Jump to content


Weight Placement


  • Please log in to reply
3 replies to this topic

#1 ftbinc

ftbinc

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 159 posts
  • Location:Chciago

Posted 24 May 2012 - 09:26 PM

Being new to this class, any suggestions on optimal heel angles and fore/aft weight placement would be welcome. It looks like our crew is going to be 2-3 200-250 LB people, plus 3-4 120 lb people and one 170 lb'er. so we will be able to move around a lot of weight where it will do the most good. The question of course is where is that going upwind? What should our target heel be? Fore/aft ? also downwind?

Thanks for everybody's responses to my previous questions
-p

#2 haligonian winterr

haligonian winterr

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 478 posts
  • Location:Halifax, NS
  • Interests:Going Fast.

Posted 25 May 2012 - 01:02 AM

Can't say anything about heel angles, but in light air you want your weight waaaaay forward (see the Volvo guys) to get the arse outta the water, and keep the bow down. Downwind the same if it's light (as in glassy light) but in the heavy start moving aft to promote planing.

FT polars may also have optimal angles.

HW

#3 kelly

kelly

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 319 posts

Posted 25 May 2012 - 02:47 AM

Being new to this class, any suggestions on optimal heel angles and fore/aft weight placement would be welcome. It looks like our crew is going to be 2-3 200-250 LB people, plus 3-4 120 lb people and one 170 lb'er. so we will be able to move around a lot of weight where it will do the most good. The question of course is where is that going upwind? What should our target heel be? Fore/aft ? also downwind?

Thanks for everybody's responses to my previous questions
-p


Tigers are best sailed flat.

Try to sail as flat as you can in most conditions. You will be supprised how flat this isn't as she is a light boat with a narrow round hull and big rig, so weight on the rail is a continual struggle. She is set up for cross sheeting which assists in keeping this weight high and forward, but nothing forwaqrd of the Stays as you will start to bury the nose in most condtions. Trim you available weight until the nose just pops up and down on the surface. Get your biggest piece of rail meet in the slot between the Stays and staunchion, that's about max beam so max righting effect. Uuse the lighter crew member to keep an eye out on the low side clean up sheets etc.

Downwind you will also be striving to keep her flat, otherwise you will all be taking swimming lessons. The tiger does not do Shy well particulary in anything above 15 knots. . She loves to run off the breeze and that's where you get you investment from the big crew. Get them back to induct planing , once this happens its all good, the steering becomes very light and responsive, the speedo goes off the scale and you realise why you purchased the Tiger. Make sure you keep a responsive hand on the Vang at all times down wind. If you start to feel the steering load up or if some one calls a big puff in, get the sttering away quickly, call for vang and main as needed, you can not be too quick with this action.

In the worst case if you do loose it, the Tiger will lay down and round up. " Don't Panic " we have all done it many times in our first year of two of Tigering. A couple of suggestions to getting back up and looking like you meant to do it. .

1. Get as much weight as possible up on the Rail, tell them not to scream and its only a practice drill.

2. Ease the main, to gain some forward drive, but pull the boom in so that its not in the water otherwise it becomes a rudder and keeps you turning up. You need to get the nose away.

3. Straightern your rudder until the boat starts to move forward when you can actually achieve some steering to get away. Just holding the joy stick up under your throat does not work in fact it just stalls the rudder and prevents the forward momentun you are trying to achieve .

4. In say up to 20+ knots the avbove should see the boat get its nose away and begin to right itself and you just sail away pull the kite back on and pass around the beers, that was fun.

5. In higher winds she will just stay down and start going sideways, here is where you need to get the jib up, not necessarilly all the way up but enough to give the boat somthing to drive with. It is amazing how a bit of Jib and the boom out of the water can change the situation from "call the Insurance Company"" to " more beers please and get that vang off quicker next time".


I hope some of this is of use.

#4 Philc

Philc

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,480 posts
  • Location:Sydney Australia

Posted 07 June 2012 - 02:50 AM

I would have thought the best place for weight on a FT 10 would be in lead on the bottom of the keel. :) :D ;)




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users