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Volvo Ocean Race 2014-2015 Entrants


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#1 corkob

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 11:38 AM

SCA - a Swedish hygiene paper and wood product company have just announced they are entering an all female team in the next Volvo Ocean Race. This will add a bit of glamour and gender rivalry to the next race. Great news.

#2 Icedtea

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 11:57 AM

I'm surprised an entry has been announced so early, great news

#3 mad

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 12:22 PM

Skipper????

#4 euro

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 12:40 PM

Awesome. That's very cool news.

#5 mr_ryano

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 01:19 PM

Here's the full press release:

The Volvo Ocean Race will feature an all-female team for the first time since 2001-02 after global hygiene and forest company SCA announced they would enter a women’s crew for the next edition in 2014-15.
The team are the first to announce an entry for what will be the 12th edition of the race, starting from Alicante in the second half of 2014.

The all-female challengers are the first team to confirm an order for the new 65-foot one-design boat, details of which were announced by the race in June. The new high-performance boat is being built by a consortium of boatyards in the United Kingdom, France, Switzerland and Italy and will make it significantly cheaper for teams to mount a competitive campaign. The Volvo Ocean Race will ensure a minimum of eight boats are built, with the goal of getting between eight and 10 teams on the start line for the 12th edition of the race. The first of the boats will be finished in mid-2013.

The new design puts less of a premium on physical strength, and means all-female teams should be competitive in the race, which is one of sailing’s Big Three events along with the America's Cup and the Olympics.

"I'm very pleased to see a women's team back in the race," said Volvo Ocean Race CEO Knut Frostad. "The lack of women in the last few editions of the race has meant we haven't been representing half the population of the human race.

"I'm also delighted to welcome back Sweden, which has a rich history in the Volvo Ocean Race. This is extremely good news."

Under race rules, all-female teams will be able to race with two extra crewmembers.

Richard Brisius, who competed in two editions of sailing's toughest challenge, will manage the team for Atlant Ocean Racing, who have two previous Volvo Ocean Race victories behind them with EF Language in 1998 and Ericsson Racing Team in 2009.

“SCA’s investment in an all-female crew is unique,” said Brisius. “Competing for nine months in the world’s toughest offshore sailing race is a challenge that deserves respect. The new boat design enables an all-female crew, and our aim is to create a strong team that will have the best possible conditions to succeed."

Details on the selection process for the new team will be released in the near future, Brisius added.

SCA is a global hygiene and forest company that develops and produces personal care products, tissue, publication papers and solid-wood products. Sales are conducted in some 100 countries. SCA global brands include TENA and Tork. The company has approximately 37,000 employees and sales in 2011 amounted to SEK 106 billion (EUR 11.7 billion). More information atwww.sca.com.

“The Volvo Ocean Race will increase awareness of the SCA brand and create stronger links to product brands such as TENA, Tork, Lotus, Tempo, Saba and Libero,” said Kersti Strandqvist, Senior Vice President, Corporate Communications at SCA. “We also want to highlight how our products improve our consumers’ quality of life.”

The last time an all-female team competed in the race was in 2001-02, when Lisa Charles (now Lisa McDonald) skippered Amer Sports Too. The first all-female team to compete were Maiden, skippered by Tracy Edwards, back in 1989-90. The full list is as follows:

1989-90 Maiden/Tracy Edwards

1993-94 US Women’s Challenge/Nance Franck, later Heineken/Dawn Riley

1997-98 EF Education/Christine Guilou

2001-02 Amer Sports Too Lisa Charles (now McDonald)

The last woman sailor in the race was Adrienne Cahalan, who was navigator on Brasil 1 for a single leg in 2005-06.

The most recent edition of the Volvo Ocean Race featured the closest battle in the 39-year history of the event. Groupama sailing team of France, skippered by Franck Cammas, emerged as the winners from a pack of four teams challenging for victory right up until the final few days of racing.


#6 smackdaddy

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 01:56 PM

This will be very interesting to watch.

#7 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 02:07 PM

One design paying dividends. This is great news.

#8 Icedtea

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 03:51 PM

Was thinking about Skipper and reckon Sam Davies could be in with a shout, she could go straight in after the Vendée and with a new kid the slightly less risky aspect of the Volvo in comparison with the Vendée could appeal to her

#9 Lostmydetailsagain

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 07:01 PM

So how is a boat with basically the same RM and not really much less sail area is going to be physically much less demanding? Do not get me wrong I think that Tena Lady jumps in and sponsors Atlant Ocean Racing to set up this female only team is great but having heard some of the stories of behind the scenes in the boat development just is worrying and I just hope sincerely the sponsor does not get burned in this case.

Furthermore I hope it won't be too long before we can ignore this "women only" story, it'd be nice to just regard them as one of the teams. And congrats to Richard Brisius for getting some starting money sorted.

#10 corkob

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 10:54 PM

How about Ellen MacArthur for skipper......If she could be coaxed out of Retirement. Tough fast and experienced, she would have to be a favorite for any female team. Holds numerous world sailing records. She's even fast in a car.... Broke the Top Gear lap record as "star in a reasonably priced car". She would have immense kudos.

#11 Moonduster

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Posted 21 August 2012 - 11:09 PM

It's relatively rare that the skills that make for a successful solo career translate that well into running a massive fully crewed media intensive affair. I question whether either Sam or Ellen would really be interested in entering the melee that is the Volvo ...

#12 mr_ryano

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 01:17 AM

It's relatively rare that the skills that make for a successful solo career translate that well into running a massive fully crewed media intensive affair. I question whether either Sam or Ellen would really be interested in entering the melee that is the Volvo ...


Yeah, it really sucked for Cammas

#13 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 03:34 AM

With the crew reduced on the men-only boats, the advantage of the two extra bodies the girls will get could be substantial, especially on long legs.

I dig the woody look.

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#14 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 03:36 AM


It's relatively rare that the skills that make for a successful solo career translate that well into running a massive fully crewed media intensive affair. I question whether either Sam or Ellen would really be interested in entering the melee that is the Volvo ...


Yeah, it really sucked for Cammas


:P

Sam is running a pretty low budget Vendee - I imagine she'd love the chance to run a team and an opportunity to take on the challenge...for the right price! I'd imagine Ellen would never happen. Dee is a great person and a natural leader, and strong like bull. Need some serious muscles on these girls, but then again, there are some nice...um...frames on those Swedish sailor chicks.

#15 Jason AUS

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 07:00 AM



It's relatively rare that the skills that make for a successful solo career translate that well into running a massive fully crewed media intensive affair. I question whether either Sam or Ellen would really be interested in entering the melee that is the Volvo ...


Yeah, it really sucked for Cammas


:P

Sam is running a pretty low budget Vendee - I imagine she'd love the chance to run a team and an opportunity to take on the challenge...for the right price! I'd imagine Ellen would never happen. Dee is a great person and a natural leader, and strong like bull. Need some serious muscles on these girls, but then again, there are some nice...um...frames on those Swedish sailor chicks.


What about Liz Wardley? ex Amer Sports and the ultimate "pocket rocket." I'd argue that she is, in fact, harder than nails.

#16 Moonduster

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 07:17 AM

Alan,

Always good to know we can count on you for being a sexist, useless jerk

#17 corkob

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 07:41 AM

How about Tamara Echegoyen. Maybe not as skipper, but would be a big asset for in ports

#18 Navigare

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 11:47 AM

One or more of Anna Kjellberg, Malin Källström and Lotta Harrysson should be qualified.
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#19 nkb

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 11:52 AM

Miranda Merron?

and Emma Creighton?


There are plenty of great candidates out there....

#20 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 02:13 PM



#21 Left Hook

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 02:23 PM

Make it Dawn!

#22 jesposito

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 02:45 PM

Make it Dawn!

Stop sucking up so you can get a ride at Oakcliff!

#23 mr_ryano

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 05:12 PM

Lisa MacDonald would be a good place to start.

So the next race is off and running, and a good shift in demographics hopefully helps everyone else looking for the big check. Atlant usually runs 2-boat teams. Might they have a mens team coming to train with the girls?

#24 dumper

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 08:52 PM

any idea when the first vod65 will be on the water?

#25 pslsail22

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 01:39 PM

I am super exited for the all women's team. It is great to have them back in the Volvo. I think if this is a sign of the type of teams we are going to be getting with the 65' then I defiantly think the OD boat is great. I hope this leads to there being maybe a youth team and other types of teams that are out of the usual. Anyone heard if any of this years skippers besides Sanderson are coming back or have expressed interest?

#26 Heriberto

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Posted 23 August 2012 - 11:14 PM

One design paying dividends. This is great news.


Please pass the bong.

One "women's" team is "paying dividends"? Newsflash - THEY ARE THE ONLY ANNOUNCED TEAM. Meanwhile, if you read Seahorse, Telefonica, and the entire Spanish sailing establishment are PISSED, Groupama is OUT, and apparently not pleased either, Puma is SILENT, and last word from Ken is "yuk", Camper and Abu Dhabi also, SILENT. Nobody who is a current or past factor has blessed this, much less announced they have bought in. Mike Sanderson thinks it's a good idea because it dumbs down the technical, more than financial requirements, how sad is that? Then his support could primarily be put down to trying to sell it to his Chinese clients.

Paying dividends? Only if you are Knut's lap puppy would you say that at this point in time.

Don't get me wrong, It's a good thing to have women sailing, All for that, but having a "women's" team has always been basically a gimmick, it's like Billie Jean King against whatever that chucklehead was, an outdated construct. I would be more impressed by a mixed team scenario, or a crew limit or fabrication where men and women are equally valued as crew.

#27 corkob

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 12:32 AM

Telefonica and the entire Spanish  sailing establishment are pissed because they didn't win, Groupama are out because they're broke. As for the rest, the last race is just finished..... Give it a rest Herby Berto. It's happening whether you like it or not. Done deal, get over it. Close competition, which by it's nature one design will promote, will surely make the next race exciting. It wasn't much fun in 2008 /2009 when Ericsson had the thing won half way round. The close competition in 2010/11 was brilliant. Would have been even better if Abu and Sanya had been in the running. I think the female team will add a further dimension. Looking forward already.

#28 pslsail22

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 01:11 AM


One design paying dividends. This is great news.




Mike Sanderson thinks it's a good idea because it dumbs down the technical, more than financial requirements, how sad is that? Then his support could primarily be put down to trying to sell it to his Chinese clients.




Ok so you do know that he has WON this race in the Volvo 70. So yeah pretty sure he is good at technical stuff. He got in the game late this year and thus had a slow boat. But I would check your facts before saying incorrect things.

#29 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 02:05 AM


One design paying dividends. This is great news.


Please pass the bong.

One "women's" team is "paying dividends"? Newsflash - THEY ARE THE ONLY ANNOUNCED TEAM. Meanwhile, if you read Seahorse, Telefonica, and the entire Spanish sailing establishment are PISSED, Groupama is OUT, and apparently not pleased either, Puma is SILENT, and last word from Ken is "yuk", Camper and Abu Dhabi also, SILENT. Nobody who is a current or past factor has blessed this, much less announced they have bought in. Mike Sanderson thinks it's a good idea because it dumbs down the technical, more than financial requirements, how sad is that? Then his support could primarily be put down to trying to sell it to his Chinese clients.

Paying dividends? Only if you are Knut's lap puppy would you say that at this point in time.

Don't get me wrong, It's a good thing to have women sailing, All for that, but having a "women's" team has always been basically a gimmick, it's like Billie Jean King against whatever that chucklehead was, an outdated construct. I would be more impressed by a mixed team scenario, or a crew limit or fabrication where men and women are equally valued as crew.


The first women's team in a decade and you think that isn't a big benefit? Clueless. I dig one-design, and I support it completely. Strange that it makes me "Knut's Lap Puppy" in your eyes especially as I have offered more criticism of the VOR under Knut than anyone writing anything, but then again I wouldn't expect any less from you.

Just so you know the real story behind what you glean from what you read: Spain is fucked beyond economic belief, and the only reason there was a team this time is the King gave Tele an offer they couldn't refuse. That's exactly what it took. Groupama is one of three huge French sponsors that have left sailing and most of their big sponsorship deals, because France is almost as fucked as Spain. I imagine you wouldn't have missed Seahorse telling you about Veolia and Foncia leaving the sport too. Puma was out long ago, wouldn't have been in this one if Berg didn't pick up almost half the cost, and they've moved on to bigger spends with the Cup. And the fact that you think an all-chicks team is a gimmick? I'll just leave that one here so we can revisit it at a later date.

#30 thetruth

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 06:48 AM

How low can Volvo go. History tells us and current events tell us. Fuck me talk about flogging a horse..........................

#31 Heriberto

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 09:35 AM



One design paying dividends. This is great news.




Mike Sanderson thinks it's a good idea because it dumbs down the technical, more than financial requirements, how sad is that? Then his support could primarily be put down to trying to sell it to his Chinese clients.




Ok so you do know that he has WON this race in the Volvo 70. So yeah pretty sure he is good at technical stuff. He got in the game late this year and thus had a slow boat. But I would check your facts before saying incorrect things.


Yes, I knew that. His interview in September Seahorse Moose specifically talks about both the financial AND technical hurdles being an obstacle to new boat entries. He sees it as an advantage that an OD program removes almost all of the technical hurdle. It removes the advantage of past (or future) team's technological advances, i.e. dumbs it down.

Not saying it's a bad thing to have a women's team, but yes it's a gimmick, just like having an under 25 boat, "all Canadian" boat or anything else like that. Otherwise, why are they doing it? Because it is the best way to win? I want more women in the sport, and think a more legitimate way to do it is maybe even require a certain percentage of women crew. Just ask yourself, even without a single other team being named, do you believe this team will be the odds on favorite to win? Yeah, ok.

Are the Spanish pissed about this? Why shouldn't they be, they got done about as dirty as you can get. Completely shut out in a backroom done deal after everything they (yes "The King", correction) have done for the Volvo. I don't exactly know how you can spin that Groupama, Puma, Telefonica, Ericsson, Berg, etc. are down and/or out and not coming back is somehow a "good" thing?

"It's happening", yes, well, when some serious contenders step up then you can say that. Facts not yet in evidence. While this is a welcome development, it's pretty minor compared to everything else that is falling out right now. I'm sorry I'm not drinking the koolaid, being a booster, all that, sorry to throw the wet blanket of actual reality on.


The truth hurts. The anarchy hurts.

#32 Heriberto

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 10:21 AM



One design paying dividends. This is great news.


Please pass the bong.

One "women's" team is "paying dividends"? Newsflash - THEY ARE THE ONLY ANNOUNCED TEAM. Meanwhile, if you read Seahorse, Telefonica, and the entire Spanish sailing establishment are PISSED, Groupama is OUT, and apparently not pleased either, Puma is SILENT, and last word from Ken is "yuk", Camper and Abu Dhabi also, SILENT. Nobody who is a current or past factor has blessed this, much less announced they have bought in. Mike Sanderson thinks it's a good idea because it dumbs down the technical, more than financial requirements, how sad is that? Then his support could primarily be put down to trying to sell it to his Chinese clients.

Paying dividends? Only if you are Knut's lap puppy would you say that at this point in time.

Don't get me wrong, It's a good thing to have women sailing, All for that, but having a "women's" team has always been basically a gimmick, it's like Billie Jean King against whatever that chucklehead was, an outdated construct. I would be more impressed by a mixed team scenario, or a crew limit or fabrication where men and women are equally valued as crew.


The first women's team in a decade and you think that isn't a big benefit? Clueless. I dig one-design, and I support it completely. Strange that it makes me "Knut's Lap Puppy" in your eyes especially as I have offered more criticism of the VOR under Knut than anyone writing anything, but then again I wouldn't expect any less from you.

Just so you know the real story behind what you glean from what you read: Spain is fucked beyond economic belief, and the only reason there was a team this time is the King gave Tele an offer they couldn't refuse. That's exactly what it took. Groupama is one of three huge French sponsors that have left sailing and most of their big sponsorship deals, because France is almost as fucked as Spain. I imagine you wouldn't have missed Seahorse telling you about Veolia and Foncia leaving the sport too. Puma was out long ago, wouldn't have been in this one if Berg didn't pick up almost half the cost, and they've moved on to bigger spends with the Cup. And the fact that you think an all-chicks team is a gimmick? I'll just leave that one here so we can revisit it at a later date.


Look, I understand you want this to succeed, but "paying dividends"? Come on. Seriously?

As for whether it's a gimmick, well, I'm not calling them an "all-chick" team, or talking about their "Swedish frames", so I guess I'm being disrespectful? The question is whether or not the Volvo is Grand Prix racing, or an adventure reality TV show. If it is the former, it's a gimmick to do anything other than bringing the best team possible, if it is the later, all fair game, just more spectacle. Is this going to be the best team possible? Well, they just excluded 50% of the talent pool, but then again, maybe so. We can revisit that at a later date when they name the team.

#33 winchfodder

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 03:07 PM



One design paying dividends. This is great news.


Please pass the bong.

One "women's" team is "paying dividends"? Newsflash - THEY ARE THE ONLY ANNOUNCED TEAM. Meanwhile, if you read Seahorse, Telefonica, and the entire Spanish sailing establishment are PISSED, Groupama is OUT, and apparently not pleased either, Puma is SILENT, and last word from Ken is "yuk", Camper and Abu Dhabi also, SILENT. Nobody who is a current or past factor has blessed this, much less announced they have bought in. Mike Sanderson thinks it's a good idea because it dumbs down the technical, more than financial requirements, how sad is that? Then his support could primarily be put down to trying to sell it to his Chinese clients.

Paying dividends? Only if you are Knut's lap puppy would you say that at this point in time.

Don't get me wrong, It's a good thing to have women sailing, All for that, but having a "women's" team has always been basically a gimmick, it's like Billie Jean King against whatever that chucklehead was, an outdated construct. I would be more impressed by a mixed team scenario, or a crew limit or fabrication where men and women are equally valued as crew.


The first women's team in a decade and you think that isn't a big benefit? Clueless. I dig one-design, and I support it completely. Strange that it makes me "Knut's Lap Puppy" in your eyes especially as I have offered more criticism of the VOR under Knut than anyone writing anything, but then again I wouldn't expect any less from you.

Just so you know the real story behind what you glean from what you read: Spain is fucked beyond economic belief, and the only reason there was a team this time is the King gave Tele an offer they couldn't refuse. That's exactly what it took. Groupama is one of three huge French sponsors that have left sailing and most of their big sponsorship deals, because France is almost as fucked as Spain. I imagine you wouldn't have missed Seahorse telling you about Veolia and Foncia leaving the sport too. Puma was out long ago, wouldn't have been in this one if Berg didn't pick up almost half the cost, and they've moved on to bigger spends with the Cup. And the fact that you think an all-chicks team is a gimmick? I'll just leave that one here so we can revisit it at a later date.


Yep, pass that Bong to Knut. The girlie boat is most probably a swedish/volvo stitch up to try and get the ball rolling. Let alone no boats interested, the ports are dropping away as well. Who would ante up $4 million plus for the privelege of hosting five or six boats for a week. Just does not add up. Galway organisers are desperately to get govt funding, but just can't see it a third time.

http://galwayindepen...-bid-stalemate-

#34 bombarie

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Posted 24 August 2012 - 07:12 PM

Not sure it doesn't add up. From the VOR site:

In May 2009 over 600,000 supporters visited the race village during the stopover, with the crowd peaking at 62,000 people on the In-Port Race day alone. The seaside resort of Salthill drew a further 120,000 visitors to watch the dramatic close-combat race from the shoreline.

Say they all drink two pints of Guinness, eat something, park their car. So each visitor spends EUR 10. That's EUR 7.2 MM of revenue for the region. Typical gross margin in the F&B business is 66%, so the "region" packs about EUR 4.5 MM in income (profit and wages). So it evens about out, and pays future dividends in brand name.

And, if Knut pulls this one of, we won't have 5 / 6 yachts pulling into harbor, put perhaps as much as 12 / 15 (okay this is wishful thinking but hey). Bigger spectacle, more people. Doesn't look like a total waste of money to me.

(But if I were an Irish politician, I would spend the scarce EUROs left elsewhere, and ask the local community to take this one on, if they think it is worth it).

#35 roca

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 01:35 PM

One design paying dividends. This is great news.


I do not see how this team decision can be related to the new OD boat. It is the crew numbers' rule who can have affected. I bet they would have done the same on a VO 70 with 2 more crew than other teams. no particular reason for the new boat being interesting for a female crew.


Ok so you do know that he has WON this race in the Volvo 70. So yeah pretty sure he is good at technical stuff. He got in the game late this year and thus had a slow boat. But I would check your facts before saying incorrect things.


I do not think he would have supported a OD VOR back in the days when he had the only 2 boats program, the earliest program and the biggest budget and the fastest boat. He did never complain about not being able to win that race with a boat performing as his competitors.

#36 dogwatch

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 02:41 PM

The question is whether or not the Volvo is Grand Prix racing, or an adventure reality TV show.


False dichotomy. In order to have the first - at least in a sponsor-funded model - you also have to have the second and in a way that doesn't undermine the first. That's the circle that must be squared.

#37 dogwatch

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 02:45 PM

Say they all drink two pints of Guinness, eat something, park their car. So each visitor spends EUR 10. That's EUR 7.2 MM of revenue for the region. Typical gross margin in the F&B business is 66%, so the "region" packs about EUR 4.5 MM in income (profit and wages). So it evens about out, and pays future dividends in brand name.


Betcha there are 50 non-sailing proposals on the table that project ROI a whole lot better than just "evening out".

#38 dogwatch

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 02:52 PM

Are the Spanish pissed about this? Why shouldn't they be, they got done about as dirty as you can get. Completely shut out in a backroom done deal after everything they (yes "The King", correction) have done for the Volvo.


Yeah well join the club. The Brits started it. Ran it for years. Now we don't even get a stop-over. "Anglo-Saxon dominated" is the biggest load of bollox going. It's a commercial event, that's the way it goes, get used to it.

#39 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 02:55 PM

I do not see how this team decision can be related to the new OD boat. It is the crew numbers' rule who can have affected. I bet they would have done the same on a VO 70 with 2 more crew than other teams. no particular reason for the new boat being interesting for a female crew.



The same rule was in effect last time.

#40 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 02:57 PM


The question is whether or not the Volvo is Grand Prix racing, or an adventure reality TV show.


False dichotomy. In order to have the first - at least in a sponsor-funded model - you also have to have the second and in a way that doesn't undermine the first. That's the circle that must be squared.


I know that I am a lifelong F-1 fan in large part because of the heady 'reality show' days of Senna and Mansell and Prost, and because of the drama that Eccelstone's wars brought to the game. It's exactly what the ACWS is missing; personality and drama - or more importantly, someone getting the story out.

#41 smackdaddy

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Posted 27 August 2012 - 07:36 PM



The question is whether or not the Volvo is Grand Prix racing, or an adventure reality TV show.


False dichotomy. In order to have the first - at least in a sponsor-funded model - you also have to have the second and in a way that doesn't undermine the first. That's the circle that must be squared.


I know that I am a lifelong F-1 fan in large part because of the heady 'reality show' days of Senna and Mansell and Prost, and because of the drama that Eccelstone's wars brought to the game. It's exactly what the ACWS is missing; personality and drama - or more importantly, someone getting the story out.


Stay tuned.

#42 roca

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Posted 28 August 2012 - 09:32 AM


I do not see how this team decision can be related to the new OD boat. It is the crew numbers' rule who can have affected. I bet they would have done the same on a VO 70 with 2 more crew than other teams. no particular reason for the new boat being interesting for a female crew.



The same rule was in effect last time.


A new team for this edition doesn't necessarily imply they did not apprciate the race race 3 years ago. It is like pretending that groupama entered last edition because there were no 2 boats programs anymore. I really do not see the reason to credit this new team entry to OD. Costs will not change much than what was this last edition. The boat in the end will be harder than last time, even for women (tougher to sail the vo65 in 10 than the vo70 in 12). This managing team has experience in managing the most complex programs, design and building and logistics (erikson 2 boats program and in house building ). They have a strong record in results with these complexity. I really do not see any advantge in OD for them.

#43 skipper734

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 03:46 PM

Just an excuse to practise their skills. Posted Image

#44 roca

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 11:22 AM

Yacht Club Costa Smeralda said they are valuating an entry under the glorious "azzurra" name. Mainly italians with some of the old dogs of the race. checking for sponsors, meeting with knut in short...

#45 mr_ryano

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 06:21 PM

Yacht Club Costa Smeralda said they are valuating an entry under the glorious "azzurra" name. Mainly italians with some of the old dogs of the race. checking for sponsors, meeting with knut in short...


Rumor was around for the last race too. Soldini even bought the old E3, but couldn't secure sponsorship. That was in the glory days of the Italian economy compared to now..

#46 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 04:26 AM

Yeah but Soldini's issue was baggage, not the commercial market.

Azzurra has some real money behind it. Not sure whether they have the long term will to be in the VOR, but they do have cash and a few Whitbread/VOR vets in the family.

#47 hermitCrab

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Posted 11 September 2012 - 06:58 PM

Yeah but Soldini's issue was baggage, not the commercial market.

Azzurra has some real money behind it. Not sure whether they have the long term will to be in the VOR, but they do have cash and a few Whitbread/VOR vets in the family.


Baggage? Meaning...?

#48 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 04:34 AM

Baggage, meaning he has some past big name sponsors that weren't happy with him.

#49 hermitCrab

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 06:03 PM

Baggage, meaning he has some past big name sponsors that weren't happy with him.


I'm sure there is a story there, of which I'm unaware, illustrating the relative value to sponsors of showmanship versus winning sailboat races. One strains to imagine Soldini, in a tux, standing on his keel bulb. But it's a different topic for a different thread. Or is it?

#50 DtM

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 06:25 PM

Many have said it before and at length. It is about ROI nothing more or less.

There are plenty of great crews for these boats that is not an issue.

#51 mr_ryano

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Posted 12 September 2012 - 08:50 PM

Many have said it before and at length. It is about ROI nothing more or less.

There are plenty of great crews for these boats that is not an issue.


+1, and a new one design does little in the greater scheme of things to fix the corporate ROI problem. Anyone looking at campaign costs alone is really missing the boat.

#52 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 05:46 AM

As I have written before, I tend to think that the one design does address ROI in a useful manner. ROI for sponsors can often be measured in the amount of media coverage their team gets, which is often as simple as counting the number of times their corporate logo appears in press coverage, and aggregate on screen time their logo appears in video coverage. If we consider the race coverage as a zero sum game, the use of a OD boat will have the effect of evening out the coverage and brand exposure - simply because coverage tends to concentrate on the winner or leaders. A OD design boat means teams start out with much more even chances of getting coverage. Thus sponsors can feel more secure that they will get a reasonable share of coverage - and thus a more clear ROI. This is simple risk management. When the boats are a development class sponsors have less assurance - they may get more, they may get a lot less, and it becomes harder to make an ROI assessment ahead of time. The other effect is less clear - will the OD boat lead to a more exciting race to follow? If it does then overall race coverage and exposure will increase, and the game isn't zero sum, there is actually a bigger pie to go around. The MOD70 race produced extraordinary racing. The last VOR produced some great finishes - but not of the same tightness as the MOD70 - and when it did I think it is reasonable to say general interest rose. So there is a good chance that a OD VOR will also create a better level of interest and coverage due to tighter racing. So in both ways a reasonable case can be made that a OD class will directly benefit ROI.

The OD class also provides a more assured cost base. One might argue that the cost may or may not be that much different to a VO70, but the cost is known ahead of putting together a campaign, so sponsors can be given a much clearer idea of what a team will need early in the game. This of itself does not improve ROI, but it does make it a lot easier to reason about ROI, and whether sponsorship makes sense. The OD design brings lower logistic costs, with shared spare parts inventory, so sponsors are more assured that there is less likelihood of sudden unwelcome requests for more money to do things like fly masts half way around the planet, or rebuild a custom rigging package. All this should help sponsors feel that the value proposition that sponsorship provides is much less risky than it was with a development class. Corporate mangers are usually much less worried about the absolute amount of money as the possibility that the demands for money are ongoing and hard to plan for. We heard a few times in the last race about "understanding and supportive" sponsors. Which is code for, "we needed another million to fix the boat, and they coughed up." In hard times it is that which will scare sponsors off. An open ended money siphon that reduces their ROI in an uncontrolled manner.

#53 Clovis

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 02:39 PM

Thanks Francis. Very clear and convincing.

#54 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 03:44 PM

Thanks Francis. Very clear and convincing.

Gosh, thanks. :wub:

I should add that there is a clear underlying issue in mr_ryano's post and what others have raised with ROI that I have not addressed. That is simply: what is the basic ROI benefit in the first place? My point above was that I think the OD boat helps not hinders in a lot of small but useful ways. But the elephant in the room remains. What is the core ROI proposition that you take to any sponsor? If it is poor, my reasons that an OD boat help are starting with too low a base, and probably don't improve things enough to really matter. Ocean racing is always going to be hard. And ordinary sports don't provide enough commonality to give guidance. I doubt anyone really understands how to make it work properly at the moment. But that should not stop people trying. Personally I think really well integrated internet based coverage may be the way. But it needs much better than the current 3 hour updates and idiotic suppression of strategic information from the teams.

#55 DickDastardly

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Posted 13 September 2012 - 11:33 PM


Thanks Francis. Very clear and convincing.

Gosh, thanks. :wub:

I should add that there is a clear underlying issue in mr_ryano's post and what others have raised with ROI that I have not addressed. That is simply: what is the basic ROI benefit in the first place? My point above was that I think the OD boat helps not hinders in a lot of small but useful ways. But the elephant in the room remains. What is the core ROI proposition that you take to any sponsor? If it is poor, my reasons that an OD boat help are starting with too low a base, and probably don't improve things enough to really matter. Ocean racing is always going to be hard. And ordinary sports don't provide enough commonality to give guidance. I doubt anyone really understands how to make it work properly at the moment. But that should not stop people trying. Personally I think really well integrated internet based coverage may be the way. But it needs much better than the current 3 hour updates and idiotic suppression of strategic information from the teams.

I was just about to respond similarly. ROI as measured by exposure is one thing - but there are kajillions of ways for a brand to gain exposure these days, many better than through an ocean racae. ROI is by definition a financial metric, thus the conversion to EBIT needs to be factored in at some point. That means how much "exposure" is actually and measurably converted to profitable sales, and how does that happen? "Feel Good" factor from brand exposure is limited these days. I've heard of research that plots the number of brand exposures the average consumer gets per day over time and the numbers are astonishing. It's measured in the many thousands per day now, so given that a consumer driven ROI case based on exposure is pretty ropey. B2B is an altogether different story, however. ROI for in-port activity is often taken to be related to the value of sales gained by sponsors through the various hospitality efforts at each stopover - to the extent that this is quantifiable. In terms of B2B ROI for a team sponsor, however, I'd imagine that's another set of thinking.

#56 mr_ryano

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 02:18 PM

B2B is the only real, proven way to sell this event to a sponsor. As such, you need a sponsor that has clients in most of the stopover areas, or really wants to do business there. Problem is, B2B is expensive, and needs to be added to the total budget of the program. Worse, B2B can't be amortized in the way the sporting program can, so you need a few really big checks to be written. if you look at Ericcson, for example, the B2B spend was greater than the sailing program spend....

#57 roca

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 05:45 PM

As I have written before, I tend to think that the one design does address ROI in a useful manner. ROI for sponsors can often be measured in the amount of media coverage their team gets, which is often as simple as counting the number of times their corporate logo appears in press coverage, and aggregate on screen time their logo appears in video coverage. If we consider the race coverage as a zero sum game, the use of a OD boat will have the effect of evening out the coverage and brand exposure - simply because coverage tends to concentrate on the winner or leaders. A OD design boat means teams start out with much more even chances of getting coverage. Thus sponsors can feel more secure that they will get a reasonable share of coverage - and thus a more clear ROI. This is simple risk management. When the boats are a development class sponsors have less assurance - they may get more, they may get a lot less, and it becomes harder to make an ROI assessment ahead of time. The other effect is less clear - will the OD boat lead to a more exciting race to follow? If it does then overall race coverage and exposure will increase, and the game isn't zero sum, there is actually a bigger pie to go around. The MOD70 race produced extraordinary racing. The last VOR produced some great finishes - but not of the same tightness as the MOD70 - and when it did I think it is reasonable to say general interest rose. So there is a good chance that a OD VOR will also create a better level of interest and coverage due to tighter racing. So in both ways a reasonable case can be made that a OD class will directly benefit ROI.

The OD class also provides a more assured cost base. One might argue that the cost may or may not be that much different to a VO70, but the cost is known ahead of putting together a campaign, so sponsors can be given a much clearer idea of what a team will need early in the game. This of itself does not improve ROI, but it does make it a lot easier to reason about ROI, and whether sponsorship makes sense. The OD design brings lower logistic costs, with shared spare parts inventory, so sponsors are more assured that there is less likelihood of sudden unwelcome requests for more money to do things like fly masts half way around the planet, or rebuild a custom rigging package. All this should help sponsors feel that the value proposition that sponsorship provides is much less risky than it was with a development class. Corporate mangers are usually much less worried about the absolute amount of money as the possibility that the demands for money are ongoing and hard to plan for. We heard a few times in the last race about "understanding and supportive" sponsors. Which is code for, "we needed another million to fix the boat, and they coughed up." In hard times it is that which will scare sponsors off. An open ended money siphon that reduces their ROI in an uncontrolled manner.


Sorry Frances but most of your assumptions are not proven at all and you might confuse other users as our friend Clovis.
It is not proven that OD adresses ROI in a positive way.
It is not true that in OD " teams start out with much more even chances of getting coverage".
it is not true that level in OD is always more balanced. It is not true that even if chances prove to be even, they create interest and coverage. On the contrary it would be very easy to prove that differencies create interest and coverage and chances and return.
It is not true that "OD class also provides a more assured cost base".
At this point it is very uncertain the cost of a winning campaign, as they all said (JK interview for example, finns designs for example) a certain amount of customisation on the boat is always possible in it can turn very expensive. There is no clear way of how the sail programs will be managed and at which cost and how. In my opinion there has never been such a confused idea of which is the needed budget to be able to win the race as now.
More, it is not proven that OD boats should break less.

#58 Clovis

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 10:50 PM

Sorry Frances but most of your assumptions are not proven at all and you might confuse other users as our friend Clovis.


Thanks for your concern Roca :)
What I meant is that I have read many negative opinions, but this was the first time I read something positive about the OD that was clear and logical, and went beyond "OD is cool cuz it makes for tighter racing".
And I think that Frances' points may not be proven, but it's not proven either that they are wrong. In any case the VOR had to change something major in order to survive. We may not approve of the way they did it, but at least they are trying.

#59 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 01:42 AM

It is not proven that OD adresses ROI in a positive way.
It is not true that in OD " teams start out with much more even chances of getting coverage".
It is not true that "OD class also provides a more assured cost base".


Oh come one. I write "I think" and you say I wrote "it is proven." Of course it isn't proven, the race hasn't happened. Nor do any of your assertions that it will end in ruin have any greater validity. I do try to cast my ideas in the light of corporate reality. But hey are all opinions. I say that a boat that has a known purchase price provides a more assured cost base, and you say that that can't be true. How does within the scope of all the costs of running a team, having an item that accounts for about one third of the cost being fixed ahead of time not improve things? I didn't say it fixes the team costs I said it makes it "more assured". "More" does not mean "totally".

My point remains. There is very good reason to believe that all sponsors will have much less money to throw around. The idea that there is some team that will be given an open chequebook to blitz the field is fanciful. Sure, if there is one, they may still win. But with a OD boat they will find it harder. All the other points about how unlimited money will win were true last race. And it didn't work out that way did it? No matter what, a OD boat reduces the scope for unlimited money to steamroller the field. And with the very unlikely chance that there will be unlimited money things will be much tighter again.

#60 Potter

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 09:17 AM

Actually it is absolutely true that a OD provides a more assured cost base, the key word being base. It is then up to the teams to decide if they want to spend millions looking for design advantages and fighting the class rules, or to concentrate on going sailing and finding out how to make the boat go fast. In fact, in the next addition that will be aarticularly true, as there is not a lot of time, however the edition after will be a different matter.
A team can be on the water with a competitive boat and team for €15 million, last time that was only possible by a team like TNZ that already had a lot of infrastructure in place. Obviously if a team is able to find more then they can spend that money and hopefully find an edge.
In the last edition Groupama spent significantly more than any other team (Franck has admitted to €17million..PER ANNUM for 3 years!), and they won; but half way around you may not have put your money on that (although they were my favourites at the beginning). So was the money wisely spent, well maybe not, because it would appear that the reason they won had more to do with the team and the leadership than any percentage gain in design. Certainly they had a lot of time to train, and yet were not the fastest on the water at the start of the race.

#61 roca

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 11:16 AM


It is not proven that OD adresses ROI in a positive way.
It is not true that in OD " teams start out with much more even chances of getting coverage".
It is not true that "OD class also provides a more assured cost base".


Oh come one. I write "I think" and you say I wrote "it is proven." Of course it isn't proven, the race hasn't happened. Nor do any of your assertions that it will end in ruin have any greater validity. I do try to cast my ideas in the light of corporate reality. But hey are all opinions. I say that a boat that has a known purchase price provides a more assured cost base, and you say that that can't be true. How does within the scope of all the costs of running a team, having an item that accounts for about one third of the cost being fixed ahead of time not improve things? I didn't say it fixes the team costs I said it makes it "more assured". "More" does not mean "totally".

My point remains. There is very good reason to believe that all sponsors will have much less money to throw around. The idea that there is some team that will be given an open chequebook to blitz the field is fanciful. Sure, if there is one, they may still win. But with a OD boat they will find it harder. All the other points about how unlimited money will win were true last race. And it didn't work out that way did it? No matter what, a OD boat reduces the scope for unlimited money to steamroller the field. And with the very unlikely chance that there will be unlimited money things will be much tighter again.


I am sorry but if you read back your posts it is clear that "you think" that " OD does address ROI in a useful manner"; based on the facts that " teams start out with much more even chances of getting coverage" and "OD class also provides a more assured cost base". these were presented as obvious facts on which build a logic. But they are not facts, sorry, just very weak opinions (funny thing is that even if they were true the logic on ROI doesn't work either ;) ).
And I did not make any assertion that it will end in ruin, here. It must be your logic working...

#62 roca

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 11:52 AM

Actually it is absolutely true that a OD provides a more assured cost base, the key word being base. It is then up to the teams to decide if they want to spend millions looking for design advantages and fighting the class rules, or to concentrate on going sailing and finding out how to make the boat go fast. In fact, in the next addition that will be aarticularly true, as there is not a lot of time, however the edition after will be a different matter.
A team can be on the water with a competitive boat and team for €15 million, last time that was only possible by a team like TNZ that already had a lot of infrastructure in place. Obviously if a team is able to find more then they can spend that money and hopefully find an edge.
In the last edition Groupama spent significantly more than any other team (Franck has admitted to €17million..PER ANNUM for 3 years!), and they won; but half way around you may not have put your money on that (although they were my favourites at the beginning). So was the money wisely spent, well maybe not, because it would appear that the reason they won had more to do with the team and the leadership than any percentage gain in design. Certainly they had a lot of time to train, and yet were not the fastest on the water at the start of the race.


I am sorry but I really do not see were the OD big difference is, even with VO70 you could easily have a "normal competitive" team with 15 millions, being a well known class. And even in OD if a team comes with 55 millions he will be even stronger than GPMA compared to the others.

In my opinion with OD they just lost huge chances of building stories, news, interest, surprises, curiosity and so on. It is like building the new "big brother" tv show with 8 twins in the house, try selling this to magnolia and see the result.
Costs will not change much, probably this time cold have been cheaper with VO70 at fourth round, next race might be cheaper. It depends also a lot on the sails decisions. GPMA spent less than 5 millions for the building of the new boat, the other 50 in other activities which might be similar in next OD edition. And the cost of the new OD boat is similar to that cost, by the way.

The last editions of the race should have thought that main factor to perform in this race is time, the team winning has always been the team who started first and managed the program professionally with the right time. This obviously went toghether with big budgets but AD proves that money is not the main point, the main point is time on the water, development of sails etc. This is also the problem which in my opinion did never really made clear if an old gen boat could have been competittive in VO70. you cannot do well at volvo in a hurry, neither low budget like Sanderson nor with huge money like AD.
I still think that an old gen boat could have been competitive if run in a team starting early, with the right time to test, train etc. I would really be curious to know what GPMA think was the performance gap between the two hulls and if it is true that they thought of racing the old boat for a while.

I do not even think that th OD decision is the worst one, the most stupid is for sure the 8 crew!

#63 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 15 September 2012 - 02:13 PM

but if you read back your posts it is clear that "you think"

Ugh, yes, that is what I wrote. I wrote "I tend to think". It was you that went on about things being "proven" or not, not me. Maybe it is cultural, but when I write "I tend to think" it means it is about as low key an opinion as I can give without being actually negative. I'm not sure how to indicate anything less strong. These are opinions in a discussion. Rather what forums are for.

I don't have any insight into how the VOR teams pitch things to their potential sponsors. I do however have a background where I have been involved in pitching fairly large money projects to government and large organisations. And a couple of things always turn out to be important, more important than many might imagine. One, management of risk. How close to the pitched outcomes are things likely to be? It doesn't matter if the outcomes are modest, it matters that there are few surprises. Second, is this all the money you need? You can be guaranteed that somewhere in accounting or finance management someone will ask this. Different organisations work differently, but all like to be able to plan. Accounting will say "You need 17 million Euros each year for 3 years, fine, but please don't come back in the second year asking for an extra five." Obviously there is wiggle room, but in the end a pitch will always find its mark better if it presents a clear and well specified programme, with clear attainable outcomes and without an open ended need for money. My concern is that the basic 15 million Euro teams are able to flourish, and can believe that they can be competitive. Anything that makes their life easier is going to help the race as a whole. I don't really care what the mega money teams (if there are any next time) do.

I think were we do agree is that the real key to winning is in the people. Which is where it should be. Clear high quality professional management, and starting early. It is a great shame that a previous generation boat never got a proper run at the race. Delta Lloyd and Sanya were both last minute underfunded teams. There is no doubt that VOR management had high hopes that in the last race a second gen boat could be competitive. The two time experience of it just not happening must have figured into their decision to drop the VO70. But indeed, a well funded early starter team with good people could have been a totally different matter. Given that there will be at least two editions of the race with the VOD65, they are clearly hoping that one race old boats will race in the second edition, and provide a way for more teams with less money to get involved. Whether it works out or not we will see. But sadly I suspect that those teams that are well organised enough to get sailing early will be buying new boats, and it will again be late entry teams, starting on the back foot, that sail the old boats. But it might help bolster the fleet, which is still no bad thing.

I do not even think that th OD decision is the worst one, the most stupid is for sure the 8 crew!

Indeed. I just have a bad feeling about it. Of all the decisions made for the next race, that is the one that has for me the highest risk, and the least reward. And as above, risk is bad. Anywhere you can reduce risk you want to do it. You don't win the VOR by maxing out your risk. You win it with high quality management of everything, especially risk.

#64 mr_ryano

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Posted 17 September 2012 - 12:07 AM

There is a great article on yacht sponsorship in October's Seahorse. Anyone commenting on this thread should read as homework first

#65 jeronimo2

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 05:53 AM

any chance someone can post the article here?

#66 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 02:38 PM

B2B is the only real, proven way to sell this event to a sponsor.


Not sure where your data for this proof comes from, but after speaking to the top sponsorship folks from a number of companies at the last VOR stopovers, there are three definite goals for every sponsor there:

1) Internal corporate affairs (bringing your top 700 employees to Miami, for instance, and creating a year-long internal contest supporting this goal)
2) B2B
3) Media exposure/branding

It seems every company spending 7 figures on this race needs all three of these to function properly to make the sponsorship work.

As for B2B activation - or any activation for that matter - there are rules of thumb for expenditures, but the most common I've heard from Volvo, Berg, Telefonica, Ericcson, and a few others is 2:1 activation vs. sponsorship budget.

#67 mr_ryano

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 03:24 PM

I'd more or less agree. Companies tend to weight more towards 1 or 2. It's hard to do both well from a cost/logistics standpoint. That said, the kicker is that MARcom budgets and plans for many companies in 2013 are already in place. Activation takes a lot of money, and a very dedicated internal team to make it work. Coming in now, even if the proposal is great, rarely turns the ship of MARcom. VOR doesn't help anyone pounding the pavement because the route isn't announced yet. Hard to discuss a global strategy when you can't commit on where you're going.....

#68 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 06:17 PM

any chance someone can post the article here?

No. It is copyright content. All sorts of reasons flow from this.

A quick summary and comments - the article is written by Stewart Hosford, who is sailing programme manager for the Hugo Boss team. So already you can imagine that it isn't exactly traditional in its view of sponsorship.

He makes some very interesting points. Probably the main one is that sponsorship is a two way thing, and works as a partnership - which is manifested as the sponsor taking away more than the right to have their logo on your sails. The sponsor acquires the right to use your team's activities in their own marketing, and both your team and their marketing team should be expected to cooperate. In this context Hugo Boss (the boat/team) makes a lot of sense. They have made a feature of flying the flag of the brandname in unexpected places and ways. The article specifically notes the Abu Dhabi and Sanya sponsorships as part of the way forward. Here again there is a clear partnership - where the brand/sponsors are able to use the team's activities as part of their own marketing.

The article talks about ROI and lot, but also talks about replacing it in part with ROO (return of objectives). I remain very cynical about new metrics that are not easily quantifiable. ROO has no units. You can't measure it, and in the end it will need reducing to ROI to make sense. It just means that you need to work out what the objectives are worth, which any manager should be doing anyway, but right now the article says "they are not formally quantifiable financially" But the idea is probably more about casting a wider net on valuable deliverables than simple measured media exposure (the article says "they are at least as valuable as column inches ever were." I would imagine that B2B and internal affairs would have always figured here anyway. Part of the point made is that teams need to actually get the sponsors aboard, so they can taste what it is they are sponsoring, and maybe get some ideas as how to use it. The article notes the rise of social media and its apparent value as an example of an emergent ROO. I would suggest that the plummet in the value of Facebook and the slow realisation of the difficulty is measuring the value of idiotic things such as Facebook "likes" as a reason to be careful about abstract things like ROO without any reasonable way of valuing them. It reminds me of the race to the bottom we saw when market share was more important than actually making money, and companies simple bled themselves to death. Anyway, the article notes that the Hugo Boss sailing team are themselves working ways of providing justifiable metrics of objectives - which probably places then well ahead of the average sailing team's expertise.

The things I would take out of this is that some of the VOR teams (Abu Dhabi, Sanya) are already well down the path. Puma were making a show of pushing some of the ideas. Pirates were in some ways way ahead of the game. But the main thrust is that sponsorship needs to be a real partnership, and the sailing team needs to be able to provide the sponsor with much more than a floating billboard, actively participating in the sponsors own marketing. This requires getting involved with the sponsors own marketing team, and reaching the point where this team becomes a driver for, and an ally in sponsorship for the sailing team. There is a new level of professionalism in team management that implicitly comes here. These ideas make sense for fully professional teams, but whether they translate further down the feeding chain is another matter. It is possible that sponsors will simply start to expect this level of partnering from everyone.

The article is a bit annoying in that it reads like a condensation of a Powerpoint presentation, and has lots of broad brush points but little in the way of examples or specifics. A fair share of marketing jargon too. I would guess the author doesn't feel like sharing the really good ideas with potential rivals. Not that I can see every VOR team skipper posing for a keel walk in the next race.

#69 Left Hook

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 06:33 PM


any chance someone can post the article here?

No. It is copyright content. All sorts of reasons flow from this.

A quick summary and comments - the article is written by Stewart Hosford, who is sailing programme manager for the Hugo Boss team. So already you can imagine that it isn't exactly traditional in its view of sponsorship.

He makes some very interesting points. Probably the main one is that sponsorship is a two way thing, and works as a partnership - which is manifested as the sponsor taking away more than the right to have their logo on your sails. The sponsor acquires the right to use your team's activities in their own marketing, and both your team and their marketing team should be expected to cooperate. In this context Hugo Boss (the boat/team) makes a lot of sense. They have made a feature of flying the flag of the brandname in unexpected places and ways. The article specifically notes the Abu Dhabi and Sanya sponsorships as part of the way forward. Here again there is a clear partnership - where the brand/sponsors are able to use the team's activities as part of their own marketing.

The article talks about ROI and lot, but also talks about replacing it in part with ROO (return of objectives). I remain very cynical about new metrics that are not easily quantifiable. ROO has no units. You can't measure it, and in the end it will need reducing to ROI to make sense. It just means that you need to work out what the objectives are worth, which any manager should be doing anyway, but right now the article says "they are not formally quantifiable financially" But the idea is probably more about casting a wider net on valuable deliverables than simple measured media exposure (the article says "they are at least as valuable as column inches ever were." I would imagine that B2B and internal affairs would have always figured here anyway. Part of the point made is that teams need to actually get the sponsors aboard, so they can taste what it is they are sponsoring, and maybe get some ideas as how to use it. The article notes the rise of social media and its apparent value as an example of an emergent ROO. I would suggest that the plummet in the value of Facebook and the slow realisation of the difficulty is measuring the value of idiotic things such as Facebook "likes" as a reason to be careful about abstract things like ROO without any reasonable way of valuing them. It reminds me of the race to the bottom we saw when market share was more important than actually making money, and companies simple bled themselves to death. Anyway, the article notes that the Hugo Boss sailing team are themselves working ways of providing justifiable metrics of objectives - which probably places then well ahead of the average sailing team's expertise.

The things I would take out of this is that some of the VOR teams (Abu Dhabi, Sanya) are already well down the path. Puma were making a show of pushing some of the ideas. Pirates were in some ways way ahead of the game. But the main thrust is that sponsorship needs to be a real partnership, and the sailing team needs to be able to provide the sponsor with much more than a floating billboard, actively participating in the sponsors own marketing. This requires getting involved with the sponsors own marketing team, and reaching the point where this team becomes a driver for, and an ally in sponsorship for the sailing team. There is a new level of professionalism in team management that implicitly comes here. These ideas make sense for fully professional teams, but whether they translate further down the feeding chain is another matter. It is possible that sponsors will simply start to expect this level of partnering from everyone.

The article is a bit annoying in that it reads like a condensation of a Powerpoint presentation, and has lots of broad brush points but little in the way of examples or specifics. A fair share of marketing jargon too. I would guess the author doesn't feel like sharing the really good ideas with potential rivals. Not that I can see every VOR team skipper posing for a keel walk in the next race.


Wait, you're telling me that this hasn't been done in the past? Participating in a corporate sponsored racing team has made it clear that a two way relationship is the only way to make it work and that the value a sponsor gets from their investment is only marginally from the boat being out there on the racecourse (unless it's, say, quantum sails) but rather the way that they can work it into their own missions, goals and operations.

If teams in the past have just been sucking down sponsor money without really giving back and playing ball then of course it's not going to be a good investment.

#70 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 06:54 PM

I'm simply paraphrasing the article, with a few comments. I would agree that there isn't anything that hasn't been done before, but by the same token, I think there has been a lot of sucking down sponsor money for little return.

An earlier edition had an interview with Mike Sanderson, this quote is interesting: "The board of ABN Amro set out an interesting mindset when I sat in their boardroom years ago during my interview process. They made it very clear that for ABN to just win the points race for the VOR wasn't a success, they wanted to win the commercial race as well." This was in the context of the ROI that Sanya was providing, when it was known from the start that it was never going to be in contention for the race.

#71 jeronimo2

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Posted 18 September 2012 - 07:03 PM

thanks a lot, Francis

#72 moody frog

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Posted 22 September 2012 - 09:07 AM

Sponsoring:

A few interesting points in an interview of Michel Desjoyeaux: http://laregate.fr/a...st-hitchcockien

Good salesmanship at least !

"What's a MOD 70 budget for next season ?
« The problem is not to know how much it costs, but how much it brings back ! Three millions euros, may sound a lot for an individual, but for a sizeable company which is looking to communicate, that's not a fortune. Let me give you an exemple: "Geant's (trimaran) budget put in proportion - on a monthly basis - to the number of employees in that group remained below their internal communication spendings. As an other exemple: With Foncia for the Vendee, our racing season cost the equivalent of one coffee a year per client ! The only goal is that any project brings back more than it cost... Returns on the Vendee have been estimated at Euros 30 Millions , 10 times the budget !"

And the current trimaran ?
« We are in the same bracket. At the time when I suggested the MOD 70 to Foncia, it was in adequation with what the company could spend in external and internal communication. A company like PRB is now "abutting" their capability limits: a Vendee is becoming too heavy as their T/O is no longer on a 30% increase rate as before."

Comments:
We may read between the lines that sponsoring is for companies whose market shows a potential increase in T/O, it's an investment into the future not a routine spending.
Yes Foncia pulled the plug, but this is one year after Banque Populaire sold the company to private Investments funds (inc. Bridgepoint) and those are looking at increasing returns on an already good buy. (they want a double digit profitability and plan on a resale in 5 to 6 years)

#73 mr_ryano

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 03:27 PM

Who wants to go next?

http://youtu.be/kgj1jyNMfM4

#74 FromTheRail

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 04:01 PM

Who wants to go next?


I would give my left nut to go, I strangly like that sort of thing !!!

#75 winchfodder

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 06:55 AM

I might be cynical about the prospects for 2014/14, but as for entrants, they seem a bit thin on the ground apart from the all-girl team which looks suspiciously like a Volvo ringer.

Then there is the Ken Read comments recently questioning the route into Abu Dhabi and China, suggesting that Cape Town, Auckland and South America would be best (no suprise there then).

...and now the Irish government are confirming that they will not bail out Galway stoppover's $400,000 debts with many contractors still unpaid.....so we won't be going there again!

Minister dismisses hopes of Volvo Ocean Race bailout

October 12, 2012 - 7:30am


Varadkar refuses to contribute towards €400k over-run
By Dermot Keys
Efforts to get a Government ‘bailout’ to pay the estimated debts of €400,000 amassed by the Volvo Ocean Race finale organisers have been dealt a blow after the Minister for Transport, Tourism and Sport Leo Varadkar refused to provide any additional funding.
It is understood that up to 60 suppliers have still not been paid for their services by Let’s Do It Global, who will meet with key stakeholders on Monday to discuss the financial shortfall. There have also been talks to try and secure some Government funding to cover the deficit.
However, Minister Varadkar closed a door on the possibility of assistance from his Department when speaking on Galway Bay FM on Wednesday.
Minister Varadkar said out that funding had already been allocated through Fáilte Ireland, but as a sponsor rather than an underwriter. He added that his own department is operating at a deficit and said that it was not in a financial position to cover Let’s Do It Global’s debts.
A spokesperson for the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport confirmed to the Galway City Tribune that there are no plans to issue additional funding.
“The bid for Galway to act as host port for the Volvo Ocean Race in 2009 and 2012 was made by Let’s Do It Global, and was supported by very significant State funding through Fáilte Ireland – €8 million in the case of 2009 and €4 million for the 2012 finale,” the spokesperson said.
“This financial support was the single biggest allocation to any tourism event in 2012 – larger than the combined State support for all other tourism events taking place in Ireland this year, such as the Tall Ships and Navy vs Notre Dame, combined.”
It has been estimated that Let’s Do It Global is owed in the region of €170,000 from debtors but, even if it collects all the outstanding money, the organisation will still remain unable to meet its creditors’ demands.
When contacted by the Galway City Tribune, John Killeen, Chairperson of Let’s Do It Global, said that he was unaware of the Minister’s statement and so was unable to comment. However, he said that the matter would be discussed at Monday’s meeting.
Galway City Councillor Michael Crowe has appealed to Minister Varadkar to reconsider his position and to find a way to address the situation on a one-off basis that would not create a precedent.
Read more in today’s Galway City Tribune

#76 thetruth

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 08:04 AM

Gee just maybe I was right. Good on you Jamie and "Corkob". Has the start of a Lance Armstrong story.

#77 the loose cannon

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 01:32 PM

Don't know if this is the right thread, but I heard a rumor that at the annapolis boat show they had it in print that the VOR was going to start from annapolis. I wasn't there.... does anybody have validation or dismissal of this?

#78 DtM

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 10:24 PM

Does anyone know which teams are certainties for the next go around.

#79 Moonduster

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 09:58 PM

I think it's fair to say that until the first OD boat sails several thousand miles, no teams are certain for the next go round.

#80 corkob

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Posted 19 October 2012 - 05:47 AM

Why should that have any impact? To prove reliability?

#81 Icedtea

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 11:39 PM

Don't know if this is the right thread, but I heard a rumor that at the annapolis boat show they had it in print that the VOR was going to start from annapolis. I wasn't there.... does anybody have validation or dismissal of this?


AFAIK Alicante has signed a contract to host the start of the next race. Given the VOR's relative low popularity in America I'd say it's unlikely for the race to start from there.


Wouldn't be surprised to see a stopover though...

#82 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 21 October 2012 - 11:47 PM

Alicante is committed through 2020 IIRC. Unlikely they can get out of their responsibilities even if they want to, but who knows what happens with Spain falling to economic pieces now.

#83 nroose

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 07:01 AM

I have not heard much about Spain lately in the news, except for a short story about how banks are lowering prices on the real estate they own, causing a small RE boom in some parts.

I am worried about the VOR, given the lack of news and the economic issues in Spain. And that new boat is nice, but... OD leaves many serious VOR legends feeling like it's not the same as it ever was.

The latest edition was awesome! And so much content I couldn't come close to watching it all!

#84 nroose

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Posted 27 October 2012 - 10:56 PM

I guess nobody's home here. Perhaps another question will get a response: When should we expect other entries to announce if they will be announcing?

#85 Moonduster

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 01:18 AM

To the best of my knowledge, there's absolutely no value in announcing (or even committing) to the next VOR for quite some time to come. Because teams aren't involved in the design or build, all they do by starting early is consume more dollars.

I would not expect to see any announcements until after the first boat has sailed and the build schedule is announced.

#86 onimod

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 02:47 AM

To the best of my knowledge, there's absolutely no value in announcing (or even committing) to the next VOR for quite some time to come. Because teams aren't involved in the design or build, all they do by starting early is consume more dollars.

I would not expect to see any announcements until after the first boat has sailed and the build schedule is announced.


And even then, if you're pretty sure there are more boats being built than keen teams then what's the rush?
The closer we get to the point of no return the lower the fee from Volvo surely?

#87 nroose

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 03:05 AM

That's probably bad for the race, no? If in looking for a sponsor, the fact that no one else has entered yet, and no one will announce until the last minute is hard to get past.

#88 DtM

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 05:38 AM

Wouldn't potential treams be trying to get the cream of the crews signed up or is the pool that deep that you can wait?

#89 Moonduster

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 05:35 PM

I'm sure there's considerable work going on behind the scene to secure sponsors and identify and retain key crew. My point is that the announcements, and the associated flow of cash, will probably be delayed considerably compared to the "old" Volvo cycle. And that's all aligned with the only goal of the OD approach - reducing costs.

#90 mr_ryano

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 07:32 PM

Today's Media ROI release from VOR Management:

29 October, 2012
Posted ImagePosted ImagePosted Image
HD CONTENT DIRECT FROM BOATS HELPS VOLVO OCEAN RACE 2011-12 DELIVER CROSS-PLATFORM AUDIENCE SURGE

October 29, Alicante – Stunning multimedia material produced by the Volvo Ocean Race's unique Media Crew Member programme, plus a clear focus on news production and distribution helped the 2011-12 edition deliver a surge in audience across platforms, figures in the end of race report show.

The multimedia reporters embedded in each of the six teams provided regular feeds of HD video, including live calls streamed from the boats via the Inmarsat satellite network, as well as still images, audio clips and written reports to give a thrilling view of the closest race in the 39-year history of the Volvo Ocean Race.

Headlines from the report, released to the media exactly one year after the start of the race on October 29 2011, include:

  • 42 percent increase in hours of TV broadcast around the world compared to 2008-09 – resulting in a 16 percent increasein cumulative TV audience (see note 1)
  • 47.6 percent increase in TV news audience thanks to a focus on high-value broadcasters and news agencies (1)
  • 94.8 percent increase in online articles published about the race (2)
  • More than 8 million views on the race's official YouTube channel (3)
  • 6.27 million unique visitors to volvooceanrace.com bringing 127 million page views – more than double the page views from the 2008-09 race (4)
  • 2.9 million visitors to the Race Villages – with an average crowd of 43,882 on In-Port Race days (5)
  • 23,486 corporate guests attending over the course of the race (5)
  • Number one sailing property on Facebook with over 200,000 fans (6)
  • More than 16 million visits and 244 million page views to the Race Tracker – a 67.3% increase in visits and seven timesthe number of page views (7)

"These numbers demonstrate that not only was 2011-12 the closest race in the history of our event but also a huge success commercially," said Volvo Ocean Race CEO Knut Frostad. "More fans than ever followed the racing across our multimedia platforms, almost three million people came to the stopovers and over 20,000 corporate guests came to experience the event for themselves. The guest experience has been developed a lot with pro-am racing in all ports as well as more attractions in and around the race villages.

"The Media Crew Members' performance took a big step forward and they sent back more content with higher quality than ever before, much of it going straight into news reports on some of the world's biggest TV and digital platforms. No other top-flight sporting event has anything like the MCM programme, with embedded reporters sending back such thrilling HD content direct from the front line."

The multimedia content was also introduced in new formats, such as the 3D Cinema in the Race Villages. In total, attractions at the Race Villages drew 692,000 visitors along a route that took the race across five continents, with stops in Spain, South Africa, Abu Dhabi, China, New Zealand, Brazil, the United States, Portugal, France and Ireland.

"The Volvo Ocean Race pulled in a total of 2.9 million spectators during the event," said Volvo Ocean Race Chief Operating Officer Tom Touber. "To put that into perspective, the Euro 2012 soccer championship attracted 1.5 million."

Frostad added: "We visited China for the second time in 2011-12 and made a real breakthrough with a first visit to the Middle East with what was a spectacular stop in Abu Dhabi. Going forward, we will continue to take this unique human and sporting challenge out to an audience that is truly global."

Growth in TV, online, print and social media was underpinned by unparalleled news coverage, with organisers working closely with major distribution platforms to push the story as widely as possible.

In a sign of the growing shift in the way content is consumed, media value was for the first time higher from online sources than from print, with both platforms showing significant growth.

Pictures and videos were particularly popular as drivers of engagement on Facebook, with the fan base growing from around 40,000 at the start of the race to over 200,000 by the end.

The 12th edition of the Volvo Ocean Race will start in Alicante in late 2014, with dozens of cities vying for Host Port status and the full route due to be announced in early 2013. The next race will be contested by identical "one-design" boats, designed by Farr Yacht Design of the United States and already being built by a consortium of boatyards in the United Kingdom, France, Italy and Switzerland.

The introduction of the Volvo Ocean 65 a new 65-foot (19.8 metres) one-design class is a major step in broadening the platform for entry and helping the race achieve the stated goal of increasing the size of the fleet – and retain its position as a high-quality, world-class sports event.

Shared services on shore, plus savings in R&D and staffing will make the team entries even more cost efficient. The SCA Women Ocean Race Team have already announced their participation for 2014-15, making them the first women's team to enter the race since 2001-02. More team announcements will be made over the coming months.



#91 Koukel

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 04:49 PM

Today's Media ROI release from VOR Management:


29 October, 2012
http://www.volvoocea..._lg_mailing.pnghttp://www.volvoocea..._lg_mailing.pnghttp://www.volvoocea..._lg_mailing.png
HD CONTENT DIRECT FROM BOATS HELPS VOLVO OCEAN RACE 2011-12 DELIVER CROSS-PLATFORM AUDIENCE SURGE

October 29, Alicante – Stunning multimedia material produced by the Volvo Ocean Race's unique Media Crew Member programme, plus a clear focus on news production and distribution helped the 2011-12 edition deliver a surge in audience across platforms, figures in the end of race report show.
The multimedia reporters embedded in each of the six teams provided regular feeds of HD video, including live calls streamed from the boats via the Inmarsat satellite network, as well as still images, audio clips and written reports to give a thrilling view of the closest race in the 39-year history of the Volvo Ocean Race.
Headlines from the report, released to the media exactly one year after the start of the race on October 29 2011, include:

  • 42 percent increase in hours of TV broadcast around the world compared to 2008-09 – resulting in a 16 percent increasein cumulative TV audience (see note 1)
  • 47.6 percent increase in TV news audience thanks to a focus on high-value broadcasters and news agencies (1)
  • 94.8 percent increase in online articles published about the race (2)
  • More than 8 million views on the race's official YouTube channel (3)
  • 6.27 million unique visitors to volvooceanrace.com bringing 127 million page views – more than double the page views from the 2008-09 race (4)
  • 2.9 million visitors to the Race Villages – with an average crowd of 43,882 on In-Port Race days (5)
  • 23,486 corporate guests attending over the course of the race (5)
  • Number one sailing property on Facebook with over 200,000 fans (6)
  • More than 16 million visits and 244 million page views to the Race Tracker – a 67.3% increase in visits and seven timesthe number of page views (7)


"We have had unparalleled success!"

"We are changing everything!"

Koukel

#92 Potter

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 05:13 PM

"We have had unparalleled success!"

"We are changing everything!"

Koukel

um, no. They are showing unparalleled success in the media side, which they are making small tweeks to. They had the lowest ever entry numbers, and therefore are making big changes.

#93 Heriberto

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Posted 31 October 2012 - 08:02 PM

"We have had unparalleled success!"

"We are changing everything!"

Koukel

um, no. They are showing unparalleled success in the media side, which they are making small tweeks to. They had the lowest ever entry numbers, and therefore are making big changes.


And it's "paying dividends" already, with at least one entrant, an infinite increase from zero.

#94 FMcCool

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 12:30 PM

All female crew? I think its great and it will be interesting to see how they measure up competitively over the entire race. My hope is that this becomes more common - it means more people interested in it.

#95 corkob

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 04:36 AM

Any further news on potential entries? Hard to see Spanish or French teams funding an entry. Possibly Abu Dhabi or Dubai. ETNZ? Puma? Ericsson? Sanya? Anyone got any inside info?

#96 thetruth

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:50 AM

Maybe another legendary Irish entry corknob?

#97 rockshandy

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 02:47 PM

Maybe another legendary Irish entry corknob?

there has been at least one rumble about one of those....

#98 Carboninit

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 02:53 PM

If it's like last time it will be the gayest fekin race on the planet. More to the point what is the name of the support ship. Fekin joke.

Volvo Fek off.

#99 mr_ryano

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 04:43 PM


Maybe another legendary Irish entry corknob?

there has been at least one rumble about one of those....


And a Youth AC team too....

#100 rockshandy

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 08:59 PM



Maybe another legendary Irish entry corknob?

there has been at least one rumble about one of those....


And a Youth AC team too....

never said it would happen!




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