Jump to content


Ferry collides with sailboat between Orcas and Lopez landing

Th

  • Please log in to reply
35 replies to this topic

#1 hobot

hobot

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,665 posts
  • Location:Riggers Hollow Archipelago, Wa. USA

Posted 14 September 2013 - 12:45 AM

In that small patch of water how the heck did the ferry not see it?

 

44027isoundersailboat_zps292f5548.jpg

 

  • by CALI BAGBY,  Islands Sounder Reporter 
  • posted Sep 13, 2013 at 3:03 PM— updated Sep 13, 2013 at 4:28 PM

 

An 80-year-old man was injured today after a sailboat accident, according to Orcas Fire and Rescue personnel.

The male is in stable condition and is being transported to Peace Island Hospital on San Juan Island for observation.

Several eye witnesses have reported that the man was injured after a ferry collided with his sailboat called the Norma Rae.

At around 2 p.m, Suzanne Lyons saw the mast of the sail boat crack and heard the screeching of the sailboat hitting the side of the ferry.

“An older man was sitting on the boat as it was sinking,” said Lyons, who was in her car at the time of the incident.

The ferry left Anacortes at 12:35 p.m. and landed on Lopez at 1:30 p.m. Another witness on the ferry, Micheal Bried, said the accident occurred after the boat left Lopez and was heading toward Orcas.

“The sailboat was a mile north of Lopez in the middle of the shipping lane,” said Bried.

Bried and Lyons said they saw the Sheriff's boat tow the sailboat away.

“I don't know why the ferry pilot didn't see the sailboat,” Bried said.

The accident forced the cancellation of the 2:20 p.m. sailing from Orcas to Anacortes

The Sheriff's Office declined to comment at this time and Washington State Ferries representatives could not be reached.

The incident is under investigation by the U.S. Coast Guard and the San Juan County Sheriff.

http://www.sanjuanjo.../223686481.html



#2 James McMullen

James McMullen

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 120 posts
  • Location:Anacortes
  • Interests:masturbation, gluttony, random acts of violence, karaoke

Posted 17 September 2013 - 04:31 AM

Alas, but I fear "80-year-old man" is also quite likely relevant to unravelling this story.

#3 Kirwan

Kirwan

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 683 posts
  • Location:San Diego
  • Interests:um... boats?

Posted 17 September 2013 - 07:46 PM

The sailboat blaming the ferry is a bit like a bug blaming the windshield for not avoiding him.



#4 Jim in Halifax

Jim in Halifax

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • Location:Nova Scotia
  • Interests:All things sailing. All things jazz and recording. Most things musical. Old British cars.

Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:09 PM

There is more to it than bug and windshield - the car is not obliged to honk at the bug; the ferry should have signaled the Fisher PH. Pretty obvious that neither vessel was maintaining a proper watch. Inexcusable for the ferry's bridge...catastrophic for the Fisher PH.



#5 Bob Perry

Bob Perry

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,964 posts

Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:26 PM

How do we know the ferry did not signal the Fisher?
Are "we" guessing here?

Tonnage rule always works,i.e. be vigalant when in a commercial traffic area and stay away from commercial vessels. It's worked well for me.

#6 Gatekeeper

Gatekeeper

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,719 posts
  • Location:Lake Nipissing, Ontario
  • Interests:Learning to adjust to retirement...so far, so good.

Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:45 PM

Inscription found on grave marker  

 

"...but I had the right of way"!!



#7 Bob Perry

Bob Perry

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,964 posts

Posted 17 September 2013 - 10:52 PM

Gate:
Somehow I can't imagine me diving for my copy of CHAPMAN'S as the ferry approaches, "Let's see here, Just who has the right of way?"

#8 Jim in Halifax

Jim in Halifax

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • Location:Nova Scotia
  • Interests:All things sailing. All things jazz and recording. Most things musical. Old British cars.

Posted 17 September 2013 - 11:04 PM

How do we know the ferry did not signal the Fisher?
Are "we" guessing here?

Tonnage rule always works,i.e. be vigalant when in a commercial traffic area and stay away from commercial vessels. It's worked well for me.

Bob, as an east coast sailor I have to glean what I can from those of you close at hand. From (Sailnet), John, SV Laurie Anne, Brewer 40 PH, San Juan Islands:

 

"I can see where this happened from my front windows and I was at the location half an hour before it happened in our power boat. This is what I know from reading the news reports and talking to some people here.
1. There was no fog where the accident happened although there was fog in other areas very close by (when I went through there I had the radar on but didn't need it).
2. The ferry was approaching the sailboats port side (sailboat was the stand on vessel).
3. The ferry did not sound any sound signal.
4. The ferry took evasive action only during the last few seconds before collision.
5. The sailboat was a Fisher pilothouse and none of them that I've seen have an outside steering station, the helm is inside.
6. The sailboat did not take evasive action or sound a signal.
7. The sailboat went completely under the ferry.
8. The skipper of the sailboat survived but is in the hospital.
9. The ferries here are not constrained by draft in any of the channels and have no special privileges or designation, I've had them detour around me while sailing a number of times, they are actually pretty maneuverable.
10. Only one channel that I can think of would be tight enough that a ferry wouldn't have room to change course in order to go around another boat (Wasp Pass).
11. According to the rules both vessels share responsibility for this accident IMHO- the ferry should have sounded the danger signal and either changed course or slowed down to avoid the sailboat and obviously wasn't maintaining a proper watch and the sailboat also should have sounded the danger signal and taken evasive action when they determined that the ferry was not going to alter course."

 

And yes, I completely agree with your tonnage rule - works for me too.



#9 kimbottles

kimbottles

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,584 posts
  • Location:PNW
  • Interests:SWMBO

Posted 17 September 2013 - 11:37 PM

I have made over 6600 crossings of Puget Sound through the large vessel traffic lanes and through the Bainbridge Seattle ferry route during my commute in the last 15+ years.

I ALWAYS take the stern of any commercial vessel Or ferry I come across in my commute. I believe crossing one mile in front of a large vessel is a near miss.

I have slowed to a stop and made very large course changes to follow my rule of avoiding large commercial vessels.

(Ironically my closest miss was when two very young and cute girls cut right in front of me in their small outboard while I had the right of way. They waved cheerfully to me as they forced me to take evasive action to avoid a collision, they were clueless.)

#10 Jose Carumba

Jose Carumba

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,465 posts
  • Location:Pugetopolis

Posted 17 September 2013 - 11:38 PM

Heard on the radio news this morning that the ferry captain and second mate were relieved of duty pending a full investigation.

#11 Bob Perry

Bob Perry

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,964 posts

Posted 17 September 2013 - 11:49 PM

Jim:
Many thanks for that definitive report.

I've done a lot of racing on Puget Sound where ferries and other commercial vessels we "in my way. Damn it!".
"But I don't want to tack!"

But my rule is to take action to let the commercial boat know that I know I am "in his space". I want that Captain to have no doubt that I am making an evasive manouver.

I can't second guess what happened here. Sounds like a combo of errors.

Kim:
"(Ironically my closest miss was when two very young and cute girls cut right in front of me in their small outboard while I had the right of way. They waved cheerfully to me as they forced me to take evasive action to avoid a collision, they were clueless.)"

That's called "making a pass" Kim. You probably didn't even get their phone numbers.
They were just admiring your dink.

#12 Jose Carumba

Jose Carumba

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,465 posts
  • Location:Pugetopolis

Posted 18 September 2013 - 03:29 AM

I ALWAYS take the stern of any commercial vessel Or ferry I come across in my commute. I believe crossing one mile in front of a large vessel is a near miss.
I have slowed to a stop and made very large course changes to follow my rule of avoiding large commercial vessels.


Amen brother.

#13 blackjenner

blackjenner

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,572 posts
  • Location:Seattle
  • Interests:MrsBlack, Brigadoon, freedom

Posted 18 September 2013 - 04:30 PM

I have made over 6600 crossings of Puget Sound through the large vessel traffic lanes and through the Bainbridge Seattle ferry route during my commute in the last 15+ years.

I ALWAYS take the stern of any commercial vessel Or ferry I come across in my commute. I believe crossing one mile in front of a large vessel is a near miss.

I have slowed to a stop and made very large course changes to follow my rule of avoiding large commercial vessels.

 

 
I promise myself, Kerry and Brigadoon that I will never be in such a hurry to get in a collision, get us hurt or worse, and sink Brigadoon that I will not follow this advice.

#14 Bulbhunter

Bulbhunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,238 posts
  • Interests:SA is DEAD

Posted 18 September 2013 - 04:50 PM

I have made over 6600 crossings of Puget Sound through the large vessel traffic lanes and through the Bainbridge Seattle ferry route during my commute in the last 15+ years.

I ALWAYS take the stern of any commercial vessel Or ferry I come across in my commute. I believe crossing one mile in front of a large vessel is a near miss.

I have slowed to a stop and made very large course changes to follow my rule of avoiding large commercial vessels.

(Ironically my closest miss was when two very young and cute girls cut right in front of me in their small outboard while I had the right of way. They waved cheerfully to me as they forced me to take evasive action to avoid a collision, they were clueless.)

I see it the same way as a good driver in a car you make your intended actions very clear to the other operator and the chances of a collision is greatly reduced. Regardless of a boat or car when you make it clear which way you intend to go then the other operator will not anticipate ie guess which way you might be going and get it wrong and end up running into you. Kimbottles from his description seems to follow the same rule make your intended actions clear to the other operator and all is fine.

 

We have all been there in our cars when a driver be it at a 4 way stop hasn't made it clear they are going to stop or what they are going to do as a result all the drivers at that stop who are paying attention tend to hesitate or wait till said driver makes their intended actions clear are they going to stop? Turn? Blow on through oblivious to every one else? Etc Same goes for boating though its even more important given we lack white and yellow lines and stop signs meaning you need to make your intended actions clear to the commercial captian as to what your going to do be it over the radio or by simply making a large enough heading change and keeping to it that the captain can clearly see your intentions regarding where your going etc.



#15 Jim in Halifax

Jim in Halifax

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 148 posts
  • Location:Nova Scotia
  • Interests:All things sailing. All things jazz and recording. Most things musical. Old British cars.

Posted 18 September 2013 - 09:41 PM

From the San Juan Islander: Boater shares details of ferry collision
 

"I heard a loud crunch. Turning around I saw the ferry hull coming over my stern and everything growing dark and flooding...like a slow motion horror film."

In an email to boating club members, Jack Gray described his experience last Friday afternoon when his 25-foot Fisher sailboat was struck by the Hyak, a WSF Super-Class ferry. He was enroute to Deer Harbor.

"I had been fogged in at James Island after crossing the Straits a couple days earlier. As Friday approached, skies were clearing, so I set out for your gathering. I made it half way, as now you have seen.

I've been sailing these waters for over 50 yrs, and never considered the State Ferries to be a hazard - until now.

It literally came up from behind, without horn, and quickly while I was at the wheel listening to traffic and making some radar screen adjustments just for testing.

I was so surprised to come out alive, after feeling so close to death.

I remember seeing ferry at the Lopez dock about a mile away. While at the helm in my pilot house and trying to adjust my radar functions, I heard a loud crunch.

Turning around I saw the ferry hull coming over my stern and everything growing dark and flooding...like a slow motion horror film..."

Gray and his dog were rescued by people onboard another boat. His boat sank as it was being towed.

 

...So it still seems to me to be all about keeping a proper watch...on both vessels. Mr Gray is lucky to be alive.



#16 Innocent Bystander

Innocent Bystander

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,434 posts
  • Location:Lower Southern MD

Posted 19 September 2013 - 02:18 AM









From the San Juan Islander:

Boater shares details of ferry collision


 

"I heard a loud crunch. Turning around I saw the ferry hull coming over my stern and everything growing dark and flooding...like a slow motion horror film."
In an email to boating club members, Jack Gray described his experience last Friday afternoon when his 25-foot Fisher sailboat was struck by the Hyak, a WSF Super-Class ferry. He was enroute to Deer Harbor.
"I had been fogged in at James Island after crossing the Straits a couple days earlier. As Friday approached, skies were clearing, so I set out for your gathering. I made it half way, as now you have seen.
I've been sailing these waters for over 50 yrs, and never considered the State Ferries to be a hazard - until now.
It literally came up from behind, without horn, and quickly while I was at the wheel listening to traffic and making some radar screen adjustments just for testing.
I was so surprised to come out alive, after feeling so close to death.
I remember seeing ferry at the Lopez dock about a mile away. While at the helm in my pilot house and trying to adjust my radar functions, I heard a loud crunch.
Turning around I saw the ferry hull coming over my stern and everything growing dark and flooding...like a slow motion horror film..."
Gray and his dog were rescued by people onboard another boat. His boat sank as it was being towed.
 
...So it still seems to me to be all about keeping a proper watch...on both vessels. Mr Gray is lucky to be alive.


Sorry. Despite the need to keep a watch, if the reports are correct, I have trouble blaming the stand on vessel for being run over by a give way vessel - gross tonnage or not.

Most of us go out of the way to avoid commercial traffic, right of way or not. Not following that common sense advice isn't an excuse for a burdened vessel to run you over. If you were the ferry driver, what would be your statement? "I knew I was burdened but he should have avoided me because I'm bigger and a commercial vessel". Not buying it. I know all about being "dead right". But being big and wrong is still wrong.

#17 Jon

Jon

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 331 posts

Posted 20 September 2013 - 05:27 AM

How do we know the ferry did not signal the Fisher?
Are "we" guessing here?

Tonnage rule always works,i.e. be vigalant when in a commercial traffic area and stay away from commercial vessels. It's worked well for me.

 

A friend happen to be on the ferry and reported that the ferry made no warning blasts but suddenly went into reverse and the bow dipped way down. Again, the very knowledgeable couple on the ferry heard no warning horns. I heard second hand from someone who talked to a boater who was buddy boating with the Fisher that he and the Fisher were motoring up the channel and the Fisher was overtaken by the ferry and hit from behind. All this agrees with the article referenced above.

 

From what I've heard and read, I think IB got it exactly right, being big and wrong is still wrong.



#18 hobot

hobot

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,665 posts
  • Location:Riggers Hollow Archipelago, Wa. USA

Posted 20 September 2013 - 07:28 AM

Someones getting a new boat.



#19 4knotSB

4knotSB

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,735 posts
  • Location:75.8760W 39.5142N

Posted 20 September 2013 - 11:15 AM

Let's hope it's a big steel boat with COTB.



#20 jtsailjt

jtsailjt

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 81 posts
  • Location:Penobscot Bay
  • Interests:Cruising, traveling, motorcycling, archery, snowmobiling, lots of other stuff

Posted 20 September 2013 - 11:46 AM

I have to say that quite a few of you anarchists sound awfully pious about how you ALWAYS keep a watch and ALWAYS give way to bigger vessels and ALWAYS signal your intentions, etc. etc., apparently assuming this man isn't equally diligent with his watchkeeping and good seamanship. Of course all are good and prudent things to do and hopefully we all stay safe by regularly practicing these time tested techniques. But as it turns out, which of us paragons of prudent seamanship couldn't have been run over from behind by a much faster vessel as we paid a little too much attention to scanning ahead and to the sides where the greatest threat normally lies, or are distracted by setting our radar up for the fog bank we think we're about to go into, or we have a nearly irresistable urge go below for our morning visit to the head so we take a look all around and seeing no threats ahead, and only a single vessel quite far behind with good visibility we decide to leave the helm for just a couple of minutes?  "There but for the grace of God go I" is just about all I can think of that applies to this incident.  Glad the guy survived.



#21 Bob Perry

Bob Perry

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 16,964 posts

Posted 20 September 2013 - 02:30 PM

"have to say that quite a few of you anarchists sound awfully pious about how you ALWAYS keep a watch and ALWAYS give way to bigger vessels and ALWAYS signal your intentions, etc. etc., apparently assuming this man isn't equally diligent with his watchkeeping and good seamanship"

Yeah but,,,I haved never beeen run over by a ferry. Kim has never been run over either. My way has worked well for me. I too feel very bad for the guy. I read the account and I still can't imagine how this could happen.

#22 jtsailjt

jtsailjt

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 81 posts
  • Location:Penobscot Bay
  • Interests:Cruising, traveling, motorcycling, archery, snowmobiling, lots of other stuff

Posted 20 September 2013 - 03:06 PM

"have to say that quite a few of you anarchists sound awfully pious about how you ALWAYS keep a watch and ALWAYS give way to bigger vessels and ALWAYS signal your intentions, etc. etc., apparently assuming this man isn't equally diligent with his watchkeeping and good seamanship"

Yeah but,,,I haved never beeen run over by a ferry. Kim has never been run over either. My way has worked well for me. I too feel very bad for the guy. I read the account and I still can't imagine how this could happen.

I've never been run over by a ferry either but that 80 year old fellow could probably have said the same thing back when he was a young whipperssnapper like you or me or Kim are.   I have occasionally been accused of being "obsessive" about checking things and trying to imagine all eventualities and preparing for them (little do they know the obvious things I've somehow managed to not anticipate!), but after reading the accounts of what happened here, I got this uncomfortable feeling that it's the sort of accident that could definitely happen to me, despite my "obsessive" habits that include all the watchkeeping techniques mentioned on this thread.   Sometimes "it weren't good enough...."

 



#23 Seth Brothers

Seth Brothers

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 9 posts
  • Location:Hyak
  • Interests:Sailing

Posted 20 September 2013 - 05:58 PM

I could see this happening to me. I try to watch all directions, especially near the ferry terminals. But how long does one get distracted?

Let us look at one senario: you glance back as the ferry is 3/4 mile behind you. It looks like it is still at the dock, but it has steamed 500 feet toward you. At 14 knots, they could run you down in under four minutes.

The tip of my antenna is 39' above the water. I'll hazard a guess that it is lower than Hyak's bridge.

Have fun and be careful out there!

#24 Jose Carumba

Jose Carumba

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,465 posts
  • Location:Pugetopolis

Posted 20 September 2013 - 07:02 PM

The stretch of water between the Lopez terminal and the Orcas terminal is a busy stretch and necks down to 1/4 mile or so in Harney channel. Anyone not keeping a vigilant and sharp lookout in that area are opening themselves to trouble. I think the skipper of the sailboat has some contributory negligence in the collision.

#25 blackjenner

blackjenner

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,572 posts
  • Location:Seattle
  • Interests:MrsBlack, Brigadoon, freedom

Posted 14 November 2013 - 12:56 AM

Updated:

 

http://www.king5.com...-231815291.html

 

"According to the board of inquiry report, investigators determined the incident was avoidable because the Hyak had adequate time, equipment capability and “sea room” to avoid the collision."



#26 Innocent Bystander

Innocent Bystander

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,434 posts
  • Location:Lower Southern MD

Posted 14 November 2013 - 02:30 AM

Updated:
 
http://www.king5.com...-231815291.html
 
"According to the board of inquiry report, investigators determined the incident was avoidable because the Hyak had adequate time, equipment capability and “sea room” to avoid the collision."


So if the Captain of then ferry had pulled her head out of the radar at 1330 on a clear day, she might have seen that her vessel was about to run over a private boat.

Yeah, the small boat should have kept a better watch.

#27 view at the front

view at the front

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 839 posts
  • Location:Anacortes, WA USA

Posted 14 November 2013 - 03:28 AM

In the good ole days when passengers could enter the wheelhouse when invited, I witnessed a terrifying episode.  

 

We were approaching a large power boat from behind heading from Lopez Island to Anacortes just east of Obstruction Pass.  The operator of the power boat was on the flying bridge with his feet up on the console, inattentive, and probably on auto-pilot.  The captain of the ferry said "watch this" as we were overtaking from behind and to starboard of the yacht.  As the shadow from the ferry crossed over the yacht's cockpit the guy absolutely freaked and the ferry captain said "I hope that he turns to port", which fortunately he did.  If he had turned to starboard, he probably would have died.

 

It was mildly amusing, but real shit could have happened.  Neanderthal old world skippers.



#28 sailSAK

sailSAK

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,590 posts
  • Location:Seward

Posted 14 November 2013 - 03:31 AM

Interesting read. 

 

Parts I found particularly compelling:

Whaley instructed Second Mate Hervey to “come to port and sound the
whistle if you deem it necessary.”
 
...and...
 
Whaley looked over and saw that Second Mate Hervey had responded with the wrong rudder command at which point Captain Whaley ran to the Engine Order Telegraph and ordered the engines full astern. Captain Whaley also ordered Second Mate Hervey to put the helm hard to port. Captain Whaley relieved Second Mate Hervey from control of the helm

 

 

Wow... 



#29 MR.CLEAN

MR.CLEAN

    Anarchist

  • Reporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,347 posts
  • Location:Everywhere you want to be
  • Interests:.

Posted 14 November 2013 - 04:45 PM

Cause of the accident was a second mate not knowing starboard from port.  in-fucking-credible.



#30 bert s

bert s

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 90 posts
  • Location:Cordova, Alaska
  • Interests:Women, Boats, Liquor, not in any particular order.
    Fish'n (mass murderer, not serial killer or torturer)

Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:20 PM

Weelllll......
WSF has collided with Orcas Is, Reid rock, the shoal just north of Browns Is, and Salmon Bank that I can think of. Just off of the top of my head. Within 10 miles of there. Stationary targets all. NOWHERE IS SAFE!!! Given enough time and aiming fluid, they'll park one next to the Space Needle.

#31 view at the front

view at the front

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 839 posts
  • Location:Anacortes, WA USA

Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:34 PM

And then there was the WSF Elwha on the Rocks

 

"It was a beautiful fall day when she set sail on her fateful cruise.  At the wheel was her captain, Billy Frittro.  He had made the run many times and saw nothing ahead but blue skies and getting laid.  That was where the trouble began.  Beside him that day in the wheelhouse was the winsome Peggy Warrack.  She owned a house on the shore of Grindstone Harbor.  Suave Cap’n Billy said “How about pointing to where your house in  and I’ll take us by for a look.”  Exactly what he was looking at as he said this I am not sure of, but I would guess it was part of Ms. Warrack’s winsome anatomy and not out toward any navigational hazards.  It wasn’t very long after that the the Ferry Elwha struck a submerged rock and ran aground.  There is no official record of what this did to to the little romance Billy had in mind.  There is official record that Captain Billy eventually resigned as the truth eventually emerged from murky depths. His boss Capt. Nick Tracy was later fired for trying to cover up the embarrassing mess."



#32 Bulbhunter

Bulbhunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,238 posts
  • Interests:SA is DEAD

Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:47 PM

Tech is getting pretty damn good when it comes to eliminating Human errors and with driving vehicles its pretty much already better than Human operation  however accepting the fact that a machine can do a better job than a Human is going to take another few generations ;-)



#33 zenmasterfred

zenmasterfred

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 86 posts
  • Location:Lopez Island

Posted 16 November 2013 - 12:23 AM

I sail from North end of Lopez a lot, I ALWAYS watch the big guys and make sure they know I know where they are and where they are going.  Still no excuse for the Ferry, the skipper should have put her license in her pocket and jumped overboard.

The Captain



#34 Great Red Shark

Great Red Shark

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,621 posts
  • Location:Honolulu

Posted 16 November 2013 - 02:28 AM

Once again, the proximate cause of boats colliding is..... that they got too close together.

#35 MR.CLEAN

MR.CLEAN

    Anarchist

  • Reporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,347 posts
  • Location:Everywhere you want to be
  • Interests:.

Posted 17 November 2013 - 04:41 PM

That's what you read?  I read 'second mate turned the wrong way' as the most proximate cause.  Can't really avoid boats getting close together in the channels of the PNW.



#36 Amati

Amati

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,660 posts
  • Location:Yes!
  • Interests:0 (t) = 0

Posted 12 December 2013 - 03:28 AM

We have Amati up at Friday Harbor, and honest to God, even though I've never missed seeing a ferry in plenty of time, I really don't have a clue what they're going to do. They go around, but I never can predict which side. Luffing up and crawling along doesn't seem to help all the time, although that works great up at Sydney. Stopping is nerve wracking. And every time I've hailed a ferry to find out what they'd like me to do I been told to hold my course, and that's fine if I've got 3 fathoms under us, but sometimes you have to stay in a channel, and furl the jib and start the motor just to try stay out of the way. Circling sometimes feels ok. So I hold my course and make sure the key is ready to start the engine. Sometimes I have the engine idling just in case. Add to that clueless/ and or bold boaters, and sometimes we've been convinced we're seeing a train wreck unfold from a mile and a half away. Sometimes a bunch of us will group together in a pod, figuring safety in numbers.

Frankly the worst are the cruise boats (up to Edmonds usually)as long as I'm unburdening myself. Even when I've turned around to go away from the shipping channel (when I'm not even in it yet), they aim right at us as we head to the shore, the big girls even venturing out of the lane. Wave at the pretty sailboat! One big fishing processor chased us to 2 fathoms right next to Bainbridge, and never did answer our hail. Coast Guard did, and they turned at the last minute. We were 200 yards from the island when they started hunting us down. The hunt started with us about a mile from them, and we tacked towards the island at that point to short tack up the island, hugging the shore. NE wind.

Once in a while a big boy will hail to find out who's out there, where we are, what heading and speed, but that only has happened out in the Straights. Really really nice. Makes sailing fun again.

Don't get me started about Dodd's Narrows. Sometimes self reliance just won't do the trick. Sometimes you are at the mercy of others.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users