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Frostbiting Gear for Boston


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#1 ddrum2000

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 03:06 PM

I plan to start frostbiting in Boston Harbor this winter (Nov - Mar) and I am in need of some good foulies for this. I am looking in the $400-$600 range for a good pair that can be layered and used spring, fall, and winter as I already have some cheap REI gear that works great for the summer. Initially, the Gill OS2 and SLAM Force 3 look interesting based on pricing and I don't know much about Musto or HL. I am looking for recommendations based on your experiences of price, durability, etc.

#2 bsainsbury

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 03:52 PM

get the musto gear.
you wont regret it.

#3 Murphness

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 04:41 PM

If you're ever going to sail offshore, spend the extra money and get goretex. Once your base layer is salty it's all over...

Most stuff that isn't made from goretex isn't waterproof in my experience. It'll keep you dry for about an hour. Then you're proper fucked...

The rest of the decision is prob based on how long the stuff will last. I have no comment on what the best is. I have puma gear that isn't great, but does the trick and it was the right price. Seems were coming undone after one season of heavy use. Most people I sail with have musto and swear by it...

Cheers,
Murphness

#4 Mogle

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 05:07 PM

get the musto gear.
you wont regret it.


Musto is expensive. But it is the best. All our gear are now Musto.

My girl friend, now wife have tried a few others. To begin with she wanted different colours and design. At times she ended up cold and wet and kept asking me why? I gave her a set of Musto MPX. Well - she is now dry and very happy. When visiting different marinas she keeps shopping in Musto shops only.

We sail around the year in most weather.

#5 Vendredi

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 06:19 PM

For price you can't beat Helly Hanson Highliners with proper layers underneath. You'll look more like a fisherman than a sailor but who cares you'll be warm and dry and can increase the budget for the bar afterwards. I have some really old Helly Hanson foulies that seem to stay dry no matter what but I have heard the newer stuff isn't that great. Everyone seems to complain about every brand though so buy what you like. As long as you have a waterproof outer layer you'll be fine. The layers underneath is what you should be using to control the temperature. A ski mask to cover your face is a really good idea too. Winter mechanics gloves work great (wool style with palm and finger surface dipped in rubber with rubber chunks in it) grip great on cold wet lines.

#6 RumLine

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Posted 10 October 2012 - 08:40 PM

Wait...hold on...Foulies? for Frostbiting in Boston?? You're crazy man, I like you, but you're crazy.

I think you need to be asking about Drysuits. Inshore and offshore foul weather gear is great for the fall and mid-spring, but during those frigid months you have a death wish if you're not wearing a drysuit. The good news is that there are some good ones in your price range. Check them out online and find a good price, but make sure it's going to fit with layers before you order.

Don't know what other sort of gear you have already, but i would make sure you also have the following:
Full fingered gloves
Multiple winter hats that don't have sentimental value
Comfortable coast guard approved life jacket w/ whistle
Rescue knife to keep on your life jacket
Thin but warm layers
Thin ski socks
Neoprene socks for outside your drysuit
Good dinghy boots

#7 ddrum2000

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 01:35 PM

Wait...hold on...Foulies? for Frostbiting in Boston?? You're crazy man, I like you, but you're crazy.

I think you need to be asking about Drysuits. Inshore and offshore foul weather gear is great for the fall and mid-spring, but during those frigid months you have a death wish if you're not wearing a drysuit. The good news is that there are some good ones in your price range. Check them out online and find a good price, but make sure it's going to fit with layers before you order.

Don't know what other sort of gear you have already, but i would make sure you also have the following:
Full fingered gloves
Multiple winter hats that don't have sentimental value
Comfortable coast guard approved life jacket w/ whistle
Rescue knife to keep on your life jacket
Thin but warm layers
Thin ski socks
Neoprene socks for outside your drysuit
Good dinghy boots


I appreciate your enthusiasm... I know a few people who do the frost biting and said pretty much no one has a drysuit (that was my first question to them). I have dinghy boots, neoprene sailing gloves, good PFD, etc. but am looking for the jacket and bib.

If you're ever going to sail offshore, spend the extra money and get goretex. Once your base layer is salty it's all over...

Most stuff that isn't made from goretex isn't waterproof in my experience. It'll keep you dry for about an hour. Then you're proper fucked...

The rest of the decision is prob based on how long the stuff will last. I have no comment on what the best is. I have puma gear that isn't great, but does the trick and it was the right price. Seems were coming undone after one season of heavy use. Most people I sail with have musto and swear by it...

Cheers,
Murphness


Murph, what do you use?

#8 Murphness

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 01:48 PM

yea, I'm guessing you'll be on either a Rhodes 19 or a J24? There's a Laser fleet too, which would require a dry suit. But for the keel boats all you really need are ski clothes. Rarely do they race in conditions that require real foulies, and if you're on a Rhodes you're mostly inside the boat and don't get wet.

If you're planing on/hoping to do some other offshore racing you might as well invest in a good set of Gore-Tex foulies. You won't need to buy them again for years, and you will absolutely be happy to have them when it's blowing 30 and pouring rain. Like I said before, once you get salt water on your ass you're as good as miserable for the rest of the race.

If you don't have plans to do much offshore stuff, you can get away with non-Gore-Tex coastal foulies. They're much cheaper but will eventually get waterlogged.

I have a mix and match set of Puma gear at the moment. I got a good deal on it, but if I had the money I'd be buying Musto MPX or HPX.

Cheers,

Murphness

#9 RumLine

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 03:10 PM


Wait...hold on...Foulies? for Frostbiting in Boston?? You're crazy man, I like you, but you're crazy.

I think you need to be asking about Drysuits. Inshore and offshore foul weather gear is great for the fall and mid-spring, but during those frigid months you have a death wish if you're not wearing a drysuit. The good news is that there are some good ones in your price range. Check them out online and find a good price, but make sure it's going to fit with layers before you order.

Don't know what other sort of gear you have already, but i would make sure you also have the following:
Full fingered gloves
Multiple winter hats that don't have sentimental value
Comfortable coast guard approved life jacket w/ whistle
Rescue knife to keep on your life jacket
Thin but warm layers
Thin ski socks
Neoprene socks for outside your drysuit
Good dinghy boots


I appreciate your enthusiasm... I know a few people who do the frost biting and said pretty much no one has a drysuit (that was my first question to them). I have dinghy boots, neoprene sailing gloves, good PFD, etc. but am looking for the jacket and bib.

If you're ever going to sail offshore, spend the extra money and get goretex. Once your base layer is salty it's all over...

Most stuff that isn't made from goretex isn't waterproof in my experience. It'll keep you dry for about an hour. Then you're proper fucked...

The rest of the decision is prob based on how long the stuff will last. I have no comment on what the best is. I have puma gear that isn't great, but does the trick and it was the right price. Seems were coming undone after one season of heavy use. Most people I sail with have musto and swear by it...

Cheers,
Murphness


Murph, what do you use?


Gotcha, so it sounds like you're doing more keelboat sailing. We frostbite in dinghies down here, so drysuits are mandatory. I really like my Atlantis Bibs, they've got adjustable shoulders and are easy on and off. Dinghy boots are good, but DuBarrys or offshore boots are warmer. As for jackets, find something that fits well and is priced right. HL, Gill, Musto, Atlantis...whatever you like.

All that being said, I know a lot of guys who work on boats all winter and swear by Grudens. It's not the fancy sailing gear you're used to, but it's tough as shit.

#10 ddrum2000

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 05:00 PM



Wait...hold on...Foulies? for Frostbiting in Boston?? You're crazy man, I like you, but you're crazy.

I think you need to be asking about Drysuits. Inshore and offshore foul weather gear is great for the fall and mid-spring, but during those frigid months you have a death wish if you're not wearing a drysuit. The good news is that there are some good ones in your price range. Check them out online and find a good price, but make sure it's going to fit with layers before you order.

Don't know what other sort of gear you have already, but i would make sure you also have the following:
Full fingered gloves
Multiple winter hats that don't have sentimental value
Comfortable coast guard approved life jacket w/ whistle
Rescue knife to keep on your life jacket
Thin but warm layers
Thin ski socks
Neoprene socks for outside your drysuit
Good dinghy boots


I appreciate your enthusiasm... I know a few people who do the frost biting and said pretty much no one has a drysuit (that was my first question to them). I have dinghy boots, neoprene sailing gloves, good PFD, etc. but am looking for the jacket and bib.

If you're ever going to sail offshore, spend the extra money and get goretex. Once your base layer is salty it's all over...

Most stuff that isn't made from goretex isn't waterproof in my experience. It'll keep you dry for about an hour. Then you're proper fucked...

The rest of the decision is prob based on how long the stuff will last. I have no comment on what the best is. I have puma gear that isn't great, but does the trick and it was the right price. Seems were coming undone after one season of heavy use. Most people I sail with have musto and swear by it...

Cheers,
Murphness


Murph, what do you use?


Gotcha, so it sounds like you're doing more keelboat sailing. We frostbite in dinghies down here, so drysuits are mandatory. I really like my Atlantis Bibs, they've got adjustable shoulders and are easy on and off. Dinghy boots are good, but DuBarrys or offshore boots are warmer. As for jackets, find something that fits well and is priced right. HL, Gill, Musto, Atlantis...whatever you like.

All that being said, I know a lot of guys who work on boats all winter and swear by Grudens. It's not the fancy sailing gear you're used to, but it's tough as shit.


Yeah, it would be on J24's not Lasers. Everyone says Musto but its hard to swallow paying $1000-$1200 for gear which is what all of the common shop charge. Do you know any other sources then West Marine, APS, Mauri, Vela, Layline...

#11 Murphness

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 05:21 PM

If you're not planning on doing any offshore sailing all you need are coastal foulies. Just grab some gill coastal kit or use ski pants...The grudens are a good option too, you'll look like a fisherman, but it'll keep you dry and warm.

If you are planning on using them for offshore sailing, its worth the extra $400, especially if you've already committed to $600. You'd be pissed when you're coming on watch at 2 am and its pouring rain when you step into soggy foulies. Yes, you can get by without the stuff, but it improves quality of life a great deal to be warm and salt water free...

#12 RumLine

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 05:22 PM




Wait...hold on...Foulies? for Frostbiting in Boston?? You're crazy man, I like you, but you're crazy.

I think you need to be asking about Drysuits. Inshore and offshore foul weather gear is great for the fall and mid-spring, but during those frigid months you have a death wish if you're not wearing a drysuit. The good news is that there are some good ones in your price range. Check them out online and find a good price, but make sure it's going to fit with layers before you order.

Don't know what other sort of gear you have already, but i would make sure you also have the following:
Full fingered gloves
Multiple winter hats that don't have sentimental value
Comfortable coast guard approved life jacket w/ whistle
Rescue knife to keep on your life jacket
Thin but warm layers
Thin ski socks
Neoprene socks for outside your drysuit
Good dinghy boots


I appreciate your enthusiasm... I know a few people who do the frost biting and said pretty much no one has a drysuit (that was my first question to them). I have dinghy boots, neoprene sailing gloves, good PFD, etc. but am looking for the jacket and bib.

If you're ever going to sail offshore, spend the extra money and get goretex. Once your base layer is salty it's all over...

Most stuff that isn't made from goretex isn't waterproof in my experience. It'll keep you dry for about an hour. Then you're proper fucked...

The rest of the decision is prob based on how long the stuff will last. I have no comment on what the best is. I have puma gear that isn't great, but does the trick and it was the right price. Seems were coming undone after one season of heavy use. Most people I sail with have musto and swear by it...

Cheers,
Murphness


Murph, what do you use?


Gotcha, so it sounds like you're doing more keelboat sailing. We frostbite in dinghies down here, so drysuits are mandatory. I really like my Atlantis Bibs, they've got adjustable shoulders and are easy on and off. Dinghy boots are good, but DuBarrys or offshore boots are warmer. As for jackets, find something that fits well and is priced right. HL, Gill, Musto, Atlantis...whatever you like.

All that being said, I know a lot of guys who work on boats all winter and swear by Grudens. It's not the fancy sailing gear you're used to, but it's tough as shit.


Yeah, it would be on J24's not Lasers. Everyone says Musto but its hard to swallow paying $1000-$1200 for gear which is what all of the common shop charge. Do you know any other sources then West Marine, APS, Mauri, Vela, Layline...


Jamestown Distributors have the Bibs I suggested on sale...as long as you're XL
http://www.jamestowndistributors.com/userportal/show_product.do?pid=57938&familyName=Atlantis+WeatherGear+Aegis+Hybrid+Bib

Defender
http://www.defender.com/foul-weather-gear.html

Landfall Navigation has Gill Gear on sale (35% off)
http://www.landfallnavigation.com/gillos2.html

#13 Sailing My Cubicle

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 08:20 PM

I'm a Musto fan and am glad I spent the money on the mpx offshore gear about 6-7 years ago. Only complaint with Musto is that the collar on my 8 year old spray top seems to be coming undone.

But regardless of how much you spend on your gear, you'll get more life out of it if you take care of it properly. When I'm done racing for the day/weekend, take the time to rinse the salt water out. Using some nikwax waterproof spray every other year or so can also improve the waterproof-ness of whatever gear you want.

Invest in good gear and proper layers.

#14 Merit 25

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 08:49 PM

Pick a good shell. Look for old gear (last year's model) and save a bunch. I got some good offshore stuff from HL for almost 1/2 the price just b/c they came out with a new and improved style. Got an offshore HL jacket for $300 and the bibs for $300 on sale at a boat show.

You biggest mistake was waiting this long to buy foulies. You don't have enough time to wait for a sale now.

Some options
http://www.defender....&cartId=3793197
http://www.defender....0292&id=1587280

FWIW this is similar to what I went with but for less than 1/2 the cost:
http://www.defender....0289&id=1132255
http://www.defender....0293&id=1132273

#15 ddrum2000

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 10:14 PM

Pick a good shell. Look for old gear (last year's model) and save a bunch. I got some good offshore stuff from HL for almost 1/2 the price just b/c they came out with a new and improved style. Got an offshore HL jacket for $300 and the bibs for $300 on sale at a boat show.

You biggest mistake was waiting this long to buy foulies. You don't have enough time to wait for a sale now.

Some options
http://www.defender....&cartId=3793197
http://www.defender....0292&id=1587280

FWIW this is similar to what I went with but for less than 1/2 the cost:
http://www.defender....0289&id=1132255
http://www.defender....0293&id=1132273


I need to get to a shop to check these out but do you think (the the Gill Case) that the "coastal line" is sufficient or does it make a large difference to step up to the Keelboat Racer or OS 2 line?

#16 Murphness

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Posted 11 October 2012 - 10:31 PM


Pick a good shell. Look for old gear (last year's model) and save a bunch. I got some good offshore stuff from HL for almost 1/2 the price just b/c they came out with a new and improved style. Got an offshore HL jacket for $300 and the bibs for $300 on sale at a boat show.

You biggest mistake was waiting this long to buy foulies. You don't have enough time to wait for a sale now.

Some options
http://www.defender....&cartId=3793197
http://www.defender....0292&id=1587280

FWIW this is similar to what I went with but for less than 1/2 the cost:
http://www.defender....0289&id=1132255
http://www.defender....0293&id=1132273


I need to get to a shop to check these out but do you think (the the Gill Case) that the "coastal line" is sufficient or does it make a large difference to step up to the Keelboat Racer or OS 2 line?


For almost all sailing short of multi day off shore passages or a rainy gail, the Gill stuff will work great. You wont be frostbiting in any serious weather. They call it if it's its blowing more then 20 sustained and usually if it's its steadily raining and cold out...

Get the Gill stuff and use it as back up if you end up upgrading at some point. Like Cubesie said, put it away dry and only wear it sailing and it'll last far longer...

You can try most of the gill stuff on at West Marine, just don't buy it there...

See you out there!

#17 Merit 25

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 01:11 AM

+1 to Murphness. The coastal stuff is fine. The key to staying warm is a dry shell, then LAYERING under it. The shell shouldn't provide hardly any warmth.

However, if you spend a ton of money now, you'll never regret it. Good/great foul weather gear is worth it's weight in gold. And it's priced accordingly.

#18 Vogel515

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 01:17 PM

You're forgetting the most important piece of gear for frostbiting in Boston Harbor...

Posted Image
Add rum and cider. Might want a good collapsible shovel / brush too.

#19 ddrum2000

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 02:09 PM

You're forgetting the most important piece of gear for frostbiting in Boston Harbor...

Posted Image
Add rum and cider. Might want a good collapsible shovel / brush too.


I'm more of a whiskey and coffee type but both are great!

#20 RumLine

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 03:30 PM


You're forgetting the most important piece of gear for frostbiting in Boston Harbor...

Posted Image
Add rum and cider. Might want a good collapsible shovel / brush too.


I'm more of a whiskey and coffee type but both are great!


Whiskey and coffee? Nothing like having to hang your ass over the rail to take a dump when it's 15 degrees...I would stick with cider and rum.

#21 EthanB

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 04:31 PM


...


Yeah, it would be on J24's not Lasers. Everyone says Musto but its hard to swallow paying $1000-$1200 for gear which is what all of the common shop charge. Do you know any other sources then West Marine, APS, Mauri, Vela, Layline...


Bass Pro Shops It ain't yachtie gear, but it's GoreTex and in your price range. Haven't used it myself, but I've heard it's decent. Doesn't appear to have reflective things, so probably not appropriate for going offshore or over night.

#22 tomtriad

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Posted 12 October 2012 - 06:27 PM

Gill is ok for a couple of years use, then the seams will leak and the fabric becomes porous. But they have a lifetime warranty and will replace the failed gear if you send it back.

You also need some good boots and gloves:
http://www.fisherman..._deck_boots.htm

Fisherman's rubber coated gloves (waterproof) and some polypro liners (warm) are good and inexpensive.

If you're sailing on J24's you will get wet. Also it rains sometimes.

#23 BarePoles

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 03:33 AM

I have a Musto drysuit and it is by far the best piece of kit I own. We frostbite in dinghies.

Now you say, those babies are upwards of $800 bucks.....well if you do your research, talk to you local reps, etc. etc. you might be able to walk out the door with a brand new Musto drysuit for $300, like I did.

If you say you'll drop $600 on decent gear now, I guarantee you'll drop another $600 on more decent gear next time, when all the while you could have purchased the Musto gear and you won't think about purchasing anything else for a long while.

I'd go with a set of Musto foulies, you won't regret the money spent. Just my .02 cents worth.

#24 MoMP

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 02:00 AM

Frost biting isnt a fashion show by any stretch. Buy less Expensive shells and spend your money on layering, gloves and socks any jacket and bib that breaths and keeps you dry is fine. Spend money for longevity. If you also ski, the layering gear does double duty pretty well.

#25 pippsk

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 07:54 PM

If you're going to layer the Zhik superwarm top is great. It's actually meant to be worn as an outer layer and has the "hydrophobic" outer that makes it waterproof. I bought this along with the skiff suit for dinghy racing. The two of them together were way too warm even in sub 40 temperatures with 20 knots of wind. As a result the superwarm top sat unused for a year until I decided to use it frostbiting keelboats. Now if the temperatures are at or below 40, I'll wear that. If it's a really cold day I might wear a softshell or an offshore smock. I like that it gives me options depending on the conditions. The downside is that they've raised the price to nearly $200. However, I'm sure you can find it cheaper and Zhik now has some competition. Other companies are putting out the same waterproof/hydrophobic neoprene type top. The surprising thing is that it's thinner than you'd expect so your movements aren't restricted by extra bulk or thicker neoprene.

#26 dreaded

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 08:48 PM



Fisherman's rubber coated gloves (waterproof) and some polypro liners (warm) are good and inexpensive.


atlas 460's .... around $10

#27 Anonymous Anarchist

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 12:59 PM

I've just heard a J-24 capsized and sank in Boston a few weeks ago. That being said, it's hard to imagine using anything other than a dry-suit.

aa

#28 Murphness

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 01:19 PM

I've just heard a J-24 capsized and sank in Boston a few weeks ago. That being said, it's hard to imagine using anything other than a dry-suit.

aa


Where did you hear that? I don't sail in the J24 frostbite fleet but word gets around fast in a small community. A friend was out with them Saturday and he didn't mention anything about it...Guess it coulda been a random J24 out sailing too...

#29 Anonymous Anarchist

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 04:10 PM


I've just heard a J-24 capsized and sank in Boston a few weeks ago. That being said, it's hard to imagine using anything other than a dry-suit.

aa


Where did you hear that? I don't sail in the J24 frostbite fleet but word gets around fast in a small community. A friend was out with them Saturday and he didn't mention anything about it...Guess it coulda been a random J24 out sailing too...


I heard it from a survivor, I'll gather more info and post it.

aa

#30 JaredC

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Posted 09 February 2013 - 04:33 AM

I've just heard a J-24 capsized and sank in Boston a few weeks ago. That being said, it's hard to imagine using anything other than a dry-suit.

aa


One down, a few thousand to go.




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