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Varnishing Hell


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#1 pete_nj

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 03:58 PM

Yesterday I decided to repair the varnish on a small section of toerail. There are currently 10 coats of Epifanes that were applied a few months ago. A small section was damaged when a launch driver put a line on one of my mid-ship cleats and backed down hard. The varnish was damaged in a small section.

I taped off a 12-inch section of the toerail, sanded with 220 then 320 grit. Aftercleaning, I applied a coat of Epifanes Wood Finish Gloss. About 8 hours later, it was dry to the touch and looked great. I then applied a second coat and went home.

Went back to the boat this morning and the finish is totally dull, no gloss at all. 

It was somewhat humid last night.

Is this a result of humidity? Did I put the second coat on too soon?

What now - do I need to sand off the coats that I put on and start over?

Thanks!



#2 Jim Conlin

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 06:52 PM

Not to worry.  The dullness is caused by the moisture it was exposed to and is only at the surface.  When it's hard enough, give it the usual inter-coat sanding and you're back in business.



#3 CharlieCobra

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 07:56 PM

What Jim said...



#4 pete_nj

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 08:09 PM

Thanks Jim and Charlie.

 

Purely as a guess, this is exactly what I did this morning. I figured worst case I would be sanding the last few coats off. 

It had been over 15 hours and the mixture I had used yesterday was 2 parts varnish, 1 part thinner . Hopefully, I had waited long enough.

 

Pete



#5 bruno

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Posted 30 June 2013 - 08:26 PM

coats late in the day, especially near wTer frequently dull due to rise in humidity

#6 casc27

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 12:22 AM

What the rest said. My rule of thumb is no varnish (or paint) application within 4 hours of the arrival of dew-point.



#7 Soņadora

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 01:03 PM

yep, no varnishing after around 3 pm unless you can be indoors in a controlled environment.

 

Here are some tips.

 

  • Ideally, you will apply your varnish in a clean room with temperature range of 73.9 - 74.1 degrees (f).
  • Humidity a steady 18.5%.
  • No exposure to sun or incandescent bulbs.
  • When you apply, you don't actully 'apply' it. You 'persuade' it to go on to the surface.
  • Your brush needs to be of the finest Eophippus hair from the Himalayas.
  • For best results, on horizontal surfaces use a ratio of .0763:1 thinner:varnish ratio. On vertical surfaces, you can reduce that to .0762:1.
  • Never EVER varnish during a full moon. The extra gravity will cause particles in your varnish to elevate above the surface
  • Be sure the goat you sacrifice is of pure, scottish stock. You did sacrifice a goat, didn't you?

Your mileage may vary, but the above is what I have discovered to be optimal.

 

Good luck! ;)



#8 Jim Conlin

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 02:36 PM

For the coat that you hope will be the final one, what he said is correct.  In times past, virgins were sacrificed instead of goats.  The varnisher should wear freshly laundered lint-free clothing or, better yet, be naked.

 

When its Sunday at 4PM in the boatyard and you won't be back for days and you're doing intermediate coats where the object is to build film thickness, whatever sticky mess you get down will dry soon enough and as it's going to be sanded pretty briskly before the top coats, so much lower standards are OK.   If it's cloudy or lumpy, it's OK. Just don't create sags or a film so thick that it puckers.  



#9 pete_nj

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 05:38 PM

Thanks all.

Jim, Sons - thanks for the instructions - now I get what I was doing wrong. I did not perform the goat sacrifice. I did sacrifice a pair of shorts to the Dutch god Epifanes.

 

I got back on the boat today. As everyone predicted, the light sanding and a fresh coat of varnish did the trick. All looks good.



#10 Bull City

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Posted 01 July 2013 - 08:42 PM

I had the same issue a few months ago when I did my annual Cetol gloss coat.



#11 _dinsdale_

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 06:11 AM

We want to sacrifice virgins around here, but we can't find any.



#12 vmg

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Posted 05 July 2013 - 07:36 AM

My chandler sells virgin goats

 

..... at least, he says they are virgins..........






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