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SUP vs Kayak? (cruising content)


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#1 greeng

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:08 PM

Right now our dingy is a kayak. While it works for our purposes it takes up a lot of deck space and it doesn't carry much (or carry it very well) and it's awkward to get in and out of.  However, I ran across a roto-molded Stand Up Paddle board the other day with 350 lbs capacity, places for two big coolers, etc.

 

http://jacksonkayak....ng/superfishal/

 

It's nice and flat and would fit well on the foredeck. Here's the thing though - I don't know anything about SUP's.  So for any of you with knowledge - can I get on the thing without getting in the water first?  It looks more stable than our kayak (which I can stand on), but is it?.  I wonder how bad the windage would be with my 6'5" self standing on it would be?  How slow/fast compared to the kayak.  Etc, etc, etc.



#2 memopad

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:43 PM

I haven't been on a SUP before but I've never been passed by one in my kayak... I usually see people kneeling on them when it gets rough or windy.  Could be for stability or windage.  I kind of doubt you'd get much improvement over a kayak in terms of easy of getting in/out and storage on the boat.  Instead you'll get something slower, less seaworthy, and potentially much wetter ;)



#3 bored broker

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:45 PM

SO to be upfront with you, I sell these for a living. Here is my $.02.  The board you are refering to is supper stable. You will have NO problem keeping your balance on it unless you are a 300lbs idiot who drives a SeaRay. The big draw back to SUP is that you have a lot of windage and only one paddle. In high winds, you can kneel and use a kayak paddle. Body Glove sells a paddle that one end of it can be taken off and a handdle put on it so that it changes back and forth between being a kayak paddle and an SUP paddle. The only problem with the paddle is that it DOSE NOT FLOAT. Have fun and happy sailing.



#4 LLD

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:53 PM

Shane Perrin may be able to give you some good advice.   He recently completed the 300-mile WaterTribe Everglades Challenge (Tampa Bay to Key Largo) in a little over six days on a SUP.  His email is listed in the lower portion of his blog: 
 
 


#5 SailRacer

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 07:54 PM

If you get a SUP (which I like) get a pair of crokies for your sunglasses....

 

Sail safe!



#6 olaf hart

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 09:50 PM

I would use a short fat sit on top kayak.

#7 bljones

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Posted 16 May 2013 - 09:58 PM

a decent 8' roll-up dinghy is under $900.  

It can carry three people.

It can carry the gear that three people require, along with three people.

It can stow in a locker, a quarter berth or tow it.

The payload stays mostly dry.

 

The SUP you linked costs more.

Carries less.

Weighs more.

is harder to stow.

 

If you're willing to spend more, get a Porta-bote.

 

 

If you want something that takes up less space and carries more, you need a bigger boat, not a smaller board.



#8 Steam Flyer

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 12:57 AM

After this years Everglades Challenge, which as noted above was completed by an SUP, I vowed to not make fun of them. So this comment is intended to be serious.

 

The SUP is a great form of exercise. They're a lot of fun in the right conditions. They're simple & reliable.

 

I would recommend checking one out with your cruising partner and see if you both agree they are practical before deciding to use one as a dinghy. And I am not saying this out of misplaced devotion to the conventional, I'm a guy who has seriously recommended an aluminum canoe for a yacht tender (done it, worked quite well for me).

 

FB- Doug



#9 soma

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 01:04 AM

We have 4 Bali Solstice inflatable SUPs and we love em. You'd never really know they're inflatable and they roll away beautifully. They are $600 each at West Marine, $500 with Port Supply. My wife paddles in with the customs book with no fear. We'll go out to dinner well dressed paddling the SUPs in to shore.

#10 ewalker

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 01:11 AM

I have used kayaks, sups, and inflatable boats for cruising. We use the inflatable SUPs alot. they inflate ridged and work great great if the water is flat. when it gets wavy the boards seem to flex in the waves making them unstable. We also got extendable paddles, they store well as they get short and all your friends can use them.



#11 JBE

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 01:15 AM

We've had a couple of Redair units for about 3 seasons. Good fun , stow right away down below.



#12 Brodie

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 02:40 AM

I also use a kayak as a dinghy - 11' sit in (although I recommend SOTs for most on-bigger-boat applications).  Compared to kayaks, SUPs are S-L-O-W (even the much less stable racing boards), and they are miserable in any kind of wind (unless you're just paddling downwind, then they are a blast).  Very easy to get on/off from the boat, but in any kind of waves whatever you have on the board will be wet unless it's in a drybag.  They are also wide - the board you are looking at is likely much wider than your kayak - it will stick up above the lifelines a good distance.  SUP is a lot of fun, much easier than most people think, but does have some drawbacks.  The only reason I would see having one on a larger boat is for fun or exercise while at anchor.  A good, basic sit on top IMO is the best choice for a small boat as a dinghy.

 

Disclosure: I sell both kayaks and SUPs and enjoy both (I own three kayaks and am looking for my "next" SUP).

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#13 Veeger

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 01:26 PM

So what's the deal with SUP's regarding have to wear a PFD?  Is it a boat which requires a PFD for everyone 'on board'?  I've seen a lot of folks without anything and wondered whether the Marine Patrol would write a ticket.



#14 Brodie

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 04:05 PM

According to the Coasties (and most states), unless being used in the surf zone, a SUP is a vessel, and therefore has the same requirements as a vessel of the same size regarding pfds, whistle etc.  A LOT of people do not follow this rule.  It is a pain to wear a pfd while paddling a SUP (and the "fanny pack" inflatables are dorky) and many boards do not have tie down points for lashing a vest on deck.  The SUP world of course is vigorously arguing this rule.  There are also debates about whether or not to wear a leash on flatwater.  Both are a tough call - it's a lot easier to fall and hit your head on something while on a SUP, and if you do fall off and there is any wind, the board is going to be unreachable in seconds if you're not wearing a leash.  I always wear a leash but usually put the pfd on deck unless it's cold or there is some other reason I feel I need to wear it.  (For the record I ALWAYS wear a pfd while kayaking, and wear one sailing when I am solo, or with non sailors, which is 95% of the time).

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#15 Alex W

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 04:45 PM

This topic is interesting to me.  I was really into kayaks before I got into sailing, and it makes me sad knowing that I'll be sailing past tons of great kayaking territory without a kayak.

 

However I haven't found a good kayak to carry on my sailboat.  My normal kayak is a Valley Nordkapp (18' long, so a bit long for a 28' sailboat).  I tried a Feathercraft K-Light because it will pack into a suitcase, but the suitcase still took up a lot of room on board and assembling the Feathercraft takes a while.  Carrying two (one for my wife) just wasn't going to be worth it.  The inflatable kayaks have the same issue with no packing down very small and don't paddle as well.

 

I've always sort of laughed at SUPs, but an inflatable SUP as a bring along toy is starting to look pretty compelling.  They seem to roll up small enough that we could fit two into the laz.  They aren't cheap, but they aren't too expensive.  They would be a fun way to silently check out the shoreline (something that kayaks are very good for), and maybe even be fun in tidal races the way that a good kayak is.

 

What's a lower end inflatable that works well?  For kayaking folks I guess that I'm looking for something like the Tempest 170 of iSUPs, not too expensive but not something that one will grow out of immediately.  Good for flat water and in currents.



#16 Brodie

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 05:04 PM

Here's a good link that describles some of the choices and tradeoffs.  IMO, you definitely get what you pay for with inflatables, so plan on spending some $$ for a good one.  I've seen the NRS and Starboard inflatables and they are very nice.  Starboard even has an inflatable 12'6" touring/race board now!  The non-inflatable board in my previous post is also a Starboard.

 

http://cksblog.com/2...s-right-for-me/

 

Alex W - I had a Valley Anas Acuta for 9 years, and worked for the East Coast importer for Valley and North Shore.  I just sold the Anas and am waiting for a new North Shore Ocean to arrive from England.  I couldn't get the 17' Anas on my 30' Sea Sprite either, so I went with a Necky Manitou sport - 10'11"x26", with actual deck rigging and a moderate sized cockpit (it's a very mini "sea" kayak).  It's not a Valley, but it's actually pretty fun to paddle compared to most tubby rec boats, but short enough to get on deck and stable enough to stand in.



#17 Ship4Brains

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:23 PM

I love to kayak and almost always bring one with as the anchorages we visit are usually freakin awesome places to paddle around in. But we always have a dinghy for hauling people, gear, and groceries back and forth from shore. If you didn't have much need to haul things a yak might work- but anything large enough to be useful at hauling stuff (E.g. a double, sit-on-top) would suck to paddle solo. That being said I'm springing for a sit-on-top kayak to leave with our boat this season, a Wilderness Systems Tarpon 100: 600 × 293 - marshbunny.com. It's decent to paddle, stable, and has a reasonable amount of space for groceries, etc. Now I'm just wondering if I can fit the Necky, Tarpon, and the dinghy on deck all at once if needed...



#18 Brodie

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Posted 17 May 2013 - 07:51 PM

Tarpon 100 is a great little boat.  I've sold many to folks intending to put them on larger boats.  Ocean Kayak Frenzy is another good choice, especially for kids or smaller folks - there are a few knockoffs out there too, here's me paddling RTM's version of a Frenzy (called a Mambo) in the BVIs.  had a lot of fun paddling that little boat, although the heavy clunky paddle was another story...anyone looking to get a kayak, don't skimp on a paddle!!

 

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#19 bert s

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 07:31 PM

Bought an Innova Helios from REI years ago. Took it on the plane (under 50# packed with paddles) to lots of exotic locales. Great having a boat to get away from all those who don't have one. 2 person open top sit in. You get yer butt wet in it most times if not really careful. It tied to the rail of several charters quite nicely, and it was good to have a second dink. The glue started letting go after 10 years, and the inflatable shop quoted $500 to repair what was bad, but we would just be chasing the problem. Went back to REI and explained this, and they replaced it.



#20 Catalina 36

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 12:23 AM

So, I was walking down the street with my buddy and we saw this really hot chick, and he say's, "Man, I'd like to bang her in the worst way!"  I said "Really?, why would you want to do her standing up in a hammock?"

 

 

That's what a SUP seems like to me.  The absolute worst way to move across the surface of the water.



#21 Kirwan

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 03:37 AM

What are the pro's and cons of 'Sit-inside' vs. 'Sit on top' Kayaks? - especially wrt use from a sailboat.

 

I've only ever paddled sit-in's; it seems to me the sit-on's would be fun in swimsuit conditions.  The SF Bay isn't that.. ever.

Brodie's pic above (first one, at the dock) looks like a great boat to me (I gotta stay <12ft)



#22 Brodie

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 04:03 AM

"sit-ins" (I wish there was a better term than this):

Pros: drier ride, some sun protection on the lower body (depending on boat), boat usually a little lighter than comparable SOT, boat can be narrower due to lower center of gravity.  IF boat has bulkheads then semi-dry storage.  Generally better performance than SOTs (with some notable exceptions)

Cons: safety of smaller, "recreational" sit ins with no or one bulkhead - not self rescuing, can swamp - NOT suitable for rough water.  Yes you may stay "drier" than in a SOT but if the water's cold you shouldn't be out there without a wetsuit or drysuit anyway.  Longer touring boats that are safe in rough water (are designed for it actually) require more advanced skills and techniques to re-enter (or learn to roll) but can use a skirt to keep most water out

 

"SOTs":

Pros: Safety due to boat being one big sealed buoyancy chamber, any water than comes aboard drains back out, easier for some folks to get in and out of, easy to climb back on from the water - BEST option for a stable, recreational kayak that can handle some rough water.  Great for taking kids, dogs, going fishing, etc.

Cons: wetter ride, usually wider than comparable sit-in (less performance oriented), some lacking in seating comfort, usually heavier

 

SOTs somehow have earned a reputation as "toy" boats or "kids" boats - but in many situations they are the preferred choice, usually because of the safety of one sealed compartment.  Honestly you don't get that much wetter in a SOT than in a large cockpit, recreational sit in boat.

 

Cat 36 - I think the SUP 'craze' will be a flash in the pan.... another year or two and you won't hear much about them again.



#23 Alex W

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 11:33 AM

In real waves the narrower "sit in" is more stable than the wider "sit on top".  If the wave is coming on your beam than the wider beam of the sit on will make it follow the angle of the face of the wave, up until the point that it dumps you.  The narrower sit-in will pivot on the wave (with your bracing stroke helping) and stay more upright.  The two images demonstrate that:

 

Wide:

stability.gif

 

Narrow:

stability2.gif

 

(from http://www.meetup.co.../thread/7171360)

 

However the sit-ins that do best in rough water are long and narrow and don't fit that nicely onto sailboats.  My kayak is almost 18' long and only 20" wide.  The length is partially necessary for buoyancy.  A good compromise might be a Mariner Coaster (a shorter rough water kayak), but it is still 14' long (and hasn't been made for a decade and has a strong cult following, so they aren't easy to find).  For just paddling around an anchorage in protected waters this is less important.

 

I don't really get SUPs either, but the storage size of an iSUP is nice on a smaller sailboat.

 

That kayak at the dock appears to not have a forward bulkhead.  If it is paddled and swamps without a floatation bag up front it could do a "cleopatra's needle" where the rear is poking out of the water and the front is 10' below and full of water.  That is hard to recover from.

 

On Puget Sound I end up wearing a wetsuit or drysuit almost year round unless I'm in very protected waters.



#24 B.J. Porter

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 01:27 PM

I'm struggling to see how you'd get very many groceries back to the boat with either option.



#25 Brodie

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Posted 21 May 2013 - 11:58 PM

Alex W - you are right, but I left out the "narrow boats are better in rough water" part because as you stated, long skinny boats don't work well as dinghies.

 

BTW, there are long, narrow SOTs, too - surf skis.

 

The kayak in the photo does not have a front bulkhead.  At this length (11') there just isnt much space up there in front of the foot pegs to fit a functional bulkhead.  That boat does have a foam pillar as a stiffener.  So yes, it is not an easily self-rescuable boat.  Which is why I usually recommend SOTs for dinghy use, and for recreational use where rough water or swamping is a possibility.  I use that boat as a way to get to the sailboat (which is on a mooring) after the launch service ends.  So all it really has to do is get me and maybe my dinner and a small overnight bag 100 yds out to the boat.  It also fits on deck so I can putt around different harbors when I get somewhere.  When I start doing more cruising, I'll likely end up with a small inflatable dinghy.



#26 steele

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Posted 22 May 2013 - 05:55 PM

I have used a rigid sit-ins, an inflatable sit-in, sit-on, as well as rigid and inflatable dinks.  The best so far for my 30 ft sailboat is a good quality hypalon inflatable without a rigid stern.  I picked up a used avon redcrest on CR a few years ago and use it more than the rest.  It is dry, easy to lug up the beach, tows fine for short trips, and is easy to store on deck partialy deflated or bagged in a berth.  I can inflate it with a manual pump in under 10 mins.  

 

A problem with sit in yaks is getting into one from the boat.  Getting into a narrow cockpit of a yak using a boarding ladder is very hard on the arms and sholders.  I ended with a large cockpit short kayak (a CLC wood duck).  By using a spray skirt it is ok in rougher water.  I put a towing eye low on the bow and for calm water tow it as often as I keep it on deck.  A cockpit cover is needed for towing, but it has never turtled even at hull speed in chop.  The inflatible is a Strerns and came with the boat, it paddles better than you would think by looking at it and is easy to board from the boat.  The combination of the rigid and inflatable yaks is great for puttering around anchorages in the evening for the wife and I, but load hauling is limited at best.



#27 DAC

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 05:40 PM

I've been running through a similar debate with regards to kayak vs inflatable vs SUP and keep coming back to the Sea Eagle Fast Track inflatable kayak.  It rolls up small, can transport two people and can carry groceries.   They claim that it can also be used standing up, which may make for fun in an anchorage. That said, I've never used one.   



#28 steele

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 07:27 PM

I have not used a sea eagle, but my single sterns inflatable is similar, including front and year skeg. I works fine for what it is. I have also used a sevylor and aire double inflatable yaks. The biggest problem with all of them is getting a wet ass. They are low freeboard and you sit on the floor. Even with inflatable floors or seats it is hard to stay dry. None will have the stability or load capacity of a proper small inflatable dink.

#29 Ishmael

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 07:31 PM

I have been looking at kayak options, since they seem like a good way to get around near the shore. We have a West Marine inflatable 'yak (made by Advanced Elements) and my wife really likes it. I was thinking of a hardbody kayak for myself, but I like to drag big bags of camera gear around with me, so I think I will stick with the inflatable dinghy as a shooting platform. It's no harder to row than the inflatable kayak and holds a lot more stuff, dryer.

Plus I can leave the motor on and make serious time if I want...



#30 Kirwan

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Posted 24 May 2013 - 07:45 PM

"sit-ins" ...  Generally better performance than SOTs (with some notable exceptions)

 

Care to elaborate on this?  I understand that the 9' sit-in pumpkin seed from Costco won't compare to a good 12' SOT.... 

Maybe you can point out a few 'stand out' SOT's that actually paddle well?   

 

I do have an inflatable dink with O/B, but I also singlehand a lot, and just tossing a plastic 'yak over the side and slipping around the anchorage sounds mighty nice. 



#31 Brodie

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 03:41 AM

Sure...most SOTs were designed for stability and ease of use first, and because of the higher center of gravity of the paddler, a "comparable" (in stability) SOT will be a little wider than the sit-in boat of the same length.  Wider = slower.

 

In either case, to gain speed and performance you are going to sacrifice initial stability and require more length - but some examples of "performance" oriented SOTs that paddle very well without being super tippy would be Necky's Vector 13 and Vector 14 and Current Designs' Kestrel 140 SOT (which is unfortunately out of production now).  Guessing that since we're talking about using kayaks as dinghies/anchorage toys that boats like the CD Zone and entry level surf skis like the Stellar SR and Epic V6 or V8 are going to be too long (16' - 18').

 

IMO the Wilderness Systems Tarpons (100 and 120) paddle very well, have comfortable seats and lots of bells and whistles.  For simplicity's sake, you can't really go wrong with Ocean Kayak's old standby's, the Frenzy (9') and Scrambler (11.5').  I am a certified kayak snob and I had a blast in a Frenzy in the Caribbean.  Ocean Kayak has gotten away from some of their older (slow) hull designs like the Tridents so some of their newer efforts like the Venus 11 and Tetra 10 aren't bad boats either.  In general, most SOTs that are marketed as "anglers" paddle like bricks, because they are designed to carry tons of gear and be super stable.  So boats like the Ocean Kayak Tridents and Wilderness System Ride aren't going to be as pleasant for just paddling around, but they are great fishing machines.

 

Obviously there are more brands out there but these are the ones I am familiar with.  The shop I worked for carried about 15 different lines but we didn't have them all - so I don't know much about Hobie, Jackson, Emotion and a few other common brands.  FWIW, with the exception of Hobie, we generally only carried boats that we liked, so that may tell you something about the lines we didn't have.  The shop owner would have loved to get Hobie in, but there was another dealer too close so Hobie wouldn't open us up.



#32 olaf hart

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 10:36 AM

We have a couple of old glass SOT's, a bit over 14'.

They were designed in NZ, called a dolphin.

They get a lot of use, and can be repaired easily because they are glass.

We bought them for not much from a hire business that was closing.

We have had them over ten years, and they get a lot of use. Pretty stable, but they are fast enough for cruising. The only boats that pass us are surf skis and very thin kayaks.

Have never used them to get to the boat, I would think we would need a boarding platform or an open transom to use them safely.

#33 Mark Morwood

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Posted 25 May 2013 - 11:16 AM

As much as I like our inflatable SUPs as boat toys, I think you would be better off with a kayak if it is to be your dinghy as well. Personally like some previous posters, I think you'd be even better off looking at a small inflatable dinghy for ferrying groceries and people, but that may not fit your boat or desires.

 

Anecdotal support for this suggestion comes from friends of ours who are enthusiastic kayakers and are cruising full time on their Westsail 32.  They started with two hard kayaks as their primary tender, with a small inflatable dinghy with oars as backup. They still use the kayaks for exploring, but have added power to the dinghy for when the need a tender - they first powered it with a salvaged electric outboard before finally switching to a small gas outboard.

 

Mark.



#34 Tom Ray

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 09:59 AM

So, I was walking down the street with my buddy and we saw this really hot chick, and he say's, "Man, I'd like to bang her in the worst way!"  I said "Really?, why would you want to do her standing up in a hammock?"

 

 

That's what a SUP seems like to me.  The absolute worst way to move across the surface of the water.

 


I would have agreed until a couple of years ago, when I was out for a morning paddle in an inlet just south of here. The bird and fish life was incredible and some guy on an SUP arrived to enjoy the show. We were both just cruising around slowly, doing the same things, except his head was 6' above water level while mine was under 3' up. He had a much better angle for looking down into the water.

 

The next year, a friend brought his SUP to the same place and I took it out. There was a strong wind and tide going in the same direction. Fighting it on the SUP was much harder than on a kayak. I guess kneeling with a double ended paddle would have been better, but I would rather sit.



#35 B.J. Porter

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Posted 30 May 2013 - 04:07 PM

We have a Pakboat Puffin Saranac two person folding Kayak on board.  It folds down to a decently small package and weighs about 27 lbs.

 

My son can get it set up in under an hour on deck, and it works well with two - I imagine their single seater is OK to.  We have the optional deck cover, which keeps down spray, but still for wind and chop a skirt would help.  Or some way to close the forward hole if there's only one person on board.  They sell a deck with a single hole, and you can rig it with one seat in the middle but we did not get the second deck.

 

It uses air tubes down the side to provide floatation and rigidity to the cloth & frame structure.

 

Pros:

- Light

- Fast

- Not too hard to put together once you've done it a few times.

- Packs down to about the size of a rolling carry-on, maybe a tiny bit larger.

- Reasonably tough, considering what it is

 

Cons:

- You do have to put the thing together, and take it apart later. 

- It's obviously not as rugged as a hunk of PVC or plastic, you can bend the tube and break things more easily.

- Some of the valves can be tricky, particularly the valves in the seat cushions.

- As it is so light you do need to make sure you secure it well when not in use.

 

 

It only comes out occasionally.  We've got the RIB and the Portland Pudgy for every day usage, the Kayak is a bit of a specialty item for when we anchor someplace more protected with less wind.  Right now in Bequia with gusts into the mid/upper 20's it's not coming out.  Someplace like Tobago Keys might be a good kayak spot.



#36 TeamGladiator

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 04:48 PM

We just picked up a pair of 10' kayaks at Dick's for $199 each... cheap enough that if we don't like the option we can Craigslist them for what we paid.

 

And, yes, on a SUP you need a PFD... friend got a citation from the sheriff for not having one.  He argued, "WTF?!? you aren't giving tickets to those dudes RIGHT THERE that are surfing with no PFD!"  The sheriff responded, "they don't have a paddle, and as soon as you use a paddle you are a boat and you have to have a PFD."  He tried to fight it in court... lost there too.  YMMV



#37 Mark Morwood

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Posted 01 June 2013 - 07:18 PM

Yep - the coast guard decided that SUPs are vessels (like kayaks, but unlike surfboards and windsurfers) so you have to have a lifejacket etc with you if you are outside a swim or surf zone. I understand there have been efforts to have that relaxed if you have a leash on, but I don't believe they have come to anything.

 

http://coastguard.do...paddleboarding/

 

Mark.



#38 James McMullen

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 02:44 AM

SUP's are nowhere near as easy as a kayak to get anywhere as soon as there is any wind or chop at all. The kind of wind or waves you don't even notice in a kayak is a much bigger deal (unless it's favorable, blowing you downwind)

#39 miscut jib

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Posted 03 June 2013 - 03:16 AM

SUP's are nowhere near as easy as a kayak to get anywhere as soon as there is any wind or chop at all. The kind of wind or waves you don't even notice in a kayak is a much bigger deal (unless it's favorable, blowing you downwind)

 

That's when you get out your SUP sail

tumblr_mnob7itdSt1qcvi9jo2_1280.jpg\

 

Only $129.95 +$9.95 S/H, call now, operators are standing by!



#40 Kenny Dumas

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 05:22 PM

Sure seems like you could strap a couple of any of these toys together when you want to make a grocery run.  Anybody try it?



#41 Ship4Brains

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 05:33 PM

SUP's are nowhere near as easy as a kayak to get anywhere as soon as there is any wind or chop at all. The kind of wind or waves you don't even notice in a kayak is a much bigger deal (unless it's favorable, blowing you downwind)

 

That's when you get out your SUP sail

tumblr_mnob7itdSt1qcvi9jo2_1280.jpg\

 

Only $129.95 +$9.95 S/H, call now, operators are standing by!

Good for down wind only I'm guessing.



#42 Brodie

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Posted 05 June 2013 - 07:18 PM

Yes, which isn't very helpful as SUPs are very easy to paddle downwind anyway.  It's upwind that sucks.



#43 JBE

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 11:19 PM

Sure seems like you could strap a couple of any of these toys together when you want to make a grocery run.  Anybody try it?

 

 

 Hell yeah, doesn't everyone?

 

IMG_2400_12.jpg

 

IMG_2401_13.jpg






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