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LED light for jib at night.


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#1 Tucky

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 03:45 PM

I'm moving my navigation lights to the end of my sprit which means i will no longer get the glow from them into my asymmetric at night. I'm thinking of installing a small LED deck light to give a soft red glow upwards and might as well install it aft enough that the jib can get a little night illumination as well. I have easy access in my anchor locker if the light is small enough and will be bringing wires there as well. If it is simple enough it will beat a flashlight.

I can't find anything using Google- can't figure out the right search terms. Anyone got a link- small, low power (31 foot boat), LED, sturdy.

Thanks.

#2 Heriberto

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 03:56 PM

You mean like this?
Posted Image
Search "led livewell lighting".

#3 WHL

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 04:19 PM

Or Glowfast Tape on sails

#4 USA190520

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 04:56 PM

I'm moving my navigation lights to the end of my sprit which means i will no longer get the glow from them into my asymmetric at night. I'm thinking of installing a small LED deck light to give a soft red glow upwards and might as well install it aft enough that the jib can get a little night illumination as well. I have easy access in my anchor locker if the light is small enough and will be bringing wires there as well. If it is simple enough it will beat a flashlight.

I can't find anything using Google- can't figure out the right search terms. Anyone got a link- small, low power (31 foot boat), LED, sturdy.

Thanks.


Check any auto parts store.. Tons of 12v led lighting..



#5 Left Hook

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 07:20 PM

I always thought that a light installed partway up the mast which had the ability to shine a beam only on the location of telltales and spinnaker luffs would be a really cool little bit of kit. Easier and less obnoxious than having a flunkie up on the rail with a flashlight.

Don't know if this product exists or could be created...

#6 Heriberto

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 07:22 PM

The Glowfast tapes look pretty cool. I forgot about that stuff.

The livewell LEDs would really be perfect for your installation, they are made for mounting through a bulkhead, accept a range of voltage, low current draw, waterproof and really durable. At less than $10 it's hard to go wrong. I've used the white ones for other stuff.

#7 WHL

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 08:00 PM

I always thought that a light installed partway up the mast which had the ability to shine a beam only on the location of telltales and spinnaker luffs would be a really cool little bit of kit. Easier and less obnoxious than having a flunkie up on the rail with a flashlight.

Don't know if this product exists or could be created...

Black Light... been around since the 70's B)

#8 Left Hook

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:12 PM


I always thought that a light installed partway up the mast which had the ability to shine a beam only on the location of telltales and spinnaker luffs would be a really cool little bit of kit. Easier and less obnoxious than having a flunkie up on the rail with a flashlight.

Don't know if this product exists or could be created...

Black Light... been around since the 70's B)


Was thinking something more like this. Apologies in advance for my obvious lack of formal drafting education.

Posted Image

View is of it affixed to the front of a mast. Front view shows 3 LED bulbs which, through lenses set at varying angles including one for the mid-luff telltale, shine on the telltale areas only. The long side bars are for lighting symmetric spinnaker trimming and are designed to show as much of the luff as possible through the range of the pole without shining down on deck and shining slightly upwards to include the whole luff. it's not shown in the drawing but they are on each side of the unit to allow for trimming on each gybe. The three bulbs on the front double for viewing the luff of an assymetric spinnaker. Finally there is a bulb on the bottom to double as a deck light/work light.

Considering the ultra bright, ultra small LEDs being manufactured today I assume it's possible to fit a red and white LED behind each lens to allow for selective color choice.

Unit is controlled by remote from the cockpit with simple selector keys for each bulb. Pressing each once turns it on in one color while double clicking turns on the other color. A single press after being on turns the particular light off.

Thoughts? Does something like this exist? How ridiculous is the idea?

#9 Trevor B

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:41 PM

Don't forget that your spinnaker staysail will block the spinnaker, or at least part of it, from a light on the mast.

Glowfast tape works pretty nicely, but not as nicely as a good light. I think the idea of the well light at the aft end of your anchor locker sounds pretty good. I'd go with a very dim white light.

#10 LeoV

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:44 PM

If you have a foredeck hatch, mount one inside. many offshore single-handed sailors use that trick.

#11 WHL

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:52 PM



I always thought that a light installed partway up the mast which had the ability to shine a beam only on the location of telltales and spinnaker luffs would be a really cool little bit of kit. Easier and less obnoxious than having a flunkie up on the rail with a flashlight.

Don't know if this product exists or could be created...

Black Light... been around since the 70's B)


Was thinking something more like this. Apologies in advance for my obvious lack of formal drafting education.

Posted Image

View is of it affixed to the front of a mast. Front view shows 3 LED bulbs which, through lenses set at varying angles including one for the mid-luff telltale, shine on the telltale areas only. The long side bars are for lighting symmetric spinnaker trimming and are designed to show as much of the luff as possible through the range of the pole without shining down on deck and shining slightly upwards to include the whole luff. it's not shown in the drawing but they are on each side of the unit to allow for trimming on each gybe. The three bulbs on the front double for viewing the luff of an assymetric spinnaker. Finally there is a bulb on the bottom to double as a deck light/work light.

Considering the ultra bright, ultra small LEDs being manufactured today I assume it's possible to fit a red and white LED behind each lens to allow for selective color choice.

Unit is controlled by remote from the cockpit with simple selector keys for each bulb. Pressing each once turns it on in one color while double clicking turns on the other color. A single press after being on turns the particular light off.

Thoughts? Does something like this exist? How ridiculous is the idea?

My eyes... my eyes !! B)

Too much light and possibly confusing to other boats from a navigational perspective if left on and mast mounted. A light in the deck shining up the luff as Heriberto suggests wouldn't interfere with Nav lights.

I think the Glow Fast would do the job

#12 SailRacer

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 09:53 PM

Beware of confusing any light with a navigation light.

The blacklight idea might be interesting. Anyone know hat was used on the last Volvo race?

Sail safe!



#13 Bulbhunter

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 10:08 PM

Never really had much issue with lighting the kite at night once we cured all the light pollution in the cockpit that killed our night vision. Even a super small single LED mounted in a forward stanchion - in such a way that it only projects light across the foredeck and aimed upward would provide plenty of ambient light to read the kite assuming all the instruments in the cockpit are dimmed down the way they should be to start with. I would mess with that idea use a blue or non NAV color to avoid any possible chances of it getting confused with the nav lights. You could easily rig up a test with just a few bucks and some Radio shack stuff lashed to stanchions.

But really you don't need much light even a single little LED one on each side mounted in a stanchion would be far plenty light and might avoid killing your night vision also.

Your sample sketch idea is far too much light. Your basically matching a head lamp strapped to the mast which case the last head lamp used at night in normal sailing conditions nearly got tossed over the side with the head still attached to it by the rest of the crew who were more or less blind once that thing was flipped on.

#14 markvannote

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 11:06 PM

I did see a class 40 mast with a light mounted on the front for this purpose. I do not know how this works with COLREGS or any other enitties who may consider this a steaming light. We have never sent a mast out of our door with a telltale light mounted that I know of and we have sent some masts to some very clever sailors. Having asked enough bowmen to tack the stanchion light, fix the angle or change the batteries I would think it would be pretty nice on an offshore specific boat. The Glowfast stripes are very, very nice with no moon or overcast night but there are times when they don't really cut it.

We have found, on spreader lights, that marinized LED's tend to not be bright enough or directional enough for any kind of distance and I believe that would transfer to this application. You may be into halogen if you do mount something on the front of the rig.

Thanks.
Mark

#15 Left Hook

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Posted 04 December 2012 - 11:34 PM

I did see a class 40 mast with a light mounted on the front for this purpose. I do not know how this works with COLREGS or any other enitties who may consider this a steaming light. Nor do I, any insights from sea lawyers? We have never sent a mast out of our door with a telltale light mounted that I know of and we have sent some masts to some very clever sailors.Indeed, which makes me wonder what I've missed which makes this into a dealbreaker. Obviously the GP guys will talk about saving weight aloft. Perhaps complicated wiring? No real need for the idea at all? Having asked enough bowmen to tack the stanchion light, fix the angle or change the batteries I would think it would be pretty nice on an offshore specific boat. The Glowfast stripes are very, very nice with no moon or overcast night but there are times when they don't really cut it. Having used the glowfast draft stripes they are good for sail shape but less so for trim. Can anyone comment on the luminous telltale patches?

We have found, on spreader lights, that marinized LED's tend to not be bright enough or directional enough for any kind of distance and I believe that would transfer to this application. You may be into halogen if you do mount something on the front of the rig. Lenses?

Thanks.
Mark

Never really had much issue with lighting the kite at night once we cured all the light pollution in the cockpit that killed our night vision. Even a super small single LED mounted in a forward stanchion - in such a way that it only projects light across the foredeck and aimed upward would provide plenty of ambient light to read the kite assuming all the instruments in the cockpit are dimmed down the way they should be to start with. I would mess with that idea use a blue or non NAV color to avoid any possible chances of it getting confused with the nav lights. You could easily rig up a test with just a few bucks and some Radio shack stuff lashed to stanchions.
Kite is easier, true. Just trying to be clever and has out things that have been bouncing around in my skull for too long. The only problem I have with the deck mounted lights is that the deck isn't always clear of sails/people or even above water. Having water over the deck messing with your visual on the telltales would suck.

Someone remind me the effect of blue wavelength light on night vision?

But really you don't need much light even a single little LED one on each side mounted in a stanchion would be far plenty light and might avoid killing your night vision also.

Mark's comment about LED leumens is valid. On their own the light disperses rapidly and doesn't reach too terribly far. That's why the concept of a lens seemed interesting. I've used headlamps in the past with and without lenses over the LED's and when it was focused the light was more useful, farther.

Your sample sketch idea is far too much light. Your basically matching a head lamp strapped to the mast which case the last head lamp used at night in normal sailing conditions nearly got tossed over the side with the head still attached to it by the rest of the crew who were more or less blind once that thing was flipped on.
Maybe I should explain better. You choose which lights you want on at any time and they all face forward or at least away from the eyes of those doing the sailing. So if you're driving by the bottom telltale then just illuminate that. Middle telltale? Flip to that. It's no more light than if a crew-member was sitting on the rail with a flashlight and you don't have to worry about him accidentally flashing the helmsman with the torch


Mark & U20, I made comments. Thoughts? I'm not seriously considering this as a product, just hashing out the idea because I like thinking.

#16 Bulbhunter

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 12:13 AM


I did see a class 40 mast with a light mounted on the front for this purpose. I do not know how this works with COLREGS or any other enitties who may consider this a steaming light. Nor do I, any insights from sea lawyers? We have never sent a mast out of our door with a telltale light mounted that I know of and we have sent some masts to some very clever sailors.Indeed, which makes me wonder what I've missed which makes this into a dealbreaker. Obviously the GP guys will talk about saving weight aloft. Perhaps complicated wiring? No real need for the idea at all? Having asked enough bowmen to tack the stanchion light, fix the angle or change the batteries I would think it would be pretty nice on an offshore specific boat. The Glowfast stripes are very, very nice with no moon or overcast night but there are times when they don't really cut it. Having used the glowfast draft stripes they are good for sail shape but less so for trim. Can anyone comment on the luminous telltale patches?

We have found, on spreader lights, that marinized LED's tend to not be bright enough or directional enough for any kind of distance and I believe that would transfer to this application. You may be into halogen if you do mount something on the front of the rig. Lenses?

Thanks.
Mark

Never really had much issue with lighting the kite at night once we cured all the light pollution in the cockpit that killed our night vision. Even a super small single LED mounted in a forward stanchion - in such a way that it only projects light across the foredeck and aimed upward would provide plenty of ambient light to read the kite assuming all the instruments in the cockpit are dimmed down the way they should be to start with. I would mess with that idea use a blue or non NAV color to avoid any possible chances of it getting confused with the nav lights. You could easily rig up a test with just a few bucks and some Radio shack stuff lashed to stanchions.
Kite is easier, true. Just trying to be clever and has out things that have been bouncing around in my skull for too long. The only problem I have with the deck mounted lights is that the deck isn't always clear of sails/people or even above water. Having water over the deck messing with your visual on the telltales would suck.

Someone remind me the effect of blue wavelength light on night vision?

But really you don't need much light even a single little LED one on each side mounted in a stanchion would be far plenty light and might avoid killing your night vision also.

Mark's comment about LED leumens is valid. On their own the light disperses rapidly and doesn't reach too terribly far. That's why the concept of a lens seemed interesting. I've used headlamps in the past with and without lenses over the LED's and when it was focused the light was more useful, farther.

Your sample sketch idea is far too much light. Your basically matching a head lamp strapped to the mast which case the last head lamp used at night in normal sailing conditions nearly got tossed over the side with the head still attached to it by the rest of the crew who were more or less blind once that thing was flipped on.
Maybe I should explain better. You choose which lights you want on at any time and they all face forward or at least away from the eyes of those doing the sailing. So if you're driving by the bottom telltale then just illuminate that. Middle telltale? Flip to that. It's no more light than if a crew-member was sitting on the rail with a flashlight and you don't have to worry about him accidentally flashing the helmsman with the torch


Mark & U20, I made comments. Thoughts? I'm not seriously considering this as a product, just hashing out the idea because I like thinking.


What color is your deck? White? Any excess light shining down on the boat ie deck will wipe out your night vision. Spreader light pointed forward or kept forward of the spreaders might work without damaging your night vision again not really aimed down but forward and to the sides which would light the sail for trim needs. The stanchion light idea would be the same idea only the LED on the opposite side of the sail is doing the lighting not the light on the same side. So think small LED's embedded in a stanchion which are pointed across the deck and up they can't be seen aft of the rig as that would kill your night vision but if you were standing on port side facing starboard side on the foredeck you would see the starboard side lights facing port side. Or standing starboard facing port you would see the other set facing you etc. You wouldn't get effective lighting from port side lights on a port side chute but the Starboard side lights aimed at the port side chute would work.

#17 Left Hook

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 12:26 AM



I did see a class 40 mast with a light mounted on the front for this purpose. I do not know how this works with COLREGS or any other enitties who may consider this a steaming light. Nor do I, any insights from sea lawyers? We have never sent a mast out of our door with a telltale light mounted that I know of and we have sent some masts to some very clever sailors.Indeed, which makes me wonder what I've missed which makes this into a dealbreaker. Obviously the GP guys will talk about saving weight aloft. Perhaps complicated wiring? No real need for the idea at all? Having asked enough bowmen to tack the stanchion light, fix the angle or change the batteries I would think it would be pretty nice on an offshore specific boat. The Glowfast stripes are very, very nice with no moon or overcast night but there are times when they don't really cut it. Having used the glowfast draft stripes they are good for sail shape but less so for trim. Can anyone comment on the luminous telltale patches?

We have found, on spreader lights, that marinized LED's tend to not be bright enough or directional enough for any kind of distance and I believe that would transfer to this application. You may be into halogen if you do mount something on the front of the rig. Lenses?

Thanks.
Mark

Never really had much issue with lighting the kite at night once we cured all the light pollution in the cockpit that killed our night vision. Even a super small single LED mounted in a forward stanchion - in such a way that it only projects light across the foredeck and aimed upward would provide plenty of ambient light to read the kite assuming all the instruments in the cockpit are dimmed down the way they should be to start with. I would mess with that idea use a blue or non NAV color to avoid any possible chances of it getting confused with the nav lights. You could easily rig up a test with just a few bucks and some Radio shack stuff lashed to stanchions.
Kite is easier, true. Just trying to be clever and has out things that have been bouncing around in my skull for too long. The only problem I have with the deck mounted lights is that the deck isn't always clear of sails/people or even above water. Having water over the deck messing with your visual on the telltales would suck.

Someone remind me the effect of blue wavelength light on night vision?

But really you don't need much light even a single little LED one on each side mounted in a stanchion would be far plenty light and might avoid killing your night vision also.

Mark's comment about LED leumens is valid. On their own the light disperses rapidly and doesn't reach too terribly far. That's why the concept of a lens seemed interesting. I've used headlamps in the past with and without lenses over the LED's and when it was focused the light was more useful, farther.

Your sample sketch idea is far too much light. Your basically matching a head lamp strapped to the mast which case the last head lamp used at night in normal sailing conditions nearly got tossed over the side with the head still attached to it by the rest of the crew who were more or less blind once that thing was flipped on.
Maybe I should explain better. You choose which lights you want on at any time and they all face forward or at least away from the eyes of those doing the sailing. So if you're driving by the bottom telltale then just illuminate that. Middle telltale? Flip to that. It's no more light than if a crew-member was sitting on the rail with a flashlight and you don't have to worry about him accidentally flashing the helmsman with the torch


Mark & U20, I made comments. Thoughts? I'm not seriously considering this as a product, just hashing out the idea because I like thinking.


What color is your deck? White? Any excess light shining down on the boat ie deck will wipe out your night vision. Spreader light pointed forward or kept forward of the spreaders might work without damaging your night vision again not really aimed down but forward and to the sides which would light the sail for trim needs. The stanchion light idea would be the same idea only the LED on the opposite side of the sail is doing the lighting not the light on the same side. So think small LED's embedded in a stanchion which are pointed across the deck and up they can't be seen aft of the rig as that would kill your night vision but if you were standing on port side facing starboard side on the foredeck you would see the starboard side lights facing port side. Or standing starboard facing port you would see the other set facing you etc. You wouldn't get effective lighting from port side lights on a port side chute but the Starboard side lights aimed at the port side chute would work.


Envisioned this being mounted in a location similar to that of the steaming light on the mast and all pointing forward. No light shining downward onto the deck & the side bars illuminate the chute.

#18 Bulbhunter

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 12:30 AM




I did see a class 40 mast with a light mounted on the front for this purpose. I do not know how this works with COLREGS or any other enitties who may consider this a steaming light. Nor do I, any insights from sea lawyers? We have never sent a mast out of our door with a telltale light mounted that I know of and we have sent some masts to some very clever sailors.Indeed, which makes me wonder what I've missed which makes this into a dealbreaker. Obviously the GP guys will talk about saving weight aloft. Perhaps complicated wiring? No real need for the idea at all? Having asked enough bowmen to tack the stanchion light, fix the angle or change the batteries I would think it would be pretty nice on an offshore specific boat. The Glowfast stripes are very, very nice with no moon or overcast night but there are times when they don't really cut it. Having used the glowfast draft stripes they are good for sail shape but less so for trim. Can anyone comment on the luminous telltale patches?

We have found, on spreader lights, that marinized LED's tend to not be bright enough or directional enough for any kind of distance and I believe that would transfer to this application. You may be into halogen if you do mount something on the front of the rig. Lenses?

Thanks.
Mark

Never really had much issue with lighting the kite at night once we cured all the light pollution in the cockpit that killed our night vision. Even a super small single LED mounted in a forward stanchion - in such a way that it only projects light across the foredeck and aimed upward would provide plenty of ambient light to read the kite assuming all the instruments in the cockpit are dimmed down the way they should be to start with. I would mess with that idea use a blue or non NAV color to avoid any possible chances of it getting confused with the nav lights. You could easily rig up a test with just a few bucks and some Radio shack stuff lashed to stanchions.
Kite is easier, true. Just trying to be clever and has out things that have been bouncing around in my skull for too long. The only problem I have with the deck mounted lights is that the deck isn't always clear of sails/people or even above water. Having water over the deck messing with your visual on the telltales would suck.

Someone remind me the effect of blue wavelength light on night vision?

But really you don't need much light even a single little LED one on each side mounted in a stanchion would be far plenty light and might avoid killing your night vision also.

Mark's comment about LED leumens is valid. On their own the light disperses rapidly and doesn't reach too terribly far. That's why the concept of a lens seemed interesting. I've used headlamps in the past with and without lenses over the LED's and when it was focused the light was more useful, farther.

Your sample sketch idea is far too much light. Your basically matching a head lamp strapped to the mast which case the last head lamp used at night in normal sailing conditions nearly got tossed over the side with the head still attached to it by the rest of the crew who were more or less blind once that thing was flipped on.
Maybe I should explain better. You choose which lights you want on at any time and they all face forward or at least away from the eyes of those doing the sailing. So if you're driving by the bottom telltale then just illuminate that. Middle telltale? Flip to that. It's no more light than if a crew-member was sitting on the rail with a flashlight and you don't have to worry about him accidentally flashing the helmsman with the torch


Mark & U20, I made comments. Thoughts? I'm not seriously considering this as a product, just hashing out the idea because I like thinking.


What color is your deck? White? Any excess light shining down on the boat ie deck will wipe out your night vision. Spreader light pointed forward or kept forward of the spreaders might work without damaging your night vision again not really aimed down but forward and to the sides which would light the sail for trim needs. The stanchion light idea would be the same idea only the LED on the opposite side of the sail is doing the lighting not the light on the same side. So think small LED's embedded in a stanchion which are pointed across the deck and up they can't be seen aft of the rig as that would kill your night vision but if you were standing on port side facing starboard side on the foredeck you would see the starboard side lights facing port side. Or standing starboard facing port you would see the other set facing you etc. You wouldn't get effective lighting from port side lights on a port side chute but the Starboard side lights aimed at the port side chute would work.


Envisioned this being mounted in a location similar to that of the steaming light on the mast and all pointing forward. No light shining downward onto the deck & the side bars illuminate the chute.

Might work but you may need two light sources given the steaming light is mid chute. ie light pointed down and light pointed some what up vs - stanchion light would be simply pointed up covering the entire chute

#19 Left Hook

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 12:58 AM

So then maybe just a single, well diffused and widespread, LED set farther up the mast at asym curl level.

#20 glowmaster

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 01:06 AM

I havent heard anybody mention fluorescent telltales. I take a photo of the ones I am making for my new black mainsail, bright yellow-green and fluor orange. I dont know if they will glow with backlight but a tiny bit of light on the black background will light em up like a flare.

ed

#21 Christian

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 01:47 AM

I always thought that a light installed partway up the mast which had the ability to shine a beam only on the location of telltales and spinnaker luffs would be a really cool little bit of kit. Easier and less obnoxious than having a flunkie up on the rail with a flashlight.

Don't know if this product exists or could be created...


Especially when the flunkie is some overgrown adolesent with a penchant for pointing out his overstated racing provess.

Anyway - built-in-the-deck trim lights are very nice (and better than mast mounted ones) as thy (id done right) will have minimum impact on your night vision. have raced with them and absolutely love them.

#22 Christian

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 01:58 AM


I always thought that a light installed partway up the mast which had the ability to shine a beam only on the location of telltales and spinnaker luffs would be a really cool little bit of kit. Easier and less obnoxious than having a flunkie up on the rail with a flashlight.

Don't know if this product exists or could be created...


Especially when the flunkie is some overgrown adolesent with a penchant for pointing out his overstated racing provess.

Anyway - built-in-the-deck trim lights are very nice (and better than mast mounted ones) as thy (id done right) will have minimum impact on your night vision. have raced with them and absolutely love them.


Then off course you can also learn to trim and helm by feel - it is a pretty good skill to have for distance racing.

#23 Left Hook

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:18 AM



I always thought that a light installed partway up the mast which had the ability to shine a beam only on the location of telltales and spinnaker luffs would be a really cool little bit of kit. Easier and less obnoxious than having a flunkie up on the rail with a flashlight.

Don't know if this product exists or could be created...


Especially when the flunkie is some overgrown adolesent with a penchant for pointing out his overstated racing provess.

Anyway - built-in-the-deck trim lights are very nice (and better than mast mounted ones) as thy (id done right) will have minimum impact on your night vision. have raced with them and absolutely love them.


Then off course you can also learn to trim and helm by feel - it is a pretty good skill to have for distance racing.


this is not a problem I'm having, just something in my head. The deck lights work better? ok. Then that's the reason my idea sucks. Thx.

#24 scaprat

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 09:06 AM

If you have a foredeck hatch, mount one inside. many offshore single-handed sailors use that trick.


+1 on LeoV's suggestion.
That's how we set it up on the minis.
Just mount a 12V LED light strip to the inside of your forward hatch and put the switch into the cockpit or near the companionway.
If you want it really nice attach it to one of the screws holding the hatch, that way you can swing it to the side in case you want to douse a spinnaker through the hatch or something.

#25 Heriberto

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 09:59 AM


If you have a foredeck hatch, mount one inside. many offshore single-handed sailors use that trick.


+1 on LeoV's suggestion.
That's how we set it up on the minis.
Just mount a 12V LED light strip to the inside of your forward hatch and put the switch into the cockpit or near the companionway.
If you want it really nice attach it to one of the screws holding the hatch, that way you can swing it to the side in case you want to douse a spinnaker through the hatch or something.


Seems like a painless way for testing (beats holes in the deck) but with a tinted hatch like most Lewmars are, doesn't that dim it a lot? Also, yeah, for dousing a chute it seems like one more problem, thing to cover with chafing tape, if you want something permanent.

Deck mount seems a lot better: less holes in mast, less weight aloft, zero windage, less wires in the mast and wires to connect when rigging, less interference with night vision, no confusion with steaming lights or nav lights, easier to maintain.

The nice thing about red is it doesn't affect your night vision so much, but the downside is it could be confused with nav lights. Sounds like a thing to experiment with, red/white, placement, intensity, but I bet it kicks when you have it dialed in right. Better than having somebody (like me maybe, sorry Shorty) blind you with their headlamp every five/ten minutes. Why I've also been looking at locations to put dim red ones in the cockpit for courtesy lights.

#26 Tucky

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 11:25 AM

Thanks to everyone- the Livewell is just what I was thinking of. My mast rotates, so the mast idea won't fly.

#27 bgytr

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 12:12 PM

Or Glowfast Tapeon sails


That stuff looks pretty cool. Anyone have experience with it- does it work?

I could see cutting it into thin strips to make night telltales instead of lighting up the whole sail with a stripe. Or maybe both.

#28 WHL

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Posted 05 December 2012 - 02:04 PM

The Glow Fast tape is too heavy for telltales, however in addition to draft stripes, you could stick on the jib/genoa some 18 to 24inch strips of their draft stripe, horizontally starting at the luff and low enough for a helmsman to see. At least if pinching, he'll see the luff start to back-wind. It won't help if he's sailing too fat but then fat is fast right? :lol:

Back to the Black Light solution for telltales:
You could use Black Light invisible ink marker to paint the telltales, then use a Black Light light facing up on a stanchion, inside the hatch, in the deck etc..to illuminate the telltales.
Black Light Marker

Black Light Flashlight (it will shine 20ft so it might work strapped to a stanchion facing up.)

I haven't found 12V bulbs yet for an under-deck solution, but here's a spot lamp bulb that could be useful if you could find one in 12v

edit: here's a 12v black light spot lamp bulb

#29 barefoot children

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 12:28 AM

I have an LED backlight flashlight and tape it to the bow pulpit for night viewing, SIMPLE

#30 -Julian-

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 02:04 AM

The Glow Fast tape is too heavy for telltales, however in addition to draft stripes, you could stick on the jib/genoa some 18 to 24inch strips of their draft stripe, horizontally starting at the luff and low enough for a helmsman to see. At least if pinching, he'll see the luff start to back-wind. It won't help if he's sailing too fat but then fat is fast right? :lol:

Back to the Black Light solution for telltales:
You could use Black Light invisible ink marker to paint the telltales, then use a Black Light light facing up on a stanchion, inside the hatch, in the deck etc..to illuminate the telltales.
Black Light Marker

Black Light Flashlight (it will shine 20ft so it might work strapped to a stanchion facing up.)

I haven't found 12V bulbs yet for an under-deck solution, but here's a spot lamp bulb that could be useful if you could find one in 12v

edit: here's a 12v black light spot lamp bulb


That bulb can probably be hacked to make it 12V. it's the water-proofing/marinizing that i would be concerned about.

#31 JL92S

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 01:05 PM

we used a bicycle spot light attached to a stanchion using the handlebar mount

#32 ColinG

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Posted 06 December 2012 - 08:50 PM

Quick search of LED blacklight flashlights. Seems that there are plenty waterproof ones available and cheap enough that full marinising is not a big issue.
Also saw some blacklight markers - woudl think that the combination of a BL torch plus blacklight markers on the telltales could be a good cheap solution?

#33 WarBird

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Posted 08 December 2012 - 03:07 AM

If you are sailing often at night I don't have any good ideas. I race two or three times a year at night and..... a couple of different "Head Light" (straps to your forehead) makers have led in white or red . Some with a red lens over the white! They all seem to have some adjustment in one axis or two. We tape them to a forward windward stanchion pointing at the tales, before a tack we rip it off and retape on the new windward side. I have also taped those puppies right to the deck, duct tape. Have wedged them in the foreward hatch and angled them arround to the right aim point. Do not compromise your foreward hatch in ugly weather! Buy 'em cheap 'cuz you lose them in hurried tacks as the jib sweeps them off the boat sometimes.




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