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Cutting wire for wind instrument


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#1 islandplanet

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 04:22 AM

If you need to cut a wire for a Raymarine wind instrument to pull a mast, what's involved in re-connecting?

#2 break my wallet

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 09:42 AM

cut the wire for my B&G..
I cut near the junction box and spliced a section back on (detail work but doable) The extra wire I bought even had the same colour codes,,,
the only thing is that if the spliced wire has to be "pulled" the splice cannot be too "fat" I staggered the splice used really small bare metal butt connectors and shrink tube.. ( all the bits and pieces from a local electronics warehouse,)
It is too bad if they left an extra 6 inches I could have saved a ton of time..

#3 diggler

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 12:22 PM

Two thumbs down to butt connectors, especially in corrosive or high vibration environments. Solder is much much better. Either way, make sure something is down about stress relief on the connection if you care about longevity.

#4 TheOffice

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 01:13 PM

Solder is not better. It too corrodes. Heat shrink and butt connectors.

#5 Bermerlin

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 06:35 PM

Cut inside the cabin and pull the wire off the deck. Reinstall with a small junction box inside (there is one furnished with a new wind vane specifically for this situation).

#6 Leon T

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 06:51 PM

TheOffice has a good point, heat shrink is more important to isolate the connection from corrosive environment than obsessing over whether to solder or crimp w/ connector (unless you suck at soldering or connecting, then it might be a factor). Run the wire through a cable clam (mounted on the deck) and make the cut inside the cabin.

#7 diggler

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Posted 01 November 2012 - 08:47 PM

To be clear, I was taking heat shrink for granted regardless of connection type. And yes solder corrodes, but it does so from the outside, which means the conductivity of the connection is unaffected for much longer than a butt connector. Vibration is still the main reason I hate butt connectors, although it's not as bad on boats as on helicopters.

Definitely like the cut inside with junction box idea the best.

#8 SMBReno

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 06:21 PM

How about solder (with the Al heat shield to protect insulator ala Don Casey), coat splice with dielectric grease, then heat shrink (double adhesive kind)?

#9 gangbusters

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 07:53 PM

I use the Raymarine junction box for this and have had no issues disconnecting and reconnecting over 5 years. In can be a bit of a paid=n working in a cramped space and the screws are small but it works.

#10 Moonduster

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Posted 02 November 2012 - 08:26 PM

These wires are one of the few places where a junction box is the best solution. Cut the wire so you have plenty of pigtail hanging out of the mast. Make sure the wires enter the junction box from the bottom so that water creeping along the wire drips off at a point below the box and can't run into the box. Secure the wires so that any tension doesn't wind up pulling the individual conductors out. Probably makes sense to tin the end of each conductor but it shouldn't be necessary.

Good luck!




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