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Broken ankle at anchor

Getting home with an injury

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#1 olaf hart

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:19 PM

So it finally happened.

I have always wondered what would happen if something broke.
Sweet Hart and I were at a birthday party for a fellow sailor on an uninhabited island in the Channel.
All the boats were anchored for the night in a bay near the island.
Slipped on a rock going back to the dinghy, ankle twisted along the side of a dinghy near the rock, and I landed on the side of my foot.
Something went crack and started to hurt.

In my idle moments at sea, I often think through what to do if something goes, including me. I had never thought of an ankle. This is my first fracture.

Anyway, it was not too bad, the main problem was weight bearing. There were lots of folks around who could help if needed, but I was quite interested in what I could do for myself. It was also possible the ankle was sprained, but the pain felt like bone pain.

Crawling is good. I could just hobble but it really hurt, so I managed to get in the dinghy and row it back to the boat.

Getting into the boat was a challenge. Having a big stable dinghy and a boarding step was a big help, but I will have to do something about my weight or my upper body strength.

So, off to bed for the night. Lots of pain, so plenty of time to think through the next steps. Raising the anchor was the big one.

Fortunately we were on the 30 footer, so I had 120' of 8mm chain and a 25lb Manson to bring in.
I have a good Muir manual winch, but I usually just do it all by hand. Sweet Hart could use the winch, but it is slow and she would have problems getting the anchor aboard.

So, motor idling and a calm morning, I crawled to the foredeck, sat behind the winch and pulled the anchor up. Easy. Just used the winch to break the anchor out, otherwise the whole deal was neat and tidy.

The next challenge was picking up the mooring at the other end, again no sweat.

We would have been in trouble if we had sail up in a blow, or a big swell at anchor, so thanks for that Huey.

So it worked out fine in the end. Friends and Sweet Hart were around, so this was really an exercise.

She is already working on doing more around the mast and foredeck, but I was surprised by how easily things went with a bit of planning.

Thought it might be useful to share stories, maybe come in handy some day.

#2 Bob Perry

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:40 PM

Holy cow Olaf!
That sounds like some pain was involved and not a good way to end a party.

Throw some 5200 on it and call me in the morning.

#3 olaf hart

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 10:45 PM

I was schooled by the Christian Brothers Bob, so pain is an old friend.
I am in a Cam Boot now, so it is very comfortable.
Would make it easier on the boat too, not that I plan to try it out for a while.

#4 kdh

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Posted 08 November 2012 - 11:27 PM

Holy cow Olaf!
That sounds like some pain was involved and not a good way to end a party.

Throw some 5200 on it and call me in the morning.


You're very funny, Bob.

Olaf, sorry for your pain. I broke my 5th metatarsal running with my brother in the woods. Same sort of thing with landing on the side of my foot. Have you had an x-ray yet? If it's that bone you want the break close to your ankle. Mine heeled just fine.

We were about to go sailing, and I refused to let the ankle stop me. We took the launch to shore and I self-medicated. I was fine.

#5 MoeAlfa

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:04 AM

Scary story, Doc. Glad it ended well.

So, did you immobilize it that night?

I tend to keep a few old oxycodone/acetaminophen on hand even for overnights, since slicing my finger through the nail making dinner and then smashing it when we docked the boat next day. A broken bone would be worse.

#6 Anomaly2

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:05 AM

I was schooled by the Christian Brothers


Nothing says cheap brandy like Christian Brothers... take with or without the 5200 and you'll be fine Olaf. Oh, and I recommend twice - a-day doses of those chocolate cookie/bar thingies of Sweet Hart's. Everything is an opportunity: elevate your ankle, take the above medicines (you can substitute a libation of choice), and do some SERIOUS daydreaming about that wishbone'd staysail, the interior refit of the Adams, and when you two are coming here to meet Scout and sail on the bay.

#7 kdh

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:21 AM

Scary story, Doc. Glad it ended well.

So, did you immobilize it that night?

I tend to keep a few old oxycodone/acetaminophen on hand even for overnights, since slicing my finger through the nail making dinner and then smashing it when we docked the boat next day. A broken bone would be worse.


Oxycodone/acetaminophen? Last I knew they weren't in the same drug class. Is there a Yiddish term for pain killer?

I have a huge tolerance for pain. I'm able to get outside it and think, "that hurts."

#8 olaf hart

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:38 AM

Scary story, Doc. Glad it ended well.

So, did you immobilize it that night?

I tend to keep a few old oxycodone/acetaminophen on hand even for overnights, since slicing my finger through the nail making dinner and then smashing it when we docked the boat next day. A broken bone would be worse.


The palliative care guys say high doses of paracetamol (?acetaminophen in US) is a good start for bone pain.
They were right in this case.
It's not hard to immobilise an ankle with cushions if you are lying down.
Would have killed for an inflatable splint though.

#9 Gatekeeper

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:40 AM

Alcohol may have been involved...

:)

#10 MoeAlfa

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:43 AM


Scary story, Doc. Glad it ended well.

So, did you immobilize it that night?

I tend to keep a few old oxycodone/acetaminophen on hand even for overnights, since slicing my finger through the nail making dinner and then smashing it when we docked the boat next day. A broken bone would be worse.


The palliative care guys say high doses of paracetamol (?acetaminophen in US) is a good start for bone pain.
They were right in this case.
It's not hard to immobilise an ankle with cushions if you are lying down.
Would have killed for an inflatable splint though.

I'll remember that. Not palliative in the ultimate sense of, "you won't be needing that liver for long, anyway", I trust.

#11 MoeAlfa

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:45 AM


Scary story, Doc. Glad it ended well.

So, did you immobilize it that night?

I tend to keep a few old oxycodone/acetaminophen on hand even for overnights, since slicing my finger through the nail making dinner and then smashing it when we docked the boat next day. A broken bone would be worse.


Oxycodone/acetaminophen? Last I knew they weren't in the same drug class. Is there a Yiddish term for pain killer?

I have a huge tolerance for pain. I'm able to get outside it and think, "that hurts."

The generic cocktail known to the Goyim as Percocet.

#12 olaf hart

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:47 AM

About two six hourly for two days did it for me, and I weigh 100kg.

Have had a few palliative patients on 2g every four hours, LFTs held up even though they were pretty frail.

#13 olaf hart

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:50 AM

Alcohol may have been involved...

:)


Not that much, about two beers, I brought my own.
The problem was the side of the dinghy rotated the foot as it came down, so I landed on the side of the foot.
Would have been all right if I had landed on a flat foot, fall less than 18 in.

The orthopod said I probably hadn't had enough to drink.

#14 boomer

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 01:14 AM

He was probably right.....but....

#15 Gatekeeper

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 01:31 AM

I was schooled by the Christian Brothers Bob, so


Ok, it may be the wine talking but how did we get on the topic of hockey sticks?? Did Olaf trip over one??

More wine please!!

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#16 olaf hart

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 01:34 AM

About two six hourly for two days did it for me, and I weigh 100kg.

Have had a few palliative patients on 2g every four hours, LFTs held up even though they were pretty frail.


Don't try this at home folks.

#17 olaf hart

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 01:37 AM


I was schooled by the Christian Brothers Bob, so


Ok, it may be the wine talking but how did we get on the topic of hockey sticks?? Did Olaf trip over one??

More wine please!!


The Christian Brothers runs a string of Catholic boys schools here in Oz.
Worked on the theory if you hit boys often and hard enough they might learn something.

It certainly worked for the Rugby teams, pain meant nothing to us.

#18 Balder

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 01:42 AM

Just so everyone knows, please don't combine alcohol and Tylenol (acetaminophen, parecetomol) or any of the combo drugs that contain it with alcohol. The leading cause of liver failure in the us is concurrent use of alcohol/acetaminophen. If u have imbibed more than a couple stick with ibuprofen (Advil) for the short term and if you are a heavy drinker abstain from Tylenol completely.

Olaf, u one tough piece o' meat.

#19 MoeAlfa

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 02:12 AM


About two six hourly for two days did it for me, and I weigh 100kg.

Have had a few palliative patients on 2g every four hours, LFTs held up even though they were pretty frail.


Don't try this at home folks.

Word.

#20 Sublime

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 02:33 AM

Oof!


You can use a pillow, fold it around your foot and leg, tie it around your foot and around your leg and it will be somewhat immobilized.

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#21 Paps

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 08:16 AM

About two six hourly for two days did it for me, and I weigh 100kg.

Have had a few palliative patients on 2g every four hours, LFTs held up even though they were pretty frail.


Panadol or Percocet?? Inquiring minds need to know.

Glad your OK Farty, nice to have a trial run with a lower level fracture to see whats its like. In a lively boat situation it would be a challenge, I'm sure.

That said the body is amazing and sometimes people do extraordinary things with injuries that defy explanation. I guess something involving a decent wound and blood loss could be more difficult to deal with in a moving environment.

I have also never had a fracture, touch wood, if you dont count toes stubbed while drunk and never attended to. In the morning its like WTF is that on my foot??

Followed by "who are you?"..... "have you seen my wallet?".... "what time is it?"..... "where am I?"........"did we...?"

"do you mind, its just that"....... " great, lovely to meet you..............(pregnant pause).............and that naked girl I met in the hall on my way to the John as well, is she your flatmate?"...."right"

"would you like my business card....?" "no, your probably right there"..... "which way did you say town was again?"

#22 jhiller

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:15 PM

Did the same once as I was leaving the dock on a run from the Chessie to Florida. Never knew how many colors a foot could be... I wrapped it tightly, iced as often as I could and consumed more Motrin non-stop. Damn that was a miserable few days. I kept thinking about the single-hander who allegedly removed his own appendix with a grapefruit spoon. Bet that hurt worse......

#23 boomer

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 12:27 PM

Did the same once as I was leaving the dock on a run from the Chessie to Florida. Never knew how many colors a foot could be... I wrapped it tightly, iced as often as I could and consumed more Motrin non-stop. Damn that was a miserable few days. I kept thinking about the single-hander who allegedly removed his own appendix with a grapefruit spoon. Bet that hurt worse......


:blink:

#24 Tucky

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 04:35 PM

Pretty close-

http://news.google.c...&pg=7037,990171

#25 MoeAlfa

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 05:58 PM

Dan Carlin, telemedicine god.

#26 Blackbeard

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 07:23 PM

So it finally happened.

I have always wondered what would happen if something broke.

Thought it might be useful to share stories, maybe come in handy some day.


I collapsed my heel bone when a jump over the lifelines on to the dock went sideways. I thought I had just broken my ankle until the Dr. at the Friday Harbor (San Juan Island WA) clinic told me I should fly back to Seattle because there was nothing he could do there.

With my boat and family in Friday Harbor (last few days of a cruise) I chose not to fly out and asked the Dr. to wrap it up. I bought some light pain meds and a set of crutches. Fortunately my brother was able to fly up to Friday Harbor by seaplane the next morning to help with delivering the boat et al back to Seattle.

I was propped up behind the wheel for the docking maneuvers and when we needed to take a mooring to fix an engine problem. We avoided any other fancy nautical maneuvers and had calm conditions and favorable tides for most of the 10 hour trip back to Shilshole.

I ended up with a 5 hour reconstructive surgery to regain something close to full function but I will never dance ballet again. I no longer jump over lifelines onto docks and I wear full support shoes not thin "boat" shoes.

Blackbeard

#27 Mung Breath

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 08:49 PM

Sport on, Olaf!!



(I'm still grinning over WHL's belly-laughing recital of this video last summer)

#28 Caca Cabeza

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 01:16 AM

Good OTC pain reliever formula is Ibuprofen, the 3 hours later Acetaminophen then 3 hour later Ibuprofen, etc. They are normally each every 6 hours (which they still are), but because one is metabolized by the kidneys and one by the liver, you are maintaining analgesic maximum efficiency without overloading the removal mechanism. I was first told about this by a surgical RN, and it was later verified (actually prescribed) by the chief of pediatric XXXXX department (and head of the pediatric XXXXXXX medical school) at a large, world class university. Cant name the university, but it's the one that plays the "Big Game" in college football and doesn't say "Go Bears".

Daughter had major reconstructive surgery on her soft palate and with that cocktail was asking for french fries on the drive home ~36 hours later.

Just my observation. I haven't stayed in Holiday Inn Express in quite a while, so...

#29 MoeAlfa

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 02:22 AM

Good OTC pain reliever formula is Ibuprofen, the 3 hours later Acetaminophen then 3 hour later Ibuprofen, etc. They are normally each every 6 hours (which they still are), but because one is metabolized by the kidneys and one by the liver, you are maintaining analgesic maximum efficiency without overloading the removal mechanism. I was first told about this by a surgical RN, and it was later verified (actually prescribed) by the chief of pediatric XXXXX department (and head of the pediatric XXXXXXX medical school) at a large, world class university. Cant name the university, but it's the one that plays the "Big Game" in college football and doesn't say "Go Bears".

Daughter had major reconstructive surgery on her soft palate and with that cocktail was asking for french fries on the drive home ~36 hours later.

Just my observation. I haven't stayed in Holiday Inn Express in quite a while, so...

Dead right for those with no contraindications to either drug. CV available on request.

#30 Soņadora

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 03:08 AM

hopefully you had some Mike's handy...



#31 kdh

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 03:13 AM

...CV available on request.


I've always imagined you have an impressive CV that makes your mother very proud, Moe. I respect you for that.

#32 Ishmael

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 05:13 AM


...CV available on request.


I've always imagined you have an impressive CV that makes your mother very proud, Moe. I respect you for that.


Ouch.

#33 boomer

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 05:46 AM

Broke my back a couple times years ago, and never liked doing any of the pain killers, didn't want to become dependent on them. So even though they gave them to me after discharge, never took them. Getting older in the last ten years or so, had those occasional emergency repair jobs, where we might work in excess of 24 hours straight. This usually resulted the next day or a couple days later in sever back pain, no doubt due to fatigue. One of my right hand men, Joe Chafero offered me an Ibuprofen, I was surprised how well it worked. Since then maybe three or for times, when do to fatigue had the same sever back pain, the Ibuprofen did the trick.

#34 olaf hart

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 06:16 AM

Broke my back a couple times years ago, and never liked doing any of the pain killers, didn't want to become dependent on them. So even though they gave them to me after discharge, never took them. Getting older in the last ten years or so, had those occasional emergency repair jobs, where we might work in excess of 24 hours straight. This usually resulted the next day or a couple days later in sever back pain, no doubt due to fatigue. One of my right hand men, Joe Chafero offered me an Ibuprofen, I was surprised how well it worked. Since then maybe three or for times, when do to fatigue had the same sever back pain, the Ibuprofen did the trick.


Anti Inflammatories turn off the switch that causes muscle spasm, which is responsible for most back and neck pain, and are not drugs of dependence. Just look out for your stomach.


#35 boomer

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 06:40 AM

The pain wasn't muscle spasm. When it happens it's almost at the base of the spine, feels like bone on bone. It only happens when I've been up for 24-36 hours with maybe a short half hour to hour and a half cat nap thrown in. Since my last occurrence of this pain in about '08, I made a point of not working such long hours, only limiting myself to 12-14 hour stretches of work, followed with six to eight hours of sleep. I always took the Ibuprofen after a meal, and only took one 400mg tablet or two 200mg tablets. and didn't need another dose.

Like I said, I don't do meds as a habit, and have only taken one dose of Ibuprofen less then five times in my life. The percocets you get from the dentist, never took them either. Usually I've always been able to deal with pain, other then first thing in the morning. After my last back injury in the late 70's, usually I'd have to roll out of bed on my hands and knees, then stand up to get ready for work. The amount of days I had to do this to get up in the morning became less frequent, till it was just one or two days a week. This lasted till about the spring of 84. My back never liked being excessively fatigued after this, but I could usually deal with the pain, till the winter of 2005 when I finally took Ibuprofen for the first time.

Tried the chiro...went to four different chiros back then, but they didn't help the pain. Once I started working out, exercising and windsurfing daily, the pain subsided. What works for me still, is to exercise and make sure I get some windsurfing in regularly.

#36 kdh

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 12:05 PM



...CV available on request.


I've always imagined you have an impressive CV that makes your mother very proud, Moe. I respect you for that.


Ouch.


I was completely serious. Moe seems very smart to me.

#37 mad

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 12:45 PM

Pretty close-

http://news.google.c...&pg=7037,990171

Don't forget about Bertrand de Broc sewing his own tongue back on in the '92-'93 vendee :o

#38 Paps

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 10:41 PM


Pretty close-

http://news.google.c...&pg=7037,990171

Don't forget about Bertrand de Broc sewing his own tongue back on in the '92-'93 vendee :o


Did the wuss take Ibuprofen??

#39 boomer

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:33 PM

My brothers and I were beach cruising. One morning after breaking camp and getting ready to launch the boats, the wind died. So we decided to pass the time playing a bit of football on the beach. My younger brother went long for a pass, jumped and caught the pass over my older brother, and twisted his ankle when he came down. Or we thought he twisted his ankle. We fashioned a splint for him, but he didn't want to wear it.

He had been sailing with my older brother in his Flattie, but I took him in my Comet after he broke it. Mostly he'd keep it elevated on our gear bags, alternating with periods of soaking it in the chilly waters of the San Juans as we sailed.He complained of the pain a couple of times over the next couple days and his ankle swelled up pretty good. My brothers and I were giving him a ration about sucking it up, though we were all actually pretty concerned about his swollen ankle. We help him off the boat at night and make him a nice comfy bed with bags to elevate his foot. Still he was in pain and the ankle remained swollen.

So we headed back home. When we got back, he went to the doc,turned out he had a broken ankle. I know I felt bad about giving him schitt, I suspect my brothers felt likewise. That was years ago, but he still gives us a bad time for not being sympathetic enough.

#40 kdh

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:44 PM

My brothers and I were beach cruising. One morning after breaking camp and getting ready to launch the boats, the wind died. So we decided to pass the time playing a bit of football on the beach. My younger brother went long for a pass, jumped and caught the pass over my older brother, and twisted his ankle when he came down. Or we thought he twisted his ankle. We fashioned a splint for him, but he didn't want to wear it.

He had been sailing with my older brother in his Flattie, but I took him in my Comet after he broke it. Mostly he'd keep it elevated on our gear bags, alternating with periods of soaking it in the chilly waters of the San Juans as we sailed.He complained of the pain a couple of times over the next couple days and his ankle swelled up pretty good. My brothers and I were giving him a ration about sucking it up, though we were all actually pretty concerned about his swollen ankle. We help him off the boat at night and make him a nice comfy bed with bags to elevate his foot. Still he was in pain and the ankle remained swollen.

So we headed back home. When we got back, he went to the doc,turned out he had a broken ankle. I know I felt bad about giving him schitt, I suspect my brothers felt likewise. That was years ago, but he still gives us a bad time for not being sympathetic enough.


I don't know Boomer. I've broken my ankle. It swelled up. I feel like giving a good dose of HTFU in the circumstances is not something to justify any sort of continuing guilt. An apology might free you from that, if you haven't given one yet.

I have a little brother, 6 years younger than my twin brother and I. He's given us a bad time, justifiably, though less and less over the years. At this point not at all. Water under the bridge.

#41 boomer

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Posted 10 November 2012 - 11:49 PM

Believe me, we heard it enough over the years and we've all apologized countless times. Even though we give him a ration about he pain, we were all actually pretty concerned and sympathetic.

I broken more then a few bones over the years, the only thing that bothered me was someone telling jokes, because then I'd start laughing and then it would hurt.

I do know the compound fractures with the bone sticking through the skin are the most painful, torn ligaments are equally as painful...minor fractures and stress fractures not so painful.

I had a compound fracture of my left ankle skiing, that was fairly painful.

Probably the worst pain I've had was compound fractures of my right arm, wrist and elbow all at once...four breaks in the elbow, four in forearm and four in the wrist. Then the arm healed with an s-curve and had to be re-broken,pinned and plates and set straight. Once again I was fine as long as know was telling jokes, and I started laughing.

#42 Mung Breath

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 12:04 AM

I was an only-child. Pain was self-inflicted. Now I have three sons. I can see it coming.

#43 boomer

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 12:20 AM

Seeing anyone in pain bothers me, seeing one of my children or any child hurt, even more so. With six kids, I've had to deal with a few of my kids being hurt over the years. Not something I'd want to wish on any parent. The worst was recently this year.

My son as a pedestrian, was hit by a car that was doing about 60 last spring. The car was driven by an old man in his 80's who probably shouldn't of been driving. The compound fractures were numerous, as well as the plates and pins to put him back together again. I pleaded with the doctors not to amputate his legs, and to do whatever it took to put everything back together. The initial surgery was eight and a half hours. There were two follow up surgeries within a week and another followup surgery a couple months later. He also had injuries to his shoulder and left arm, pretty ugly really. He also had a pretty bad concussion. He was in intensive care for a week, and on a morphine drip to deal with the pain. Believe me, it was quite painful to see him like that. I really don't want to see that again. Whenever I hear the MAST or Harborview helicopters, my thoughts go out to those involved.

#44 Paps

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 06:37 AM

Morphine! The wuss........................................:)

#45 boomer

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Posted 11 November 2012 - 12:24 PM

Yea, he had a problem with pain..... a week after he got out of the hospital, he said none of the pain killers they prescribed did jack....I nodded my head in agreement....told him, "your going to be feeling pain the rest of your life, may as well get used to it, here's what you do....." So after explaining a few things that prescription of pain killers didn't get a refill.

#46 Balder

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 11:50 AM

The pain wasn't muscle spasm. When it happens it's almost at the base of the spine, feels like bone on bone. It only happens when I've been up for 24-36 hours with maybe a short half hour to hour and a half cat nap thrown in. Since my last occurrence of this pain in about '08, I made a point of not working such long hours, only limiting myself to 12-14 hour stretches of work, followed with six to eight hours of sleep. I always took the Ibuprofen after a meal, and only took one 400mg tablet or two 200mg tablets. and didn't need another dose.

Like I said, I don't do meds as a habit, and have only taken one dose of Ibuprofen less then five times in my life. The percocets you get from the dentist, never took them either. Usually I've always been able to deal with pain, other then first thing in the morning. After my last back injury in the late 70's, usually I'd have to roll out of bed on my hands and knees, then stand up to get ready for work. The amount of days I had to do this to get up in the morning became less frequent, till it was just one or two days a week. This lasted till about the spring of 84. My back never liked being excessively fatigued after this, but I could usually deal with the pain, till the winter of 2005 when I finally took Ibuprofen for the first time.

Tried the chiro...went to four different chiros back then, but they didn't help the pain. Once I started working out, exercising and windsurfing daily, the pain subsided. What works for me still, is to exercise and make sure I get some windsurfing in regularly.


For the rest of the tough guys who don't want to take pain pills- patients who take pain meds as directed for acute pain rarely (almost never) become dependent or addicted ( two different thing). Proper pain management also helps you heal faster. So if you are in pain take those meds like the doctor says!

Chronic ( long term) pain patients are much more likely to become dependent or addicted to the drugs. But short term pain related to injury or surgery rarely lead to addiction.

#47 MoeAlfa

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:20 PM


The pain wasn't muscle spasm. When it happens it's almost at the base of the spine, feels like bone on bone. It only happens when I've been up for 24-36 hours with maybe a short half hour to hour and a half cat nap thrown in. Since my last occurrence of this pain in about '08, I made a point of not working such long hours, only limiting myself to 12-14 hour stretches of work, followed with six to eight hours of sleep. I always took the Ibuprofen after a meal, and only took one 400mg tablet or two 200mg tablets. and didn't need another dose.

Like I said, I don't do meds as a habit, and have only taken one dose of Ibuprofen less then five times in my life. The percocets you get from the dentist, never took them either. Usually I've always been able to deal with pain, other then first thing in the morning. After my last back injury in the late 70's, usually I'd have to roll out of bed on my hands and knees, then stand up to get ready for work. The amount of days I had to do this to get up in the morning became less frequent, till it was just one or two days a week. This lasted till about the spring of 84. My back never liked being excessively fatigued after this, but I could usually deal with the pain, till the winter of 2005 when I finally took Ibuprofen for the first time.

Tried the chiro...went to four different chiros back then, but they didn't help the pain. Once I started working out, exercising and windsurfing daily, the pain subsided. What works for me still, is to exercise and make sure I get some windsurfing in regularly.


For the rest of the tough guys who don't want to take pain pills- patients who take pain meds as directed for acute pain rarely (almost never) become dependent or addicted ( two different thing). Proper pain management also helps you heal faster. So if you are in pain take those meds like the doctor says!

Chronic ( long term) pain patients are much more likely to become dependent or addicted to the drugs. But short term pain related to injury or surgery rarely lead to addiction.

Pain, like everything else, is also bad for you in large doses. Circuits in the nervous system that conduct pain sensations also exert partial control over inflammation. In chronic pain situations, self-reinforcing, feed-forward activity can start up in them, making both processes worse, decreasing mobility, destroying joints, etc. Maladaptive reinforcement of pain responses can happen in acute injuries, too. Pain should always be treated early and aggressively.

#48 boomer

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 01:49 PM


The pain wasn't muscle spasm. When it happens it's almost at the base of the spine, feels like bone on bone. It only happens when I've been up for 24-36 hours with maybe a short half hour to hour and a half cat nap thrown in. Since my last occurrence of this pain in about '08, I made a point of not working such long hours, only limiting myself to 12-14 hour stretches of work, followed with six to eight hours of sleep. I always took the Ibuprofen after a meal, and only took one 400mg tablet or two 200mg tablets. and didn't need another dose.

Like I said, I don't do meds as a habit, and have only taken one dose of Ibuprofen less then five times in my life. The percocets you get from the dentist, never took them either. Usually I've always been able to deal with pain, other then first thing in the morning. After my last back injury in the late 70's, usually I'd have to roll out of bed on my hands and knees, then stand up to get ready for work. The amount of days I had to do this to get up in the morning became less frequent, till it was just one or two days a week. This lasted till about the spring of 84. My back never liked being excessively fatigued after this, but I could usually deal with the pain, till the winter of 2005 when I finally took Ibuprofen for the first time.

Tried the chiro...went to four different chiros back then, but they didn't help the pain. Once I started working out, exercising and windsurfing daily, the pain subsided. What works for me still, is to exercise and make sure I get some windsurfing in regularly.


For the rest of the tough guys who don't want to take pain pills- patients who take pain meds as directed for acute pain rarely (almost never) become dependent or addicted ( two different thing). Proper pain management also helps you heal faster. So if you are in pain take those meds like the doctor says!

Chronic ( long term) pain patients are much more likely to become dependent or addicted to the drugs. But short term pain related to injury or surgery rarely lead to addiction.


The pain wasn't muscle spasm. When it happens it's almost at the base of the spine, feels like bone on bone. It only happens when I've been up for 24-36 hours with maybe a short half hour to hour and a half cat nap thrown in. Since my last occurrence of this pain in about '08, I made a point of not working such long hours, only limiting myself to 12-14 hour stretches of work, followed with six to eight hours of sleep. I always took the Ibuprofen after a meal, and only took one 400mg tablet or two 200mg tablets. and didn't need another dose.

Like I said, I don't do meds as a habit, and have only taken one dose of Ibuprofen less then five times in my life. The percocets you get from the dentist, never took them either. Usually I've always been able to deal with pain, other then first thing in the morning. After my last back injury in the late 70's, usually I'd have to roll out of bed on my hands and knees, then stand up to get ready for work. The amount of days I had to do this to get up in the morning became less frequent, till it was just one or two days a week. This lasted till about the spring of 84. My back never liked being excessively fatigued after this, but I could usually deal with the pain, till the winter of 2005 when I finally took Ibuprofen for the first time.

Tried the chiro...went to four different chiros back then, but they didn't help the pain. Once I started working out, exercising and windsurfing daily, the pain subsided. What works for me still, is to exercise and make sure I get some windsurfing in regularly.


For the rest of the tough guys who don't want to take pain pills- patients who take pain meds as directed for acute pain rarely (almost never) become dependent or addicted ( two different thing). Proper pain management also helps you heal faster. So if you are in pain take those meds like the doctor says!

Chronic ( long term) pain patients are much more likely to become dependent or addicted to the drugs. But short term pain related to injury or surgery rarely lead to addiction.


Not about addiction or being tough. Only took painkillers if it was really needed. Usually I used natural remedies, and only resorted to Ibuprofen if needed.

#49 Ajax

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:07 PM

"Hello, Life Alert? I've fallen and I can't get up!"

This morning, I was headed to the bathhouse for my morning shower and shave. The temperature was 34F. The dew on the finger dock had frozen to a micron-thin coating of slick frost. As I stepped onto the finger, I slipped and fell between the boat and the finger dock, draped over the gunwhale. I landed so hard, that I dented my steel shaving mug.

I'm going to mount a high-traction doormat to the finger dock, and be a lot more careful this winter. :(

#50 boomer

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:07 PM



The pain wasn't muscle spasm. When it happens it's almost at the base of the spine, feels like bone on bone. It only happens when I've been up for 24-36 hours with maybe a short half hour to hour and a half cat nap thrown in. Since my last occurrence of this pain in about '08, I made a point of not working such long hours, only limiting myself to 12-14 hour stretches of work, followed with six to eight hours of sleep. I always took the Ibuprofen after a meal, and only took one 400mg tablet or two 200mg tablets. and didn't need another dose.

Like I said, I don't do meds as a habit, and have only taken one dose of Ibuprofen less then five times in my life. The percocets you get from the dentist, never took them either. Usually I've always been able to deal with pain, other then first thing in the morning. After my last back injury in the late 70's, usually I'd have to roll out of bed on my hands and knees, then stand up to get ready for work. The amount of days I had to do this to get up in the morning became less frequent, till it was just one or two days a week. This lasted till about the spring of 84. My back never liked being excessively fatigued after this, but I could usually deal with the pain, till the winter of 2005 when I finally took Ibuprofen for the first time.

Tried the chiro...went to four different chiros back then, but they didn't help the pain. Once I started working out, exercising and windsurfing daily, the pain subsided. What works for me still, is to exercise and make sure I get some windsurfing in regularly.


For the rest of the tough guys who don't want to take pain pills- patients who take pain meds as directed for acute pain rarely (almost never) become dependent or addicted ( two different thing). Proper pain management also helps you heal faster. So if you are in pain take those meds like the doctor says!

Chronic ( long term) pain patients are much more likely to become dependent or addicted to the drugs. But short term pain related to injury or surgery rarely lead to addiction.

Pain, like everything else, is also bad for you in large doses. Circuits in the nervous system that conduct pain sensations also exert partial control over inflammation. In chronic pain situations, self-reinforcing, feed-forward activity can start up in them, making both processes worse, decreasing mobility, destroying joints, etc. Maladaptive reinforcement of pain responses can happen in acute injuries, too. Pain should always be treated early and aggressively.


More importantly swelling should be treated early and aggressively. Once the healing is done,then rehab and exercise. Between football,skiing, climbing and windsurfing. I've had more injuries to ankles,knees,legs and hips then the average person,and don't have any problem with any of them, and I'll be 60 soon. You on the other hand. working in an office all your life are ready for a knee replacement. I wouldn't dispensing advice if you can't take care of your own body.

#51 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:15 PM

"Hello, Life Alert? I've fallen and I can't get up!"

This morning, I was headed to the bathhouse for my morning shower and shave. The temperature was 34F. The dew on the finger dock had frozen to a micron-thin coating of slick frost. As I stepped onto the finger, I slipped and fell between the boat and the finger dock, draped over the gunwhale. I landed so hard, that I dented my steel shaving mug.

I'm going to mount a high-traction doormat to the finger dock, and be a lot more careful this winter. :(


http://www.costco.co...t.11602407.html

This will solve your problems.

#52 Bob Perry

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:28 PM

Ajax:
Glad to hear you are OK. Good thing you didn't go in the drinkl.
Do you have a ladder on your dock close by so you climb out if you went in? I think you should have one.

#53 MoeAlfa

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:30 PM

More importantly swelling should be treated early and aggressively. Once the healing is done,then rehab and exercise. Between football,skiing, climbing and windsurfing. I've had more injuries to ankles,knees,legs and hips then the average person,and don't have any problem with any of them, and I'll be 60 soon. You on the other hand. working in an office all your life are ready for a knee replacement. I wouldn't dispensing advice if you can't take care of your own body.

You know nothing about me or what I do. My joints are fine, thank you, and I use them hard on a daily basis.

#54 kimbottles

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:31 PM

"Hello, Life Alert? I've fallen and I can't get up!"

This morning, I was headed to the bathhouse for my morning shower and shave. The temperature was 34F. The dew on the finger dock had frozen to a micron-thin coating of slick frost. As I stepped onto the finger, I slipped and fell between the boat and the finger dock, draped over the gunwhale. I landed so hard, that I dented my steel shaving mug.

I'm going to mount a high-traction doormat to the finger dock, and be a lot more careful this winter. :(/>


I have done that, fallen between the dock and boat. Did it on my commute a while back. I had a hell of a time getting back on the dock. It was a real wake up call that at 64 I am not the athlete I once was. Of course I weigh more now than in the good old days. That might contribute to the problem of hoisting my self up onto the dock too. I am very careful on icy mornings now.

#55 MoeAlfa

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:34 PM

"Hello, Life Alert? I've fallen and I can't get up!"

This morning, I was headed to the bathhouse for my morning shower and shave. The temperature was 34F. The dew on the finger dock had frozen to a micron-thin coating of slick frost. As I stepped onto the finger, I slipped and fell between the boat and the finger dock, draped over the gunwhale. I landed so hard, that I dented my steel shaving mug.

I'm going to mount a high-traction doormat to the finger dock, and be a lot more careful this winter. :(

Ajax, that sounds dangerous. Glad you're OK. I assume you've got a ladder within easy swimming distance?

#56 Slick470

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:34 PM

be careful there Ajax. I wonder if you should get some "winter morning" shoes with some kind of studs or aggressive traction to help with those slick docks, especially as it will only get worse once winter comes. Bob's right about the ladder.

#57 Bob Perry

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 02:39 PM

My non sailor buddy helped me move the boat early this year. As I swung up to the dock he stepped off too soon and went into the drink between the boat and the dock. He weighs about 210. It was all I could do to pull him back up onto the dock with him helping. I know that there have been several drownings this way in our area. Put a ladder in Ajax, right next to your boat and make the ladder go deep down into the water, about 60".

#58 mad

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:03 PM




The pain wasn't muscle spasm. When it happens it's almost at the base of the spine, feels like bone on bone. It only happens when I've been up for 24-36 hours with maybe a short half hour to hour and a half cat nap thrown in. Since my last occurrence of this pain in about '08, I made a point of not working such long hours, only limiting myself to 12-14 hour stretches of work, followed with six to eight hours of sleep. I always took the Ibuprofen after a meal, and only took one 400mg tablet or two 200mg tablets. and didn't need another dose.

Like I said, I don't do meds as a habit, and have only taken one dose of Ibuprofen less then five times in my life. The percocets you get from the dentist, never took them either. Usually I've always been able to deal with pain, other then first thing in the morning. After my last back injury in the late 70's, usually I'd have to roll out of bed on my hands and knees, then stand up to get ready for work. The amount of days I had to do this to get up in the morning became less frequent, till it was just one or two days a week. This lasted till about the spring of 84. My back never liked being excessively fatigued after this, but I could usually deal with the pain, till the winter of 2005 when I finally took Ibuprofen for the first time.

Tried the chiro...went to four different chiros back then, but they didn't help the pain. Once I started working out, exercising and windsurfing daily, the pain subsided. What works for me still, is to exercise and make sure I get some windsurfing in regularly.


For the rest of the tough guys who don't want to take pain pills- patients who take pain meds as directed for acute pain rarely (almost never) become dependent or addicted ( two different thing). Proper pain management also helps you heal faster. So if you are in pain take those meds like the doctor says!

Chronic ( long term) pain patients are much more likely to become dependent or addicted to the drugs. But short term pain related to injury or surgery rarely lead to addiction.

Pain, like everything else, is also bad for you in large doses. Circuits in the nervous system that conduct pain sensations also exert partial control over inflammation. In chronic pain situations, self-reinforcing, feed-forward activity can start up in them, making both processes worse, decreasing mobility, destroying joints, etc. Maladaptive reinforcement of pain responses can happen in acute injuries, too. Pain should always be treated early and aggressively.


More importantly swelling should be treated early and aggressively. Once the healing is done,then rehab and exercise. Between football,skiing, climbing and windsurfing. I've had more injuries to ankles,knees,legs and hips then the average person,and don't have any problem with any of them, and I'll be 60 soon. You on the other hand. working in an office all your life are ready for a knee replacement. I wouldn't dispensing advice if you can't take care of your own body.

Got to say Moes advice on all things medical is worth listening to Boomer, he's a good guy.

#59 boomer

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:08 PM


More importantly swelling should be treated early and aggressively. Once the healing is done,then rehab and exercise. Between football,skiing, climbing and windsurfing. I've had more injuries to ankles,knees,legs and hips then the average person,and don't have any problem with any of them, and I'll be 60 soon. You on the other hand. working in an office all your life are ready for a knee replacement. I wouldn't dispensing advice if you can't take care of your own body.

You know nothing about me or what I do. My joints are fine, thank you, and I use them hard on a daily basis.


You also no nothing about me, and how I've rehabed my injuries...so dispense your advice to someone else.

Sorry about your slip Ajax,and good thing nothing serious.

#60 Anomaly2

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:19 PM



More importantly swelling should be treated early and aggressively. Once the healing is done,then rehab and exercise. Between football,skiing, climbing and windsurfing. I've had more injuries to ankles,knees,legs and hips then the average person,and don't have any problem with any of them, and I'll be 60 soon. You on the other hand. working in an office all your life are ready for a knee replacement. I wouldn't dispensing advice if you can't take care of your own body.

You know nothing about me or what I do. My joints are fine, thank you, and I use them hard on a daily basis.


You also no nothing about me, and how I've rehabed my injuries...so dispense your advice to someone else.


See what you started Olaf? "Pissing contest in aisle three on Cruising Anarchy"....

Hey Moe, are you still thinking about pussy? (it would seem more pleasurable than this exchange, but then again, I don't know either of you guys...) :rolleyes:

#61 boomer

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:22 PM





The pain wasn't muscle spasm. When it happens it's almost at the base of the spine, feels like bone on bone. It only happens when I've been up for 24-36 hours with maybe a short half hour to hour and a half cat nap thrown in. Since my last occurrence of this pain in about '08, I made a point of not working such long hours, only limiting myself to 12-14 hour stretches of work, followed with six to eight hours of sleep. I always took the Ibuprofen after a meal, and only took one 400mg tablet or two 200mg tablets. and didn't need another dose.

Like I said, I don't do meds as a habit, and have only taken one dose of Ibuprofen less then five times in my life. The percocets you get from the dentist, never took them either. Usually I've always been able to deal with pain, other then first thing in the morning. After my last back injury in the late 70's, usually I'd have to roll out of bed on my hands and knees, then stand up to get ready for work. The amount of days I had to do this to get up in the morning became less frequent, till it was just one or two days a week. This lasted till about the spring of 84. My back never liked being excessively fatigued after this, but I could usually deal with the pain, till the winter of 2005 when I finally took Ibuprofen for the first time.

Tried the chiro...went to four different chiros back then, but they didn't help the pain. Once I started working out, exercising and windsurfing daily, the pain subsided. What works for me still, is to exercise and make sure I get some windsurfing in regularly.


For the rest of the tough guys who don't want to take pain pills- patients who take pain meds as directed for acute pain rarely (almost never) become dependent or addicted ( two different thing). Proper pain management also helps you heal faster. So if you are in pain take those meds like the doctor says!

Chronic ( long term) pain patients are much more likely to become dependent or addicted to the drugs. But short term pain related to injury or surgery rarely lead to addiction.

Pain, like everything else, is also bad for you in large doses. Circuits in the nervous system that conduct pain sensations also exert partial control over inflammation. In chronic pain situations, self-reinforcing, feed-forward activity can start up in them, making both processes worse, decreasing mobility, destroying joints, etc. Maladaptive reinforcement of pain responses can happen in acute injuries, too. Pain should always be treated early and aggressively.


More importantly swelling should be treated early and aggressively. Once the healing is done,then rehab and exercise. Between football,skiing, climbing and windsurfing. I've had more injuries to ankles,knees,legs and hips then the average person,and don't have any problem with any of them, and I'll be 60 soon. You on the other hand. working in an office all your life are ready for a knee replacement. I wouldn't dispensing advice if you can't take care of your own body.

Got to say Moes advice on all things medical is worth listening to Boomer, he's a good guy.


I'm sure he is a good guy. I'm also well versed in rehab and properly seeing to injuries. Being on a Seabee team back in the day, you had to be trained for three rates.I was trained as a builder,then an engineering aid and finally as a medic. My wife is a nurse, my brother is a MD if I need medical advice, two of my friends are doctors, and I also have a personal MD/Naturepathic physician...Had numerous ortho surgeons over the years...so I think I'm covered.

BTW....Most who are ten to twenty years younger then I aren't in as good of shape as I am,and in better shape then many 30 years or more younger...so I'd say I'm taking care of my body.

#62 MoeAlfa

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:26 PM

"Pissing contest in aisle three on Cruising Anarchy"....

Hey Moe, are you still thinking about pussy? (it would seem more pleasurable than this exchange, but then again, I don't know either of you guys...) :rolleyes:

Always and I have to admit I got the basis of that joke from Chris Rock.

I am far too big a softy to sustain a pissing contest with anyone.

#63 Anomaly2

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:32 PM

Always. I have to admit I got that joke from Chris Rock


Atta boy!. As far as borrowing from Chris Rock-- most great art etc. is built on heavy doses of borrowing.... standing on the shoulders of giants and all that. Now where was I?... Oh yeah......

#64 boomer

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:36 PM


"Pissing contest in aisle three on Cruising Anarchy"....

Hey Moe, are you still thinking about pussy? (it would seem more pleasurable than this exchange, but then again, I don't know either of you guys...) :rolleyes:/>

Always and I have to admit I got the basis of that joke from Chris Rock.

I am far too big a softy to sustain a pissing contest with anyone.


OK...but not always, from what I've seen you've usually made a point of stating your opinion, and so do I.

Pissing contests aren't worth the bother and I make a point of caring for others and their feelings.

I'm not tolerant of shit stirrers however,and those I don't have a problem engaging.

#65 Ajax

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:40 PM

There is a ladder one slip over, that goes down into the water, plus I have my own boarding ladder, so at least I got that going for me.

I like that heated mat from Costco.

#66 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 04:01 PM

There is a ladder one slip over, that goes down into the water, plus I have my own boarding ladder, so at least I got that going for me.

I like that heated mat from Costco.


I strongly recommend a ladder within 5 feet of where you get on and off the boat. I've been in 38 degree water without a wetsuit and you lose strength and focus very quickly. You literally want to get to the ladder within 10-15 seconds from going in. Even if it's a treated 2x4 ladder from the slip bottom to several feet above the finger, you need something to get you out right there and right now.

#67 MoeAlfa

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 04:22 PM


There is a ladder one slip over, that goes down into the water, plus I have my own boarding ladder, so at least I got that going for me.

I like that heated mat from Costco.


I strongly recommend a ladder within 5 feet of where you get on and off the boat. I've been in 38 degree water without a wetsuit and you lose strength and focus very quickly. You literally want to get to the ladder within 10-15 seconds from going in. Even if it's a treated 2x4 ladder from the slip bottom to several feet above the finger, you need something to get you out right there and right now.

Hesitant as I am to give advice :), I strongly agree.

#68 Ajax

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 05:37 PM

My boarding ladder is within 5 feet where where I step on and off. The dock mounted ladder is about 15' away.

#69 steele

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 06:02 PM

I found my boats ladder could not be pulled down while in the water, the angle was wrong and the friction mount too strong, it has since been modified. 15 feet is probably too far fully clothed in cold water having sustained an inury in a fall. Best to just stay on board, not bathe, and have all your food delivered.

#70 Ajax

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 06:18 PM

I found my boats ladder could not be pulled down while in the water, the angle was wrong and the friction mount too strong, it has since been modified. 15 feet is probably too far fully clothed in cold water having sustained an inury in a fall. Best to just stay on board, not bathe, and have all your food delivered.


Lol...I'm just going to leave a line with a slip knot dangling over the side.

I assure you, I'm wide awake and will be paying closer attention in the future.

#71 Steam Flyer

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 07:57 PM

... ...
Slipped on a rock going back to the dinghy, ankle twisted along the side of a dinghy near the rock, and I landed on the side of my foot.
Something went crack and started to hurt.
... ...


Yikes! Just saw this

I gather from the remainder of the thread that things are progressing OK. My wife broke an ankle very badly in falling on a dock a couple of years ago. Her break was a particularly bad and she had a long and very painful recovery... a big part of the recovery was staying off it for 40 days which she did not want to do... but she also worked very hard at the physical therapy and is now fully recovered, not even a limp.

So chin up and do what the doc tells you.

FB- Doug

#72 olaf hart

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:29 PM


... ...
Slipped on a rock going back to the dinghy, ankle twisted along the side of a dinghy near the rock, and I landed on the side of my foot.
Something went crack and started to hurt.
... ...


Yikes! Just saw this

I gather from the remainder of the thread that things are progressing OK. My wife broke an ankle very badly in falling on a dock a couple of years ago. Her break was a particularly bad and she had a long and very painful recovery... a big part of the recovery was staying off it for 40 days which she did not want to do... but she also worked very hard at the physical therapy and is now fully recovered, not even a limp.

So chin up and do what the doc tells you.

FB- Doug


Thanks Doug, it's nearly two weeks and things are going well.
I even stopped the medication a few days ago.
These Cam Boots are the bomb, I have some skin issues over the fracture site, I can wash and dress the blister site every day.
Used to be a lot different in plaster.

Speaking of pissing competitions, I would suspect the more experienced (older) members of this forum would want to avoid them for hydraulic reasons.

Story from my adolescent days when a pissing contest was a real option.

The Sydney Cricket Ground is an icon in the game of cricket, a bit like dodgers stadium.
Part of the ground was known as The Hill, where the tickets were cheapest, so the crowd was the most interesting, no seats just sit on the ground, watch the game, drink beer and make a lot of noise.

Above The Hill was a large scoreboard, and under the scoreboard was the men's urinal.

So, a bunch of teen boys decided to enliven their visit by seeing who could pee furthest up the wall over the urinal. At the top of the wall was an open space, no windows. The competition progressed, and soon the largest of the boys managed to pee out the gap above the wall.

Cheers all round, till a policeman came into the urinal with a stern face and a wet hat.
He demanded to know who got him, it was a bit difficult to hide the evidence, the guilty party had a line from his feet all the way up the wall.
Anyway, he was a good sport in the end, and congratulated me on my honesty and on winning the pissing contest.

#73 MoeAlfa

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 08:47 PM

Glad you're on the mend.

Great story; what an indulgent cop! That stunt would not have been so well tolerated by the NYPD of my yout'.

My prostate is certainly not as youthful as my knees, but then I don't exercise it as much, despite my errant thoughts.

#74 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:03 PM

Glad you're on the mend.

Great story; what an indulgent cop! That stunt would not have been so well tolerated by the NYPD of my yout'.

My prostate is certainly not as youthful as my knees, but then I don't exercise it as much, despite my errant thoughts.


I guess all I can say is I'd rather have my (soon to be bionic) knee than your prostrate.

#75 boomer

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:07 PM

Nice to hear your off the meds and healing...Those cam boots are the bomb, it does make it nice to wash, air out and redress.

#76 Paps

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Posted 16 November 2012 - 11:51 PM



... ...
Slipped on a rock going back to the dinghy, ankle twisted along the side of a dinghy near the rock, and I landed on the side of my foot.
Something went crack and started to hurt.
... ...


Yikes! Just saw this

I gather from the remainder of the thread that things are progressing OK. My wife broke an ankle very badly in falling on a dock a couple of years ago. Her break was a particularly bad and she had a long and very painful recovery... a big part of the recovery was staying off it for 40 days which she did not want to do... but she also worked very hard at the physical therapy and is now fully recovered, not even a limp.

So chin up and do what the doc tells you.

FB- Doug


Thanks Doug, it's nearly two weeks and things are going well.
I even stopped the medication a few days ago.
These Cam Boots are the bomb, I have some skin issues over the fracture site, I can wash and dress the blister site every day.
Used to be a lot different in plaster.

Speaking of pissing competitions, I would suspect the more experienced (older) members of this forum would want to avoid them for hydraulic reasons.

Story from my adolescent days when a pissing contest was a real option.

The Sydney Cricket Ground is an icon in the game of cricket, a bit like dodgers stadium.
Part of the ground was known as The Hill, where the tickets were cheapest, so the crowd was the most interesting, no seats just sit on the ground, watch the game, drink beer and make a lot of noise.

Above The Hill was a large scoreboard, and under the scoreboard was the men's urinal.

So, a bunch of teen boys decided to enliven their visit by seeing who could pee furthest up the wall over the urinal. At the top of the wall was an open space, no windows. The competition progressed, and soon the largest of the boys managed to pee out the gap above the wall.

Cheers all round, till a policeman came into the urinal with a stern face and a wet hat.
He demanded to know who got him, it was a bit difficult to hide the evidence, the guilty party had a line from his feet all the way up the wall.
Anyway, he was a good sport in the end, and congratulated me on my honesty and on winning the pissing contest.


Ahhh the "hill", how I miss those days!

Bring your own esky full of booze, when the booze was gone tip the icy water down the hill and have toboggan races down the wet track on empty beer cartons.

Throw the odd chicken carcase at any West Indian fielder silly enough to come in range. Big Joel Garner was the unlucky target one time and he was over the fence in a flash chasing the poor bugger up the hill.


Attached File  967475-joel-garner-david-williams.jpg   36.97K   5 downloads

#77 Steam Flyer

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:38 PM

My daughter broke her ankle on the boat. How did I know? It was very quickly the size of a grapefruit and she was swearing. Profusely. Luckily we were feet (no pun intended) from the dock when she slipped. I actually thought about calling on 16 for help, but figured what we could get her to the car with the aid of a wheelbarrow. By the time I had run up to the house to get the wheelbarrow and returned, she had already hopped the 300 foot length of the pier on one leg with the broken ankle. Don't ever underestimate the guts of a 110 pound female who has done basic training.

As an aside, a week earlier my wife had broken her foot. If you ever want to have people be suspicious of you, show up to the emergency ward two Fridays in a row, each time with with a different female family member with the same body part broken.



When my wife broke her ankle, it was EXTREMELY obviously a very bad break... foot sticking out sideways & twisted with sharp points of bone about to come out thru the skin. She was understandably testy.

Another point to reckon with, which would not have cheered her up at all but fortunately she never realized the game... when you call an ambulance to a boat emergency they assume you are drunk. After all, that's what people do on boats, right? The EMTs started joking with me and asking how much we'd had and how many times I'd seen a broken ankle etc etc... I was giving them instructions on what gear to bring and how to deal with it. I have no idea what shut them up but something in voice or look made them toe the line and act very professionally indeed when they came down to the dock... good thing for them...

I can only imagine what would be said to show up next week with the same thing!

FB- Doug

#78 JBE

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Posted 19 November 2012 - 09:12 PM

Ibprofen


Its compulsory to say that with a jamaican accent. And yeah , you want to be careful of your gut with the anti inflammatory drugs.

I don't know how old old you are Olaf, but one thing I've learnt about being fifty Idon't wanttotalkabout it is stuff like that takes forever to go away. I still get pings from the same thing as you from 2007.

#79 olaf hart

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 01:44 AM

I am being really careful about taking my time.
They don't do ankle replacements yet.

The fracture involves the joint surface, so it will cause some cartilage and arthritic issues in the future.
Damn.

#80 Ishmael

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Posted 20 November 2012 - 02:02 AM

I am being really careful about taking my time.
They don't do ankle replacements yet.

The fracture involves the joint surface, so it will cause some cartilage and arthritic issues in the future.
Damn.


Even if it's nowhere near the joint, bone damage can lead to arthrits. My "classic boottop compound fracture" of the tibia and fibula was messy enough when it happened, with the splintered bone ends sitting on the outside of my ski boot, but the recovery over nine months (two rebreaks and then a bone graft) was really bothersome. That was 30 years or so ago, now my right knee is getting ready for a bunch of new parts. As my doctor said, if it's enough force to break the bone, imagine the force on the joints at either end of that bone.




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