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Asym for my Jeanneau 44


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#1 oceaneer

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 01:58 PM

Hello All

 

So i have been saving my pennies.. 

And Its time for a Asym Chute. 

 

But I need some advice on the weight. 

 

I am short handed, and sail in the pacific north west. 

The boat is a older Jeanneau sun odyssey 44 with the tall rig. 57 ft luff. 

I want the chute for light wind. from 5-15 Kts apparent. 

So i think  need .75 Oz but the sail makers keep insisting I need 1.5.

 

This seems very heavy. For racing boats we almost never used 1.5 unless we were in pretty heavy air.  But we did not have the sort of all purpose shape that I am asking for. 

 

 

 

What am i missing? Does the all purpose shape need more material strength or are the sail makers just not really listening to my wants.

I need the sail to fly in light air and in 5kts a 1.5 is gong to fly like a lead balloon. 

 

Thanks 

Oceaneer



#2 Remodel

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 02:47 PM

You've got a fairly heavy displacement vessel with a tall mast. You could certainly have a 3/4 oz built, but at 15 knots apparent wind beam reaching for example, you would be seriously pushing that kite.

 

For both price and durability, you would be better off with the 1.5. I suspect that is why they are pushing the heavier cloth.

 

That said, if you want a 3/4, buy one, Nobody is going to turn own your money. Just don't bring it back in shreds expecting a replacement because you got a hit with a 20 knot gust while tight reaching. ;)



#3 sailanything

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 03:09 PM

+1



#4 davesect

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 03:44 PM

Hi,

 

I've  built  many 3/4 oz  cruise and race sails with a few 1.5  oz  luff gores  in the head and  tack sections,

rest  3/4.

 

Could  also strengthen 3/4  with  a  3"  1.5 oz ply  under most of leech tape and  luff tape,  not  needed  in corner  patches.

 

Make the  patches bit  oversize too.

 

Dave



#5 Schnick

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:36 PM

Oceaneer - I think I may know your boat.  Anyhow, here is one vote from a Vancouver BC based Catalina 36 - proportionally heavier than you but still at just 36' so a bit less loaded up.

 

I carry two kites.  The heavier one is a 0.8oz which I use over 12 knots true right up to 'I'm scared' conditions.  It is certainly straining once the breeze ticks over 20 but that happens about once every 3 years here.

 

The lighter kite is a true 0.5oz with heavier panels coming out of the corners.  I'm not sure if the heavier panels are just Airex 600 or if they are 0.75.  This kite works great in our more typical 5-8 knots TWS and has that bit of extra safety factor when you overstand the mark and need to load it up to reach in.

 

A-kites do load the luff more than sym kites as you typically are carrying more apparent.

 

For your boat and what sounds like your uses, I would go no higher than 0.75 for the kite but would almost definitely go up a cloth weight for some or all of the luff.  This could mean going to 1.5 or just a more expensive cloth in a similar weight.  A really good sailmaker should help you with weights and layout.  If you are in the PNW and in Canada you get to choose from North, Evolution, LeitchMcBride/Sobstad, or UK.  There are a bunch of mail order houses in BC who are going to push you to 1.5oz simply because they have pre-existing designs that are all based on the heavier cloth and they are picking specs off a spreadsheet rather than doing actual design work.

 

Most 'cruising Asym' kites on other Catalina 36's seem to be 1.5oz mail order jobs.  They start to actually work around 10 or 11 knots TWS, and most of these guys promptly take them down around 12 knots TWS because they are almost as fast wing and wing under whites and the wife is often getting tense right around then.



#6 afterguy

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:37 PM

As Remodel indicates, the problem with the 3/4 isn't the 5kt number or if you're sailing deep, it's beam reaching at the upper end of the range. You really need to make a decision about the target wind range. If it's more like 5-10 then go with the 3/4. If it's more like 10-15 then go with the 1.5. I would build the 3/4 and be right quick to take the sail down if the wind builds much over 10, particularly on a reach. After all, reaching in 10+ kts should be just fine with white sails. This is cruising anarchy after all and the PNW doesn't blow that hard. Except when it does :).



#7 White Wing

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 04:47 PM

Sun Odyssey 44 isn't that heavy --- SA/D is 18.9 and D/L 158....not a lightweight boat, but it's not a Baba either.  I like Schnick's comments - very practical.  We have a 1.5 oz fractional semi-asymm that is our "main" spinnaker....we can use it in anything, but in under 8kn it sags and is not fast.  Since most of our sailing is done in the 5-10kn range, I plan to buy a 3/4 oz with some extra reinforcement in the luff.  I plan to take it down in favor of the 1.5oz if the breeze is 15kn+ ---- we're also going to rig the sail with top-down furling kit so if the breeze comes on, we can furl in under a minute.  

 

WWing

(also PNW)



#8 oceaneer

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:34 PM

Thanks to you all..

 

Im going with the 3/4.. I hate using the engine.. so taking it down in 10 apparent on a beam reach is just fine. The boat does 5/6 kts with the white sails in that condition so its good. 

And when I get more cash then I get a 1.5.

But the gulf islands in the summer are very very light. 

 

Schinck, I hope to see you out there this summer!

After Guy and Whitewing thanks as well.

 

Oceaneer



#9 kent_island_sailor

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:46 PM

I blew up a 3/4 sheeted hard a little forward of a beam reach when hit by 15-18 knot gust. Just sayin...



#10 oceaneer

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 05:49 PM

yep there is no such thing as a single sail that will magically do it all. ... no wait thats wrong.. its called an engine. But its no fun and I do that for work.

15-18 my white sails are working pretty good.

Thanks



#11 Hobie Dog

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 06:11 PM

Thanks to you all..

 

Im going with the 3/4.. I hate using the engine.. so taking it down in 10 apparent on a beam reach is just fine. The boat does 5/6 kts with the white sails in that condition so its good. 

And when I get more cash then I get a 1.5.

But the gulf islands in the summer are very very light. 

 

Schinck, I hope to see you out there this summer!

After Guy and Whitewing thanks as well.

 

Oceaneer

+1 Good Call and have fun with your new sail!



#12 Brodie

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 07:34 PM

PIcs mandatory once you get it flying....

 

I'd love to get one for my boat, but right now that's waaay down the wish list (I also don't have a spin halyard, so would need that too).  I got one for my last boat, a Cape Cod Marlin (23').  Unlike most boats that size, the Marlin has a masthead rig, so the asym was HUGE (I think it was 400 sq ft).  It was a blast in light air - everyone else would be parked or motoring and I'd be cruising along in my classic old boat under a monster spinnaker, usually singlehanded. 

P1050843_zps7683c31b.jpg

P1140881_zps6ae8e7a4.jpg



#13 oceaneer

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 08:09 PM

Thanks Brodie!

Awesome



#14 White Wing

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 10:22 PM

Oceaneer - get one of these, they are really terrific.  I haven't figured out a way to rig up a top-down furler drum, so in the meantime I decided to try one of these out.  I used to run a tack line to a block near the stem, then used a sail tie to try to keep the tack close to centerline.  Total pain and no way to adjust the tack height/luff tension.  With the ATN Tacker, I run the same tack line as before, but it leads to the shackle on the Tacker.  The U-shape slides very easily up and down the furled jib, so I have from the cockpit tackline/luff tension control. For a douse, you simply trigger the shackle and the sail floats back to midships, where I douse behind the main.  So easy!  I should have bought the Tacker a few years ago.

 

WWing 

 

tacker1.jpg    tacker3.jpg

(left picture actually shows the tackline going to the sail - but it's better to rig as shown in the right hand picture)



#15 White Wing

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 10:26 PM

Oops - forgot to give you the link:  http://www.atninc.co...equipment.shtml

 

They come in I think three sizes -- West Marine carries them, although they don't stock locally.  2-3 days to ship up from CA.

 

WWing 



#16 Joli

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Posted 11 June 2013 - 11:40 PM

We Mostly Sail With A 3/4 Assy. As Long As You're Deep It Should Be Fine. If You Punch It Up The AwS Is Going To Come On Quickly.

#17 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 12:46 PM

I use a 1.5 on a 22K lb leadmine.  It's a great sail for close reaching in light winds and AW ramps up pretty quickly with a slight increase in TW.  The 1.5 is strong enough to survive a round up if I'm silly enough (or slow enough) to let it happen.  We often use it single or doublehanded so having some margin isn't a bad thing.   Not the greatest sailing deep but does a nice job VMG gybing downwind. 



#18 Hobie Dog

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 07:26 PM

IB, Do you think you make better VMG downwind than you would by just polling out the jib and going barn door wing on wing??? I know we are talking cruising but from a racing stand point A sails just don’t get it done without fling them on a sprint or spin pole when talking downwind VMG. Light reaches I certainly see how they are better than the working sails.



#19 Pooch692000

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 07:26 PM

White wing.  I have been researching a top down system for my j34c.  The selden gx furler  and selden deck pole seems to be the best choice for my boat, but I've heard conflicting thoughts/opinions on being able to have an adjustable tack, which I would like.

 

 I have a bow stem with extended pulpit for anchor.  Selden does offer removable bowsprits,  http://www.seldenmas...e=595-261-e.pdf    that can be projected past the bow pulpit  and the furling drum would go on that.  The pole attaches with padeyes to the deck in the rear and there is an O- bracket that can attach to the anchor stem with a 90 degree fitting for the fore end of the sprit.  For my boat it would be a 3" diameter sprit pole and the pole can be ordered to the length needed.  Because I have raised aluminum toerails to mount rear padeyes, I would just need to put a starboard, teak or mahogany spacer mounted on the deck and to padeye to get it to be level with the stem bracket.   Pop sprit out of padeye, pull it out and store.  I amthinking this setup for next year.  not too expensive for furler and the sprit either 



#20 Alex W

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 07:43 PM

I had the same Cruising Direct (aka North Sails Direct) cruising asym as Brodie on my Catalina 25:

856132_10200732327369473_441395033_o.jpg

 

I liked it enough that I bought the same one a few sizes larger for my Pearson 28-2 when I moved up to a larger boat:

994778_10151422195410780_356954103_n.jpg

 

They are pretty easy to find used (both of these were bought used) and usually come with a very nice sock.  The Catalina one was a bit newer and came with a nice duffle-like bag for launching from the deck.  The Pearson one just came in a large sail bag.  It doesn't matter since we launch from inside the cabin on both boats anyway, it keeps the sail out of the way when we aren't using it.

 

For some reason we can sail a bit deeper with it on the Catalina than the Pearson, it might be due to the Catalina having a smaller E with respect to J.  I'm also rigging my Pearson with a symmetrical spinnaker for deeper sailing when we have a larger crew.

 

I can't help with sail weight, I've never had the pleasure of owning or sailing on a 44' boat.  Both of these asyms are 0.75 cloth weight, but clearly they are a lot smaller than what you'd be looking at (the Catalina one is 410sqft, the Pearson is 550ish).



#21 jameswilson29

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 08:06 PM

IB, Do you think you make better VMG downwind than you would by just polling out the jib and going barn door wing on wing??? I know we are talking cruising but from a racing stand point A sails just don’t get it done without fling them on a sprint or spin pole when talking downwind VMG. Light reaches I certainly see how they are better than the working sails.

 

I have 2 symmetrical spinnakers 1 1.5 oz. and 1 .75 oz, and 1 recently acquired asymmetrical spinnaker .75 oz. (all bought used on eBay for $200 or less each) on my Pearson 28.  For your size boat, I would buy the 1.5 oz.

 

Downwind sails are a necessity for a 4ktsb.  I sail solo and appreciate the extra speed boost when cruising.  I just picked up the asym for wind at or forward of the beam.  In certain circumstances, I will sail wing and wing with a whisker pole, but I would prefer to fly the spinnaker:

Asym:

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=nvStXX10uPM

 

1.5 oz symmetrical:

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=HggDjw3lCxc

 

.75 oz symmetrical:

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=LRUj8DR3AIo

 

Wing and wing:

 

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=aylGADJIPbc



#22 Brodie

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 09:21 PM

Yup that was exactly the sail I had, down to the color.  I used a local sailmaker (Jasper and Bailey) for my white sails but given the amount of times I'd use the assy, the CD sail was a great value.  Very easy to fly and very stable.  I flew it wing and wing a few times in very light air and it would still pull great.  My CC Marlin weighed about 1300 lbs less than your Cat 25, with a 1' shorter I dimension.  I didn't use a sock, would just bear away and sheet in the spinnaker until it collapsed behind the main, release the tack line, bunch up the foot, then lower it into the cockpit.  Worked great.



#23 Alex W

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 10:59 PM

My Catalina 25 was the tall rig, so the I was 3' taller.  Still heavy though, with a lower SA/D.  That CC Marlin looks pretty fun to sail, I'd love to have a chance to try one.  I think I could have fit the next size up CD sail if I didn't use a sock, but the sock takes some effective luff length away.  The socks are nice to use though, and were included with both of my sails.

 

I also have worked with a local loft (Ballard Sails) on new sails (main for the Catalina 25 and a genoa for my Pearson 28-2).  On the asym the more generic CD sails seemed to work pretty well and the price was right when purchased used.



#24 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 12 June 2013 - 11:50 PM

IB, Do you think you make better VMG downwind than you would by just polling out the jib and going barn door wing on wing??? I know we are talking cruising but from a racing stand point A sails just don’t get it done without fling them on a sprint or spin pole when talking downwind VMG. Light reaches I certainly see how they are better than the working sails.



I believe so. Particularly in the typical 5-8 summer winds, I can run at about 110 awa and gybe through 90 degrees with about 7 knots of boat speed. Easy to get speed addicted and heat up too much and go fast by no vmg. Poled out white sails gets me about 3.5 knots so I'm making about 1.5 knots more vmg, have some cooling wind over the deck and look cooler doing it.

White sails only, I'm faster (if there is such a thing) poled out ddw in less than 5 or more than 15 true. 5-10 is a toss up and 10-12 is vmg time. Like most lead mines, above 15 is time to sail deep and above 20 you either go symmetric (too hard singlehanded) or pole out the genny. On my boat a symmetric is the better runner by far but an assy in a sock and a good AP is not bad one or two up.

#25 White Wing

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 07:13 AM

White wing.  I have been researching a top down system for my j34c.  The selden gx furler  and selden deck pole seems to be the best choice for my boat, but I've heard conflicting thoughts/opinions on being able to have an adjustable tack, which I would like.

 

 I have a bow stem with extended pulpit for anchor.  Selden does offer removable bowsprits,  http://www.seldenmas...e=595-261-e.pdf    that can be projected past the bow pulpit  and the furling drum would go on that.  The pole attaches with padeyes to the deck in the rear and there is an O- bracket that can attach to the anchor stem with a 90 degree fitting for the fore end of the sprit.  For my boat it would be a 3" diameter sprit pole and the pole can be ordered to the length needed.  Because I have raised aluminum toerails to mount rear padeyes, I would just need to put a starboard, teak or mahogany spacer mounted on the deck and to padeye to get it to be level with the stem bracket.   Pop sprit out of padeye, pull it out and store.  I amthinking this setup for next year.  not too expensive for furler and the sprit either 

 

Challenge for me is that I have an anchor locker just aft of the bow pushpit area -- so temp sprits like the Selden won't allow me to open the anchor locker....I want full access to the anchor locker, windlass etc. - while leaving the top-down furled spinn in place.  So far, nothing "stock" works - still working on creative ideas.  My spinn halyard exit is about 2' above the hounds, so all I need really is enough "sprit" for the furled spinn to clear the pushpit - and a clean lead for the continuous furling drum line. 

 

I like the Bamar system because they have a way to adjust the luff tension dynamically - North guys like another (Karver?) because you can have multiple sails furled w/o needing multiple drums.  

 

Lots of options.

 

WWing 



#26 Hobie Dog

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Posted 13 June 2013 - 05:16 PM

IB, Do you think you make better VMG downwind than you would by just polling out the jib and going barn door wing on wing??? I know we are talking cruising but from a racing stand point A sails just don’t get it done without fling them on a sprint or spin pole when talking downwind VMG. Light reaches I certainly see how they are better than the working sails.



I believe so. Particularly in the typical 5-8 summer winds, I can run at about 110 awa and gybe through 90 degrees with about 7 knots of boat speed. Easy to get speed addicted and heat up too much and go fast by no vmg. Poled out white sails gets me about 3.5 knots so I'm making about 1.5 knots more vmg, have some cooling wind over the deck and look cooler doing it.

White sails only, I'm faster (if there is such a thing) poled out ddw in less than 5 or more than 15 true. 5-10 is a toss up and 10-12 is vmg time. Like most lead mines, above 15 is time to sail deep and above 20 you either go symmetric (too hard singlehanded) or pole out the genny. On my boat a symmetric is the better runner by far but an assy in a sock and a good AP is not bad one or two up.

Roger...



#27 Tom Keffer

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Posted 14 June 2013 - 01:09 AM

Challenge for me is that I have an anchor locker just aft of the bow pushpit area -- so temp sprits like the Selden won't allow me to open the anchor locker....I want full access to the anchor locker, windlass etc. - while leaving the top-down furled spinn in place.  So far, nothing "stock" works - still working on creative ideas.  My spinn halyard exit is about 2' above the hounds, so all I need really is enough "sprit" for the furled spinn to clear the pushpit - and a clean lead for the continuous furling drum line. 

 

How about something like this? It fits in my port anchor roller. More details.

 

View_from_bow.jpg



#28 Danziger

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 03:02 PM

Maybe it's worth to share my 2cents on this topic.

 

Recently I purchased a 130m2 top-hoisted genacker for my 40.7. It's supposed to work well for shorthanded racing and family cruising. Together with a bob-stay supported carbon Selden-Sprit retractable mounted on the deck my 40.7 is close in the specs of a J120. The sailmaker (Elvström) advised me to order .75 Oz cloth. .75 is delicate enough for wind lower than 6 kts and yet durable enough to withstand puffs above 15 and more in a run. 1.5 Oz is way to heavy. I own a heavy sym. runner of 1.5 Oz and this spinacker is the most uninspiring peace of cloth I ever sailed with. It's only good in 15+ TWS when running square down. 

 

Also the shape is vital. There are many offerings for the cruiser in the market that are so-called allround-genackers. I know by testing that these don't go as deep as a proper A2 is able to. We are not talking about 5 degrees, we are talking about 10+. For a run they are pretty much useless or you gybe yourself to death. I ordered a proper A2 runner. It will have it's weaknesses on a tight reach but for the cruiser on a reach a genua will do well enough and for racing I've got an A5 already.

 

For family cruising a snuffer is always a good idea. I'll probably get one some day.

 

One more word on the Selden bow-sprit. They are very high quality and well thought out. You get them also made in aluminium. It makes sense to support them with a bob-stay, makes you feel better when on a reach. When not in use you can store the boom close to the foot-rail. No real obstacle for anchoring.

 

Hans



#29 Joli

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Posted 16 June 2013 - 08:46 PM

How Many Here Have Blown Out A 3/4? How Many Have Blown Out A 1.5? How Many Haves Blown Out The 2.2?

I Would Guess Most Haven't Blown Out Any Off These. Blowing Out A 3/4 In Good Condition Is Not Easy, It Usually Requires Running Into The Back Of A Wave Or Giving It A Good Shake With A Hard Fill In 25 ~30.

Short Handed Cruising Machines Won't Typically Be Flying Color When It's Blowing That Hard. Cruisers Use Kites To Help When The Breeze Is Light. A 3/4 Oz Light Air Sail Is Good For Most Cruising Boats.

#30 oceaneer

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Posted 22 June 2013 - 11:11 AM

Thanks all for the advice

 

For a update.. 

I went with Leitch & McBride out of sidney. 

They were more money than the offshore lofts by about $500 bucks. But hey I think thats worth the support of the loft and the support of local businesses.

The big surprise was Doyle. Cheaper than the offshore loft Precision sails, and not by a little bit but a substantial difference.. I would have gone with then but decide that local was better. 

 

The sail will be all  3/4 oz, grey with 2 red draft/trimming stripes. It should look pretty cool especially in the overcast PNW days we get.

 

So next is 2 snatch blocks, sheets and a tack line. 

Also a Tacker.  If anyone has some they want to get rid of PM me. 

 

Will post pics in Aug when its flying!

 

Thanks

Oceaneer



#31 No.6

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 06:37 PM

Have the sail built out of Airx 900. 1.5 is too heavy for the wind range you are talking. .75 is probably fine, so long as you don't collapse the thing at the upper end.
Anyhow, you want Airx, period. If someone is trying to sell you something else, walk away.

#32 lydia

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 09:36 PM

Have the sail built out of Airx 900. 1.5 is too heavy for the wind range you are talking. .75 is probably fine, so long as you don't collapse the thing at the upper end.
Anyhow, you want Airx, period. If someone is trying to sell you something else, walk away.

He beat me to it
Get 0.9oz airx but get the sailmaker to put in oversize corner patches especially on the tack.
Tried and tested solution with us on 7000kg 43 footer and for much more than 15 knots

#33 lydia

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 09:40 PM

PIcs mandatory once you get it flying....
 
I'd love to get one for my boat, but right now that's waaay down the wish list (I also don't have a spin halyard, so would need that too).  I got one for my last boat, a Cape Cod Marlin (23').  Unlike most boats that size, the Marlin has a masthead rig, so the asym was HUGE (I think it was 400 sq ft).  It was a blast in light air - everyone else would be parked or motoring and I'd be cruising along in my classic old boat under a monster spinnaker, usually singlehanded. 
P1050843_zps7683c31b.jpg
P1140881_zps6ae8e7a4.jpg

Good example of a tack patch that is much to small in the top pic.

#34 oceaneer

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Posted 06 July 2013 - 02:49 PM

Ok another question..

I have been looking at top down furlers, this is my next purchase after I top off the piggy bank.

And came across the CDI one http://www.mauripros...ker-Furler.html

Does anyone have any experience with the CDI one?

I have been looking at the forums and the question has been asked allot about this furler and every answer is normally about a different brand of furler. 

I know the Profurl and Facnor, Karver and others are all great. But they cost more than double.

 

Thanks

Oceaneer



#35 oceaneer

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 05:51 PM

some shots.. its really light wind.. so its just flying.. the boat is doing 2-3 kts. 

i could not get better ones as the dinghy is only good for 3 kts!

1262489_159214087607823_797753586_o.jpg



#36 oceaneer

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 05:53 PM

1270457_159213830941182_795242186_o.jpg1267685_159213720941193_573312666_o.jpg1269748_159213380941227_590877831_o.jpg



#37 DtM

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 10:48 PM

Well done



#38 Steam Flyer

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 01:12 AM

... ...

The boat is a older Jeanneau sun odyssey 44 with the tall rig. 57 ft luff. 

I want the chute for light wind. from 5-15 Kts apparent. 

So i think  need .75 Oz but the sail makers keep insisting I need 1.5.

 

... ...

 

Well, you can get a 3/4oz asym and use it in 3~8kt and get another asym in 1.5oz to fly in 8~18

 

The problem is that your boat is heavy and the sail will really load up once you start approaching hull speed. You're right that 1.5 will be useless in light air but the sailmaker is probably assuming you'll be motoring anyway. The sailmaker is right in telling you that a 3/4oz chute will burst somewhere before 15 kt winds.

 

Go to another sailmaker and see what they say.

 

If you're going to get a light running sail, go 1/2oz poly. Flies like a dream.

 

FB- Doug



#39 oceaneer

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 01:16 PM

FB doug.. 1/2 poly.. do you have any pictures??

Thanks

Oceaneer



#40 Steam Flyer

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 05:01 PM

FB doug.. 1/2 poly.. do you have any pictures??

Thanks

Oceaneer

 

Well unfortunately I don't have any pics, but I just bought a new 1/2oz poly runner for my smaller boat... conventional spinnaker on a pole, I'm talkin'... and it's beautiful, weighs nothing, and is super-easy to fly. The material my local sailmaker likes is Contender but there are several variants. It's not only light & strong but also totally impervious to water which gives better longevity.

 

The "1/2oz" really isn't a technical spec but a range of cloth density that's approximately comparable. There are some cloths out there now that are quoting specs of less than 1/3oz density. A cloth in the upper end of this range should still fly nicely in light air and not shred too quick as it starts to pick up.

 

I posted my above comments before seeing your pics... LIKE !!!

 

FB- Doug



#41 oceaneer

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Posted 03 September 2013 - 05:29 PM

Haha Thanks Doug..

I was thinking poly like you get at home depot.. was very confused,.

 

I will need a 1.5 oz as well but for now im very happy. 

Leitch and Mc Bride did a great job. 

Oceaneer






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