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Schooner missing between NZ & Aus


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#1 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 10:59 AM

http://www.abc.net.a...chooner/4788738

#2 Gutterblack

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 11:29 AM

7 sailors, very sad. I hope their loved ones are getting support through a very tough time.



#3 Ajax

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 11:52 AM

Shudder...

 

In this day and age of satellite tracking, sat-phones and epirbs, it's absolutely creepy when a boat goes missing without a whisper.

Whatever happened to them, must have been sudden and catastrophic.



#4 Amati

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 12:58 PM

S & S Nina?

http://news.yahoo.co...-053935827.html

#5 chessiebaysailor

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 01:24 PM

S & S Nina?

http://news.yahoo.co...-053935827.html

Starling Burgess, I believe.



#6 desldes desk

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 08:20 PM

Evi Nemeth, one of the crew on the Nina (big deal in the unix computer world) is indirectly responsible for me getting into the sport. A friend of mine sailed with her off of Africa (around senegal) while she was circumnavigating.

 

He remembered most vividly the night they hit a whale. It's not like hitting a solid object..it has some give. While everyone was going a bit nuts Evi stayed calm and started the engine to help the whale understand they weren't looking for a fight. It was the first time I understood what seamanship was.

 

Hope they turn up, or if they don't, that it was quick and painless.



#7 billy backstay

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 08:49 PM

I was not aboard, but my Mom and her business partner owned a schooner named Windigo back in the early 70's.  Popped a garboard plank off Pt. Judith and she sank to the bottom very quickly.  But, it was broad daylight and all hands were fine.  Hope these folks are in their raft, but it doesn't sound very good....



#8 KiwiJoker

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 11:22 PM

S & S Nina?

http://news.yahoo.co...-053935827.html

Starling Burgess, I believe.

 

Yes, Burgess.

 

Nina was one of the greats.  A rich and memorable history.

 

In 1960 under the ownership of DeCoursey Fales, a former Commodore of the NYYC, she won the Bermuda Race. 

 

There is a lovely tribute to Nina from her co-owner Rosemary Dyche, one of those missing believed dead  http://www.sailblogs.../member/around/


It reads in part:  In 1934, New York banker, DeCoursey Fales bought Niña, and each year of his life he became more and more devoted to her. He would talk for hours about the "old girl". The rest of Niña's career was probably fore-ordained as she won the New York Yacht Club Astor Cup in 1939 and 1940. Just before WWII, she won for the first time an event that was to become her specialty, the 233 mile Stanford-Vineyard Race on Long Island Sound. Afterward, she was laid up for the duration of the war. Niña was not allowed to rot, however, and she came out after the war in better shape than ever for a three year stint as flag ship for the New York Yacht Club. Mr. Fales became the NYYC commodore in 1949, and Niña earned her honors by taking first place in ¾ of the yacht club's squadron races as well as winning the Cygnet Cup in 1949. She made such a habit of winning races that Commodore Fales put the trophies back in competition. It became almost a stock joke that Niña would proceed to win back her own trophies! In 1962 to thunderous cheers, Niña, became the oldest yacht at 34 years to win the Newport to Bermuda Race, under 72 year old Commodore Fales. In 1966, then 78 year old Commodore Fales passed away while his crew was attempting to repeat the Bermuda win. Niña had five owners after Fales, one being Kings Point Academy.

 

What the media reports don't touch on was the massive low and southerly buster that slammed into NZ just over a week ago, wreaking havoc the length of the country.  The worst of it was south of Nina's last known position but still not good news.



#9 No.6

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 11:28 PM

This is very sad news.
I had the pleasure of sailing on Nina in the mid 70's along with my Father. My Father had the pleasure of sailing on Nina with his Father in the 40's and 50's. Grand Dad was a close friend of DeCoursey's, was navigator and watch captain on the boat. I grew up reading about her in books my Grandfather put together about racing Nina. At some point maybe I will dig them out and scan a few old photos.

#10 KiwiJoker

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 11:39 PM

This is very sad news.
I had the pleasure of sailing on Nina in the mid 70's along with my Father. My Father had the pleasure of sailing on Nina with his Father in the 40's and 50's. Grand Dad was a close friend of DeCoursey's, was navigator and watch captain on the boat. I grew up reading about her in books my Grandfather put together about racing Nina. At some point maybe I will dig them out and scan a few old photos.

 

It would be great if you'd do that. 

 

Much to be sad about here.  The loss of seven successful, productive and adventurous souls, the end of a great sailing vessel, and the thin, sketchy, mindlessness of news outlets who don't reach beyond a few bare facts from rescue services.

 

There must also be some wonderful pix from two generations of Rosenfelds, now in the Mystic Seaport archives.



#11 No.6

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 11:47 PM

Here is a poem from one of the books Grand Dad printed up.
 

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#12 btbotfa

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Posted 28 June 2013 - 11:53 PM

Excerpted from the YRA of LIS Racing Program:

 

Who was De Coursey Fales?

 

                The Yacht Racing Association of Long Island Sound’s annual awards dinner in December features an impressive collection of perpetual trophies,  large silver cups and urns, glittering plates and gleaming bowls inscribed with the names of great yachts and great sailors.  The men and women who have donated these prizes are the winners from decades past and chose to honor us now with their legacies, not only giving us something to strive for but giving us a direct connection to the history of our sport . We look at the names, Sparkman, Nall, Hipkins, Sagola,Caper and have to wonder what they would have been like to sail with, how did those wooden yachts built on City Island and designed by Olin Stephens carve upwind, who were their crew, what does the name on the transom mean?

                The pre-eminent distance racing  award  for big boats  racing under IRC on the Sound  is the De Coursey Fales Trophy.  The history of the award and the man who deeded that  prize  to the YRA is a fascinating example of how our sport is inextricably tied to the founding of this nation and its growth.

                The Fales family, of which there are countless members throughout the United States, first appears in local paperwork in the 1640’s in Dedham, Massachusetts. They were not on the first trip on the Mayflower but did show up for one of the subsequent crossings in the Puritan migration.  Some of the genealogical wizards trace the family name to England back into the 1200’s. The branch that sprang from these first descendants in Dedham eventually settled in Bristol, Rhode Island and the family surnames of Haliburton and Dunlap extend down through the centuries and find their way into the worlds of New York City law firms, investment houses, and banking .

In  1888, De Coursey Fales is born  in Saranac, New York, into the wealthy family of Haliburton Fales and begins the life of a true Renaissance man.  He attends St. Paul’s, becomes coxswain of the crew, heads to Harvard and then Columbia Law before enlisting in the Navy in 1914. After the war, he practices law, merges his firm with Cadwalader, Wickersham and Taft and becomes an eminent advisor to banks, eventually attaining the chairmanship of the New York Bank for Savings.  At Harvard, he had developed an intense love of British and American fiction and began amassing an enormous collection of literature that he wound up donating to NYU, a treasure of over  50,000 original manuscripts, novels and papers from  the 18th to the 20th centuries. He collected his family papers going back to 1620 and wrote an in-depth history of the family entitled “The Fales Family of Bristol, Rhode Island.” The personal papers, donated to NYU encompass 45 linear feet of boxes in the Bobst Library and contain, notably,  correspondence from Thomas Jefferson and John Adams.

                With such a full life, hard to believe there was time for anything else, but De Coursey began sailing on Long Island Sound at the age of 5, and worked his way up to the purchase of the great love of his life, Nina, the 59 -foot staysail schooner, in 1934. Nina, designed by Starling Burgess had an anomalous rigging set up, essentially a two-masted cutter, with a very tall mainmast of 85 feet  and foremast of 65 feet. She weighed 44 tons with a 14 foot beam. She had been designed as a state of the art race boat for the 1928 Transatlantic race, and for the time, was relatively stripped out down below.

                As Nina finished her first race, the 3900 miles to Spain in 24 days, King Alfonso approached the boat in his Royal Launch and yelled, “Well sailed, Nina, I congratulate you! I am the King of Spain.” Nina then went to England and became the first American yacht to win the Fastnet Race. She returned to the States by winning the 1929 London to Chesapeake Bay Race and traded hands for a couple of years.  The boat was fast but wet and she had been through some serious weather and Bobby Somerset put her up for sale and De Coursey had his boat for life.

                Along with climbing the ladder of banking and finance, Fales became an integral part of yacht racing on the Sound and in America. He was treasurer of the New York Yacht Club from 1938 to his death in 1966 and served as Rear Commodore and Commodore from 1942 to 1948. He was a lifelong member of the YRA. He never stopped sinking money and effort into the care and grooming of Nina, and had a full-time crew of three who lived on the boat constantly cleaning, polishing, and maintaining what became a proud flagship of the New York Yacht Club. And she was tweaked and massaged into modernity, aluminum spars replacing tall timber, winch upgrades, and an always current quiver of 24 sails. Nina won the NYYC’s Astor Cup in 1939 and 1940, countless Marblehead to Halifax Races, Annapolis to Newport Races , Around Block Island Races and, in 1941, 47,52, 53, 54, and 1960, Nina took the big prize in the Vineyard Race.

                De Coursey Fales, befitting a man of letters, would  write a pre-race  formal letter of invitation to each member of his crew, assigning bunks, lockers and watches and would issue post-race wrap-ups containing pictures, copies of log entries, notes of some of the highlights of the respective race. He sailed with a core group of friends for decades, campaigning the waters of Long Island and beyond. The racing crew, all amateurs, lived well onboard, with the full-time crew taking care of the galley chores ,though on one particularly long race the crew had to resort to pouring martinis over their cornflakes for dawn breakfast.  The post-race get-togethers always involved a shaker and gin.

                Fales distributed a 12-page guide entitled “ Nina’s Sea Routine for Ocean Racing and Day Cruising, by her Owner.” The last page contained a list of ten rules for the boat including such homilies as “Tidiness is a blessing,” and “Investigate the Gear.” The last one summed it all up-“Let’s win.” And win he did, finally, in 1962, the 34 year-old boat and its 72 year-old skipper  taking the Newport-Bermuda top prize.  The Commodore, as he was always known, had finally won the big one and his competitors  were glad that if they had to lose to anyone, it was him.

                In 1963, Harry Powell, then President of the YRA of LIS wrote in the yearbook, “This year a new trophy was put in competition by Commodore Fales for the cruising club members of the YRA and I think the results shown by the bigger number of yachts participating in the cruising races proves the great value of this trophy and I sincerely thank  Commodore Fales for his interest and his willingness to put the trophy in competition.”  The big custom silver tray from Tiffany’s had been ordered by Fales expressly for promoting distance racing on the Sound.  In the post-war boom years, yacht racing was increasing rapidly but De Coursey Fales special prize was something to fight for—the 1964 yearbook summed it up-“The De Coursey Fales Trophy has stimulated more competition  than ever; this year 32 yachts qualified for the Trophy.” 



#13 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:30 AM

So I have scouring the house for one of the books and can not locate it. Really pissed about that.

I did find another and so here we go.

 

Over early at the start of the 1948 Newport Bermuda Race!

 

 

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#14 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:33 AM

Here is that poem as a jpeg

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#15 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:36 AM

A reprint from Yachting Magazine of Nina's lines.

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#16 R Booth

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:37 AM

So I have scouring the house for one of the books and can not locate it. Really pissed about that.

I did find another and so here we go.

 

Over early at the start of the 1948 Newport Bermuda Race!

 

 

Great pic----made even better with the destroyer helping the rc.....:lol:



#17 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:39 AM

Nina with a storm trysail and every other working sail sans headsail. My guess is she blew out her main but it could be she just balanced out well like this.

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#18 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:41 AM

Bone in her teeth and eating it up to weather.

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#19 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:43 AM

Dressed. This is Grand Dad and DeCoursey, against the dog house and I think a fellow named Edgar Dupree with a weather eye discussing strategy.

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#20 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:46 AM

Bermuda per race inspection and along side in Newport.

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#21 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:47 AM

Grand Dad and I believe a fellow named Sam Lane driving.

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#22 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:49 AM

And finally, if you would indulge me, a pic of DeCoursey, and my grand parents in a launch in Hamilton Harbour.

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#23 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:54 AM

I'll see if I can find the other book. We have been through the house once, checked the bookshelves and what not. Will go over the whole place again. I am pretty sure I showed this particular book to BTBOTFA and BitPitch back in April when they were over. Perhaps I lent it to BTBOTFA for his article above but it isn't the kind of thing you let out of your sight as it is irreplaceable. BT, it is white, thin and has that pic of Nina right close to Plum Gut Light.



#24 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 12:58 AM

So I have scouring the house for one of the books and can not locate it. Really pissed about that.

I did find another and so here we go.

 

Over early at the start of the 1948 Newport Bermuda Race!

 

 

Great pic----made even better with the destroyer helping the rc..... :lol:

Rickster, they always us a navy ship as the race committee boat to start the Bermuda Race. Line is real long and it is very difficult to know if you are over early or not unless you start at the pin end.

I don't know if my grandfather was calling the line, but i do know one year I was calling the line and we had to go back.... so maybe it runs in the family!



#25 btbotfa

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:05 AM

i remember it, but also remember you being pretty careful with it, and putting it somewhere away from the beercans and steak platter



#26 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:08 AM

Right, I am pretty guarded with them, if not anal. I would have put it back in the den and most likely in to bookshelf...but it ain't there. Pissed off right now about it.



#27 btbotfa

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:10 AM

its there, you will find it-might have put under the coffee table or something



#28 btbotfa

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:11 AM

and those pictures are very special, give a real sense of what a distinctive boat she is, I hope....hard to think of her as gone...she was the flagship of the New York Yacht Club for decades.



#29 White Cracker

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:17 AM

As a young lad my Dad had a Rosenfeld picture of Nina "under full canvas" (as they would say) on the wall.

 

This is very sad news.
I had the pleasure of sailing on Nina in the mid 70's along with my Father. My Father had the pleasure of sailing on Nina with his Father in the 40's and 50's. Grand Dad was a close friend of DeCoursey's, was navigator and watch captain on the boat. I grew up reading about her in books my Grandfather put together about racing Nina. At some point maybe I will dig them out and scan a few old photos.

 

It would be great if you'd do that. 

 

Much to be sad about here.  The loss of seven successful, productive and adventurous souls, the end of a great sailing vessel, and the thin, sketchy, mindlessness of news outlets who don't reach beyond a few bare facts from rescue services.

 

There must also be some wonderful pix from two generations of Rosenfelds, now in the Mystic Seaport archives.



#30 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:37 AM

A few more Nina pics BT sent me a short while ago.

 

 

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#31 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:40 AM

A more recent photo.

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#32 No.6

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 01:45 AM

As she should be remembered.

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#33 Regatta Dog

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 03:27 AM

A friend of mine had a great experience on the boat and captured it in a documentary --

 

 

 

Check out the whole series and look up Darin if you ever get to Mystic. 



#34 ProaSailor

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 04:02 AM

Here is a poem from one of the books Grand Dad printed up.
 

 

 

ORDER OF FINISH
Nina .............. 4:05:07
Mistress .......... 4:43:17    38:10
Gesture ........... 4:44:42    39:35
Stormy vVeather ... 4:50:03    44:56
Argyll ............ 4:50:35    45:29
Burma ............. 4:56:57    51:50
Spookie ........... 5:42:36  1:37:29
Penneseewasee ..... 6:25:56  2:20:49
Hottier ........... 4:45:22    40:15
Venture ..........


- THE NINA
There's Nina, a lady billowing with grace,
Who went to Newport in quite a breeze;
Her obsession was to have first place
In yachting society, if you please!
The weather was atrocious, with fog and rain,
From Glen Cove up to Newport was the race;
Nina just showed her stern and took the gain,
(Bermuda was in her mind, that's plain!)


Nina's out to win, ambitious schooner!
With lovely lines and artful sails
Her desire's to arrive a wee bit sooner,
Flying the colors of DeCoursey Fales.
Nina's a lady of the ocean, a racing yacht
On the make-she wants to win, a lot!


      H. FALLER

 

 



#35 moody frog

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Posted 29 June 2013 - 08:18 AM

As said in an other similar thread I have always admired Ninã since I was a kid in the 60s.

 

Before De Coursey Fales bought her she had been designed "to beat the rule" for another great N.Y yachtman Paul Hammond, owner of several other offshore yachts and J.Class supporter.

Hammond built her for the transatlantic race to Spain and won it

 

I later bumped into an other of Hammonds yachts: Rara Avis, a Philip Rhodes 100' built on the spirit of a Thames barge, when she became a Sail-training-ship on our local shores.

 

And, recently, ocean-racer Sam Davies' parents had a Nina replica built at Covey Island Boatworks, they live aboard and actively sail her, spending a lot of time along our coast to everyone's eye-delight.

http://coveyisland.c...yachts/#Image_4

 

Let's hope some good news of the crew come from New-Zealand



#36 buchhla

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 09:43 AM

http://www.wavetrain...d-presumed-sunk

 

This has been big news down here in NZ for the past few days, but I didn't see anything posted on here.  I am still holding out hope that they are out there, but SAR still keeps on coming up short.

 

Very nice family and a beautiful yacht that we have been sailing with on and off for the past few seasons...

 

Let's all send our best wishes there way and hope they can found safe soon!



#37 Jim in Halifax

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 12:39 PM

http://www.wavetrain...d-presumed-sunk

 

This has been big news down here in NZ for the past few days, but I didn't see anything posted on here.  I am still holding out hope that they are out there, but SAR still keeps on coming up short.

 

Very nice family and a beautiful yacht that we have been sailing with on and off for the past few seasons...

 

Let's all send our best wishes there way and hope they can found safe soon!

Trying to send out good vibes from 1/2 a world away...schooners are revered in my part of the world and Nina is certainly a thoroughbred. I hope we hear of the ship and her crew soon!



#38 sailglobal

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 07:13 PM

Tragic. She was an amazing yacht with an impressive record. The family who had her custody truly had a love affair with her and evidently they treated her well. The Tasman can be a harsh sea, and sadly it appears a legend has become a victim.

#39 Matagi

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 04:18 PM

First of all it's seven people who - presumably - have lost their lives, the youngest among them not even 18.

This is what really makes me sad: a young man, looking for adventure, with all his life before him. Gone forever.

May they all find their peace.



#40 Sailing in FL

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:06 PM

There were three stories in the Palm Beach Post last Thursday and Friday.  Apparently Mr. Dyche's mother lives in West Palm Beach. Here are the links:

 

http://www.palmbeach...nd-his-f/nYYpb/

http://www.palmbeach...-pacific/nYXPZ/

http://www.palmbeach...g-7-sank/nYYGq/



#41 watercooled

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 08:32 PM

In the strange world of ocean cruising, coincidence is common. I first met David and Nina in a secluded anchorage in the San Blas islands 2009 after a rough passage from Colombia, we were the only two boats there. Then 4 years later, while waiting for the car ferry across to Russell in the bay of Islands NZ a man and his son ask if I have room in the car for them, quite a surprise to again meet David and his son David. They had already cleared customs so had very little time to catch up, I was asked to email Australian immigration their details for the notice of arrival requirement and we said goodbye. A few days later they emailed me that they had engine problems and were postponing the passage. Evie Nemeth was a regular at my boat club as well and I still hold out hope for them and their shipmates..



#42 R Booth

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Posted 03 July 2013 - 10:12 PM

Looks like they're gonna give it another go. I'm tipping one right now to the SAR teams for their perseverence, and another one for the crew. Hopefully some questions will be answered soon....

 

 

 

 

Search resumes for signs of schooner
 

Search resumes for signs of schooner

 

Thu, 04 Jul 2013 7:56a.m.

nina-search-1200a.jpg?width=460 The Nina has been missing for a month

An air force Orion will resume the search for the crew from the vintage schooner Nina which has been missing in the Tasman Sea for a month.

The sailing ship, with six Americans and one British man aboard, has not been heard from since June 4.

They left on their journey from Opua in the Bay of Islands to Newcastle in Australia on May 29 but struck bad weather days into the trip as winds hit 110km/h and swells were as high as 8 metres.

 

Bad weather halted the search for the 21m vessel on Wednesday, but Rescue Coordination Centre said the air force aircraft would search an area of 73,000 square nautical miles, most of which has not been searched before.

The nine-day search has failed to find any sign of the crew, the 85-year-old schooner or its liferaft despite searching an area four times the size of New Zealand.

The six Americans on board were captain David Dyche, 58, his wife Rosemary, 60, their son David, 17, their friend Evi Nemeth, 73, as well as a 28-year-old man and an 18-year-old woman.

The Briton has been named as Matthew Wootton, a 35-year-old from Lancaster.

NZN


Read more: http://www.3news.co....x#ixzz2Y1iy3KhU



#43 mlitwicki

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:03 AM

A friend passed this URL along earlier today - she's got a friend connection to the young U.S. guy aboard Nina, so has been following the SAR and news closely as well. I didn't see this posted earlier in the thread, apologies if it has been already:

 

http://www.katc.com/...urvived-storms/

 

I am aware that the last communication from Nina the news has been reporting was a text from Evi Nemeth, so if this report is true (and it's been picked up by a NZ media outlet, but that means nothing, I suppose), there's a bit more reason for optimism.  Cheers to RCC NZ for their tireless efforts.

 

I don't know anyone aboard, but I (and many many many of my friends) have been in the systems administration field (and related fields) for years and greatly admire Evi. My thoughts are with the sailors and their families.



#44 billy backstay

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:08 AM

Wow, that is positive news indeed!



#45 R Booth

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 12:29 AM

Wow, that is positive news indeed!

 

 

I didn't realize that they've been missing for almost a month now. But effin-a, there's got to be something out there that belongs to the Nina. At least one would think so.....



#46 monsoon

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 01:02 AM

Wow, that is positive news indeed!

 

 

I didn't realize that they've been missing for almost a month now. But effin-a, there's got to be something out there that belongs to the Nina. At least one would think so.....

 

Sure hope they're floating around in a life raft and its just that the EPIRB failed...



#47 billy backstay

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 01:07 AM

 

Wow, that is positive news indeed!

 

 

I didn't realize that they've been missing for almost a month now. But effin-a, there's got to be something out there that belongs to the Nina. At least one would think so.....

 

Sure hope they're floating around in a life raft and its just that the EPIRB failed...

 

  If you read the linked article, it says they are motoring in Nina at 3-4 knots.



#48 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 03:11 AM

 

 

Wow, that is positive news indeed!

 

 

I didn't realize that they've been missing for almost a month now. But effin-a, there's got to be something out there that belongs to the Nina. At least one would think so.....

 

Sure hope they're floating around in a life raft and its just that the EPIRB failed...

 

  If you read the linked article, it says they are motoring in Nina at 3-4 knots.

 

I hope you are correct, but the evidence is pretty thin.  A single text almost a month ago just now being reported by the father of one of the crew. The rescue forces that cover the Tasman are some of the best in the world and they have searched without success.  



#49 robmo01

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 06:46 AM

I once helped pull the elegant Nina out of Robinson's Hole in Buzzards Bay o/a 1992.  Her wine glass transom was, in my opinion, nearly indecently beautiful.  She was hung up on the rocks at the eastern end of the hole and my Capt'n, Charles G. Mitchell, was called by the Nina's skipper to come to her aid.  I helped Charlie (my good friend and neighbor) as a deck hand and I assisted in the attachment of a 4" polypro hawser to Nina's stern.  Jaguar (Charlie's 65' twin diesel tug) gave a bit of a pull and off she came. Luckily Nina sustained no damage and she was able to proceed on her way to her next port of call (I think it was Vinyahd Haven).  We headed for home happy with a job well done.  I witnessed Nina broad reaching into New Bedford, full and bye with a bone in her teeth on many occasions, she was a beauty to behold.  My heart and thoughts go out to the families of her crew. 



#50 SCANAS

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Posted 04 July 2013 - 07:15 AM

 

 

 

Wow, that is positive news indeed!

 

 

I didn't realize that they've been missing for almost a month now. But effin-a, there's got to be something out there that belongs to the Nina. At least one would think so.....

 

Sure hope they're floating around in a life raft and its just that the EPIRB failed...

 

  If you read the linked article, it says they are motoring in Nina at 3-4 knots.

 

I hope you are correct, but the evidence is pretty thin.  A single text almost a month ago just now being reported by the father of one of the crew. The rescue forces that cover the Tasman are some of the best in the world and they have searched without success.  

 

As well as being a busy place marine traffic wise too. I still hope but it's been a whole month now.



#51 opus

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Posted 08 July 2013 - 08:18 AM

New Zealand search and rescue has called off the search for the Nina. 

 

http://www.theregist...meth_unix_dead/



#52 floating dutchman

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 04:50 AM

Update:

http://www.stuff.co....n-Sea-life-raft

 

 

A privately funded New Zealand search plane will this afternoon fly to an area in the Tasman Sea where dozens of people have reported seeing what they believe is a life-raft possibly from the missing American yacht Nina.

 

 

Hope.



#53 billy backstay

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 10:06 AM

Update:

http://www.stuff.co....n-Sea-life-raft

 

 

A privately funded New Zealand search plane will this afternoon fly to an area in the Tasman Sea where dozens of people have reported seeing what they believe is a life-raft possibly from the missing American yacht Nina.

 

 

Hope.

 

 

OMG!  How could they have possibly survived this long, if it is them?  Yes, hope and prayers, if that's what you beleive in.....



#54 SloopJonB

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Posted 18 August 2013 - 05:26 PM

People have but it's mighty unlikely.



#55 pipe dream

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 10:34 PM

http://www.news.com....q-1226740747522

 

http://www.nydailyne...ticle-1.1486404

 

PICTURES of a mystery object floating in the Pacific Ocean are giving hope to the families of seven crew members whose yacht went missing on its way to Australia in June.

The Nina - a classic 85-year-old wooden vessel - was carrying six Americans and one Brit when it disappeared off the coast of New Zealand.

The yacht left New Zealand to sail to Australia on May 29 and has not been heard from since it sailed through a heavy storm on June 4.

The missing people are Captain David Dyche, 58, his wife Rosemary, 60, and their son David, 17; their friend Evi Nemeth, 73; Kyle Jackson, 27; Danielle Wright, 19 and Matt Wootton, 35, from Britain, NY Daily News reports.

745468-c8b50eae-35e1-11e3-bf1a-051e1d25a

The Nina tied at dock at an unidentified location. Picture: AP Source: AP

 

On June 4 Ms Nemeth sent a text message to a New Zealand meteorologist asking for steering guidance: "ANY UPDATE 4 NINA? ... EVI."

But the yacht did not activate its emergency locator beacon and it was not known to be missing until 10 days later.

Family members hold hope that the crew is still alive and have been pleading with US officials to search for the missing ship but so far they have been ignored. They also want Australian and New Zealand authorities to get involved.

746723-c4c5b262-35e1-11e3-bf1a-051e1d25a

This undated photo shows American David Dyche, skipper of Nina which went missing while sailing from New Zealand to Australia. Picture: AP Source: AP

 

Ricky Wright, whose daughter Danielle is one of the missing, told The News: "We've got six Americans out there and the United States has only lifted a finger to say they're not involved.

"It was a nightmare, and that's the most difficult part of this nightmare: Why does the government not want to participate? That just baffles my mind."

Ralph Baird, an adviser with volunteer group Texas EquuSearch, said there was no clear evidence the ship had sunk but warned that finding it would prove difficult because it vanished in such a large area of ocean.

"It's a needle in the haystack, and that needle is moving," Mr Baird told The News.






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