not as talented as the others? Yes, the thing has been a cow on certain points of sail, but so have most of the other boats. Ian, IT'S NOT ABOUT THE BOAT!!!





It all comes down to speed, Walker reckons.

"It's just been a tale of bleeding miles,'' he said. "The fleet spent a lot of time in similar wind, sailing the trade winds, sailing a very similar strategy and for whatever reason we weren't sailing as fast as the other boats.

"Day in, day out those miles add up. It puts a lot of pressure on Jules (Salter) and myself to try and pull a rabbit out of a hat and try to find something extra and make up for that. It puts a lot of pressure on us just to stay in touch with everyone let alone to try and make any gains."

The need for speed forced the crew to take two risks; packing a minimal amount of food in a bid to save weight, which resulted in some very hungry crewmen, and some roll-the-dice moves in the Caribbean, Walker said.

"As the leg went on we took more and more risk to try and get a bit of leverage to try and get back to Groupama, that didn't work out for us in the end,'' Walker said.

"The other option was to just follow in their wake and just lose more miles, so that makes it a very difficult place for us.

"I think anybody following the race would see we have a speed issue and it's an issue that we see pretty much on all points of sail, some more than others. It's not to say we didn't make any mistakes, but I'm sure all the boats out there made mistakes at some point during the leg."




I think you are 100% wrong here - the boat is plain slow. Ian has some seriously good people on that boat who have won the VOR on boats like Ericsson, ABN AMRO etc. They know what they are doing. And he is right that for sure, you will start to make mistakes if the guy next to you is reaching along 0.75kts quicker....you try different things, trim, sails, tactics that you know in your mind are probably not right, but it is hard to just sit there being smoked.....

And I admire Ian for trying to remain upbeat and positive, which must be bloody hard.....

Don't think he's throwing FYD under the bus either. Could be the hull; could be the rig; could be the sails; could be the foils; could be some poor tradeoffs made at the design stage. All he says is that the boat is slow, which is in complete agreement with what a lot of people on here have been saying for a long time.

If the crew were the problem, we'd see the boat getting hosed in difficult conditions or making consistently poor tactical calls. Seems like a lot of this leg has been a drag race in relatively benign conditions, which is exactly when boatspeed is king.



i tend to agree, for one reason or another the boat is of the pace.
I would be interested to know who made the call to go with Farr and why? I can see why ETNZ went with Botin (second in the last race and perhaps more maleable to ETNZ than JK would have been).

I would also be interested to know what the sponsors think? Will they have another go and will Walker be given a second (third if you count green dragon) chance?


time will tell. I just hope for walkers pride sake they get some big downwind conditions on the next leg and he gets to sail it like he stole it

#712 dlangpap

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 08:03 PM

With the way the winds were on this leg and having seen ADOR slip from being close to Camper to falling behind everyone, I would say it's pretty safe to say the boat is slower than the rest.

#713 IC701

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 08:30 PM

http://www.puma.com/sailing/media

The episodes are funny, check them out.

#714 tacksea

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 09:46 PM

Best leg so far, I think I checked the VOR website and SA more on leg 6 than I did from the start to # 5.

#715 Koukel

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 10:10 PM

Best leg so far, I think I checked the VOR website and SA more on leg 6 than I did from the start to # 5.

Wow, I'm all about jumping on the Puma bandwagon, but I think leg 3 and 4 were both super entertaining. I've never sailed on that coast however, so maybe that's the difference.

Koukel

#716 tacksea

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 10:38 PM

Best leg so far, I think I checked the VOR website and SA more on leg 6 than I did from the start to # 5.

Wow, I'm all about jumping on the Puma bandwagon, but I think leg 3 and 4 were both super entertaining. I've never sailed on that coast however, so maybe that's the difference.

Koukel


;) I am a Groupama/ Cammas fan .

#717 A Florida Redneck

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 11:06 PM

This race is so much about the challenge of the sailors vs the elements as much as sailor vs sailor, it's harder to take a nationalistic view of the competitors. Yes, I support Puma, but the connection with all the sailors and the mutual challenges they face, even life and death, make the rah rah USA, NZL, etc., stuff a little silly at times.
But not right now!
Go Puma!!
But we can't help but root for all of them at various times, eh?
What an awesome race.

#718 armchairair

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 12:30 AM

Below is a "comment" that I sent to VOR last night in response to their article announcing that the Race Village in Miami was "temporarily" closed. The "temporary" time was of pretty great significance to we who had traveled from MAINE to participate. At this point they have NOT published it. I wonder why. USA was sorely UNDER represented and there was a fairly marginal crowd (especially compared to Itajai and NZ!!!) to welcome #1 PUMA and the rest of the VOR racers to Miami. Even so, Puma's arrival was timed perfectly for greetings, interviews and awards BEFORE the forecast thundershowers. Just as number 2 finisher, Camper, was about to arrive at the dock a powerful storm with high winds and even hail passed thru. We all ran to available cover. It was quite scary for a while. Indeed some of the temporary structures took quite a wipping and a fair area of the village became an inches deep pool. But all were safe and the faithful fans prevailed. Soon the sun was back out and Camper pulled up to the dock to rounds of cheers. As a shower once again threatened, the indigenous dancers and musicians, spectators and sailors were directed inside the Volvo race building for cover once again. The gift bags and bottles of champagne were carried across the "pond" and it appeared that the iconic award ceremony and champagne "shower" would be imminent. But suddenly all present were told to immediately LEAVE!!!!! the grounds!!!! at aprox. 5:00pm. Could our faithfulness and endurance not be rewarded with the short and simple award ceremony for team Camper??? We are feelin' pretty UNLOVED!!!! You NEED US VOR!!!! We are your fans! By then the danger of the storm had passed! We have been following this race from day one... and for years before. This is the first time we have traveled the 3000 miles to see the teams and experience the race village. Have you let us down or has Miami/USA let you down? Then when we returned shortly before 10 pm to welcome Groupama and Telephonica to the US, we -YOUR FANS (few as we are!) were barred at the gate from entry! So we walked down the opposite side of the inlet and CHEERED for the finishing boats from there!!!! All 5 of us. You probably won't publish this as a comment, but I hope that you take note that Your fans are feeling pretty neglected and sad. We are few but we are passionate- we are your ambassadors! Show us some LOVE!!! Pretty please????


F.Y.I.

The VOR Village is in a Public Park. Because of this they have to abide by certain rules dictated by the Local Government. One rule is once a "Severe Weather Alert" is issued all operations must be shut down and the park evacuated.

So it wasn't the VOR people's call.

That is a helpful insight, Anthoyvop. Regardless of who made the call a little communication could have gone a long way, but your comment might get VOR off my hook for the abrupt evacuation AFTER the storm was OVER!!!! Doesn't life hold its little jokes on us.

I apologize if I sound like a total grouch, but our overall experience in Miami is that the race venue is set up for the general public who know little to nothing about the VOR- and of course marketing IS the goal not creating a fan club. They are really not set up for people who actually have been following the race. Everything is at a very entry level to the race and many of the "front" people have just been "hired off the street" (knowing nothing about the race) given a couple days training and then put forth to answer questions. No fault to them, they are just not someone to engage in the details of the following the race over the long term.
My experience is that it is MUCH more fun to follow at home and over the finishes texting back and forth the our favorite team's ups and downs with friends. Go figure.

Seeing the boats and the sailors ever so briefly yesterday and the boats out of the water today was great tho and the "pen" where the public is allowed to go among the shore teams tents has the "real deal" feel. I can just feel the pulse of them working- there seems to be no chance to talk to anyone- and I don't blame them since they have SO much to get done in a finite amt of time.

Next time I will continue my armchair observation. Lesson learned.



#719 A Florida Redneck

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 02:07 AM

ArmchairAir, sorry to hear they did not receive you with open arms. As we all know, sailing and, in particular, Ocean Racing is not a primo sport in the U.S.
But I expect a weekend from next there will be a bit more interest - a weekend when those of us who work for a living will be able to attend. You will see a more energetic crowd.
I know there will be a contingent of very dedicated racers from SW Fla there, likely from Sarasota and the Tampa Bay area as well. If you can stick around, hope to see you there.

#720 the paradox of thrift

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 02:16 AM

Best leg so far, I think I checked the VOR website and SA more on leg 6 than I did from the start to # 5.

Wow, I'm all about jumping on the Puma bandwagon, but I think leg 3 and 4 were both super entertaining. I've never sailed on that coast however, so maybe that's the difference.

Koukel


;) I am a Groupama/ Cammas fan .


They're only going OK because of Marshy

#721 Beachcomber

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 02:22 AM

On the Azzam boatspeed question, I've got to say I think it's more a case of Farr choosing the wrong team than Abu Dhabi picking the wrong design firm. Way too many observers here attribute all differences in performance to boat design. That may be the most convenient and comfortable thing for mediocre sailors to blame their lack of success on, but it's quite far down on the list of dominant factors. Sail in a Laser regatta, and observe the huge difference in performance between the front runners and mid fleet - not even the tail-enders. Or if you're a proper Sailing Armchairist, look up some results that have not just order of finish, but times as well.

Walker and crew are decent at the in-port races because they start reasonably well, and don't gamble. He sails like the expert dinghy sailor he is, where it's all about avoiding mistakes. Offshore, I think it's all about boat speed, route selection, and above all, not breaking the boat. My feeling is that offshore, you have to take more tactical chances and bang the corners. Walker and co took the "safe" low risk route outside the islands and got passed. Groupama took their chances, went inside, and moved up from 5th to 3rd.

As for boat speed, I think all the other teams trained in windy oceans with big waves. Abu Dhabi trained in the Persian Gulf.

Having said this, Abu Dhabi have also had a good deal of rotten luck. Through no fault of their own, they were pummeled on leg 4 down to Auckland. They had every right to finish 3rd, but those behind them got get out of jail free cards and were given good winds west of the Solomons.

One more note. When Farr dominated the Whitbread leaderboard, they were designing most of the boats in the fleet. Now Juan K has that position. A lot of the success comes down to simple odds. The more lottery tickets you have, the likelier you are to win...

#722 erdb

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 02:59 AM

That is a helpful insight, Anthoyvop. Regardless of who made the call a little communication could have gone a long way, but your comment might get VOR off my hook for the abrupt evacuation AFTER the storm was OVER!!!! Doesn't life hold its little jokes on us.

I apologize if I sound like a total grouch, but our overall experience in Miami is that the race venue is set up for the general public who know little to nothing about the VOR- and of course marketing IS the goal not creating a fan club. They are really not set up for people who actually have been following the race. Everything is at a very entry level to the race and many of the "front" people have just been "hired off the street" (knowing nothing about the race) given a couple days training and then put forth to answer questions. No fault to them, they are just not someone to engage in the details of the following the race over the long term.
My experience is that it is MUCH more fun to follow at home and over the finishes texting back and forth the our favorite team's ups and downs with friends. Go figure.

Seeing the boats and the sailors ever so briefly yesterday and the boats out of the water today was great tho and the "pen" where the public is allowed to go among the shore teams tents has the "real deal" feel. I can just feel the pulse of them working- there seems to be no chance to talk to anyone- and I don't blame them since they have SO much to get done in a finite amt of time.

Next time I will continue my armchair observation. Lesson learned.


So based on your experience, how much time one needs to go through the race village? Somewhere I saw they have IMAX, and the grinding thingy. Are they fun? I'm planning to go there with kids on the 19th and 20th, and I'm trying to figure out how to split time between the village and watching the race out on the water.

Thanks!

#723 SW Sailor

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 03:01 AM

On the Azzam boatspeed question, I've got to say I think it's more a case of Farr choosing the wrong team than Abu Dhabi picking the wrong design firm. Way too many observers here attribute all differences in performance to boat design. That may be the most convenient and comfortable thing for mediocre sailors to blame their lack of success on, but it's quite far down on the list of dominant factors. Sail in a Laser regatta, and observe the huge difference in performance between the front runners and mid fleet - not even the tail-enders. Or if you're a proper Sailing Armchairist, look up some results that have not just order of finish, but times as well.

Walker and crew are decent at the in-port races because they start reasonably well, and don't gamble. He sails like the expert dinghy sailor he is, where it's all about avoiding mistakes. Offshore, I think it's all about boat speed, route selection, and above all, not breaking the boat. My feeling is that offshore, you have to take more tactical chances and bang the corners. Walker and co took the "safe" low risk route outside the islands and got passed. Groupama took their chances, went inside, and moved up from 5th to 3rd.

As for boat speed, I think all the other teams trained in windy oceans with big waves. Abu Dhabi trained in the Persian Gulf.

Having said this, Abu Dhabi have also had a good deal of rotten luck. Through no fault of their own, they were pummeled on leg 4 down to Auckland. They had every right to finish 3rd, but those behind them got get out of jail free cards and were given good winds west of the Solomons.

One more note. When Farr dominated the Whitbread leaderboard, they were designing most of the boats in the fleet. Now Juan K has that position. A lot of the success comes down to simple odds. The more lottery tickets you have, the likelier you are to win...

But Tele banged the corners every which way trying to get around Puma and the fire engine, and got nothing but set back in the process.

It's more a function of staying in the race and picking the corners at the right time, as GPMA did.



#724 corkob

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 04:05 AM

Ian Walker hanging Farr out to dry. I suppose he has to explain another poor result. He will be understandably reluctant to criticize the Crew and risk mutiny. With green dragon it was the keel weight. Whats wrong with this one?Maybe the boat is slow but then again maybe it isn't. It did win the Fastnet race Against Groupama and Sanya. It did win an in-port. When you see how much time these guys can pull out on each other in an in-port race, that aint the boat in most cases its tactical. How about a game of boat swapping where the skippers throw their VO70 keys in a hat. That would be interesting.

#725 Te Kooti

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 06:07 AM

So based on your experience, how much time one needs to go through the race village? Somewhere I saw they have IMAX, and the grinding thingy. Are they fun? I'm planning to go there with kids on the 19th and 20th, and I'm trying to figure out how to split time between the village and watching the race out on the water.

Thanks!


The village will not take long. The grinding thingo is boring. Seen it all before.

Perhaps the best pavillion is the one belonging to Volvo. Some nice technology in there.

The Sanya tent is an embarassment, the Puma set-up is odd.

The concerts and stage might be alright.

Watching the starts and mark roundings is the thing.

#726 Potter

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 09:40 AM

Best leg so far, I think I checked the VOR website and SA more on leg 6 than I did from the start to # 5.

Wow, I'm all about jumping on the Puma bandwagon, but I think leg 3 and 4 were both super entertaining. I've never sailed on that coast however, so maybe that's the difference.

Koukel


;) I am a Groupama/ Cammas fan .


They're only going OK because of Marshy

Nah, they are okay because of Thomas Coville, Jean-Luc Nelias, Damian Foxall, Charles Caudrelier and all the other absolute freakin legends they have on board...just not legends of the VOR...
Gotta say I am torn between Groupama and Telefonica.

#727 ILYA_Fan

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 10:12 AM

What an awesome race.


I agree with you 100%. I've followed this race for the last four or so iterations going back to EF Learning or whatever that was, and this is far and away the best round the world race I've seen. Finally, the coverage is done great and it's possible to get news on a daily basis. Most importantly, I feel connected to the competition thanks to all the great innovations that have been implemented.

In previous iterations, you could check every day and see nothing new for long stretches of time.

Now, you can check several times per day and get news every time.

How many of you are hooked on the Dashboard and Tracker? I find it endlessly fascinating to study those two screens. Especially on this last leg... the distance between Puma and their competitors was riveting, and I thoroughly enjoyed studying what each boat was doing.

The videos and constant stream of reports from on-board complete the feast for the armchair sailor. Well done to all who made this happen.

Now that the points are tight, I am hooked until the very end.

#728 ILYA_Fan

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 10:17 AM

Next time I will continue my armchair observation. Lesson learned.


Hehe.

I have been dreaming a bit about visiting a VOR race village and am grateful for your comments. I will gladly continue to follow this and all ocean races from the comfort of my chair :)

#729 ILYA_Fan

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 10:26 AM

... to get around Puma and the fire engine....


Thanks for that!

I've been trying to think of a nickname for that godawful looking boat and I'm glad to see someone figured it out before me.

MAN that is one sickly looking graphic job... when I see videos from on board the fire engine, I imagine how tired the blokes on board must be of looking at that hot mess.

I have no idea what the hell "Camper" is, but if they sell stuff and it looks like their boat, they need a serious design make-over. I would normally take a look at their website but their shit is so fucking ugly, I won't bother.

#730 Cyrille Hydrogene

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 10:56 AM

Best leg so far, I think I checked the VOR website and SA more on leg 6 than I did from the start to # 5.

Wow, I'm all about jumping on the Puma bandwagon, but I think leg 3 and 4 were both super entertaining. I've never sailed on that coast however, so maybe that's the difference.

Koukel


;) I am a Groupama/ Cammas fan .


They're only going OK because of Marshy

Nah, they are okay because of Thomas Coville, Jean-Luc Nelias, Damian Foxall, Charles Caudrelier and all the other absolute freakin legends they have on board...just not legends of the VOR...
Gotta say I am torn between Groupama and Telefonica.


You forgot Cammas? Is that intentional? ;)

#731 Roleur

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 11:09 AM

... to get around Puma and the fire engine....


Thanks for that!

I've been trying to think of a nickname for that godawful looking boat and I'm glad to see someone figured it out before me.

MAN that is one sickly looking graphic job... when I see videos from on board the fire engine, I imagine how tired the blokes on board must be of looking at that hot mess.

I have no idea what the hell "Camper" is, but if they sell stuff and it looks like their boat, they need a serious design make-over. I would normally take a look at their website but their shit is so fucking ugly, I won't bother.


Camper is a Spanish company that makes shoes mostly and as I understand from the ladies, quite nice shoes generally. I bought a pair of their boat shoes at the Alicante race village (blue, not the red ones that team wear) and I got to say they are awesome. Super comfy and super grippy.

Having seen all of the boats in person, they all look cool and I wouldn't get tired of looking at any of them. JHMO.

#732 Potter

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 11:31 AM

[/quote]

You forgot Cammas? Is that intentional? ;)
[/quote]
Only because he is named so often. There are so many great offshore sailors on that boat, but they are not well known (apart from maybe THomas and Damian), it has been interesting to see how they have learned and adapted to the crewed ocean racing that is the VOR.
Charles Caudrelier for instance, always a go to man for offshore teams in France, but has never had his own high profile campaign. He epitimises for me the French style; quiet, very relaxed but utterly focused at the right moment.

#733 armchairair

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 11:59 AM

So based on your experience, how much time one needs to go through the race village? Somewhere I saw they have IMAX, and the grinding thingy. Are they fun? I'm planning to go there with kids on the 19th and 20th, and I'm trying to figure out how to split time between the village and watching the race out on the water.

Thanks!
[/quote]

Let's see, things to do at the VOR village: the Puma Social club offers a few games outside of their shop and bar, there are two falcons, a man who will write your name in Arabic and a woman doing Henna in the beautiful Abu Dhabi social area, there are the grinders as you say that don't take too long to tire a normal body out, you can walk down a gated pathway to a holding area among all the teams work tents- mostly sail and rigging work going on there, there are some chairs with driving simulators in the Volvo Pavilion, there are some food venders- we had the crepes which were quite good and reasonably priced, the 3 D building was never open when we were there, there is the "riding on the boat" (mist included!) simulator that lasts 3 min or so, there was a film and sculpture display about keeping the oceans clean, but that blew down on Wed. in the storm and as of yesterday had been rolled up looking like it would not be put up again. There are also touch screens in the Volvo Pavilion along with a huge "table" one where you can look at the sail course tracker and old video footage.... and of course you can look at the VOR open 70s in their cradles lining the shore and watch the shore crew hard at work. There are a few info tents at the entrance too. That is about it. I'd say you could make the rounds easily in a couple of hours and spend more time if you want to focus on something specific among these things. There are of course the retail spaces for VOR, Puma and Camper as well if you want to shop for shoes and clothing to commemorate your visit.

Hope this is helpful.

#734 roca

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 12:00 PM

once more to remark how amazing this race is.
I just hope they succeed in keeping it alive, possibly with this same boats/format and at least this number of top teams (4).
Last race around most interest was actually about the online game ;) , this time about the real race. The quality of the teams, the closeness of racing makes really interesting and thrilling.

I must say that the Groupama team has made the race richer and more interesting, for those who like them (I am one) but also for those who don't. Their often different choices and very different approach make for real big stories and emotions. Biodiversity is for good!

#735 atefooterz

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 02:09 PM


Last race around most interest was actually about the online game ;) , this time about the real race. The quality of the teams, the closeness of racing makes really interesting and thrilling.


Exactly right on the nail head!

#736 Anthonyvop

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 02:30 PM

I apologize if I sound like a total grouch, but our overall experience in Miami is that the race venue is set up for the general public who know little to nothing about the VOR- and of course marketing IS the goal not creating a fan club. They are really not set up for people who actually have been following the race. Everything is at a very entry level to the race and many of the "front" people have just been "hired off the street" (knowing nothing about the race) given a couple days training and then put forth to answer questions. No fault to them, they are just not someone to engage in the details of the following the race over the long term.
My experience is that it is MUCH more fun to follow at home and over the finishes texting back and forth the our favorite team's ups and downs with friends. Go figure.



With all due respect that is the way it is with all major sports, The spectator amenities are set up for the casual fan. They could allow more "behind the scenes" or "Up close and personal" access for those who are educated fans but how would they know who is and who isn't?

#737 ET1

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 04:27 PM

Here at last is the explanation why GP4 ran around in circles just befor the finish:
http://www.cammas-gr..._equipe_490.jsp

#738 erdb

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 04:44 PM

Let's see, things to do at the VOR village: the Puma Social club offers a few games outside of their shop and bar, there are two falcons, a man who will write your name in Arabic and a woman doing Henna in the beautiful Abu Dhabi social area, there are the grinders as you say that don't take too long to tire a normal body out, you can walk down a gated pathway to a holding area among all the teams work tents- mostly sail and rigging work going on there, there are some chairs with driving simulators in the Volvo Pavilion, there are some food venders- we had the crepes which were quite good and reasonably priced, the 3 D building was never open when we were there, there is the "riding on the boat" (mist included!) simulator that lasts 3 min or so, there was a film and sculpture display about keeping the oceans clean, but that blew down on Wed. in the storm and as of yesterday had been rolled up looking like it would not be put up again. There are also touch screens in the Volvo Pavilion along with a huge "table" one where you can look at the sail course tracker and old video footage.... and of course you can look at the VOR open 70s in their cradles lining the shore and watch the shore crew hard at work. There are a few info tents at the entrance too. That is about it. I'd say you could make the rounds easily in a couple of hours and spend more time if you want to focus on something specific among these things. There are of course the retail spaces for VOR, Puma and Camper as well if you want to shop for shoes and clothing to commemorate your visit.

Hope this is helpful.


Good info, thanks a lot!

#739 armchairair

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 06:27 PM

I apologize if I sound like a total grouch, but our overall experience in Miami is that the race venue is set up for the general public who know little to nothing about the VOR- and of course marketing IS the goal not creating a fan club. They are really not set up for people who actually have been following the race. Everything is at a very entry level to the race and many of the "front" people have just been "hired off the street" (knowing nothing about the race) given a couple days training and then put forth to answer questions. No fault to them, they are just not someone to engage in the details of the following the race over the long term.
My experience is that it is MUCH more fun to follow at home and over the finishes texting back and forth the our favorite team's ups and downs with friends. Go figure.



With all due respect that is the way it is with all major sports, The spectator amenities are set up for the casual fan. They could allow more "behind the scenes" or "Up close and personal" access for those who are educated fans but how would they know who is and who isn't?

Ha! Just goes to show you that I am a sporting event neophyte. I realize now that I had way to high expectations. Live and learn. I also get the sense that each leg's venu reflects the amount of energy that has been put into preparing for the boats arrival (Centennial Park is nothing to write home about. They took a sandy lot, set temporary buildings down and then created paths with wood chips- and the place floods with just an afternoon squall -happened again yesterday) along with the degree of "sailing fever" of the area. Itajai and NZ at least appeared (I've become cautious about how things are edited that we see on line) have a passion for the race and their home country sailors.

All and all it has been a good get-away from the NE. I trust you local sailors will have a great time next weekend cheering for the in-port race. Sadly we will be back home by then. Thanks for your on-line hospitality!



#740 A Florida Redneck

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 01:24 AM

As racers know, the high from winning a race is almost IMMEDIATELY replaced by the expectation of the next race - and that means preparing for the start.
So the Florida racers will be showing up week from Saturday for the in port and the restart.
The anticipation is building.
VOLVO racers are feeling the same expectation right now.
They've had a couple days to depressurize.
The urge to get back and win is already building. ALL of them are very accustomed to winning.
South Beach can only provide so much satisfaction/distraction.
They will be increasingly distracted by the task at hand.

It is a very close regatta now!!!
It will be awesome!

#741 SW Sailor

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 05:29 AM

... to get around Puma and the fire engine....


Thanks for that!

I've been trying to think of a nickname for that godawful looking boat and I'm glad to see someone figured it out before me.

MAN that is one sickly looking graphic job... when I see videos from on board the fire engine, I imagine how tired the blokes on board must be of looking at that hot mess.

I have no idea what the hell "Camper" is, but if they sell stuff and it looks like their boat, they need a serious design make-over. I would normally take a look at their website but their shit is so fucking ugly, I won't bother.

It is a godawful ugly boat.

Maybe a nice design for shoes, but who wants to sail a 70' shoe 39,000 miles around the world.

I'd think the sails would be a bitch to trim as well - staring up at those designs for hours on end would give one a headache, not to mention the bright red deck.

I wonder if red underware are also part of the program.



#742 haligonian winterr

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 10:52 AM

... to get around Puma and the fire engine....


Thanks for that!

I've been trying to think of a nickname for that godawful looking boat and I'm glad to see someone figured it out before me.

MAN that is one sickly looking graphic job... when I see videos from on board the fire engine, I imagine how tired the blokes on board must be of looking at that hot mess.

I have no idea what the hell "Camper" is, but if they sell stuff and it looks like their boat, they need a serious design make-over. I would normally take a look at their website but their shit is so fucking ugly, I won't bother.

It is a godawful ugly boat.

Maybe a nice design for shoes, but who wants to sail a 70' shoe 39,000 miles around the world.

I'd think the sails would be a bitch to trim as well - staring up at those designs for hours on end would give one a headache, not to mention the bright red deck.

I wonder if red underware are also part of the program.



Did you not see Il Mostro last time around? Posted Image

HW

#743 Indio

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 11:50 AM

... to get around Puma and the fire engine....


Thanks for that!

I've been trying to think of a nickname for that godawful looking boat and I'm glad to see someone figured it out before me.

MAN that is one sickly looking graphic job... when I see videos from on board the fire engine, I imagine how tired the blokes on board must be of looking at that hot mess.

I have no idea what the hell "Camper" is, but if they sell stuff and it looks like their boat, they need a serious design make-over. I would normally take a look at their website but their shit is so fucking ugly, I won't bother.


Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. A visit to the optometrist might be in order....

#744 Te Kooti

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 03:15 PM

Does anyone here know how much Sanya put into their VOR project?

And the extent of the research they did before making the commitment?

#745 Indio

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 11:25 PM

Does anyone here know how much Sanya put into their VOR project?

And the extent of the research they did before making the commitment?


Probably like most Chinese business strategies: buy cheap & copy it cheaper!!Posted Image

#746 Anthonyvop

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 01:16 AM

Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image

#747 harzak

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 03:54 PM

... to get around Puma and the fire engine....


Thanks for that!

I've been trying to think of a nickname for that godawful looking boat and I'm glad to see someone figured it out before me.

MAN that is one sickly looking graphic job... when I see videos from on board the fire engine, I imagine how tired the blokes on board must be of looking at that hot mess.

I have no idea what the hell "Camper" is, but if they sell stuff and it looks like their boat, they need a serious design make-over. I would normally take a look at their website but their shit is so fucking ugly, I won't bother.


Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. A visit to the optometrist might be in order....


To my eye the only fugly boat is Puma! :)

I was both impressed and shocked by Puma's sponsor designs last time around. The boat really looked like a shoe. What a great resemblance to the actual product the sponsor sells though. This time around she doesn't have any resemblance to Puma's usual commercial profile. Wierd marketing strategy.

#748 A Florida Redneck

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 04:10 PM

Anybody have a line on a boat for this weekend?
We have three going to Miami for the in-port and restart.
Anyone?

#749 J24_guy

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Posted 14 May 2012 - 07:44 PM

... to get around Puma and the fire engine....


Thanks for that!

I've been trying to think of a nickname for that godawful looking boat and I'm glad to see someone figured it out before me.

MAN that is one sickly looking graphic job... when I see videos from on board the fire engine, I imagine how tired the blokes on board must be of looking at that hot mess.

I have no idea what the hell "Camper" is, but if they sell stuff and it looks like their boat, they need a serious design make-over. I would normally take a look at their website but their shit is so fucking ugly, I won't bother.


Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. A visit to the optometrist might be in order....


To my eye the only fugly boat is Puma! :)

I was both impressed and shocked by Puma's sponsor designs last time around. The boat really looked like a shoe. What a great resemblance to the actual product the sponsor sells though. This time around she doesn't have any resemblance to Puma's usual commercial profile. Wierd marketing strategy.




Kind of agree. Puma is one ugly machine and I can't readily make out what the graphics have to do with the company. To my eye the boat that's the most attractive and elegant is Telefonica. The graphics are superb and every photo of it seems just great.

Actually, I Camper is kind of cool -- I remember reading that it's a riff on how they used to paint battleships, with jagged lines so you couldn't quite make out the contours of the ship. To me the only thing that looks wrong is that the bow doesn't ride about four feet higher...

What I do not understand for a second is how Puma and Azzam, being black, can be even the least bit tolerable in tropical conditions. At least they have white decks, but man, that's gotta be brutal as far as generating heat inside the boat!!!

#750 DtM

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 12:44 AM

oh well, no more tropics to worry about !!!

#751 LoopyGirdleSniffer

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 02:06 AM

I live and sail in the tropics and having a black boat or a white boat or any other color has very little effect on how you feel below. It's the ventilation that makes the difference not the color of the hull.

#752 richie

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 09:16 AM

If you live in the tropics,it doesn't matter what color you paint your boat...as long as it's WHITE !! :D

#753 Terrorvision

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 10:31 AM

I live and sail in the tropics and having a black boat or a white boat or any other color has very little effect on how you feel below. It's the ventilation that makes the difference not the color of the hull.


When I was in Hong Kong there was a dark grey boat; hull, decks...the lot. It was great looking boat but during the summer we called it the monkey boat because when the crew sat on the hot deck they bounced up and down going 'Ooh,ooh,ahh,ahh'. Not funny, just true!

#754 LoopyGirdleSniffer

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 10:53 AM

I live and sail in the tropics and having a black boat or a white boat or any other color has very little effect on how you feel below. It's the ventilation that makes the difference not the color of the hull.


When I was in Hong Kong there was a dark grey boat; hull, decks...the lot. It was great looking boat but during the summer we called it the monkey boat because when the crew sat on the hot deck they bounced up and down going 'Ooh,ooh,ahh,ahh'. Not funny, just true!


I've been on boats with light grey decks that couldn't be walked on barefoot during the day. EVERYTHING gets hot in the sun in the tropics.

#755 umpire

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Posted 17 May 2012 - 03:45 PM

I live and sail in the tropics and having a black boat or a white boat or any other color has very little effect on how you feel below. It's the ventilation that makes the difference not the color of the hull.


When I was in Hong Kong there was a dark grey boat; hull, decks...the lot. It was great looking boat but during the summer we called it the monkey boat because when the crew sat on the hot deck they bounced up and down going 'Ooh,ooh,ahh,ahh'. Not funny, just true!


I've been on boats with light grey decks that couldn't be walked on barefoot during the day. EVERYTHING gets hot in the sun in the tropics.


No Shit Sherlock!!