Jump to content


brake anarchy


  • Please log in to reply
52 replies to this topic

#1 celphtaught

celphtaught

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,609 posts
  • Location:wherever there is water. and beer.
  • Interests:the great blue yonder. and random bits of string

Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:04 PM

I need to get my hands on some inexpensive front rotors for my a6, preferably drilled and slotted but not a deal breaker. Anyone hook a brother up?

#2 movable ballast

movable ballast

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,034 posts
  • Location:San Diego

Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:08 PM

Why do you need drilled and slotted on a street car? Do you take the A6 to track days? If not it's a wank... Just get stock rotors.

#3 Bulbhunter

Bulbhunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,704 posts
  • Interests:SA is DEAD

Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:14 PM

MB - he's towing his 28ft Searay with it everyone knows drilled and slotted rotors help stop searays.

#4 jerseyguy

jerseyguy

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,471 posts
  • Location:somewhere over the rainbow

Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:22 PM

I need to get my hands on some inexpensive front rotors for my a6, preferably drilled and slotted but not a deal breaker. Anyone hook a brother up?

"Inexpensive" and "Audi" do not go together. I've had 5 of them over the last 35 years or so. But I wised up. Now I drive a Porsche!!

:lol:

#5 Mojo Risin

Mojo Risin

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,763 posts

Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:27 PM


I need to get my hands on some inexpensive front rotors for my a6, preferably drilled and slotted but not a deal breaker. Anyone hook a brother up?

"Inexpensive" and "Audi" do not go together. I've had 5 of them over the last 35 years or so. But I wised up. Now I drive a Porsche!!

:lol:


Have you had your oil changed recently? Or brake fluid changed?

B)

#6 Pinch This

Pinch This

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 276 posts

Posted 03 May 2012 - 08:39 PM

Tire Rack is where I shop sometimes. Pretty inexpensive, but sometimes my local parts shop is cheaper.

#7 Takk2

Takk2

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 311 posts
  • Location:west of TO ON CA

Posted 03 May 2012 - 09:40 PM

I've been ordering from these guys so far I'm happy with everything

http://www.ecstuning...tors/ES2189958/

#8 ropetrick

ropetrick

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,422 posts

Posted 03 May 2012 - 09:51 PM

Another satisfied ECS customer here.

#9 jerseyguy

jerseyguy

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,471 posts
  • Location:somewhere over the rainbow

Posted 03 May 2012 - 11:53 PM



I need to get my hands on some inexpensive front rotors for my a6, preferably drilled and slotted but not a deal breaker. Anyone hook a brother up?

"Inexpensive" and "Audi" do not go together. I've had 5 of them over the last 35 years or so. But I wised up. Now I drive a Porsche!!

:lol:


Have you had your oil changed recently? Or brake fluid changed?

B)

Yup!!
Oil "service" and brake fluid change, at the dealership, was just north of $500.
Car goes in next week for spark plugs, mechanical checkup on the convertible top, check air bag sensors, check roll over protection, engine air filter, cabin air filter. And I get a "free" loaner and a "free" detailing. Boy am I lucky.

I keep telling my sons that it is simply less money for them to fight over when I die.

#10 jerseyguy

jerseyguy

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,471 posts
  • Location:somewhere over the rainbow

Posted 03 May 2012 - 11:58 PM

forgot--the oil service is once a year or 15,000 miles. Brake fluid is every 2 years. That makes it so much better.

Once upon a time someone asked me how I could afford to play golf since it was so expensive. My answer was simple--expensive? Try sailboat racing.

:blink:

#11 dacapo

dacapo

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,403 posts
  • Location:NY
  • Interests:walks on the beach,a good book,a good cry

Posted 04 May 2012 - 12:11 AM

www.autopartswarehouse.com

#12 Bulbhunter

Bulbhunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,704 posts
  • Interests:SA is DEAD

Posted 04 May 2012 - 12:20 AM

forgot--the oil service is once a year or 15,000 miles. Brake fluid is every 2 years. That makes it so much better.

Once upon a time someone asked me how I could afford to play golf since it was so expensive. My answer was simple--expensive? Try sailboat racing.

:blink:


No doubt - wife and I met racing sailboats. We drive a Subaru and just bought a used 06 Sequoia to replace our 93 landcruiser. We have a few friends who drive the latest hot rod whatever trendy expensive ride. They now and then will say something and the wife and I both remind them that they got a ride on our hand built custom one of a kind composite sports car last weekend during a sunset wine cruise. HA HA

No boat and a very very nice 911 Turbo would be far cheaper and require far less time to wash not counting the time to and from the YC vs walking out to the garage.

#13 jerseyguy

jerseyguy

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,471 posts
  • Location:somewhere over the rainbow

Posted 04 May 2012 - 12:41 AM


forgot--the oil service is once a year or 15,000 miles. Brake fluid is every 2 years. That makes it so much better.

Once upon a time someone asked me how I could afford to play golf since it was so expensive. My answer was simple--expensive? Try sailboat racing.

:blink:


No doubt - wife and I met racing sailboats. We drive a Subaru and just bought a used 06 Sequoia to replace our 93 landcruiser. We have a few friends who drive the latest hot rod whatever trendy expensive ride. They now and then will say something and the wife and I both remind them that they got a ride on our hand built custom one of a kind composite sports car last weekend during a sunset wine cruise. HA HA

No boat and a very very nice 911 Turbo would be far cheaper and require far less time to wash not counting the time to and from the YC vs walking out to the garage.


Boat is gone. Sold it years ago to pay for a couple of years of college tuition for the younger kid. Car is a 2004, just a 911 cabriolet, not a turbo or even an "S". I live about 10 minutes from the YC so a Sunday afternoon jaunt down there to sit on the patio have a drink or two (diet coke when I'm driving that car), and look at all the boats in our slip system that never leave their slips. Don't need 3 or 4 people to drive the car. Needed a couple of folks when it was time to take the boat out.

#14 Monkey

Monkey

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,165 posts

Posted 04 May 2012 - 04:40 AM

I'm still trying to figure out the need for drilled/slotted rotors on an A6. Waste of money for the cool factor.

If I didn't need them, I sure as hell wouldn't have spent the extra money.

#15 The Advocate

The Advocate

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,350 posts
  • Location:32.00.13 S 115.50.73 E

Posted 04 May 2012 - 10:35 AM

Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.

#16 TPG

TPG

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,677 posts
  • Location:Popes Island Performing Arts Center

Posted 04 May 2012 - 10:44 AM

I'm still trying to figure out the need for drilled/slotted rotors on an A6. Waste of money for the cool factor.

If I didn't need them, I sure as hell wouldn't have spent the extra money.


But but, all the angry lawnmowers have them! Next he needs a 6" tailpipe. Then he can be REAAAAALLLLLLLYYYYY cool.

#17 celphtaught

celphtaught

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,609 posts
  • Location:wherever there is water. and beer.
  • Interests:the great blue yonder. and random bits of string

Posted 04 May 2012 - 12:38 PM

That's fair, I don't really need them and price point is a big factor. Thoughts on ceramic pads? And would you think it'd be cheaper to order on ecs or have the garage order them?

#18 Mojo Risin

Mojo Risin

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,763 posts

Posted 04 May 2012 - 12:40 PM

Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.


Ceramic.

#19 The Advocate

The Advocate

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,350 posts
  • Location:32.00.13 S 115.50.73 E

Posted 04 May 2012 - 01:38 PM


Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.


Ceramic.


Carbon.

#20 Monkey

Monkey

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,165 posts

Posted 04 May 2012 - 01:41 PM

That's fair, I don't really need them and price point is a big factor. Thoughts on ceramic pads? And would you think it'd be cheaper to order on ecs or have the garage order them?

Good pads are a MUCH better place to spend money. You'll benefit from them every time you drive. The Gucci rotors would only help if you're frequently building up a ton of heat. I'm not that current on the best materials though. Mine are very purpose built for big tires/small rotors, so it's been awhile since I've looked into "normal" pads. It's almost always cheaper buying the parts on your own, but many garages frown on that. Brakes and rotors aren't hard to do on your own though.

#21 Mojo Risin

Mojo Risin

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,763 posts

Posted 04 May 2012 - 02:04 PM



Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.


Ceramic.


Carbon.


Carbon-ceramic.

#22 celphtaught

celphtaught

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,609 posts
  • Location:wherever there is water. and beer.
  • Interests:the great blue yonder. and random bits of string

Posted 04 May 2012 - 02:08 PM

Lack the facility or knowledge of german cars to do the pads and rotors on my own. Already told the garage I may have my own rotors b/c I thought my buddy had some, so they're expecting outside goods. I'm just trying to reduce the $650 bill they quoted me.

#23 Footlong

Footlong

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,212 posts
  • Location:Lawnguyland
  • Interests:Member # 175

Posted 04 May 2012 - 03:46 PM

They really like it when you bring your own parts.

#24 austin1972

austin1972

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,633 posts
  • Location:Sandwich, IL

Posted 04 May 2012 - 03:46 PM

Lack the facility or knowledge of german cars to do the pads and rotors on my own. Already told the garage I may have my own rotors b/c I thought my buddy had some, so they're expecting outside goods. I'm just trying to reduce the $650 bill they quoted me.


Seriously, brakes are pretty easy so long as you have some basic tools... These guys differ on that opinion. Just remember to pump them back up after replacement and use the proper grease for the little set pin thingy. And put the anti-squeal stuff on that comes with the pads.

In my experience, I've had mixed success on brakes or tires for German cars when I've used non OEM. I've tried lots of different combos including ceramic etc...OEM has always been the best bet.

#25 jerseyguy

jerseyguy

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,471 posts
  • Location:somewhere over the rainbow

Posted 04 May 2012 - 04:14 PM

I once screwed up an oil change on a Pontiac. Did not notice that the rubber seal on the old oil filter stuck to the car so when I put the new filter on there were 2 rubber seals. Fired up the car, drove 1/2 mile watched the oil pressure in the car drop to near zero. Looked out the rear window and saw 5+ quarts of oil in a nice line following my car.

After that experience there is no way I'm touching the brakes on my 911.

And to think, my brother is a retired auto mechanic.

<_<

#26 Timo42

Timo42

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,687 posts
  • Location:Marina Del Rey, Ca

Posted 04 May 2012 - 04:59 PM




Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.


Ceramic.


Carbon.


Carbon-ceramic.



Cheapo steel and 2 steps more expensive than the cheapest pad at Rock Auto, he isn't racing at Indy, he's a broke student trying to get to class... Sheesh :rolleyes:

#27 Navigare

Navigare

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 124 posts
  • Location:Stockholm - Sweden
  • Interests:Sailing?

Posted 04 May 2012 - 05:04 PM

Brakes? Buy a decent sized anchor, mount it in the trunk with a quick release line (made from some exotic and ridiculous overpriced fibre).

#28 dreaded

dreaded

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,253 posts
  • Location:Dallas

Posted 04 May 2012 - 05:32 PM




Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.


Ceramic.


Carbon.


Carbon-ceramic.


nokia phones..

#29 Shibby

Shibby

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,140 posts

Posted 04 May 2012 - 05:51 PM

or you could buy a new car...

#30 Mr. Squirrel

Mr. Squirrel

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,966 posts
  • Location:In a van, down by the river

Posted 04 May 2012 - 05:54 PM

Please dont buy cheap shit rotors and pads. If I was buying rotors for my A6 I would use Bendix, TRW, or Brembo (Brembo does make a base rotor). For pads I would use Federal Mogul or Akebono. Anything else is a guessing game at best.

Changing rotors and pads is really easy, but because of the TRW rear caliper on the car you will need to borrow/buy one of these if you intend to DIY-

http://www.amazon.co...36153563&sr=8-1

You can retract the rear piston with needle nose pliers, but it is a pain in the ass. Buy it, use it, return it if you must.

I can explain to you how to change the rotors and pads via PM if you are interested. It is a 1-2 hour job if you have the proper tools.

MS

#31 austin1972

austin1972

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,633 posts
  • Location:Sandwich, IL

Posted 04 May 2012 - 06:07 PM

Please dont buy cheap shit rotors and pads. If I was buying rotors for my A6 I would use Bendix, TRW, or Brembo (Brembo does make a base rotor). For pads I would use Federal Mogul or Akebono. Anything else is a guessing game at best.

Changing rotors and pads is really easy, but because of the TRW rear caliper on the car you will need to borrow/buy one of these if you intend to DIY-

http://www.amazon.co...36153563&sr=8-1

You can retract the rear piston with needle nose pliers, but it is a pain in the ass. Buy it, use it, return it if you must.

I can explain to you how to change the rotors and pads via PM if you are interested. It is a 1-2 hour job if you have the proper tools.

MS


Autozone will loan you tools like that, bearing presses etc..

#32 Bulbhunter

Bulbhunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,704 posts
  • Interests:SA is DEAD

Posted 04 May 2012 - 06:37 PM

Lack the facility or knowledge of german cars to do the pads and rotors on my own. Already told the garage I may have my own rotors b/c I thought my buddy had some, so they're expecting outside goods. I'm just trying to reduce the $650 bill they quoted me.


Celph if you have ever mixed two part epoxy - you can replace pads and rotors LOL.

First week of April we picked up a single owner 06 Sequoia pads were down to about 10% rotors were fine. Took me about an hour to put new stock pads on it - had never even looked at a toyota truck newer than 93 regarding brakes. Brakes are about the most basic no brainer job designed to be nearly 100% fool proof. All I had was a jack - a stand and an empty driveway for an hour.

Our VW uses allen wrenches instead of metric bolts but the disc and pads removal and install is exactly the same as the Sequoia - and our Subaru and even the old 93 Land Cruiser. The shops all wanted over $600 - it cost me $150 for the stock pads front and rear ordered online at about a 30% discount compared to the dealer parts counter across town.

All my track buddies say the same thing regarding brakes - stick with OEM for pads and discs unless you plan on going after market on other various bits too like brake lines and even calipers etc. If your stock pads and rotors run 30-40K with no issues why spend more on aftermarket parts that for the most part have a shorter life span and a higher cost? Unless of course your doing track days and added performance over durability and life is your interest.

#33 Timo42

Timo42

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,687 posts
  • Location:Marina Del Rey, Ca

Posted 04 May 2012 - 07:02 PM

Please dont buy cheap shit rotors and pads. If I was buying rotors for my A6 I would use Bendix, TRW, or Brembo (Brembo does make a base rotor). For pads I would use Federal Mogul or Akebono. Anything else is a guessing game at best.

Changing rotors and pads is really easy, but because of the TRW rear caliper on the car you will need to borrow/buy one of these if you intend to DIY-

http://www.amazon.co...36153563&sr=8-1

You can retract the rear piston with needle nose pliers, but it is a pain in the ass. Buy it, use it, return it if you must.

I can explain to you how to change the rotors and pads via PM if you are interested. It is a 1-2 hour job if you have the proper tools.

MS



If he wasn't a starving college student, I would agree, it really depends on how long he is keeping the car, after all this cuts into his beer fund. B)

#34 movable ballast

movable ballast

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,034 posts
  • Location:San Diego

Posted 04 May 2012 - 11:21 PM

That's fair, I don't really need them and price point is a big factor. Thoughts on ceramic pads? And would you think it'd be cheaper to order on ecs or have the garage order them?


EBC green stuff brake pads give a great pedal feel. Ceramics leave your wheels clean but have no pedal modulation. IMO...

#35 The Advocate

The Advocate

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,350 posts
  • Location:32.00.13 S 115.50.73 E

Posted 05 May 2012 - 11:23 AM




Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.


Ceramic.


Carbon.


Carbon-ceramic.

Deal.

#36 redboat

redboat

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,270 posts
  • Location:Spofford, New Hampshire
  • Interests:none

Posted 05 May 2012 - 01:01 PM

They really like it when you bring your own parts.


You're probably a first time/one time customer at this garage and they won't be thrilled if you walk in with new parts in boxes. Their attitude might be reflected in the work they do or they might find another problem while working on the brakes.

A6 is not a good car for a college kid on a budget. German car part costs will kill ya.

#37 Timo42

Timo42

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,687 posts
  • Location:Marina Del Rey, Ca

Posted 05 May 2012 - 03:00 PM


They really like it when you bring your own parts.


You're probably a first time/one time customer at this garage and they won't be thrilled if you walk in with new parts in boxes. Their attitude might be reflected in the work they do or they might find another problem while working on the brakes.

A6 is not a good car for a college kid on a budget. German car part costs will kill ya.



More likely they won't warranty the work, and if you get a noise or pulsation, will say "your parts, your problem" Part of the markup that the shop charges covers the warranty they give on their parts and labor. The tech usually doesn't get a cut on parts so he won't care.

#38 1topfueljim

1topfueljim

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 18 posts
  • Location:SoCal

Posted 05 May 2012 - 04:28 PM

Look at BrakePerformance.com before you do anything else. Dimpled (better than drilled) and slotted rotors with pads for an A6 for under $200. I have used them and have been very pleased. I don't know where you are, but this outfit is in SoCal (Chatsworth) and actually makes the product there. My experience has been that it is good quality stuff.

#39 stranded

stranded

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 687 posts
  • Location:Brisbane
  • Interests:cruising, racing, inshore and offshore

Posted 06 May 2012 - 09:39 AM

an accident that reveals non standard / non approved brake gear without engineering documentation is not a good look for insurance / police or opposing insurer



a change often requires higher performance improvements in the WHOLE package



tyres, suspension, possibly alignment geometry


good non standard brakes are not always a simple gain



a bit like turboing a rig on a good boat without better rudder and keel ---- and it can still become too twitchy



gains are often only in certain wind ranges



losses can result in other wind ranges



good design ( if that what an audi is )



can be difficult to modify without losing " balance "



boat or car





you stop quicker



just maybe



you get rear ended more often



That's what happened to alfa drivers in the 60's & 70's



you need a car to behave similar to the rest of the traffic in the pack ..................

#40 TPG

TPG

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,677 posts
  • Location:Popes Island Performing Arts Center

Posted 06 May 2012 - 10:44 AM

They really like it when you bring your own parts.


They encourage it and will happily find every other little thing wrong with your car to fix for you.
PS. Go slow after.

#41 stranded

stranded

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 687 posts
  • Location:Brisbane
  • Interests:cruising, racing, inshore and offshore

Posted 06 May 2012 - 11:27 AM

or stay standard spec



P. S. I thort u woz un enjineer

#42 celphtaught

celphtaught

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,609 posts
  • Location:wherever there is water. and beer.
  • Interests:the great blue yonder. and random bits of string

Posted 06 May 2012 - 01:14 PM

Different kind of engineer. If the car had a head or a desal plant and one wasn't working I might be able to troubleshoot a fix.

#43 President Eisenhowler

President Eisenhowler

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,459 posts

Posted 07 May 2012 - 05:01 PM



Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.


Ceramic.


Carbon.


Unobtainum, with sintered tungsten pads.

#44 TPG

TPG

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,677 posts
  • Location:Popes Island Performing Arts Center

Posted 07 May 2012 - 05:06 PM




Not a waste of money at all, huge difference, but do it properly, go carbon.


Ceramic.


Carbon.


Unobtainum, with sintered tungsten pads.


Greased with unicorn tears.

#45 Timo42

Timo42

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,687 posts
  • Location:Marina Del Rey, Ca

Posted 07 May 2012 - 05:26 PM

Different kind of engineer. If the car had a head or a desal plant and one wasn't working I might be able to troubleshoot a fix.



Engineers can't actually fix anything...it takes a tech to do that. :rolleyes: :ph34r:

#46 MisterMoon

MisterMoon

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,053 posts
  • Location:Acworth, GA

Posted 07 May 2012 - 05:33 PM

I once screwed up an oil change on a Pontiac. Did not notice that the rubber seal on the old oil filter stuck to the car so when I put the new filter on there were 2 rubber seals. Fired up the car, drove 1/2 mile watched the oil pressure in the car drop to near zero. Looked out the rear window and saw 5+ quarts of oil in a nice line following my car.

After that experience there is no way I'm touching the brakes on my 911.

And to think, my brother is a retired auto mechanic.

<_<



Good to hear I'm not the only who's done that. First time I changed the oil on myself on my '77 Celica, I was perplexed to see oil spraying everywhere as soon as the engine fired up. I damn near killed myself trying to tighten that thing up! Dad wasn't too happy about the mess in the driveway, either.

#47 southportK2

southportK2

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 202 posts
  • Location:Eastern CT

Posted 08 May 2012 - 02:30 AM


Different kind of engineer. If the car had a head or a desal plant and one wasn't working I might be able to troubleshoot a fix.



Engineers can't actually fix anything...it takes a tech to do that. :rolleyes: :ph34r:


someone works is a union shop

#48 President Eisenhowler

President Eisenhowler

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,459 posts

Posted 08 May 2012 - 03:09 AM


Different kind of engineer. If the car had a head or a desal plant and one wasn't working I might be able to troubleshoot a fix.



Engineers can't actually fix anything...it takes a tech to do that. :rolleyes: :ph34r:



I know a guy who has a PhD in physics and is a fairly big deal in the science and engineering that puts those pretty maps on the big projection screens at Verizon's or Akamai's "mission control" network operations centers. His parents, who themselves forewent education so that they could emigrate to the US and put their own kids through college, while duly impressed by his accomplishments, remain somewhat skeptical that with all that fancy technical education he still doesn't know how to fix a TV set.

#49 floating dutchman

floating dutchman

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,815 posts
  • Location:nelson: new zealand

Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:37 AM



Different kind of engineer. If the car had a head or a desal plant and one wasn't working I might be able to troubleshoot a fix.



Engineers can't actually fix anything...it takes a tech to do that. :rolleyes: :ph34r:



I know a guy who has a PhD in physics and is a fairly big deal in the science and engineering that puts those pretty maps on the big projection screens at Verizon's or Akamai's "mission control" network operations centers. His parents, who themselves forewent education so that they could emigrate to the US and put their own kids through college, while duly impressed by his accomplishments, remain somewhat skeptical that with all that fancy technical education he still doesn't know how to fix a TV set.

Not so long ago here when our Sewage treatment plant was having a major up-grade somone got one of the design Engineers to ring around town, looking to find where to borrow a sky-hook from.

#50 celphtaught

celphtaught

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,609 posts
  • Location:wherever there is water. and beer.
  • Interests:the great blue yonder. and random bits of string

Posted 08 May 2012 - 12:43 PM

Sounds like a rookie desk jockey

#51 President Eisenhowler

President Eisenhowler

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,459 posts

Posted 08 May 2012 - 02:18 PM




Different kind of engineer. If the car had a head or a desal plant and one wasn't working I might be able to troubleshoot a fix.



Engineers can't actually fix anything...it takes a tech to do that. :rolleyes: :ph34r:



I know a guy who has a PhD in physics and is a fairly big deal in the science and engineering that puts those pretty maps on the big projection screens at Verizon's or Akamai's "mission control" network operations centers. His parents, who themselves forewent education so that they could emigrate to the US and put their own kids through college, while duly impressed by his accomplishments, remain somewhat skeptical that with all that fancy technical education he still doesn't know how to fix a TV set.

Not so long ago here when our Sewage treatment plant was having a major up-grade somone got one of the design Engineers to ring around town, looking to find where to borrow a sky-hook from.


Ooof. The same prank wouldn't work as well here, though; "Sky-hook" is a trade name for small construction cranes of the sort you might use to, say, lift something small-ish ( an electrical transformer?) onto the roof of a two storey building; it's the sort of thing that more than one municipal department might own, so a request to call around to borrow one wouldn't come across as silly.

#52 floating dutchman

floating dutchman

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,815 posts
  • Location:nelson: new zealand

Posted 09 May 2012 - 04:59 AM





Different kind of engineer. If the car had a head or a desal plant and one wasn't working I might be able to troubleshoot a fix.



Engineers can't actually fix anything...it takes a tech to do that. :rolleyes: :ph34r:



I know a guy who has a PhD in physics and is a fairly big deal in the science and engineering that puts those pretty maps on the big projection screens at Verizon's or Akamai's "mission control" network operations centers. His parents, who themselves forewent education so that they could emigrate to the US and put their own kids through college, while duly impressed by his accomplishments, remain somewhat skeptical that with all that fancy technical education he still doesn't know how to fix a TV set.

Not so long ago here when our Sewage treatment plant was having a major up-grade somone got one of the design Engineers to ring around town, looking to find where to borrow a sky-hook from.


Ooof. The same prank wouldn't work as well here, though; "Sky-hook" is a trade name for small construction cranes of the sort you might use to, say, lift something small-ish ( an electrical transformer?) onto the roof of a two storey building; it's the sort of thing that more than one municipal department might own, so a request to call around to borrow one wouldn't come across as silly.

Here it does.

#53 bowman81

bowman81

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 850 posts
  • Location:Australia
  • Interests:Beer, tits, boats, pussy, boats, tits

Posted 09 May 2012 - 08:44 AM

while I understand the joke, we have a "sky hook" brand crane we use to change chucks out on the big lathes we have. It comes from a long line of apprentice jokes, send them out to get: checkered/striped paint, left handed screw driver, metric shifting spanner, a long wait, the list goes on.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users