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Europa Warmup


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#1 Carboninit

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 07:35 AM

Thought this might be of interest. Europa warmup before the Vendee. http://www.europa-warmup.com/

#2 Icedtea

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Posted 20 May 2012 - 08:45 AM

JP is leading by around 17 miles I think, no surprises there, with the back group of Kito, Bernard and Javier very close but around 45 miles back.


Looking at the tracker Stamm seems to be a lot further back than Sanso but it's showing him ahead in the rankings


Tracker

#3 Carboninit

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Posted 23 May 2012 - 05:22 PM

I see that Michel Desjoyeaux is on Macif. How the boats look so different with new sponsors logo's.

#4 victor t

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 02:29 PM

1st leg results:
1. Virbac Paprec JP DICK (with JOURDAIN on board among others)
2. Macif - GABART (with DESJOYEAUX on board)
3. PRB - RIOU
4. Banque Pop - LE CLEACH
5. Poujoulat - STAMM
6. Bel - PAVANT
7. Acciona - SANSO

First three boats arrived in 7 minutes (only 1 min between #2 and #3), then BP, then #5 and #6 together, then #7. Conditions were no wind and breeze upwind, I wish there will be more reaching to see how Poujoulat behaves in next leg compared to others (next leg is solo).

#5 LeoV

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 11:43 AM

Slowly becoming a fan of JP Dick, nice lead...
Pavant should take weather routing more seriously :)

#6 Carboninit

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 07:12 AM

I wonder what broke on Groupe Bel this time for the mast to come down.

#7 Icedtea

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 07:44 AM

I wonder what broke on Groupe Bel this time for the mast to come down.

kito seems to be making a habit of it!

#8 Carboninit

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 09:29 AM

On the upside the ones who have broken there rigs now go into the Vendee with new rig and stick.

#9 Icedtea

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 11:29 AM

On the upside the ones who have broken there rigs now go into the Vendee with new rig and stick.

On the downside they lose alot of training time...

#10 Lemon

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 12:06 PM

1337793774[/url]' post='3724419']
I see that Michel Desjoyeaux is on Macif. How the boats look so different with new sponsors logo's.


It is a different boat! Same design though. His old bus in now Banque pop.
It's a shame about Kito, but funny how some skippers in IMOCA attract bad luck!

#11 Mash

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 12:15 PM

I was in Port Camargue (Kito's / Groupe Bel's home port) a couple weeks ago and something that looked like a mast section was visible near their shed. If it was a full spare mast, or remains from a previous broken one, I can't tell.

If they indeed have a spare at the ready, they might be back on the water soon enough.

M

#12 LeoV

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 06:27 PM

And Stamm is smoking along:
Of the site:

In these conditions the outstanding performer has been Bernard Stamm’s Cheminées Pojoulat which has been positively smoking, getting to within less than 10 miles of Alex Thomson’s 24 hour solo record.

Stamm is calculated to have made 457.7 miles point to point over the 24 hours to 1430 UTC this afternoon, and then 458.6 to 1730hrs, a very favourable comparision with Alex Thomson’s 468.72 miles which he set in 2003 in the North Atlantic

#13 forss

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 07:25 PM

I was in Port Camargue (Kito's / Groupe Bel's home port) a couple weeks ago and something that looked like a mast section was visible near their shed. If it was a full spare mast, or remains from a previous broken one, I can't tell.

If they indeed have a spare at the ready, they might be back on the water soon enough.

M


Information from Alex Thomson Racing Facebook (Hugo Boss)

I have been following the Europa Warm Up Race http://www.europa-warmup.com/ closely and was very sorry to see that Kito de Pavant’s boat Group Bel was dismasted yesterday. Any major problems like this are terrible in the lead up to the Vendee Globe as it is so disruptive in the short term and leads to a lack of confidence in the long term. The good news is that Kito has a spare mast and I am sure he will be back in fine shape very soon. Good luck Kito



#14 Potter

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Posted 31 May 2012 - 09:43 PM

Stamm is smoking!
Latest release:
Contrary to the early forecast, so far the strong S’ly winds have not yet abated for the leaders of the Europa Warm’Up race and so speeds have remained consistently high as the IMOCA Open 60’s plunge headlong towards the Fastnet Rock light. In these conditions the outstanding performer has been Bernard Stamm’s Cheminées Pojoulat which has been positively smoking, getting to within less than 10 miles of Alex Thomson’s 24 hour solo record.
Stamm is calculated to have made 457.7 miles point to point over the 24 hours to 1430 UTC this afternoon, and then 458.6 to 1730hrs, a very favourable comparision with Alex Thomson’s 468.72 miles which he set in 2003 in the North Atlantic. And there has been no let up in the ferocious pace with Stamm clawing back 10 miles today on leader PRB. Vincent Riou leads by just seven miles this afternoon ahead of the Swiss skipper, with Armel Le Cléac’h clinging on to third at 20.9 miles behind PRB.
Making over 25 knots in the sustained surfs, the pressure on the skippers and the boats is intense as they plunge into the back of the next wave, huge volumes of water sluicing over the deck. All of the skippers contacted today admitted some kind of wipeouts or sudden hand brake turns. This on the edge sailing is a perfect foretaste of the Vendée Globe conditions, a test for the skippers and their boats. And without doubt the fact that there has been damage to the fleet makes skippers have second thoughts just how hard they press. But their challenge here is to make such speeds and experiences feel like the norm. Stamm, for example, is absolutely one of the best, hard driving and skilled big winds and seas sailors there is – with two solo round the world wins already to his name. But Macif’s Francois Gabart admits that he is still very much on the upwards learning curve in the IMOCA solo in these conditions, and so he has been moving the cursor up as he learns. For him, speeds which seemed insane in the early hours of this morning, have likely begun to feel like the norm this afternoon. Man adapts to most things, they say, and before long the breeze will drop and 15-16kts of boat speed will feel positively pedestrian.
Of course it is a veritable solo baptism of fire for Bubi Sanso on ACCIONA 100% EcoPowered on his first big race with his new Owen-Clarke design.
The famous Fastnet Rock off the south of Ireland is within 500 miles for the leaders which means they can be rounding it late tomorrow night or early Saturday morning. Then the third and final leg to the finish in La Rochelle is likely to be upwind again into and E’ly or SE’ly. Predictions already have the fleet finishing the race ahead of schedule, perhaps as early as Sunday night.

They said :
Bernard Stamm (Cheminées Poujoulat): “I am a bit surprised at my position, but at the same time really happy. I’d expected that it would drop away a bit but that’s not happened so that is all good. The sea is better organised now so you can keep speeds right up. The boat does stop in the short waves, and is suddenly covered with water. Every ten seconds the waves go right over the boat. But with the new coachroof. I am well protected. Before that it was drysuit and a helmet. I managed to get some sleep, but 20-25 minutes at a time.”

François Gabart (MACIF): “I am not going fast enough. Compared with my chums nearby who have at least one tour of the globe under their belts I am learning. I went up a bit and was suddenly I was making 16-20kts, a bit less. We should continue fast to the Fastnet. You get used to speed, I was, like wahoo at 20-21kts yesterday and now you sit quietly watching the speedo hitting 23-24kts.”

#15 hermitCrab

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 03:54 AM

François Gabart (MACIF): "I am not going fast enough. Compared with my chums nearby who have at least one tour of the globe under their belts I am learning. I went up a bit and was suddenly I was making 16-20kts, a bit less. We should continue fast to the Fastnet. You get used to speed, I was, like wahoo at 20-21kts yesterday and now you sit quietly watching the speedo hitting 23-24kts."


Potter, in these conditions and speeds, how much hand-steering and how much autopilot?
I hope some of these guys are shooting video.

#16 Potter

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 08:47 AM


François Gabart (MACIF): "I am not going fast enough. Compared with my chums nearby who have at least one tour of the globe under their belts I am learning. I went up a bit and was suddenly I was making 16-20kts, a bit less. We should continue fast to the Fastnet. You get used to speed, I was, like wahoo at 20-21kts yesterday and now you sit quietly watching the speedo hitting 23-24kts."


Potter, in these conditions and speeds, how much hand-steering and how much autopilot?
I hope some of these guys are shooting video.

Difficult to say. MICH Desj would have you believe that he hand steers all the time, however as they are training for the VG I would guess they want to test their pilots hard in these conditions. I actually believe that in the big tuff they are steering less, but controlling sheets more.

#17 schakel

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 11:02 AM



François Gabart (MACIF): "I am not going fast enough. Compared with my chums nearby who have at least one tour of the globe under their belts I am learning. I went up a bit and was suddenly I was making 16-20kts, a bit less. We should continue fast to the Fastnet. You get used to speed, I was, like wahoo at 20-21kts yesterday and now you sit quietly watching the speedo hitting 23-24kts."


Potter, in these conditions and speeds, how much hand-steering and how much autopilot?
I hope some of these guys are shooting video.

Difficult to say. MICH Desj would have you believe that he hand steers all the time, however as they are training for the VG I would guess they want to test their pilots hard in these conditions. I actually believe that in the big tuff they are steering less, but controlling sheets more.


Michel Desjojeaux has better things to do nowadays.
Here he is on the maiden voyage of MOD 70 Foncia together with super movie star Audrey Tatou. (The da Vinci Code)
http://www.teamfoncia.com/?m=b1

Here is a walkthrough for solo sailing:
http://www.sfbaysss.org/tipsbook/SinglehandedTips.pdf

sleep = autopilot and
hand steering = awake

And more handsteering is winning according to Ellen Mc Arthur.

Since nobody functions properly without sleep the one who controls that part has an advantage in winning. Ellen mc Arthur was supposed to be most fanatic in that. That why she is Dame Ellen nowadays!

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#18 LeoV

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 08:30 PM

Schakel, let Potter talk and learn LOL.

Your stories contains a bit of hype, and outdated with more advanced pilots. Solo skippers have to do a lot. Studying weather good can make you go faster then handsteering al the day into a high. But its good to handsteer a few hours day if possible, you feel the boat then.

#19 ctutmark

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 11:51 PM

+1

Schakel, let Potter talk and learn LOL.

Your stories contains a bit of hype, and outdated with more advanced pilots. Solo skippers have to do a lot. Studying weather good can make you go faster then handsteering al the day into a high. But its good to handsteer a few hours day if possible, you feel the boat then.



#20 Icedtea

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 12:15 AM

Ah aqua quorum, forgot Ellen raced her for a bit, sexy boat!

#21 hermitCrab

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 08:18 AM

Chris, how much of the time were you hand-steering during your mini-transat?
Seems like the photos from the chase boats almost always show skippers with tiller in hand. Same thing with the Figaro guys. The Open60 skippers not so much.

+1


Schakel, let Potter talk and learn LOL.

Your stories contains a bit of hype, and outdated with more advanced pilots. Solo skippers have to do a lot. Studying weather good can make you go faster then handsteering al the day into a high. But its good to handsteer a few hours day if possible, you feel the boat then.



#22 ctutmark

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 01:51 PM

Very much depended on the conditions when it was easy the pilot drove a lot, when difficult I drove although there were plenty of times when I drove a lot when it was easy too. Probably averaged between 14-16 hours in a 24 for the race. The other times were boat checks, getting the limited weather info, food prep and eating, and sleeping. Never was a lack of stuff to do. Didn't take any books on the race but know of some who did, was surprised they had time to read them.

On the bigger boats I would expect the pilots drive more as the means to make power is a smaller percentage of the boat weight than on a mini. Most of the mini folks cut it very close on how much methanol to take for the fuel cell and I only know of one boat from 2009 that was exclusively solar. With the Watt&Sea now fairly well sorted the power generating equation has changed a bit too.

Maybe RailMeat can put some info into the dicussion on what the average % of target the pilot can get versus a person?

Would be interesting to hear from Anadraz on this too. Also a bunch of us are eager to see the SeaScape 27 in the water.

Chris, how much of the time were you hand-steering during your mini-transat?
Seems like the photos from the chase boats almost always show skippers with tiller in hand. Same thing with the Figaro guys. The Open60 skippers not so much.


+1


Schakel, let Potter talk and learn LOL.

Your stories contains a bit of hype, and outdated with more advanced pilots. Solo skippers have to do a lot. Studying weather good can make you go faster then handsteering al the day into a high. But its good to handsteer a few hours day if possible, you feel the boat then.



#23 schakel

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 01:25 PM

Chris, how much of the time were you hand-steering during your mini-transat?
Seems like the photos from the chase boats almost always show skippers with tiller in hand. Same thing with the Figaro guys. The Open60 skippers not so much.


+1


Schakel, let Potter talk and learn LOL.

Your stories contains a bit of hype, and outdated with more advanced pilots. Solo skippers have to do a lot. Studying weather good can make you go faster then handsteering al the day into a high. But its good to handsteer a few hours day if possible, you feel the boat then.

I know, I have my eye on the new Garmin autopilot.
I follow that for years and every month there is a new system.

The tip for studying weather is a good one.
There was even software developed for that.
It was on the front page of SA a few weeks ago.

Studying the "state of the art" in chart plotters and autopilots is a full time business.

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