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Yacht Club Infrastructure

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#1 Tom

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:24 PM

Has anyone here been apart of or has had their Yacht Club go through a major infrastucture update?

I am talking about Club House remodel, parking lot, docks, breakwall, and committee/chase boats.

I would love to hear the good, the bad, plusses and minus. Has it worked? Was it a bomb? Lay it on me SA.

#2 'moondance44

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:44 PM

ahhahahahah AHHAHHAHAHAHAHHHH HHAHAHAH !!!


WWWOO HOOO !! AHHH hhAHHAA1!!


WWWWOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooooooo!!!!!!!!!!!

:lol: :blink: :o :wacko: :ph34r:

#3 Punani Jackson

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 05:59 PM

Has anyone here been apart of or has had their Yacht Club go through a major infrastucture update?

I am talking about Club House remodel, parking lot, docks, breakwall, and committee/chase boats.

I would love to hear the good, the bad, plusses and minus. Has it worked? Was it a bomb? Lay it on me SA.


Wait about a year and ask again. Everyone in the Northeast is going through this very exercise with their own clubs. The answers you ultimately get may not be the answers you want to hear.

#4 Tom

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 06:02 PM

The one constant, is resistance to change. Everyone talks about growing our sport, but only a few want to put forth the monumental effort it will take to do it.

#5 kent_island_sailor

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 06:18 PM

I'll let you know. BOD meeting tonight.

#6 Great Red Shark

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:05 PM

I sat on the board when we replaced the marina to the tune of a million plus, does that count ?

#7 walterbshaffer

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:15 PM

I sat on the board when we replaced the marina to the tune of a million plus, does that count ?


must have been a pretty small marina

#8 casc27

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 07:29 PM


I sat on the board when we replaced the marina to the tune of a million plus, does that count ?


must have been a pretty small marina


+1

#9 Life Buoy 15

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:30 PM

Yep we have just built an extension to the Club house, are revamping the structure of the sailing office and sailing school and are undertaking a $10 Million marina refurbishment. One huge piece of advice for YC's. If you build a marina, do not under any circumstances 'sell' leases to members. Find another way to fund it and keep the income from berth rentals for the benefit of all members now and in the future. If you sell leases you will create a group of members who think they are more important than not only other members but the club it’s self. Larger YC's need to find new and different profit centers to grow the club. You can't rely on bar sales and membership subs as your only form of income. YC's need to open their doors to the general public to both grow the sport and to help subsidize the memberships sailing. And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.
Don’t become a restaurant with a marina out the front.

#10 Somebody Else

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 10:40 PM

Whenever I think about this stuff, and about Board of Directors, Flag Officers and club policies, I start drinking until all those thought are simply gone. I have such a negative attitude toward organization and planning that it really is a minor miracle I manage to keep myself alive.

The downside of that attitude is that it leaves the door wide open for people who love organization and planning. Sometimes they want to organize and make plans for me! That usually doesn't work out too well for them...

I find that, as a general group, those organizer types are not much fun to drink with.
________

I think of myself more as a 'support' person -- "Hey you! Can you give me a hand here?" "Yup! No worries!"


And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.


Oh shit!

OK, how do we recover from totally blowing that?

#11 Delta Blues

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 11:02 PM

Yep we have just built an extension to the Club house, are revamping the structure of the sailing office and sailing school and are undertaking a $10 Million marina refurbishment. One huge piece of advice for YC's. If you build a marina, do not under any circumstances 'sell' leases to members. Find another way to fund it and keep the income from berth rentals for the benefit of all members now and in the future. If you sell leases you will create a group of members who think they are more important than not only other members but the club it’s self. Larger YC's need to find new and different profit centers to grow the club. You can't rely on bar sales and membership subs as your only form of income. YC's need to open their doors to the general public to both grow the sport and to help subsidize the memberships sailing. And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.
Don’t become a restaurant with a marina out the front.


However, the IRS has some concerns for what you propose. As most clubs are not-for-profits, they are to be focused on serving their membership and the memberships needs. They need to follow their filed reason of being with the State. Anything done for non-members is to be accounted for differently than income from members, and non-member income is to be treated as taxable income. Also the club is limited to 15% of the annual revenue being from non-members (including sponsorships, regatta fees, food, beverage, clothing, etc.). The reason for this difference is that not-for-profits are not to be in competition with for profit companies that sell food, clothing, beverage, etc. as it is an unfair advantage. So the advantage is equalized by having non-members pay taxes on their purchases that levels the playing field. Also if the 15% number is exceeded for 4 years in a row, the IRS can convert your club to a for-profit. Be careful how you approach this.

#12 Bitter Gnat

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 11:17 PM

And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.
Don’t become a restaurant with a marina out the front.

+1

#13 RogerDGamache

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 11:22 PM

Ongoing issue at our club. Several suggestions: 1. The major difference between a YC and a well-run commercial marina is the sailing program offered (Racing in various formats, Junior Sailing, Adult learn to Sail, etc). The facilities need to support the programing, not the other way around (ie. what can we do to support this place???). 1a. Following that thought, you need a community of committed sailors, and keep them in control of the board and flagline. Many a club has been put on hard times by "social" members. 2. If you are in the US, it's never been cheaper to borrow money (provided you have the collateral and the current membership to cash flow the note). 3. As you look at keeping the membership engaged you cannot repeat enough times "why we are a club" (see #1 above). And remember we need to be as obssesive as Jobs about the quality of our programs. There isn't room in this economy for "good enough". You are excellent or you're dead...

#14 Life Buoy 15

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Posted 13 November 2012 - 11:30 PM


Yep we have just built an extension to the Club house, are revamping the structure of the sailing office and sailing school and are undertaking a $10 Million marina refurbishment. One huge piece of advice for YC's. If you build a marina, do not under any circumstances 'sell' leases to members. Find another way to fund it and keep the income from berth rentals for the benefit of all members now and in the future. If you sell leases you will create a group of members who think they are more important than not only other members but the club it’s self. Larger YC's need to find new and different profit centers to grow the club. You can't rely on bar sales and membership subs as your only form of income. YC's need to open their doors to the general public to both grow the sport and to help subsidize the memberships sailing. And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.
Don’t become a restaurant with a marina out the front.


However, the IRS has some concerns for what you propose. As most clubs are not-for-profits, they are to be focused on serving their membership and the memberships needs. They need to follow their filed reason of being with the State. Anything done for non-members is to be accounted for differently than income from members, and non-member income is to be treated as taxable income. Also the club is limited to 15% of the annual revenue being from non-members (including sponsorships, regatta fees, food, beverage, clothing, etc.). The reason for this difference is that not-for-profits are not to be in competition with for profit companies that sell food, clothing, beverage, etc. as it is an unfair advantage. So the advantage is equalized by having non-members pay taxes on their purchases that levels the playing field. Also if the 15% number is exceeded for 4 years in a row, the IRS can convert your club to a for-profit. Be careful how you approach this.


In Oz the ATO (Australian tax office) will issue you a binding ruling on a model you submit prior to commencement of an activity. However you can waste a lot of time and effort avoiding paying tax.


Tax laws obviously vary depending on where you live. However you may need to think outside the 9 dots on this issue. May be set up a separate entity to own and pay tax on the profit centers whist protecting the tax exempt status of the YC. The tax paying entity then 'Gifts' profits to the YC in the form of capital works or equipment. Think about temporary memberships, corporate lunch memberships, and trusts. There are plenty of ways around that within the Tax and licensing laws.
Depends on what exactly the Membership wants from their club. Whether you like it or not you are in competition to local businesses in the form of patronage by your members. From my observations business has become smarter, whilst many YC's have not changed their thinking since the 60's.
If your club has a committee that finds ways to not change - you need a new committee.

#15 miscut jib

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 04:20 AM

Everyone talks about growing our sport, but only a few want to put forth the monumental effort it will take to do it.


I'll postulate paying for large capital investments is orthogonal to growing membership in the sport.

#16 Tom

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 04:57 AM

So far the responses have not surprised me one bit. Lacking!

Do slips really matter when it comes to growing the racing side of most one design focused yacht clubs? (i am only asking the question, not making a statement of fact)
The majority of one design racing yacht clubs that I see tend to dry sail their boats. Etchells, jboats, sonar, melges, vipers, and dinghies. I get the feeling that more than half the boats in any harbor have long been forgotten, other than the monthly bill the owner gets for the slip fee. And only a small amount of them actually race. The rest are of the cruising variety. However, I do realize that the slip fees of the boats in the harbor, whether they are used or not, help pay the bills. But if the harbor is barely used, should that be the first step in rebuilding the infrastructure?

#17 President Eisenhowler

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 05:06 AM

Ask the sailors.

Ask the regulars what would make the place more attractive.

Hunt down the people who don't come out much, and ask them what's lacking.

Hunt down the kids who came out of the junior program and never really sailed beyond that. Hunt down people who have left the club. Ask every active member to name one person he or she knows who might possibly be interested, but who didn't want to join, or who joined another club. Survey them; interview them; study them.

Real data.

#18 DA-WOODY

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 05:16 AM

So far the responses have not surprised me one bit. Lacking!

Do slips really matter when it comes to growing the racing side of most one design focused yacht clubs? (i am only asking the question, not making a statement of fact)
The majority of one design racing yacht clubs that I see tend to dry sail their boats. Etchells, jboats, sonar, melges, vipers, and dinghies. I get the feeling that more than half the boats in any harbor have long been forgotten, other than the monthly bill the owner gets for the slip fee. And only a small amount of them actually race. The rest are of the cruising variety. However, I do realize that the slip fees of the boats in the harbor, whether they are used or not, help pay the bills. But if the harbor is barely used, should that be the first step in rebuilding the infrastructure?


so just cut to your agenda all ready

#19 saltyokie

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 05:34 AM

In California many Yacht Clubs are located on the tidelands meaning the clubs lease their space from a governmental entity. It is extremely important to keep a good relationship between the yacht Club and the governmental landlord. It is important that the yachting program provide something for the community.

#20 pipe dream

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 09:38 AM

Big lesson my club is only just barely recovering from is to make sure all major contractors doing work are adequately insured!!

It really comes in handy when your new marina starts falling apart.

#21 Delta Blues

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 03:10 PM

I've seen these projects done different ways by two different clubs:
1. The board is omnipotent, sits inside their ivory tower, makes all plans and decisions, then executes them. When the plan didn't work right, they had to assess the membership which pissed off everyone. The board never had member input or asked their opinion or had any buy-in.
2. The board drafted a concept, had rough sketches made, presented them to the membership in an open meeting to get feedback and input from the members. Their bylaws require something like 80% of membership approval before taking on projects over a certain size. The membership's input clearly made better plans and things the board would not have developed in an ivory tower came to fruition with this open planning. The membership approved the project by 97% and obviously had membership buy-in and support. The project went smoothly and everyone was pleased with the outcome.

So which management method will your club use?

#22 4deckgye

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 04:13 PM

There are many different types of people who belong to yacht clubs, There are racers, there are cruisers, there are geriatrics, there are power boaters, there are sailing widows. Some want more parking, some want a better marina, some want a pool, some do not want anything to change so they can still have their cheap water view dining facility.

One thing you may have trouble doing is finding a common ground between all of these people

#23 kent_island_sailor

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 05:32 PM

Maybe "should be fix our piers when no one ever uses them anyway" should have been in your original post???? A lot of us took this to be a planning and zoning type of problem.
Every club has a different situation. Right now my issue is the old "everyone wants to be in a yacht club and everyone knows when all the races are and shows up" model is about dead. We need to be proactive and then some to get the numbers we need. As for physical infrastructure, we're doing quite well with it. Now we need people to use it.

Any club or community marina with low dues and cheap slips will have an issue where boats that are essentially rotting at the dock will never leave because who wants to give up their WAY below market slip and then be at the back of the long waiting list to get another one :rolleyes: We have long-abandoned and unsafe moorings cluttering up our area. I am leading an effort to either get them in safe condition to be used or remove them.


So far the responses have not surprised me one bit. Lacking!

Do slips really matter when it comes to growing the racing side of most one design focused yacht clubs? (i am only asking the question, not making a statement of fact)
The majority of one design racing yacht clubs that I see tend to dry sail their boats. Etchells, jboats, sonar, melges, vipers, and dinghies. I get the feeling that more than half the boats in any harbor have long been forgotten, other than the monthly bill the owner gets for the slip fee. And only a small amount of them actually race. The rest are of the cruising variety. However, I do realize that the slip fees of the boats in the harbor, whether they are used or not, help pay the bills. But if the harbor is barely used, should that be the first step in rebuilding the infrastructure?



#24 lydia

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Posted 14 November 2012 - 07:21 PM

Yep we have just built an extension to the Club house, are revamping the structure of the sailing office and sailing school and are undertaking a $10 Million marina refurbishment. One huge piece of advice for YC's. If you build a marina, do not under any circumstances 'sell' leases to members. Find another way to fund it and keep the income from berth rentals for the benefit of all members now and in the future. If you sell leases you will create a group of members who think they are more important than not only other members but the club it’s self. Larger YC's need to find new and different profit centers to grow the club. You can't rely on bar sales and membership subs as your only form of income. YC's need to open their doors to the general public to both grow the sport and to help subsidize the memberships sailing. And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.
Don’t become a restaurant with a marina out the front.


Like he said.
And keep the decision making down to very small number of people who actually know what they are doing and let the fighting begin.
Be even more scared if everyone is in agreement.
But for a small fee plus expenses you can hire LB and me as consultants.

#25 Life Buoy 15

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 02:39 AM


Yep we have just built an extension to the Club house, are revamping the structure of the sailing office and sailing school and are undertaking a $10 Million marina refurbishment. One huge piece of advice for YC's. If you build a marina, do not under any circumstances 'sell' leases to members. Find another way to fund it and keep the income from berth rentals for the benefit of all members now and in the future. If you sell leases you will create a group of members who think they are more important than not only other members but the club it’s self. Larger YC's need to find new and different profit centers to grow the club. You can't rely on bar sales and membership subs as your only form of income. YC's need to open their doors to the general public to both grow the sport and to help subsidize the memberships sailing. And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.
Don’t become a restaurant with a marina out the front.


Like he said.
And keep the decision making down to very small number of people who actually know what they are doing and let the fighting begin.
Be even more scared if everyone is in agreement.
But for a small fee plus expenses you can hire LB and me as consultants.


Even a small fee would be better than what we are now paid! 60 hours a month divided by one dinner at the monthly meeting =.....
The eternal gratitude of the Members. Or not.

#26 Life Buoy 15

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 02:46 AM

I've seen these projects done different ways by two different clubs:
1. The board is omnipotent, sits inside their ivory tower, makes all plans and decisions, then executes them. When the plan didn't work right, they had to assess the membership which pissed off everyone. The board never had member input or asked their opinion or had any buy-in.
2. The board drafted a concept, had rough sketches made, presented them to the membership in an open meeting to get feedback and input from the members. Their bylaws require something like 80% of membership approval before taking on projects over a certain size. The membership's input clearly made better plans and things the board would not have developed in an ivory tower came to fruition with this open planning. The membership approved the project by 97% and obviously had membership buy-in and support. The project went smoothly and everyone was pleased with the outcome.

So which management method will your club use?


Or somewhere in between maybe. Not all YC board members live in an Ivory tower and if they do, well that's why you have elections each year.
There is a name for a meeting where every person has input into a design process. It called a shitfight and the final project will look like this........







Posted Image

#27 Bump-n-Grind

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 05:02 AM

The one constant, is resistance to change. Everyone talks about growing our sport, but only a few want to put forth the monumental effort it will take to do it.


I'm not so sure that infrastructure changes/updates at our club didn't have the opposite effect.
I think we lost focus from sailing and put too much emphasis on a liqour license and trying to turn it into a cafeteria with beer and wine.

#28 lydia

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 12:07 PM



Yep we have just built an extension to the Club house, are revamping the structure of the sailing office and sailing school and are undertaking a $10 Million marina refurbishment. One huge piece of advice for YC's. If you build a marina, do not under any circumstances 'sell' leases to members. Find another way to fund it and keep the income from berth rentals for the benefit of all members now and in the future. If you sell leases you will create a group of members who think they are more important than not only other members but the club it’s self. Larger YC's need to find new and different profit centers to grow the club. You can't rely on bar sales and membership subs as your only form of income. YC's need to open their doors to the general public to both grow the sport and to help subsidize the memberships sailing. And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.
Don’t become a restaurant with a marina out the front.


Like he said.
And keep the decision making down to very small number of people who actually know what they are doing and let the fighting begin.
Be even more scared if everyone is in agreement.
But for a small fee plus expenses you can hire LB and me as consultants.


Even a small fee would be better than what we are now paid! 60 hours a month divided by one dinne
The eternal gratitude of the Members. Or not.

WTF you only doing 60 hours a month!
You better start doing some heavy lifting son!
Only kidding

#29 Bitter Gnat

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 01:45 PM

So far the responses have not surprised me one bit. Lacking!

Do slips really matter when it comes to growing the racing side of most one design focused yacht clubs? (i am only asking the question, not making a statement of fact)
The majority of one design racing yacht clubs that I see tend to dry sail their boats. Etchells, jboats, sonar, melges, vipers, and dinghies. I get the feeling that more than half the boats in any harbor have long been forgotten, other than the monthly bill the owner gets for the slip fee. And only a small amount of them actually race. The rest are of the cruising variety. However, I do realize that the slip fees of the boats in the harbor, whether they are used or not, help pay the bills. But if the harbor is barely used, should that be the first step in rebuilding the infrastructure?


If the harbor renovations only benefit those with rotting boats in rotting slips, then make that a lower priority. But, if the harbor renovations will allow you to build safe docking and launching areas for multiple boats during large regattas, then make that priority one. Many of those classes of boats you mention have provisions in the Sailing Instructions that the boat must stay in the water during the regatta. I for one love YCs that provide proper slips or long utility docks where fleets can tie up safely. Facilities like that get you larger regattas. Larger regattas, healthier club.

#30 PeterHuston

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 02:05 PM


Yep we have just built an extension to the Club house, are revamping the structure of the sailing office and sailing school and are undertaking a $10 Million marina refurbishment. One huge piece of advice for YC's. If you build a marina, do not under any circumstances 'sell' leases to members. Find another way to fund it and keep the income from berth rentals for the benefit of all members now and in the future. If you sell leases you will create a group of members who think they are more important than not only other members but the club it’s self. Larger YC's need to find new and different profit centers to grow the club. You can't rely on bar sales and membership subs as your only form of income. YC's need to open their doors to the general public to both grow the sport and to help subsidize the memberships sailing. And stack the club committee with sailors. Sailing must always remain the core business of a sailing club.
Don’t become a restaurant with a marina out the front.


However, the IRS has some concerns for what you propose. As most clubs are not-for-profits, they are to be focused on serving their membership and the memberships needs. They need to follow their filed reason of being with the State. Anything done for non-members is to be accounted for differently than income from members, and non-member income is to be treated as taxable income. Also the club is limited to 15% of the annual revenue being from non-members (including sponsorships, regatta fees, food, beverage, clothing, etc.). The reason for this difference is that not-for-profits are not to be in competition with for profit companies that sell food, clothing, beverage, etc. as it is an unfair advantage. So the advantage is equalized by having non-members pay taxes on their purchases that levels the playing field. Also if the 15% number is exceeded for 4 years in a row, the IRS can convert your club to a for-profit. Be careful how you approach this.


Other than the the shock factor, what's the real problem if a club is converted to a for-profit?

#31 SailRacer

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 02:30 PM

what's the real problem if a club is converted to a for-profit?

TAXES

Sail safe!

#32 Delta Blues

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:01 PM

what's the real problem if a club is converted to a for-profit?

TAXES

Sail safe!


You would be suprised how many clubs sit on public owned land and have 100 year leases. Being a not-for-profit allows them that privilege. If they became a for-profit, the public would become outraged, other for-profit businesses would be demanding equal opportunity to build on public land and the club would be booted off the public land.

Converting to a for-profit would turn clubs into profit centers, demands of the shareholders wishing to maximize revenue would change the entire focus and make-up of the club. Within a year, it would no longer look like a yacht club and would look like some stand that sells slushies, corn dogs, and has kiosks selling all sorts of trinkets.

And yes, taxes.

#33 Delta Blues

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:04 PM


I've seen these projects done different ways by two different clubs:
1. The board is omnipotent, sits inside their ivory tower, makes all plans and decisions, then executes them. When the plan didn't work right, they had to assess the membership which pissed off everyone. The board never had member input or asked their opinion or had any buy-in.
2. The board drafted a concept, had rough sketches made, presented them to the membership in an open meeting to get feedback and input from the members. Their bylaws require something like 80% of membership approval before taking on projects over a certain size. The membership's input clearly made better plans and things the board would not have developed in an ivory tower came to fruition with this open planning. The membership approved the project by 97% and obviously had membership buy-in and support. The project went smoothly and everyone was pleased with the outcome.

So which management method will your club use?


Or somewhere in between maybe. Not all YC board members live in an Ivory tower and if they do, well that's why you have elections each year.
There is a name for a meeting where every person has input into a design process. It called a shitfight and the final project will look like this........







Posted Image


In all actuality, having the membership input and the membership's approval did not end up anything like a camel. The goal was to develop a part of the land that was underdeveloped previously, and the structure proposed was tweaked with suggestions that were improvements upon the original concept. With the ability of members to have a say in the matter, they bought in emotionally to the project and gave the thumbs up to proceed. When completed, expectations were met and everyone was pleased. Just remember, if the membership wants a two hump camel and that is what they approve, when complete their expectations will be met and they will be happy.

#34 Delta Blues

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:13 PM

There are some for profit clubs in the U.S. Cal Yacht Club comes to mind. The owners of the club focus on delivering value, it is in an area of significant wealth. There's only a few shareholders. As long as the shareholders get a ROI, they will continue. If a better offer comes along, we know what can happen to any for-profit business.

Another club that I know that is for-profit has members own those shares. It went for-profit ages ago, well since then the property value of the clubs land has skyrocketed. A "share price" has skyrocketed right along with it. Some members left, others died and those shares are no longer in the hands of the members. They are projecting that over time enough shares could end up in non-members hands that a junta will occur, the non-member shareholders will vote out the club members, and vote to put the land up for sale.

The purchase price of the land of many clubs occurred over 100 years ago. During that time, the land values on waterfront, in these populated communities has soared. At one of the clubs I am a member of, it is a little place on a big piece of land and there is steady talk of cashing the place out and the members can walk away with a pretty decent check. And that's a not-for-profit talking!

There's just a bit more politics to consider with a for-profit!

#35 SailAR

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:25 PM

Misery. We have a 2-year Commodore cycle and the BOT turns over roughly 15% a year. The project, start to finish was 4 years. They kept having to rejustify what was happening as changes/additions required BOT approval and the late comers didn't want to be tarnished with any cost overruns or accusations of unnecessary spending. Of course the different flag officers wanted to take credit for success and those that were coming up after the process were pissed that they had no money to spend on cool things for "their watch".

On the positive side, our Treasurer and Construction chair were both in office for entire period, so they did hoard cash for a few years before and then borrowed the rest on a short term amortizing note. It did force some discipline on the place to see the finances through and we at least had consistency on that level.

#36 Delta Blues

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:39 PM

There would be a good outcome for clubs to go for-profit. Their underutilized dining rooms and bars would become flooded with patrons. You'd come walking in after a big day on the water smelling salty and dripping wet wanting a beer and the public eaters and drinkers would look at you funny. For the first time, your club could actually make money on the dining room, as it would no longer be limited to "members only" who don't use it enough to make it work financially.

#37 oldweezer

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Posted 15 November 2012 - 03:58 PM

The more of this I read; the more I appreciate our "paper" club. It costs $25 a year to be a member. No clubhouse, no docks, no bar (for which the local establishments are grateful), very little overhead, and no worries about transitioning any of the above. At last count, we have around 600 members.




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