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2008 Beneteau First 36.7 keel


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#1 trkarl

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 04:18 AM

I have a bent fin keel that is too far bent to be smacked back into alignment according to Mars Keel. They want almost $11k + freight for a new one. Two questions:
-The bend is in a pretty precise location. Can I cut this portion out, align the pieces, melt the removed lead, and cast it back into place without loss of integrity?
-Does anyone know where I could find a good used one?

Any other options?

Thanks.

#2 jerryj2me

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 01:26 PM

you contacted Ward Richardson in Marion SC to find out what a new one from Bene parts department is going to cost?

 

 

Also, I have no idea if there is anything structural inside the cast lead. (similar to rebar in concrete, there might me something in the core of the keel)

 

The slice it at the bend and then re-section it together sounds like an interesting idea but I have a lot of doubt about the structural quality of what you are doing.

 

Sorry - no good answers!



#3 NewLeaf

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 04:13 PM

maybe it is a good opportunity to get a better fin! I would LOVE to have this boat to be less tender, carry more sail, and sail closer to the wind. have you asked for an improved keel?



#4 2high2tight

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 06:07 PM

maybe it is a good opportunity to get a better fin! I would LOVE to have this boat to be less tender, carry more sail, and sail closer to the wind. have you asked for an improved keel?


Then put in a carbon stick

#5 trkarl

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Posted 20 July 2013 - 09:01 PM

you contacted Ward Richardson in Marion SC to find out what a new one from Bene parts department is going to cost?

No, but the online parts site tells me they want abou $21k for a new one.

 

have you asked for an improved keel?

No I haven't. If I added an "improved keel," it would preclude any future one design races. Not that I'm planning on racing her, but a future owner might. That being said, what would be your idea of an improved keel? More weight at the base to increase righting moment?



#6 jerryj2me

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Posted 21 July 2013 - 12:51 AM

yeah I would stay stock due to the OD issues for sure.

 

Less tender? Time to by a cruiser!



#7 Pinching

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 10:57 AM

Keel probably didn't bend floating happily in her slip -- might check for related structural damage before bolting on any new keel.



#8 trkarl

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Posted 22 July 2013 - 05:39 PM


Keel probably didn't bend floating happily in her slip -- might check for related structural damage before bolting on any new keel.


I have, and there is. Getting that fixed already.

#9 jerryj2me

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Posted 23 July 2013 - 06:57 PM

Get in touch with Bene - if they got one collecting dust you might be able to negotiate a price.

 

Tell em what Mars wants and theres a chance you can talk em down.

 

The reason I say this - on my old boat (Bene 38s5 1992) Beneteau gave me an entire roller furling system for the boat for free.

 

No joke!

 

When I contacted them for one part they sent me the whole thing because they neeeded the space and it had been sitting for a while.

 

Normally they are way overpriced for what you are getting and I try to get the parts from the original manufacturer when possible.



#10 The Shadow

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 01:29 AM

Have you tried to straighten it out?

I hear a crane leg can work wonders.



maybe it is a good opportunity to get a better fin! I would LOVE to have this boat to be less tender, carry more sail, and sail closer to the wind. have you asked for an improved keel?


Then put in a carbon stick

A shoe works great.



#11 trkarl

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 04:57 AM

I haven't tried anything yet. The boat is on the east coast, and I'm in Colorado. Its currently a long distance relationship, but we're thinking about moving in together... :-)

#12 jerryj2me

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Posted 24 July 2013 - 10:18 PM

I haven't tried anything yet. The boat is on the east coast, and I'm in Colorado. Its currently a long distance relationship, but we're thinking about moving in together... :-)

Always more interesting at a distance.

 

When you doin the big F2F meeting?



#13 Schnick

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 06:58 PM

trkarl -what did that auction end at anyways?  By the time i filled out the paperwork I was already outbid...



#14 trkarl

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Posted 25 July 2013 - 10:00 PM

jerryj2me-- We're meeting for the first time sometime next month, I think.

 

Schnick-- The auction ended at $40k. I'm sure it's going to cost me at least $20k more to get her in the water. Did you have a survey done or see the boat? If so, I'd love to hear your thoughts. I'm uncertain that I'm doing the right thing by disclosing this... But, Fuck It!



#15 NewLeaf

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 08:36 PM

yeah I would stay stock due to the OD issues for sure.

 

Less tender? Time to by a cruiser!

not really.... at 19 degrees (#1 and full main in 12-14knots depending on crew) the boat starts going sideways. it would be nice not having so much leeway.

As for OD racing where? maybe there is some OD racing left in the Midwest, but here in the PNW, PHRF killed the fleet....so I do not care.. 

 

A Carbon stick is good and interesting idea bit how much do you think it would cost?



#16 jerryj2me

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Posted 28 July 2013 - 09:18 PM

Sounds like somebody bought a crunched and crashed project boat?

 

Care to bring the rest of us up to speed on what they got going on?

 

We are trying to get OD for the 36.7 crowd going again down here in SD.

 

If this is truly a project boat and you got the keel sitting in the shop, you might as well try to straighten it out, or melt the middle and re-cast it. Not a clue if it would work, but from what I am hearing here, you got nothing to lose but time and money.

 

:D



#17 trkarl

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:28 AM

Yea, She's crunched and crashed for sure. Her name is Opus One, and she was damaged in Hurricane Sandy. I believe that she was on the hard and got knocked over. There is damage to the lifelines, keel, grid, and rudder.

 

Here are some pictures to satisfy the curious:

 

4363649_20130514095454120_1_XLARGE.jpg

4363649_20130514095525272_1_XLARGE.jpg4363649_20130514095526969_1_XLARGE.jpg4363649_20130514095528683_1_XLARGE.jpg



#18 kevlar®

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:34 AM

That's a friend's old boat. Was knocked off her stands in Sandy. I don't think it was a violent fall (FWIW). Just leaned on other boats knocked over alongside of her. The whole yard was swamped by the storm surge. 

 

I really don't have any more information for you regarding the damage. My thought was to remove and repair the existing keel instead of buying new, but I'm no pro at that by any means. 

 

Good luck. 

 

-Kevin



#19 trkarl

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:14 PM

kevlar--

 

Thanks for the info.

 

I'm going to try to fix the keel first, then if that doesn't work, I'm going to have to replace it. Unfortunately, this is going to have to occur at the yard, not at my shop here in Colorado. I wonder how hard it is going to be casting lead outside. At least the area will be well-ventilated.

 

Even though I have some experience with fiberglass and boats, I'm thinking I'm going to have the yard do the repairs to the grid. Especially since that is a more structural area.



#20 jerryj2me

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 08:28 PM

The hull-keel joint might not be that bad - if all you got is the grid gel coat crack that you are showing.

 

Get an expert to give it a real close look.

 

As for the keel? Rent some local space and get the keel dropped off the boat and see what you can do with it,

 

I would ask Btow for any structural info they got on how the keel is made before I got going on it.



#21 Schnick

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 10:14 PM

I never got that close to the boat either as I'm on the west coast of Canada.  For that same reason the shipping was ugly and I couldn't pay that kind of price for the boat.  I assumed the keel bend was just below the end of the keel bolts.  Besides driving a semi truck over it I couldn't really see how I was going to get it straight.

 

The rest of the boat looked pretty good.

 

good luck and post some pics when she is back in the water and looking good.



#22 SloopJonB

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Posted 29 July 2013 - 11:57 PM

Get in touch with Bene - if they got one collecting dust you might be able to negotiate a price.

 

Tell em what Mars wants and theres a chance you can talk em down.

 

The reason I say this - on my old boat (Bene 38s5 1992) Beneteau gave me an entire roller furling system for the boat for free.

 

No joke!

 

When I contacted them for one part they sent me the whole thing because they neeeded the space and it had been sitting for a while.

 

Normally they are way overpriced for what you are getting and I try to get the parts from the original manufacturer when possible.

You can't melt down & recast a furler, at least not economically.



#23 trkarl

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 12:00 AM

You can't melt down & recast a furler, at least not economically.

 

We weren't talking about recasting a furler. We were talking about recasting a portion of the keel.



#24 oldweezer

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 02:05 AM

You can't melt down & recast a furler, at least not economically.

 

We weren't talking about recasting a furler. We were talking about recasting a portion of the keel.

I think the point was they COULD melt down and recast any old keels........



#25 jerryj2me

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 08:09 PM

 

You can't melt down & recast a furler, at least not economically.

 

We weren't talking about recasting a furler. We were talking about recasting a portion of the keel.

I think the point was they COULD melt down and recast any old keels........

Premise of reusing scrap lead is good.

 

 

However it never hurts to ask the question, or try to negotiate on price.

 

If they got it sitting and they need the space, don't be surprised if you can't cut a deal.

 

Also, I doubt if the location of keel casting has got anything to do with where the final product is being stored, so dumping a keel for scrap? Might be cheaper to sell it off at cost.

 

"Lets make a deal"



#26 jerryj2me

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 08:15 PM

as for straightening that keel?

 

Get it off, lay it on its side,

 

Now start thinking -

 

You can build a Frame jig out of 4x4's (or even stacked 2x4's) where you can use threaded rods to selectively apply pressure and try to rebend the keel.

 

Some 1/2 inch threaded rods, a wood frame and some steel plates under the rod-nuts to compress the framing structure.

 

Lead is really easy to work, if thats all it is.

 

my 2 cents...



#27 trkarl

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 09:10 PM

I talked to Beneteau USA today. They do not have any keels laying around, unfortunately. Their tech department would not suggest recasting, especially because of the liability issues to them. They told me that the only structural members in the keel are the keel bolts that extend less than half way down, which is probably why it bent where it did.

 

They also suggested not trying to "improve" on the keel if I buy a new one to keep the resale value.

 

I also talked to a guy at Mayco Industries, a lead foundry. He suggested trying to straighten it first. Then, if that doesn't work, cut out the bent section and, instead of trying to recast it, add lead in small increments using a torch. He said that trying to recast it would be difficult because the non-melted lead would suck heat away from the melted lead very quickly, causing it to shrink before it bonded. Then, if that also fails, I'm back to where I am now and can just sell it for scrap and buy a new one.

 

FWIW, I really like jerryj2me's wooden jig idea. I was thinking of something very similar, but hadn't quite formed the idea that far.



#28 BigSquid

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Posted 30 July 2013 - 11:52 PM

A good naval architect could tell you if there was the strength to do it depending on how far the fin is bent but you could CNC machine it so it is symmetrical and then put the lead you cut off back on the bottom in the 'bulb' section you could probably keep close to the PHRF rating and it would be worth it to put the weight lower on the fin.  I owned a 36.7 for 5 years and it was already getting tough to find OD fleets in So Cal.  The person that bought mine might start racing but so far a fully optimized 36.7 went into the cruising sphere.  Having it scanned, CNC machined and the lead cuttings applied to the bottom of the fin would be much less than $11k including the naval architect's fees.  Race boats shave and reapply lead continuously as they are getting tuned up the first few years.  Fred Courouble faired my 36.7 keel and made it symmetrical and so he has the digital templates from scanning and modelling it already: www.couroubledesign.com.



#29 trkarl

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 04:23 AM

Big Squid,

 

As you can see from the pictures above, The keel is bent more than I think CNC machining can fix. The bottom is way off center line. 



#30 jerryj2me

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 04:36 AM

I talked to Beneteau USA today. They do not have any keels laying around, unfortunately. Their tech department would not suggest recasting, especially because of the liability issues to them. They told me that the only structural members in the keel are the keel bolts that extend less than half way down, which is probably why it bent where it did.

 

They also suggested not trying to "improve" on the keel if I buy a new one to keep the resale value.

 

I also talked to a guy at Mayco Industries, a lead foundry. He suggested trying to straighten it first. Then, if that doesn't work, cut out the bent section and, instead of trying to recast it, add lead in small increments using a torch. He said that trying to recast it would be difficult because the non-melted lead would suck heat away from the melted lead very quickly, causing it to shrink before it bonded. Then, if that also fails, I'm back to where I am now and can just sell it for scrap and buy a new one.

 

FWIW, I really like jerryj2me's wooden jig idea. I was thinking of something very similar, but hadn't quite formed the idea that far.

Yeah controlled limited force methods.. screw it down a little,back off and check the results, lather rinse repeat.

 

If its just a foot of keel bolts then you might be able to make it fly.

 

 

Anybody that uses a hammer should be shot.



#31 mad

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 03:14 PM

as for straightening that keel?

 

Get it off, lay it on its side,

 

Now start thinking -

 

You can build a Frame jig out of 4x4's (or even stacked 2x4's) where you can use threaded rods to selectively apply pressure and try to rebend the keel.

 

Some 1/2 inch threaded rods, a wood frame and some steel plates under the rod-nuts to compress the framing structure.

 

Lead is really easy to work, if thats all it is.

 

my 2 cents...

:lol:



#32 Py26129

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 08:44 PM

I talked to Beneteau USA today. They do not have any keels laying around, unfortunately. Their tech department would not suggest recasting, especially because of the liability issues to them. They told me that the only structural members in the keel are the keel bolts that extend less than half way down, which is probably why it bent where it did.

 

They also suggested not trying to "improve" on the keel if I buy a new one to keep the resale value.

 

I also talked to a guy at Mayco Industries, a lead foundry. He suggested trying to straighten it first. Then, if that doesn't work, cut out the bent section and, instead of trying to recast it, add lead in small increments using a torch. He said that trying to recast it would be difficult because the non-melted lead would suck heat away from the melted lead very quickly, causing it to shrink before it bonded. Then, if that also fails, I'm back to where I am now and can just sell it for scrap and buy a new one.

 

FWIW, I really like jerryj2me's wooden jig idea. I was thinking of something very similar, but hadn't quite formed the idea that far.

Yeah controlled limited force methods.. screw it down a little,back off and check the results, lather rinse repeat.

 

If its just a foot of keel bolts then you might be able to make it fly.

 

 

Anybody that uses a hammer should be shot.

 

 

Instead of threaded rod, you could use 1 or more hydraulic jacks (rent them) to apply the force in a controlled manner.



#33 trkarl

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 08:49 PM

Instead of threaded rod, you could use 1 or more hydraulic jacks (rent them) to apply the force in a controlled manner.

 

Good point. I would be able to apply more force that way. Maybe a combination of the two methods: use the threaded rod to position things and the jack to do the bending. I bet the yard has one that I could borrow or rent.



#34 Zonker

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 10:17 PM

And the jig or whatever has to be stronger than the keel or you will just bend the jig. I'd look for scrap steel beams you can sell back to scrap yard when you are done and rented hyd. jacks

#35 trkarl

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 10:24 PM

And the jig or whatever has to be stronger than the keel or you will just bend the jig. I'd look for scrap steel beams you can sell back to scrap yard when you are done and rented hyd. jacks

 

Good point.



#36 trkarl

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 11:24 PM

One of the problems that I'm going to encounter while out there is transportation issues. Especially while hauling I-beams around. Then, there's the tool access problem. Do I just buy an extra set of tools for the boat while I'm out there? or try to carry back and forth on the airplane? Or do I take a road trip with my pickup and all of the tools that I'll ever need and park it at the marina? Will they let me keep it there for an extended period of time?

 

Thoughts?

 

It's hard being so far away.

 

Eventually, I'm going to sail her from NJ to Seattle Via the Panama Canal. I go there far more often than NJ. Plus, it's only a 3hr plane ride from Denver.



#37 echo

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 12:50 AM

Drop the keel and ship it to you.  Preform the work there  then ship it back to NJ.  it has to be cheaper than what you are talking about undertaking.  Dropping a keel is not that big of a deal. 



#38 Jim Conlin

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 01:22 AM

If you go with a new keel, don't forget the scrap value of the old one.  Maybe a buck a pound.



#39 Py26129

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 03:40 AM

One of the problems that I'm going to encounter while out there is transportation issues. Especially while hauling I-beams around. Then, there's the tool access problem. Do I just buy an extra set of tools for the boat while I'm out there? or try to carry back and forth on the airplane? Or do I take a road trip with my pickup and all of the tools that I'll ever need and park it at the marina? Will they let me keep it there for an extended period of time?
 
Thoughts?
 
It's hard being so far away.
 
Eventually, I'm going to sail her from NJ to Seattle Via the Panama Canal. I go there far more often than NJ. Plus, it's only a 3hr plane ride from Denver.


Another option might be to have the boat trucked to Denver, fix out there and then truck it to the west coast when it's done.

#40 jerryj2me

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:05 PM

I would just get the boat as is shipped to the final splash location, and do your yard work there.

 

As for the force to bend things? guessing 4x4's are strong enough, but you can look up the information for bending a cross section of metal of various types and sizes, do the math and then do the same thing for the wood structures as well. Its structural engineering 101 sorta stuff.



#41 SloopJonB

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:36 PM

Lead is one of the easiest metals to cast - melts around 600 degrees. Wear full welding protection and a good vapours respirator. Checking with OSHA for their regs for foundry workers would be a good idea.

 

If you are going to melt & recast the whole thing be sure to make a template of your keel bolt pattern beforehand so you will be able to position the studs so they will mount in the same holes.



#42 SloopJonB

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:38 PM

One of the problems that I'm going to encounter while out there is transportation issues. Especially while hauling I-beams around. Then, there's the tool access problem. Do I just buy an extra set of tools for the boat while I'm out there? or try to carry back and forth on the airplane? Or do I take a road trip with my pickup and all of the tools that I'll ever need and park it at the marina? Will they let me keep it there for an extended period of time?

 

Thoughts?

 

It's hard being so far away.

 

Eventually, I'm going to sail her from NJ to Seattle Via the Panama Canal. I go there far more often than NJ. Plus, it's only a 3hr plane ride from Denver.

Road Trip! The extent of the work you are doing means you'll need ALL your tools (and then some). The alternative is Harbour Freight for disposables.



#43 SloopJonB

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 06:41 PM

If you are considering bending it back into shape, I'd check around for a shop with a honkin' big hydraulic press - 100 tons kind of thing - and talk to them - might be doable and it would be controlled to the max.



#44 jerryj2me

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 09:27 PM

I really don't think you are going to need that much force (100 ton presses) but if you do the math you can put a number on it.



#45 SloopJonB

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 11:28 PM

You won't but you ARE going to want a BIG press. You can get 20 tons in a shop press from Harbour Freight but you ain't gett'n that keel in it. The 100's and bigger usually have huge tables under them 



#46 trkarl

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 09:27 PM

Another option might be to have the boat trucked to Denver, fix out there and then truck it to the west coast when it's done.

 
It's not an option at $5 a mile. Especially since once I'm done, I'd have to pay them both directions. Best to do it where she sits.
 
I'm going to try jerryj2me's solution first. I like the idea of not needing to move the keel very far.
 
I'm definitely not going to forget to scrap the old keel if I buy a new one.

Anyone know where I can get the specs for the keel? Most specifically, I need to be able to estimate the cross sectional dimensions at the bend so that I can calculate forces.

#47 jerryj2me

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 10:00 PM

handwaving guess?

 

Cross section - 4" thick and 30" long

 

A ruler would get you one better, but my keel is in the water.

 

Should get you ballpark.



#48 mad

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 11:50 AM

And the jig or whatever has to be stronger than the keel or you will just bend the jig. I'd look for scrap steel beams you can sell back to scrap yard when you are done and rented hyd. jacks

so you don't think some shitty 4 x 4 timbers will work either then :)



#49 The Shadow

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 01:04 PM

Step one.

Remove keel.

Step two.

Lay keel on some timbers with bent portion of strut upwards.

Step three.

place a 4x6 on apex of bend.

Step four.

Push down on 4x6 with crane leg until straight.

Step five.

Have beer and laugh at how easy that was.

Step six.

Re-install keel.



#50 SailRacer

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 01:11 PM

Interesting fix it- style.hope you can get the boat insured after that scenario...

 

Please also make sure to take a good look at the rudder and rudder post.

 

Sail safe



#51 jerryj2me

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Posted 05 August 2013 - 02:04 PM

Step one.

Remove keel.

Step two.

Lay keel on some timbers with bent portion of strut upwards.

Step three.

place a 4x6 on apex of bend.

Step four.

Push down on 4x6 with crane leg until straight.

Step five.

Have beer and laugh at how easy that was.

Step six.

Re-install keel.

Thats sort of my thinking, but I think using  threaded rods with nuts and a ratchet  to do the bend will be a lot more controlled, where you can apply force in very small and controlled steps, That way you can back off between steps and check your progress. Last thing you want to do is overbend the correction, or introduce a new bend beside the old one in the opposite direction.



#52 Chicago M.O.B.

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 05:06 AM

A metallurgical engineer should be consulted before doing this but have you considered carefully heating the area of the bend (not melting it) while jacking it straight?  I do think you should still take the keel off the boat and lay it flat on some kind of jig as has been suggested above ... but a little heat should make it easier to straighten.

 

Personally I think you are looking at a new keel but as you have said straightening it is worth a try.  Or you could leave it as-is and try to stay on starboard most of the time ...

 

Good luck.



#53 No.6

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Posted 07 August 2013 - 12:44 PM

Step one.

Remove keel.

Step two.

Lay keel on some timbers with bent portion of strut upwards.

Step three.

place a 4x6 on apex of bend.

Step four.

Push down on 4x6 with crane leg until straight.

Step five.

Have beer and laugh at how easy that was.

Step six.

Re-install keel.

Thats sort of my thinking, but I think using  threaded rods with nuts and a ratchet  to do the bend will be a lot more controlled, where you can apply force in very small and controlled steps, That way you can back off between steps and check your progress. Last thing you want to do is overbend the correction, or introduce a new bend beside the old one in the opposite direction.

You are fooling yourself if you think you can do this with threaded rods. Years ago my dad had a C&C 35. Hit a rock at crazy speeds. Bent the fin 18" at the tip out of true. Thing looked like a dead whale fin when we hauled her. Insurance company, after consulting with C&C Yachts, declared the boat a total loss even though there was no other damage beside the lead being bent.

What the yard then did was to take 8"x8" pieces of wood shoring and chained them around the keel loosely. They then put like 20 ton hydraulic housing jacks between those shoring beams and the lead and they jacked the keel back straight. Now because metal has "memory" it tends to want to go back to where it was originally cast. However the foil shape was off. The side that the bend was towards had like a double hump or ripple in it and the other side was proud or full. We faired it out so the keel would be symmetrical and the boat performed just fine. In fact because the foil shape was slightly fuller, she was better in light air then she had been prior to the accident.



#54 Jkondz

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 12:41 AM

Why not get the design for the keel
- Transfer shape to a 6x6 for various stations along keel
- Bolt together in a pallet like fashion
- remove keel Lay keel on stations
- Either make similar jig for top and stomp on it with a crane or just place8x8 under crane pad
- Bolt back on
- have it faired to get final shape.
- Go sailing.

#55 trkarl

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 08:13 PM

Thanks everyone for the ideas. I'll let you know what I end up doing.



#56 Bruce T. Shark

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 11:49 AM

Um Step One:

Remove Mast....just dont ask...but search Pearson 26 and keel removal.

 

We own Hull 242 from that hull number vintage...our delivery sail is a dacron that is about 2ft short on the luff and a foot short on the foot and a dacron jib - it is a great sail for just beating around with just us, and speed stays close (to our cruising friends) as the boat is flatter...

 

We also race PHRF, cause i knew the Ches Bay fleet would die..sigh..

 

Regards

Bruce

 

Step one.

Remove keel.

Step two.

Lay keel on some timbers with bent portion of strut upwards.

Step three.

place a 4x6 on apex of bend.

Step four.

Push down on 4x6 with crane leg until straight.

Step five.

Have beer and laugh at how easy that was.

Step six.

Re-install keel.



#57 trkarl

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 12:57 PM

Um Step One:
Remove Mast....just dont ask...but search Pearson 26 and keel removal.
 
We own Hull 242 from that hull number vintage...our delivery sail is a dacron that is about 2ft short on the luff and a foot short on the foot and a dacron jib - it is a great sail for just beating around with just us, and speed stays close (to our cruising friends) as the boat is flatter...
 
We also race PHRF, cause i knew the Ches Bay fleet would die..sigh..
 
Regards
Bruce

 

Fortunately, the mast is already removed, but a good point if it wasn't.

 

Thanks for the tidbit on the sails. I'll keep that in mind when I'm ordering sails, even though it'll be awhile.

 

From what I understand, a lot of the OD fleets are dieing. The forums on the class website http://www.beneteaufirst367.org/ also seem to be pretty stale.
 



#58 Just a Skosh

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 02:47 PM

Um Step One:
Remove Mast....just dont ask...but search Pearson 26 and keel removal.
 
We own Hull 242 from that hull number vintage...our delivery sail is a dacron that is about 2ft short on the luff and a foot short on the foot and a dacron jib - it is a great sail for just beating around with just us, and speed stays close (to our cruising friends) as the boat is flatter...
 
We also race PHRF, cause i knew the Ches Bay fleet would die..sigh..
 
Regards
Bruce

 

Fortunately, the mast is already removed, but a good point if it wasn't.

 

Thanks for the tidbit on the sails. I'll keep that in mind when I'm ordering sails, even though it'll be awhile.

 

From what I understand, a lot of the OD fleets are dieing. The forums on the class website http://www.beneteaufirst367.org/ also seem to be pretty stale.
 

 

Not so much in the midwest.  There were 14 boats at the Verve Cup in Chicago a couple of weekends ago and there's about that many signed up for North Americans.  At the Bayview One Design this year I think there were 10-11 boats.  I think it just depends on where you are...



#59 jerryj2me

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Posted 23 August 2013 - 11:23 PM

The class website has been broken for a good long time - about half the folks that have signed up can't post because the validation process is broken.

 

I have been on Beneteau to get it fixed, no results just a lot of excuses.



#60 2high2tight

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Posted 26 August 2013 - 08:39 PM

Its a great boat -- but like many great classes -- they fade away. RIght now the market for 35 foot symmetric racer cruiser lead mines is dead. Too much crew to coordinate. Too many skills to keep up. Too much ching to operate. Thats why we see such a rampage down inthe sport boat level. Much cheaper, much more fun cause they giddy up and plane, and only 3 crew members to account for. I'm in SF bay and pulling my hair out for a year -- and seriously thinking about changing my entire boating model to a big fat cruiser and a Melges 20 or Viper. Too much wind out here for the 36.7 anyway.



#61 jerryj2me

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 10:15 PM

Its a great boat -- but like many great classes -- they fade away. RIght now the market for 35 foot symmetric racer cruiser lead mines is dead. Too much crew to coordinate. Too many skills to keep up. Too much ching to operate. Thats why we see such a rampage down inthe sport boat level. Much cheaper, much more fun cause they giddy up and plane, and only 3 crew members to account for. I'm in SF bay and pulling my hair out for a year -- and seriously thinking about changing my entire boating model to a big fat cruiser and a Melges 20 or Viper. Too much wind out here for the 36.7 anyway.

We got OD running down here in SD again, largely thru the efforts of one of the owners. But our best keelboat OD group here is the J105 crowd.



#62 trkarl

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 10:31 PM

Its a great boat -- but like many great classes -- they fade away. RIght now the market for 35 foot symmetric racer cruiser lead mines is dead. Too much crew to coordinate. Too many skills to keep up. Too much ching to operate. Thats why we see such a rampage down inthe sport boat level. Much cheaper, much more fun cause they giddy up and plane, and only 3 crew members to account for. I'm in SF bay and pulling my hair out for a year -- and seriously thinking about changing my entire boating model to a big fat cruiser and a Melges 20 or Viper. Too much wind out here for the 36.7 anyway.

We got OD running down here in SD again, largely thru the efforts of one of the owners. But our best keelboat OD group here is the J105 crowd.

 

It's hard to grow a OD group when the manufacturer no longer makes the boat. The pool of 36.7s around is just going to get smaller and smaller.



#63 jerryj2me

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Posted 27 August 2013 - 10:52 PM

Fixed number of hulls out there for sure. Attrition is slow. We still got a bunch of Schock 35's going strong here. Not the number that use to be out there racing, but when the conditions are right they are still the boat to beat.



#64 trkarl

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 06:31 AM

Update: The Keel is straight!

2014-05-07%2009.29.44_cropped.jpg

2014-05-07%2009.29.51_cropped.jpg

I took it to a metal fabricator in NJ called Nordic Metal. They put it on their 150-ton press break. It took 12 tons and about a day to straighten it. No fractures, and only a small amount of surface damage, which I can fill and fair quite easily.

The guys at Nordic Metal were absolutely great! They had done some nice stainless steel work on the boat in front of me. That pulpit looks new, even though it isn't!

The cost for the job was $500 for straightening it, and $400 for transportation. It took me longer to find transportation for the keel than it did to have it straightened.

BTW, It was nice to meet you, kevlar®! I wish that I had had more time to hang out and chat with you some more!



#65 familysailor

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 04:30 AM

Its a great boat -- but like many great classes -- they fade away. RIght now the market for 35 foot symmetric racer cruiser lead mines is dead. Too much crew to coordinate. Too many skills to keep up. Too much ching to operate. Thats why we see such a rampage down inthe sport boat level. Much cheaper, much more fun cause they giddy up and plane, and only 3 crew members to account for. I'm in SF bay and pulling my hair out for a year -- and seriously thinking about changing my entire boating model to a big fat cruiser and a Melges 20 or Viper. Too much wind out here for the 36.7 anyway.

Not true.

You just need to tune for it and learn to cope with it. My son and I can doublehand on a normal summer day without reefing. Reefing would often be better, but once we're out of the slot things are easier.....



#66 SMBReno

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 06:46 PM

In light of the recent tragedy involving keel loss, for peace of mind I'd consider hiring a marine surveyor with ultrasound expertise to look at the laminate structure in the keel mounting area of the hull.

 

I was interested in a J/92s that turned out to have been involved in a high speed collision with a rock, resulting in displacement of the floors and a significant repair. The naval architect in charge specifications for the repair suggested an ultrasonic survey if I decided to put a bid on the vessel. I finally decided against the purchase, largely because of the extensive prior history of damage and other factors.



#67 jerryj2me

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 09:06 PM

Looks good - glad to see that there was a happy outcome that did not break the bank.

 

No progress on the 36.7 web site, still broken, and Beneteau has wasted more time ducking the issue and dodging the question than it would have taken to just get it done. Having owned 2 Beneteau's I am pretty disappointed.






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