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#1 arbor_ring

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 10:31 PM

A place near me is offering a certification for basically $450.00 after beginner lessons and some capsize training. It's basically 4 days over 2 weekends. Is this a good price. Here is what the course offers.


General Skill Modules
  • Wind Direction
  • Rigging and unrigging
  • Knots/Lines
  • Rules of the Road

Boat Handling Skill Modules
  • Departure/landing
  • Steering
  • Safety position
  • Tacking
  • Points of Sail
  • Jibing
  • Capsize prevention and recovery
  • Person in the water recovery
  • Getting out of irons
  • Upwind sailing
  • Downwind sailing

Is this a good deal, comparable to most other places near the Chesapeake Bay?

#2 floating dutchman

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Posted 28 September 2012 - 11:56 PM

I'm off for popcorn, Anyone want anything while I'm out?

#3 4knotSB

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:22 AM

Have you looked into the Ajax Sailing School for wayward girls yet?

#4 Dorado

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:25 AM

If you are not a spambot, you should put on your sexiest kevlar undies on NOW ! B)

#5 4knotSB

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 12:49 AM

This place wanted quite a bit more money. http://www.mdschool....htm#begin02Ches

#6 DryArmour

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 02:42 PM

Getting trained by professionals (assuming the school is professional grade) is usually worth the investment. That being said, there are so few girls/women in the sport that boats with a pretty high level of skill, knowledge and seamanship will usually take a cute girl along and teach her the ropes if she is looking to learn FOR FREE. A lot of them will even supply the sandwiches and beer (Assuming you are old enough to drink). The Fall is a great time to starts and get some experience in advance of the 2013 season where you could be brought on as a regular crew if everything works out.

My suggestion is to get PERSONAL Referrals from the board here and get feedback from the herd for the programs that invite you along. Not trying to start a $hitfight but rather want to see you get hooked up with a quality program that is interested in teaching you the sport without overbearing boys spending more time hitting on you than teaching you the sport.

SO CHESAPEAKE SAILORS- Someone help the girl out.

#7 hobie17li

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 02:53 PM

Hi, what kind of certificate would you be getting and what do you want it for? what kind of
boats would they be using? and what sort of program ASA? check around at local clubs or
go to Annapolis sailboat show..

#8 arbor_ring

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 03:11 PM

The program above teaches in a 19-foot Flying Scot sailboats towards the US Sailing Level 1 Student curriculum. I think all this certification says is that I have received training from a well-rounded nationally recognized program covering mandatory topics like the ones mentioned above.

Thanks for the awesome tips, DryArmour. You sound very knowledgeable. Is there a specific group you know about that I could invite myself along?
I'm surprised not more women out there want to be out on the water on the weekends. It's so relaxing, and makes me happy to be out on the bay.



PS: When I posted this, I had no idea sailing was purely a man-sport. I love being out on the water it's so very Zen, but not in the hot of midday when there are bugs and no wind.

#9 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 03:19 PM

gawd this place is gettin soft. She posted that 16 hours ago? and no official welcome yet?

good grief. ok..

Welcome to SA newb.. you can now fuck off.. but before you go, please show us one of the following.
1. your tits.
2. your girlfriends tits
3. all of the above, extra points if the picture was taken on a boat.

If you get that done today, you can come racing with us tomorrow at noon.. otherwise you're stuck with the sailing school..
which... may or may not be such a good deal depending on what your looking for.

If you've never sailed before in your life and it is just an "interest" you might consider something a little less expensive.
Belle Haven Marina in Alexandria offers a beginning sailing course that might be a bit less expensive than that. At least it was cheaper a couple years ago..

good luck

#10 arbor_ring

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 03:40 PM

Well, what a welcome message. Why do I suddenly feel like Christina Applegate in the movie Anchorman, just trying to get a little respect from the guys. I'll be around the boat show next weekend in Annapolis.

#11 DryArmour

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 03:47 PM

Well, what a welcome message. Why do I suddenly feel like Christina Applegate in the movie Anchorman, just trying to get a little respect from the guys. I'll be around the boat show next weekend in Annapolis.


Don't be offended by the welcome. It is a positive sign that you are now officially on board the largest site for sailing on the Internet and a welcome each and every newbie gets. I do love it when Ron Burgundy says "you may not know this...but I am kind of a big deal around here..." In the party scene by the pool. What an ass. Great movie.

If you show up on time. not hung over and do your best you will get lots of respect from most of the better crews...

Enjoy the Annapolis show...

#12 arbor_ring

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 04:05 PM

Thanks, I loved the welcome message from Butass or whatever his avatar was. I'm going to be around the boat show in Annapolis next weekend and anyone who wants to meet me for an interview to join their crew send a message? :)

#13 Steam Flyer

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 04:34 PM

Thanks, I loved the welcome message from Butass or whatever his avatar was. I'm going to be around the boat show in Annapolis next weekend and anyone who wants to meet me for an interview to join their crew send a message? :)


Is this your first day on the internet?
You're not being singled out, request for photographs of mammaries along with directions to go a certain direction are... well, a tradition. This is not only the Internet it's also Anarchy!

Sailing school= good idea.
Checking up on sailing school, asking around former students etc etc = +good idea+

It's very individual; some courses and instructors diddle around and don't really develop skill & capability in the student; others take the same material and turn out pretty good skippers in a surprisingly short time.

Getting on a racing crew is also not a bad idea. Hunt for a character around here called 'AJAX' and PM him
Sorry I can't be more direct help since I'm not in your area

FB- Doug

#14 Lazy Guy

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 04:46 PM

Where am I?

#15 Yard Dog

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 04:57 PM

The program above teaches in a 19-foot Flying Scot sailboats towards the US Sailing Level 1 Student curriculum. I think all this certification says is that I have received training from a well-rounded nationally recognized program covering mandatory topics like the ones mentioned above.

Thanks for the awesome tips, DryArmour. You sound very knowledgeable. Is there a specific group you know about that I could invite myself along?
I'm surprised not more women out there want to be out on the water on the weekends. It's so relaxing, and makes me happy to be out on the bay.



PS: When I posted this, I had no idea sailing was purely a man-sport. I love being out on the water it's so very Zen, but not in the hot of midday when there are bugs and no wind.

Sailing is not purely a man sport, but it is a boy's club. SA is lewd and crude and rude, and a reflection of the previous comment with emphasis on boy. Grow a thick skin and don't worry about it.

I think Dry Armour gave you VG advice. There is also Womanship to consider. I don't know if they are any good, but it is women for women. Also J-Port. J-Port is pretty good, and it will get you in the local racing scene. Kind of late in the season, though.

I admire your spirit and wish you luck.

Stop by the McConaghy booth at the show. If you see a boat you like, tell Ellen.

#16 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 05:34 PM

Butass? that all ya got? cmon, you can do better than that...

#17 floating dutchman

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Posted 29 September 2012 - 08:19 PM

Butass? that all ya got? cmon, you can do better than that...


And you invited her to come out for a sail!

Comon arbour. take him up on the offer. You'll kick you self if you don't.

#18 rgscpat

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 04:58 AM

Womanship has had mixed reviews; they have some good instructors but have had complaints about their organization and business practices... some students get good instructors and a supportive environment but others don't. It's the classic "your mileage may vary".

Sometimes, even at the best sailing schools, students and instructors don't mesh, or some groupings work much better than other -- different strokes for different folks and different people have different learning styles. Really good instructors can adapt to different students' needs.

No matter how good your instructors, preparation, practice time, and time on the water are needed, too.

Practicing on a small boat does a lot of good. Learning the fine art of walking sailing and yacht club docks to get rides and signing up for crew lists is good, as well. Some places have community sailing centers and sailing co-ops that bring the price of sailing way down. Some yacht clubs and sailing clubs have club-owned boats available to members.

#19 Dorado

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 05:09 AM

Butass? that all ya got? cmon, you can do better than that...


Butass ! :blink:

Ouch!

That could stick you know :P

Kid's got moxie I tells ya

#20 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 10:01 PM

and she missed a really great day out on the water. oh well... skip the boat show next weekend and go sailing instead.
AYC Fall Series distance race. and for what it's worth... about half my crew is female...

#21 SemiSalt

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 10:49 PM

SA is lewd and crude and rude, and a reflection of the previous comment with emphasis on boy. Grow a thick skin and don't worry about it.


As crude as the remarks are, the SA ethos accepts that that women can sail very well in small boats and big. There aren't many nasty remarks about the really good sailors, or anybody who tries to be a really good sailor.

#22 Somebody Else

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 11:45 PM

arbor ring, check to see what local Jr. Colleges and cities offer. In my area, those represent the cheapest way to get started. They aren't too big on the certificates until you get to more advanced courses.

The certificates are more important if you are chartering a boat for a week in the Caribbean or Greek Islands or Tahiti or wherever. For day rentals around here they pretty much don't care. If you can get away from the dock without causing damage, you're good to go.

As for getting rides on OPBs, the basics, keeping your eyes and ears open, and showing up on time will get you a lot of rides. Showing up in a bikini with six-pack or two of good beer gets you a ride on the next nicer level of boat.

Here's what not to do: last week we were a little short-handed. There was a gal on the dock whom I had seen around for a couple of years for week-day evening casual races (beer cans). She asked if we needed another so I invited her aboard. Turns out she did not know how to sail. At all. Not even the basics. Didn't know the difference between outhaul and boom-vang even though we told her what color the rope was. When she eventually found it she couldn't operate the cleat. Well... so much for the helping hand. We had a very mellow crew who had done lots of miles together so there wasn't any drama or loud talking or anything; we just reverted to using her as movable ballast and did everything ourselves. No worries.

But she wouldn't shut up. It was almost non-stop talk about nothing in particular. We were racing and it was actually pretty close racing so we weren't really into chit-chatting about gossip. Then there was a steady stream of questions like, "Am I sitting in the right place? Should I move over there?" Each time the answer was the same: "You're fine there. Don't worry; if we need you to move we'll tell you with plenty of advance warning."

There you have it: Sailing 101.

#23 DA-WOODY

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    COUGARS COUGARS & More COUGARS

Posted 01 October 2012 - 12:26 AM

Getting trained by professionals (assuming the school is professional grade) is usually worth the investment and nOOby Hazing Ritual . That being said, there are so few girls/women in the sport that the lines are long and boats with a pretty high level of skill, knowledge and seamanship will usually take a "Cute or Buxom" girl along and teach her the ropes if she is looking to learn FOR FREE. A lot of them will even supply the Rum if you're into sandwiches (Assuming you are old enough to drink an into 3-Sum's). The Fall is a great time to start and get some "Experience" in advance of the 2013 season where you could be brought on as a regular crew if everything works out.

My suggestion is to get PERSONAL around here and get feedback from the herd for the programs that invite you along. Not trying to start a $hitfight but rather want to see you get "hooked up" with a quality program that is interested in teaching you the sport without overbearing boys spending more time hitting on you than teaching you the sport.
Oh if you're looking for a few quick Quid (don't really know WTF a Quid is ??) I am auditioning for a few SEXY Technical Lingerie Models for our "New Editable" line of ware

SO CHESAPEAKE SAILORS- Someone harden the Fack Up an help the girl out.
"OR" Properly welcome this nOOb Bot


Fixed :o :lol: :lol: :unsure: :wacko:

#24 DA-WOODY

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    COUGARS COUGARS & More COUGARS

Posted 01 October 2012 - 12:38 AM

arbor ring, check to see what local Jr. Colleges and cities offer. In my area, those represent the cheapest way to get hooked-up. They aren't too big on the certificates until you get to more advanced courses.

The certificates are more important if you are chartering a boat for a week in the Caribbean or Greek Islands or Tahiti or wherever. For day rentals around here they pretty much don't care. If you can get away from the dock without causing damage, you're good to go.

As for getting rides on OPBs, the basics, keeping your eyes and ears open, and showing Mega Cleavage will get you a lot of rides. Showing up in a bikini with six-pack or two of good beer gets you a ride on the next nicer level of boat.

Here's what not to do: last week we were a little short-handed. There was a gal on the dock whom I had seen around for a couple of years for week-day evening casual races (beer cans). She asked if we needed another so I invited her aboard. Turns out she did not know how to sail. At all. Not even the basics. Didn't know the difference between outhaul and boom-vang even though we told her what color the rope was. When she eventually found it she couldn't operate the cleat. Well... so much for the helping hand. We had a very mellow crew who had done lots of miles together so there wasn't any drama or loud talking or anything; we just reverted to using her as movable ballast and did everything ourselves. No worries.

But she wouldn't shut up. It was almost non-stop talk about nothing in particular. We were racing and it was actually pretty close racing so we weren't really into chit-chatting about gossip. Then there was a steady stream of questions like, "Am I sitting in the right place? Should I move over there?" Each time the answer was the same: "You're fine there. Don't worry; if we need you to move we'll tell you with plenty of advance warning."

There you have it: Sailing 101.


fixed

#25 axolotl

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 12:48 AM

I've never understood the idea you have to go to school to learn how to sail. Do you have to go to bicycle school before riding? Best thing to do is find some rides on racing boats; be honest that you're a newbie. They'll probably make you a kite grinder or ballast technician. Then, keep your eyes open and your mouth shut. It'll make sense after a few dozen rides. Before you know it you'll be bowgirl, assuming you're not too heavy.

BTW, this way in is especially easy for attractive women.

#26 DryArmour

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Posted 01 October 2012 - 02:44 AM

I've never understood the idea you have to go to school to learn how to sail. Do you have to go to bicycle school before riding? Best thing to do is find some rides on racing boats; be honest that you're a newbie. They'll probably make you a kite grinder or ballast technician. Then, keep your eyes open and your mouth shut. It'll make sense after a few dozen rides. Before you know it you'll be bowgirl, assuming you're not too heavy.

BTW, this way in is especially easy for attractive women.


I actually admire her willingness to get formal training before showing up and trying to play the game on a competitive level. It is after all a pretty damned technical sport. Stupid people rarely bring home the pickle dish unless they surround themselves with brilliance (Which of course means they aren't that stupid to begin with). The catch 22 thing...

Have a great week everyone...

#27 Hwyl

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 01:16 PM

The program above teaches in a 19-foot Flying Scot sailboats towards the US Sailing Level 1 Student curriculum. I think all this certification says is that I have received training from a well-rounded nationally recognized program covering mandatory topics like the ones mentioned above.

Thanks for the awesome tips, DryArmour. You sound very knowledgeable. Is there a specific group you know about that I could invite myself along?
I'm surprised not more women out there want to be out on the water on the weekends. It's so relaxing, and makes me happy to be out on the bay.



PS: When I posted this, I had no idea sailing was purely a man-sport. I love being out on the water it's so very Zen, but not in the hot of midday when there are bugs and no wind.


US sailing Level 1 is an instructors certificate, and as such it is assumed that you are already a pretty good sailor.

#28 DRIFTW00D

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 03:41 PM

Simply the Best Sailing Certification on the Bay and Cheep!!


Call your Congress Person for an appointment!


United States Naval Academy



#29 4deckgye

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 03:52 PM

The Naval Academy MWR (Thats morale, Welfare, and recreation) division offers a weekend long program, saturday and sunday, that gives you a keelboat skipper cert at the end of it. $220, and very good instruction:

http://www.usna.edu/...LessonsForm.htm

#30 EverySecond

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 04:04 PM

I would get the training if you can afford it. $450 (or the $220 if it is convenient) is probably less than the cost of your saddle and will be just as good an investment. As mentioned, it isn't strictly necessary unless your are going to do charters, but it will speed up the process of learning.

Getting rides on race boats is also great, but don't get on a hyper-competitive boat with a full crew. The guys may love to have you, but at some point you'll just be in the way and learning will be slow. A competitive boat is a very busy place (unless the wind is light, then you aren't learning anything useful anyway).

Instead find a boat with a competent, but laid-back, skipper that just happens to be short-handed. They do exist and aren't hard to find. Your instructor at the sailing school can probably direct you to a couple of them. I'm sure someone here can also direct you to a crew board for your area -- most skippers posting for crew will let you know where they fall on the competitiveness scale.

#31 Rum Runner

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 04:36 PM

A place near me is offering a certification for basically $450.00 after beginner lessons and some capsize training. It's basically 4 days over 2 weekends. Is this a good price. Here is what the course offers.


General Skill Modules

  • Wind Direction
  • Rigging and unrigging
  • Knots/Lines
  • Rules of the Road
Boat Handling Skill Modules
  • Departure/landing
  • Steering
  • Safety position
  • Tacking
  • Points of Sail
  • Jibing
  • Capsize prevention and recovery
  • Person in the water recovery
  • Getting out of irons
  • Upwind sailing
  • Downwind sailing
Is this a good deal, comparable to most other places near the Chesapeake Bay?


Formal training is always good but to become competent you will have to spend time outside of class sailing on your own. I would recommend you check into sailing clubs in your area which can give you access to boats for practice. Also, think about finding a local racing fleet which will allow you to practice with experienced sailors.

Good Luck.

#32 RumLine

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 04:38 PM

Make sure you have the right gear before you go out sailing, especially as it starts to get colder. Also, if you're going to get a ride on someone's boat make sure you have non-marking closed toe shoes, tennis sneakers or converse chuck t's are the easiest to acquire but there are people around these boards who can argue for months about the best shoes for sailing.

Don't get discouraged, definitely spend money and get some training somewhere at some point, but getting a free ride is a smart way to figure out if you really like it.

#33 olshitsky

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:15 PM

But she wouldn't shut up. It was almost non-stop talk about nothing in particular. We were racing and it was actually pretty close racing so we weren't really into chit-chatting about gossip. Then there was a steady stream of questions like, "Am I sitting in the right place? Should I move over there?" Each time the answer was the same: "You're fine there. Don't worry; if we need you to move we'll tell you with plenty of advance warning."


This was actually a really good point. If you know next to nothing and fully disclose it, very little will be expected of you. if you're yelled at for not knowing when you haven't misled anybody about your abilities, then you're sailing with assholes.

but learn how to learn on a boat, which means when to be quiet and when to ask questions. especially in distance races, the noob may think nothing is happening and is an ideal time for idle chit-chat. follow the lead of the other crew to see if conversation and/or questions are appropriate given what's happening. you'll have to ask a lot of questions as to why/how things happen, but knowing when to ask is almost as important as what to ask. even a skimpy bikini can't overcome how irritating conversation that distracts can be. surefire way to not get asked back.

#34 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:39 PM


But she wouldn't shut up. It was almost non-stop talk about nothing in particular. We were racing and it was actually pretty close racing so we weren't really into chit-chatting about gossip. Then there was a steady stream of questions like, "Am I sitting in the right place? Should I move over there?" Each time the answer was the same: "You're fine there. Don't worry; if we need you to move we'll tell you with plenty of advance warning."


This was actually a really good point. If you know next to nothing and fully disclose it, very little will be expected of you. if you're yelled at for not knowing when you haven't misled anybody about your abilities, then you're sailing with assholes.

but learn how to learn on a boat, which means when to be quiet and when to ask questions. especially in distance races, the noob may think nothing is happening and is an ideal time for idle chit-chat. follow the lead of the other crew to see if conversation and/or questions are appropriate given what's happening. you'll have to ask a lot of questions as to why/how things happen, but knowing when to ask is almost as important as what to ask. even a skimpy bikini can't overcome how irritating conversation that distracts can be. surefire way to not get asked back.


and ask the other crew members those questions that you just can't wait to ask.. dont ask the skipper, he's busy driving.

#35 JasonD

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:41 PM

Put yourself on the Spinsheet crew listing here: http://www.spinsheet...sting-directory .

Racing is the best way to learn how to sail, anyway, and it's free. A little under half our crew is female, so no worries there.

#36 arbor_ring

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:43 AM

News Flash: Signed up for formal training for US Sailing certificate for a grand smack total of $550.00. Includes free boat rentals, sailing socials, and at a Cantina in DC.

Getting back to some of your stories and opinions on formal training or not from all of you. If you are comfortable being a beginner informal training with a gentle, but sophisticated crew is good. A nervous beginner with uncertainty about the crew might bite the bullet for more formal training.

Really, a combination of the two is best, formal and informal.

#37 On the Hard

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 01:33 PM

Back to your comment about it being something of a man's world, that is probably accurate. But it makes the ladies who step into the mix all that much more appreciated. I cut my teeth in the 70's and there was a solid group of girls my age+/- who were excellent sailors and great friends. They weren't overly sensitive but didn't put up with any disrespect. (Not that they saw much of that). One girl who I introduced to sailing in 7th grade ended up on the Tulane sailing team. Not sure where I am going with all of this except to say women who are competent and have a passion for the sport make it better for everybody. Welcome aboard

#38 TimFordi550#87

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 02:36 PM

Not sure where I am going with all of this except to say women who are competent and have a passion for the sport make it better for everybody. Welcome aboard


Totally agree. As I've been in OPB mode for the past 5 years (10-12 different boats per season), I get a chance to race with both sausage-fest and mixed-sex crews throughout the season. Given two boats of equal appeal, I'd choose the mixed-sex crew any day of the week. Less posturing, more cooperation/team work!

Arbor, I think you'll find the bay is a target-rich environment for someone in your situation who wants to jump in on the learning curve. Good luck!

#39 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 03:02 PM

News Flash: Signed up for formal training for US Sailing certificate for a grand smack total of $550.00. Includes free boat rentals, sailing socials, and at a Cantina in DC.

Getting back to some of your stories and opinions on formal training or not from all of you. If you are comfortable being a beginner informal training with a gentle, but sophisticated crew is good. A nervous beginner with uncertainty about the crew might bite the bullet for more formal training.

Really, a combination of the two is best, formal and informal.


Good for you for signing up for something. When ya get all done with your course... We'll be racing on sundays thru the weekend before thanksgiving.
If you want to sail, shoot a pm thingie and I'll let ya know how to get out here

#40 Tax Man

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 04:37 PM

I also recommend the dual path.

As a rookie on a racing boat you will either do nothing and have to learn by watching, or more likely get into one job and learn how to do it in isolation. There are some really good bowmen out there that couldn't trim a hedge because they have never been behind the mast.

The course will teach you the minimum amount you need to know how to do a variety of jobs without sudden death, but there will be very little depth to the education.

If you get connected with a good boat there are two critical rules - never blow a commitment, and listen much more than you speak.

Good luck

#41 J24Soup

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 04:52 PM

Good advice. Also don't use words like "Ahoy" or "Aye Aye" unless you're on a boat that is using these terms, in which case still don't use them and get out of there quickly... Plug for the Oregon Womens Sailing Association (OWSA) here in Portland, OR. Very well organized, and getting a lot of new folks into the scene.

#42 Grrl Runnin the Pointy End

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 09:48 PM

Learn how to run your OWN boat, not someone else's, especially calling the shots as skipper. And above all,don't get slotted into specialty crewing. If you jump right into big boat racing that will probably happen. Simply tailing a winch does not equal knowing how to sail.

The best sailors come from dinghy racing and are far more versatile than people who learn only on big keel boats, . The more you do on a dinghy by yourself the more you will learn. It ALL scales up to any size boat you eventually end up sailing.

#43 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 10:00 PM

Learn how to run your OWN boat, not someone else's, especially calling the shots as skipper. And above all,don't get slotted into specialty crewing. If you jump right into big boat racing that will probably happen. Simply tailing a winch does not equal knowing how to sail.

The best sailors come from dinghy racing and are far more versatile than people who learn only on big keel boats, . The more you do on a dinghy by yourself the more you will learn. It ALL scales up to any size boat you eventually end up sailing.


very true

#44 TimFordi550#87

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 10:09 PM

It ALL scales up to any size boat you eventually end up sailing.


sorta, that is, some of it.

If I had it to do, all over again, I'd do both...small boats to get the gist of it, skills, etc.... big boats to understand loads and systems and electronics, etc.

Good idea to take a dual approach, Arb.

#45 Life Buoy 15

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 11:38 PM

Do a recognised training course. You will learn more in two days than you will in months of rail meating with a bunch of well meaning racing sailors. With about 4-5 days training you will be comptent in the 'mechanics' of sailing , and then you will be useful on a race boat. Don't let the tits thing worry you. any boat that still has issues with female crew these days you wouldn't want to sail on anyway. Good luck with your sailing.
Oh and whilst on the subject of tits.........

#46 Cavelamb

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 01:56 AM

A place near me is offering a certification for basically $450.00 after beginner lessons and some capsize training. It's basically 4 days over 2 weekends. Is this a good price. Here is what the course offers.


General Skill Modules

  • Wind Direction
  • Rigging and unrigging
  • Knots/Lines
  • Rules of the Road
Boat Handling Skill Modules
  • Departure/landing
  • Steering
  • Safety position
  • Tacking
  • Points of Sail
  • Jibing
  • Capsize prevention and recovery
  • Person in the water recovery
  • Getting out of irons
  • Upwind sailing
  • Downwind sailing
Is this a good deal, comparable to most other places near the Chesapeake Bay?


Dunno a thing about the Chesapeake Bay schools, but that the same price we
get for ASA certification here in Texas. (I teach here part time).

Grab it and don't look back.

THEN take the other advice - crewing for someone on the race course.

#47 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 03:55 AM


It ALL scales up to any size boat you eventually end up sailing.


sorta, that is, some of it.

If I had it to do, all over again, I'd do both...small boats to get the gist of it, skills, etc.... big boats to understand loads and systems and electronics, etc.

Good idea to take a dual approach, Arb.


I think it sorta depends on where ya wanna go with sailing. I started out as rail meat on a 47'er. every weekend for two seasons. I didn't have a clew wtf anyone was talking about on the boat. I kept my yap shut, did what they told me to do and paid attention.. but at the end of two years all I could really do was hike like hell and get the jib inside the lifelines faster than anyone else.. I didn't know how to really trim the jib, but I could pull a string and grind like 28 mother fuckers... got off that boat onto a j29 where they taught me to trim main for windward leeward races. also learned a little bit about headsail trim. but I still had no race course sense at all.
I bought a 14' dingy called a Jet 14 and joined West River. I raced that little boat every chance I got. my crew was my racing instructor. (friggin high school and college racer that knew his way around a race course). in three years I learned how to do starts.. sorta how to pick the favored side of the race course and most of the basic RRS. even did pretty well in a regatta every now and then. got back into big boats crewing for someone else and realized how much more I learned racing that dingy than I realized. that boat gave me an understanding of how things got rigged and why. there's more points of sail then dead upwind and dead downwind.. after a couple years the owners that I had been racing with had to sell their boat and being boatless.. I bought a laser.. had a stone cold blast on that boat and learned more about 1 design racing than any number of sailng classes or jworld excursions was ever going to teach me. I'm still a wed night hack.. will probably always be a hack.. but I win a race every now and then and THAT is from racing little boats and good crew work.. from other people that have raced litlte boats. I was a pretty good jib and kite trimmer on other peoples boats.. I'm probably a better headsail trimmer than I am a driver.. and I learned how to do that well on little boats..

I've taken one 3 day sailing class since I started sailing. But i've had a coach on my boat in non-racing situations about 30 days in the last 5 or 6 years. in my opinion, i've learned from experience.. maybe I'd have learned it faster taking a class.. I dunno.. but i've enjoyed my journey and have no idea what the destination is.

#48 Steam Flyer

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 04:35 AM

Learn how to run your OWN boat, not someone else's, especially calling the shots as skipper. And above all,don't get slotted into specialty crewing. If you jump right into big boat racing that will probably happen. Simply tailing a winch does not equal knowing how to sail.

The best sailors come from dinghy racing and are far more versatile than people who learn only on big keel boats, . The more you do on a dinghy by yourself the more you will learn. It ALL scales up to any size boat you eventually end up sailing.


^ this ^

I would go a step further and say that it's impossible to learn to sail -well- on a big boat. It's possible to learn to do a job-on-a-sailboat (such as trimming, helming, etc) very well but putting the whole package together can only be done on small boats. There are a bunch of reasons for this, one is that small boats are generally more responsive & give feedback on when you're doing something right or wrong; they can do the same thing many times in an afternoon, the effect of weight & balance is easy to study when your body weight has such a noticable effect; and so forth.

Then it's also true that some things you don't learn at all on small boats. Navigating for one!


Do a recognised training course. You will learn more in two days than you will in months of rail meating with a bunch of well meaning racing sailors. With about 4-5 days training you will be comptent in the 'mechanics' of sailing , and then you will be useful on a race boat. Don't let the tits thing worry you. any boat that still has issues with female crew these days you wouldn't want to sail on anyway. Good luck with your sailing.
Oh and whilst on the subject of tits.........


I think you were the last person who brought them up, yes?

Taking a course is an excellent way to get a look at all the various tasks of sailing and how they relate to each other; something you're not likely to get from sailing with friends or crewing on a race boat. But it's still a good idea to get a reference or two from that specific course & instructor because quality varies tremendously.

FB- Doug

#49 skiffsailor_aus

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 07:10 AM

Back to your comment about it being something of a man's world, that is probably accurate. But it makes the ladies who step into the mix all that much more appreciated. I cut my teeth in the 70's and there was a solid group of girls my age+/- who were excellent sailors and great friends. They weren't overly sensitive but didn't put up with any disrespect. (Not that they saw much of that). One girl who I introduced to sailing in 7th grade ended up on the Tulane sailing team. Not sure where I am going with all of this except to say women who are competent and have a passion for the sport make it better for everybody. Welcome aboard


Yeh I'd agree with that. In the past sailing really was a boys game but now there are more women coming through at all levels of the sport. Yes it helps if you are not overly sensitive but you shouldn't have any problems.

I like sailing because it's one of the few sports where (with the exception of olympic events) men & women usually compete with and against each other in the same fleet.

From one woman to another - welcome to the sport of sailing! Hope you enjoy it for many years to come.

#50 Damp Freddie

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 10:14 PM

News Flash: Signed up for formal training for US Sailing certificate for a grand smack total of $550.00. Includes free boat rentals, sailing socials, and at a Cantina in DC.

Getting back to some of your stories and opinions on formal training or not from all of you. If you are comfortable being a beginner informal training with a gentle, but sophisticated crew is good. A nervous beginner with uncertainty about the crew might bite the bullet for more formal training.

Really, a combination of the two is best, formal and informal.


I think you'll really enjoy it and also maybe meet your next helm/crew to go up the learning curve.

I'm a certified instructor and lunatic so I must declare a bias.

When the teens I help advance ask me about Melges sailing and offshore I say, hey one hour in a dinghy is worth 8 in a keel boat.

With the wily old school and fanatical skiff sailing instructors who taught me on courses since 1995 I could double those hour values.

#51 some dude

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 10:27 PM

Butass? that all ya got? cmon, you can do better than that...


new nickname

#52 some dude

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 10:29 PM

one hour in a dinghy is worth 8 in a keel boat.



word.

#53 Hwyl

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 08:14 PM

I still think "Level 1" is an instructor class.

#54 B.J. Porter

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 08:37 PM


The program above teaches in a 19-foot Flying Scot sailboats towards the US Sailing Level 1 Student curriculum. I think all this certification says is that I have received training from a well-rounded nationally recognized program covering mandatory topics like the ones mentioned above.

Thanks for the awesome tips, DryArmour. You sound very knowledgeable. Is there a specific group you know about that I could invite myself along?
I'm surprised not more women out there want to be out on the water on the weekends. It's so relaxing, and makes me happy to be out on the bay.



PS: When I posted this, I had no idea sailing was purely a man-sport. I love being out on the water it's so very Zen, but not in the hot of midday when there are bugs and no wind.

Sailing is not purely a man sport, but it is a boy's club. SA is lewd and crude and rude, and a reflection of the previous comment with emphasis on boy. Grow a thick skin and don't worry about it.

I think Dry Armour gave you VG advice. There is also Womanship to consider. I don't know if they are any good, but it is women for women. Also J-Port. J-Port is pretty good, and it will get you in the local racing scene. Kind of late in the season, though.

I admire your spirit and wish you luck.

Stop by the McConaghy booth at the show. If you see a boat you like, tell Ellen.


My wife did a weekend on Womanship, she was quite pleased with it. The emphasis is more on cruising than racing though, which isn't really and thing if that suits.

They are right, it's dominated by men but not FOR men. Note that this is true MUCH more for the racing world than for the cruising world. It's not all about racing...if you come to the dark side we Cruisers have comfortable seats, blenders, and bathroom doors that close. The cruising world is much more gender neutral; smaller egos and less pressure.

Show's over so I won't see you there, but we're here in Annapolis for a couple more days still.

#55 Bulbhunter

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Posted 08 October 2012 - 08:47 PM

Keep in mind the sailing community is small and all the active boats will have lots of people familiar with who they are etc etc. Best thing to do is check into the schools look at the reviews and feedback. Check for local college clubs or other sailing groups given you may find a cheaper more active club that offers ASA type training courses etc. As for the racing and crewing approach you will meet far far more active local sailors doing the crew and race boat thing than taking ASA courses at a pay as you go type of place.

Going into the winter months is not exactly the time to start looking into this unless your in a year around sailing location.

#56 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:09 PM

So Ms Ring came out and sailed with us today in our beer can race. I'm guessing she had a pretty good time. Wasn't really much for her to do, but she kept out of the way and didn't do anything wrong. I think she may actually come back out with again next Sunday... brave soul LOL

#57 SMBReno

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 10:54 PM

A_R Consider spending a couple of weeks in San Francisco during the "summer" (depending upon the year, you may have to adopt a more liberal definition but you won't lack for wind or excellent training- keel boat only) - OCSC has a lot to offer for women sailors, including women only sails, women instructors, etc. You'll get comfortable very quickly, although I found the J/24 a sort of torture box on water, at least in terms of where to sit! Usually pretty mellow in am and up to 25-30 in pm. I'm not affiliated with the place, except a member for chartering/crewing purposes. Can't comment on other sailing schools except to say I often sail by J/80's from another school when headed out the estuary and I can never tell if they're happy whereas OCSC was pretty much a hoot most days.

#58 arbor_ring

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 11:38 PM

So Ms Ring came out and sailed with us today in our beer can race. I'm guessing she had a pretty good time. Wasn't really much for her to do, but she kept out of the way and didn't do anything wrong. I think she may actually come back out with again next Sunday... brave soul LOL


Thanks for the recommendation, I think. :) It was relaxing to be out on the water again after a week or so of none due to Sandy. The crew operated as a team. Impressive how quickly the crew could take down the Jib, putting up the Spinnaker in the wind and repeat. The skipper, Bump-n-Grind reminded me of what a captain is for crew, strong, patient, and orderly. Would defintiely go back. Hoping for a role on the team next time, but enjoying myself and getting to know how things work on a J-class boat.

#59 Steam Flyer

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 12:37 AM

So Ms Ring came out and sailed with us today in our beer can race. I'm guessing she had a pretty good time. Wasn't really much for her to do, but she kept out of the way and didn't do anything wrong. I think she may actually come back out with again next Sunday... brave soul LOL


So... did she call you "BumpAss" ??

Or was it "CAPTAIN BumpAss"

B)

FB- Doug

#60 Laker

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 12:52 AM

It takes 10 minutes to learn to sail and 10 years to do it properly. Welcome to the 10 years. As with any part of life, you don't always end up where you first thought you would. If you just keep on doing it; big, small, keel or skiff, you just keep getting better at the whole thing.

#61 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 12 November 2012 - 01:15 AM

She called me "shut the fuck up and drive" just like everyone else does

#62 islanderboy32

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 05:48 PM

She called me "shut the fuck up and drive" just like everyone else does


Does she get a FU shirt?

#63 chaosmaster

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 06:03 PM

So Ms Ring came out and sailed with us today in our beer can race. I'm guessing she had a pretty good time. Wasn't really much for her to do, but she kept out of the way and didn't do anything wrong. I think she may actually come back out with again next Sunday... brave soul LOL


Nice job, Butass! Always good to bring in new talent.

Cheers,

Chaos

#64 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 06:29 PM


She called me "shut the fuck up and drive" just like everyone else does


Does she get a FU shirt?


well.. I dont think she's earned one of those yet..

for $20 she can get a
Posted Image

#65 volfan615

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 06:42 PM

She called me "shut the fuck up and drive" just like everyone else does


:D

#66 SailRacer

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 06:53 PM

Good job on signing up for the class and going racing.

When do we get to see the goods?

Sail safe

#67 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 10:34 PM

I'll have the other girls in the crew brief her on the fine old Bump tradition of gettin em out if we hit 10 kts...
pray for good breeze this Sunday y'all. Sposed to be 13-15 kts and 45 F.. could get nipply B)

#68 Mr. Starbuck

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:46 AM

thinking that I might have to adopt your tradition. It would have worked last race...

#69 Life Buoy 15

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:57 AM

A few blokes around here pull their cocks out when they hit 10 knots.



Sadly it's normally in the bar after the race.

#70 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:14 PM

A few blokes around here pull their cocks out when they hit 10 knots.



Sadly it's normally in the bar after the race.

y'all are doin something wrong

#71 WhoaTed

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 04:21 PM

A place near me is offering certification for basically $450.00 after beginner lessons and some shit-shoveling training. It's basically 4 days over 2 weekends. Is this a good price. Here is what the course offers.


General Skill Modules
  • Getting on the horse
  • Staying on the horse
  • Staying on the horse
  • Staying on the horse
Horse Handling Skill Modules
  • Departure/landing (falling off the horse with style and grace)
  • Steering (pull the left one for left etc)
  • Safety position (staying away from the rear)
  • Tacking (saddles, bridles, etc)
  • Sore ass recovery
  • Getting out of irons (sugar cube 101)
Is this a good deal? Does anyone know anybody willing to trade sailing lessons for horse lessons? What about yoga?

#72 Gouvernail

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 07:15 AM

A place near me is offering a certification for basically $450.00 after beginner lessons and some capsize training. It's basically 4 days over 2 weekends. Is this a good price. Here is what the course offers.


General Skill Modules

  • Wind Direction
  • Rigging and unrigging
  • Knots/Lines
  • Rules of the Road
Boat Handling Skill Modules
  • Departure/landing
  • Steering
  • Safety position
  • Tacking
  • Points of Sail
  • Jibing
  • Capsize prevention and recovery
  • Person in the water recovery
  • Getting out of irons
  • Upwind sailing
  • Downwind sailing
Is this a good deal, comparable to most other places near the Chesapeake Bay?


Ae they accredited/? Ask them if their credits transfer to other institutions.

#73 Ishmael

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Posted 18 November 2012 - 08:05 AM


A place near me is offering a certification for basically $450.00 after beginner lessons and some capsize training. It's basically 4 days over 2 weekends. Is this a good price. Here is what the course offers.


General Skill Modules

  • Wind Direction
  • Rigging and unrigging
  • Knots/Lines
  • Rules of the Road
Boat Handling Skill Modules
  • Departure/landing
  • Steering
  • Safety position
  • Tacking
  • Points of Sail
  • Jibing
  • Capsize prevention and recovery
  • Person in the water recovery
  • Getting out of irons
  • Upwind sailing
  • Downwind sailing
Is this a good deal, comparable to most other places near the Chesapeake Bay?


Ae they accredited/? Ask them if their credits transfer to other institutions.


And if they have reciprocal moorage.

#74 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 01:58 AM

alas.. only made it to 9.5 kts.. had the camera ready too.

#75 floating dutchman

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:53 AM

alas.. only made it to 9.5 kts.. had the camera ready too.


Well, from the cheap seat's SHUT UP AND DRIVE.


Hope she's havin fun.

#76 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 07:45 PM

I think so.. put her on mast/pit yesterday.. except for one little brainfart where she didn't let go of the trip line it all went pretty well.
in post race de-brief she said it was more exciting up on the pointy end of the boat than it was crawlin back and forth across the cabintop last week....
we'll see if she shows up for down the bay race next may LOL

#77 A_guy_in_the_Chesapeake

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:39 PM


So Ms Ring came out and sailed with us today in our beer can race. I'm guessing she had a pretty good time. Wasn't really much for her to do, but she kept out of the way and didn't do anything wrong. I think she may actually come back out with again next Sunday... brave soul LOL


So... did she call you "BumpAss" ??

Or was it "CAPTAIN BumpAss"

B)

FB- Doug


Bumpass is about 15 miles NW of Richmond, VA.

:-)

#78 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 05:27 AM

I thought the bumpass's had all them friggin bloodhounds that at the christmas turkey.. no?

#79 A_guy_in_the_Chesapeake

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 03:04 PM

I thought the bumpass's had all them friggin bloodhounds that at the christmas turkey.. no?

Down there - I wouldn't be surprised by much.
https://maps.google.com/maps?q=bumpass,+va&hl=en&ll=37.963418,-77.737198&spn=0.129248,0.209255&sll=37.6,-95.665&sspn=64.709765,107.138672&t=h&hnear=Bumpass,+Louisa,+Virginia&z=13

There are a few sailboats on Lake Anna.

#80 Gouvernail

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 03:38 PM

Out loud?? Really??

#81 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 04:14 PM

I think we may have scared her off :o   

 

 

Better Gouv?



#82 Clove Hitch

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Posted 13 May 2013 - 09:42 PM

I think we may have scared her off :o   

 

 

Better Gouv?

Negative, Ghostrider.  I sailed with her yesterday in steady 18 gusting to over 25. 



#83 BlondeWithFreeBoat

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 02:01 AM

Thanks, I loved the welcome message from Butass or whatever his avatar was. I'm going to be around the boat show in Annapolis next weekend and anyone who wants to meet me for an interview to join their crew send a message? :)

 

Buttass....hahahahahaha :lol:



#84 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 02:13 AM

Thanks, I loved the welcome message from Butass or whatever his avatar was. I'm going to be around the boat show in Annapolis next weekend and anyone who wants to meet me for an interview to join their crew send a message? :)

 

Buttass....hahahahahaha :lol:

 

Hey Clove.. yeah.. and blondie with the boat was out with us.. we probably passed ya somewhere round curtis point.

 

oh.. and I still think Buttass is pretty weak ;)



#85 One eye Jack

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 02:14 AM

A place near me is offering a certification for basically $450.00 after beginner lessons and some capsize training. It's basically 4 days over 2 weekends. Is this a good price. Here is what the course offers.General Skill Modules

  • Wind Direction
  • Rigging and unrigging
  • Knots/Lines
  • Rules of the Road
Boat Handling Skill Modules
  • Departure/landing
  • Steering
  • Safety position
  • Tacking
  • Points of Sail
  • Jibing
  • Capsize prevention and recovery
  • Person in the water recovery
  • Getting out of irons
  • Upwind sailing
  • Downwind sailing
Is this a good deal, comparable to most other places near the Chesapeake Bay?
the Coast Guard auxiliary has a sailing class along with basic boat handling. Try them. They will be alot cheaper

#86 BlondeWithFreeBoat

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 03:22 AM

 

Thanks, I loved the welcome message from Butass or whatever his avatar was. I'm going to be around the boat show in Annapolis next weekend and anyone who wants to meet me for an interview to join their crew send a message? :)

 

Buttass....hahahahahaha :lol:

 

Hey Clove.. yeah.. and blondie with the boat was out with us.. we probably passed ya somewhere round curtis point.

 

oh.. and I still think Buttass is pretty weak ;)

 

So far that makes one of us... ^_^



#87 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 03:51 AM

Now that's a butt-ass

 

3buttcheeks.jpg



#88 BlondeWithFreeBoat

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 12:58 PM

Now that's a butt-ass

 

3buttcheeks.jpg

 

Oh, so thaaaaat's what you were talking about!

How....anatomically anomalous....



#89 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 14 May 2013 - 01:23 PM

Now that's a butt-ass

 

3buttcheeks.jpg

 

Oh, so thaaaaat's what you were talking about!

How....anatomically anomalous....

Note how the spinal column splits near the knot in her top?

ya don't think was photoshopped do ya?



#90 floating dutchman

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 10:43 AM

Look at the shadow of what shes sitting on.  It's real.



#91 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 11:29 AM

technically, we can't see the shadow of what she's sitting on.

We can see the shadow cast by her onto whatever it is she's sitting on.

 

but I digress ....



#92 BlondeWithFreeBoat

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 03:51 PM

 

Now that's a butt-ass

 

3buttcheeks.jpg

 

Oh, so thaaaaat's what you were talking about!

How....anatomically anomalous....

Note how the spinal column splits near the knot in her top?

ya don't think was photoshopped do ya?

 

Nope, I'm sure she's 100% real.



#93 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 04:02 PM

If you can get her to that party at HYC, I'm there!



#94 BlondeWithFreeBoat

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 05:33 PM

If you can get her to that party at HYC, I'm there!

 

Oh, because I'm not incentive enough? I see how it is. :rolleyes:



#95 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 15 May 2013 - 05:52 PM

If you can get her to that party at HYC, I'm there!

 

Oh, because I'm not incentive enough? I see how it is. :rolleyes:

I'm a realist  and besides... she's got three cheeks.. that's awesome.

 

 

 

Actually, I had other plans.. but if you're going to be there, I could change my flight ....



#96 BlondeWithFreeBoat

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:27 PM

 

If you can get her to that party at HYC, I'm there!

 

Oh, because I'm not incentive enough? I see how it is. :rolleyes:

I'm a realist  and besides... she's got three cheeks.. that's awesome.

 

 

 

Actually, I had other plans.. but if you're going to be there, I could change my flight ....

 

Seems like a lot of trouble and expense. don't you have a professional career to be worrying about?



#97 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:31 PM

What+Me+Worry.jpg



#98 BlondeWithFreeBoat

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 03:39 PM

What+Me+Worry.jpg

 

You would only worry in the most professional of ways.



#99 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 04:55 PM

yeah.. that i might get my tan all wrong or something






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