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Bulkhead repairs


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#1 BlackTarr

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 10:16 PM

Anyone have a good idea/estimate of how much bulkhead repairs cost?  

 

Our used J22 (1987 #635) arrived yesterday and after thorough inspection with some friends at the new club, we've been advised that we need to have the starboard side bulkhead inspected and repaired/replaced.  The wood is very soft (mostly at the edges and not around the bolts, but that probably doesn't matter).

 

Gonna make some calls tomorrow, but wondering if anyone has a ballpark idea or has dealt with this before.

 

Thanks!

 



#2 bloodshot

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 11:01 PM

We had that issue on our J22 right at where the chainplate met the deck.  recall it was about $500-1000 based on condition.



#3 bloodshot

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Posted 23 June 2013 - 11:43 PM

We had that issue on our J22 right at where the chainplate met the deck.  recall it was about $500-1000 based on condition.

though I'm dating myself here.  I last owned our J22 in about 1996 or so.



#4 learningj24

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:14 AM

On a 24, the bulkhead kit from Waterline was about $400, did the tearout myself, had the installation done for about $500.



#5 Bash24

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 06:08 PM

Bulkheads in the these boats are plywood.  Get a sheet of plywood from Lowes, $30.  Cut it, epoxy it, glass it in.  Pretty simple.



#6 J29Guy

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Posted 24 June 2013 - 11:08 PM

But get Marine Plywood the difference is there are no voids in the Marine grade



#7 BlackTarr

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 01:46 AM

Thanks for these comments!  Here's a photo of the bulkhead issue.

http://jblackdc.smug...i-XRrrdfG-M.jpg



#8 The Gardener

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Posted 26 June 2013 - 07:12 PM

cut out old bulkhead with fein saw (use for pattern) use marine ply. measure to make sure your chainplates are equal (ussually not) grind back 3-4" on both sides.

install new epoxied on all sides bulkhead.  do fillets to hold tabbing nicely Tab in with 2 layers 1708 cloth. 8" and 6" or so.  buy a mask, suits, and a box of rubber gloves etc.Total parts about 3-400

 

3/4" marine ply 200 ish i use okoume 4X8

glass maybe 40

epoxy a bit more than a qt. 45

 

rolling on a coat or two of an epoxy primer makes it look better

 

your aft bulkhead is likely toast as well

assume a repair at the chainplates too.



#9 opa1

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Posted 27 June 2013 - 08:18 PM

Bought a 1987 J22 2 years ago.  All the bulkheads were toast and looked like the pictures that are provided.  I replaced everything myself with 3/4" okoume.  Really nice material and very attractive finish.  Boat is now super solid.  Use Epoxy Resin and not Polyester Resin.  The materials will cost about $300.00.  Replace them all.  Since you're upside down, it would behoove you to get this job done and over with.  The boat will be good for another 20 years or so.  Just keep the water from seeping through the deck at the chainplates and keep the interior as dry as possible.  A deck fan is recommended.  I am 72 years old, so you should be able to do this job yourself.  Or, buy a lot of beer and invite the crew for a party.  Good luck, the boat is well worth it.  



#10 BlackTarr

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 02:29 AM

Thanks.  Got an estimate of about $1400 average for the bulkhead repair.  There is also some moisture around the chainplates.  Probably need to remove about 3-4 inches at $350 per side.  So about $2100.  

 

I;d love to do this stuff myself and will look at some sites, but i'm also very nervous about it!!

 

http://www.westsyste...aged-bulkheads/



#11 bloodshot

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 03:04 PM

Bought a 1987 J22 2 years ago.  All the bulkheads were toast and looked like the pictures that are provided.  I replaced everything myself with 3/4" okoume.  Really nice material and very attractive finish.  Boat is now super solid.  Use Epoxy Resin and not Polyester Resin.  The materials will cost about $300.00.  Replace them all.  Since you're upside down, it would behoove you to get this job done and over with.  The boat will be good for another 20 years or so.  Just keep the water from seeping through the deck at the chainplates and keep the interior as dry as possible.  A deck fan is recommended.  I am 72 years old, so you should be able to do this job yourself.  Or, buy a lot of beer and invite the crew for a party.  Good luck, the boat is well worth it.  

indeed.  one J/22 pro told us to remove and reseat the chainplates every 4-5 years or so.



#12 learningj24

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:11 PM

But get Marine Plywood the difference is there are no voids in the Marine grade

Agreed.

 

I did my tearout in about 3 hours by using a sharp chisel and cutting the tabbing all the way around then pulling out the wood.



#13 Scars&Scrapes

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 07:48 PM

chainplates are easy. first remove the chainplates and set aside. bend a nail a little stick it is a drill and drill between the deck and inside layer of fiberglass.  The rotton/wet core is typically black.  Just bend the nail a little longer each pass until you are starting to dig out good core.  Stop.  Tape the back (Inside)  thicken some West System and inject, it will seep into all the right areas and now you are water tight for the deck.  drill out the slot for the chain plates, reinstall, use a good silicon, good to go.



#14 The Gardener

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Posted 02 July 2013 - 04:23 PM

DO NOT use Silicon on chainplates. Or most other boat places for that matter...

 

Try Sika 291

Lifechaulk

3M 4200

 

 



#15 bottlerocket

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 07:44 PM

Thanks.  Got an estimate of about $1400 average for the bulkhead repair.  There is also some moisture around the chainplates.  Probably need to remove about 3-4 inches at $350 per side.  So about $2100.  

 

I;d love to do this stuff myself and will look at some sites, but i'm also very nervous about it!!

 

http://www.westsyste...aged-bulkheads/

If you need to remove 3 - 4 inches per side, it will probably be closer to 6 inches for and aft.   I doubt the nail in the drill trick will work for that.   You should ask you repair guy what he plans to do to fix the problem.   The most straightforward and accurate way to fix it is to take off the top non-skid layer of fiberglass and have a look at the core.  You can use a dry wall cut out tool to cut some of the top layer of deck off, inspect the balsa core, cut out the soaked stuff and replace.   Replacing balsa is easy.  Just epoxy it in and then cover up with fiberglass.   Many will say only cut from the bottom (e.g in the cabin), but it is really tough to inject epoxy and not have gravity take over this way.   The downside with cutting the top layer is your repair will be obvious to the next buyer.  (maybe that is not a bad thing).   

 

For bulkhead repair, the estimate you got is pretty reasonable.  You can do it yourself.  It is pretty straight forward.   Just get 4x8 3/4 inch MARINE plywood.   You'll need to remove the benches and the chain plates and then carefully cut out the old bulkhead.  You want to preserve it's shape so you can use it as a template for the replacement.    It is a long weekend project, so if you don't have time, the $1400 is not a bad deal at all.    



#16 Mr. Squirrel

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 11:14 PM

The best guy on the planet for this kind of stuff is Will Harris at Waterline Systems.  Email him at Will at waterlinesystems dot com

 

MS






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