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Bob Perry's Cool Rowboat

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#101 Bob Perry

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 06:17 PM

BGD:

One of the primary uses for POPEYE will be pulling my crab pots so I dont want a boat that doesn't want to turn.



#102 SemiSalt

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 06:44 PM

If you go for the ox-drawn optional propulsion pkg, don't be a dick like the guy in the picture though. This did not end well for him.

 

 

I was thinking elephant, but in truth, a pet pachyderm is a bigger investment than is warranted. 

 

By the way, where do all those logs come from? There used to log problems in New England rivers, but they were strays from delivering logs from the forests to the mills. 



#103 Ishmael

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:03 PM

The logs are from broken-up booms from the last umpty-hundred years of logging, leftover slash, and natural falldown that gets washed into the ocean. Mostly natural I think. Some of the big storms, especially coincident with high tides, put a lot of wood in the water. There is a lot of coastline here that is piled deep in logs and other debris, especially on the open west coasts. 

 

anne%20with%20buoy.jpg



#104 Bob Perry

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:06 PM

Semi:

Same here. Logbooms in transit break up and the logs wash up on the beach. Some have been here for years. They go away with one storm only to come back with the next.

Sometimes we saw them up for firewood. Sometimes we just sit on them. Every winter brings us new. fresh logs. The fresh logs are better for the fireplace. Sand ghets imbedded in the old logs and it is not good for your chain saw.

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#105 Ishmael

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:07 PM

Semi:

Same here. Logbooms in transit break up and the logs wash up on the beach. Some have been here for years. They go away with one storm only to come back with the next.

Sometimes we saw them up for firewood. Sometimes we just sit on them. Every winter brings us new. fresh logs. The fresh logs are better for the fireplace. Sand ghets imbedded in the old logs and it is not good for your chain saw.

 

We burned a load of firewood that I suspect was beach logs. In 6 months our fireplace grate rusted through.



#106 Jose Carumba

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:11 PM

More thoughts on the UHMW. 

 

It may only be effective on the logs and big rocks.

 

You can get adhesive backed tapes up ti .125" thick. http://www.eplastics.com/Slick_Strips

 

If you can buy a big roll maybe you could just roll it out over the logs and beach and slide the boat over it.  But then you would have to roll it back up again...

 

Buy 2.25" diameter uhmw rod and fashion a "jacobs ladder" from it with rope which you lay on the beach and slide the boat over. http://www.eplastics.com/UHMW_Rod. Edit:  This could work with PVC pipe as well.

 

Maybe I am overthinking this.



#107 Bob Perry

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:42 PM

Ish:

I don't burn beach logs, I have fancy fireplaces, but I have neighbors  that have burned them for years with no problem.

 

Jose:

Those are all interesting ideas. I like the Jacob's ladder idea. Keep thinking please.

 

Crisco?



#108 TheFlash

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 07:42 PM

too bad Kevlar is such a bear to work with, or a plywood boat with a kevlar skin might work.  Go the Aluminum!



#109 kimbottles

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 08:16 PM

More thoughts on the UHMW. 

 

It may only be effective on the logs and big rocks.

 

You can get adhesive backed tapes up ti .125" thick. http://www.eplastics.com/Slick_Strips

 

If you can buy a big roll maybe you could just roll it out over the logs and beach and slide the boat over it.  But then you would have to roll it back up again...

 

Buy 2.25" diameter uhmw rod and fashion a "jacobs ladder" from it with rope which you lay on the beach and slide the boat over. http://www.eplastics.com/UHMW_Rod. Edit:  This could work with PVC pipe as well.

 

Maybe I am overthinking this.

Before I finally got my dock permit I made a Jacobs Ladder out of PVC pipe and slide my dink up the beach on it. Worked great, thinking of another one not so much for protection from the rocks but because dinks slide much easier across the PVC. But need to use a heavier gauge of wire (or maybe some second hand spectra line) because the light galvanized stuff I first used rusted away quickly (like after a year or two.)



#110 Rasputin22

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 08:29 PM

too bad Kevlar is such a bear to work with, or a plywood boat with a kevlar skin might work.  Go the Aluminum!

 

I'm going to build a PeenPod out of ply hopefully to confirm the geometry of the cut sheer before Bob and Jim start cutting up much more expensive aluminum alloy. I'd love to go the Brunzeel ply route but that is probably costlier that alloy. Most likely 1/4" Marine ply and I will sheath the outside in epoxy and 10 oz  surfboard cloth. I'll look for some polypropylene tape to give the keel and bilge runners some abrasion resistance but it can be as tricky to get to lay down than Kevlar. Kevlar might not be so bad if I can vacumn bag it down or maybe just peel ply will do. Here is an idea that I got from the WoodenBoat forum. 

 


Colodial silica will certainly increase the hardness and abrasion resistance of epoxy resin, as will aluminum powder. You can tell the difference when you sand them. However, it is still quite possible to sand them without a major problem. This should tell you something about how effective these materials really are at increasing the resin's abrasion resistance. If you run over something, these epoxy mixtures will almost certainly still be much softer than whatever it was that you ran over. You are still going to damage the boat and the repair will take just about as long. Large amounts of these compounds will also tend to make the resin more brittle, which can be a liability in many situations. 

There is no magic bullet here that suddenly makes epoxy resin abrasion-proof. The only thing I've ever heard of or seen that was close was a mixture of epoxy and carborundum grit. It was used for a while as a coating on the runners of wooden Colorado River dories and would actually leave grooves in the rocks and ledges (not particularly eco-friendly and hopefully something that has since been banned).



#111 TheFlash

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 09:02 PM

that sounds like the right stuff:

 

Silicon carbide (SiC), also known as carborundum /kɑrbəˈrʌndəm/, is a compound of silicon and carbon with chemical formula SiC. It occurs in nature as the extremely rare mineral moissanite. Silicon carbide powder has been mass-produced since 1893 for use as an abrasive. Grains of silicon carbide can be bonded together by sintering to form very hard ceramics that are widely used in applications requiring high endurance, such as car brakes, car clutches and ceramic plates in bulletproof vests.

 

 

​You're right re: Kevlar - glue it down - use peel ply and get a ceramic knife for cutting "green" epoxy/kevlar, or use ceramic shears to cut the fabric.



#112 JBE

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 09:12 PM

Dunno if its applicable , but I made this dolly out of an old laminated ply office chair back in the 80's to move a heavy glass dinghy around on the boat ramp

 

2013-09-03102209.jpg

 I still use it ,but now for the 15 ft stripper

By a strange coinkidink, as the boat got longer , so did the oar.

 

IMG_5386_10.jpg

 

..



#113 olaf hart

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 09:48 PM

JBE, what is the beam on your stripper?

 

I have a similar dolly, but instead of the oar I use webbing strap that goes around the hull, through two eye bolts that insert into the rowlock holes, and clips together in the center of the boat.

 

So the boat itself becomes the lever.



#114 kimbottles

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 10:21 PM

These are the transportation methods I use on my DE St. Lawrence River Skiff.....the wheels are a PITA and the trailer is heavy.

 

So please keep posting your better ideas, I am getting good ideas from you guys!

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#115 Bob Perry

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 10:26 PM

Wait just a cotton pickin' minute.....That's my boat!



#116 Schnick

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 10:37 PM

Beach wheels: these were meant for kayaks but could work.  Rated for 300 pounds.

 

http://www.c-tug.net...=specifications

 

A guy I sail with imports them to the PNW I think.



#117 starkindler

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 10:54 PM

Is there such a thing as aluminum lapstrake construction? I understand that Henley Aluminum Boats uses something they call "roll-form lapstrake". Seems like a lot of welding.

 

Rather than a wooden mold to assist in controlling distortion, wouldn't the solution be a steel jig or frame to which the plates could be clamped during welding?

 

Anyone know how the Alubat folks address managing distortion in producing production multi-chine aluminum hulls? I believe they use jigs.



#118 Jose Carumba

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 11:10 PM

I think it would be fun to experiment with the adhesives they use to bond aluminum in cars these days.  It might make a lapstrake aluminum boat a bit easier to build.  i don't know what you would do at the hood ends and garboard though.  Attachment of the strakes at the intersections with the CVK/stem/stern posts might require some welding.



#119 Bob Perry

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 11:16 PM

Thanks for the tip Schnick. I'll check it out.

 

Starkers:

Long time no see.

Zeyang is building a big alu lapstrake boat in Norway. I told my wife I was thinking of joining his commune and she hit me in the head.

 

You see. I am a designer and this is my boat. What you see is what I want. I am far from new to the process. Most of the "Did you ever think of,,,,," comments can be answered succinctly with, "Yes I did and I don't want it."

 

 

I don't need a rowing position, oarlocks and seat, relationship that is adjustable to fit a variety of people. Fuck 'em. It just has to fit me. If someone else wants to row the boat they can adjust their body postion for the best result. Most people will never know the difference. Future boats can be made to accomodate moving seats and moving rowlocks but mine will be dirt simple. We are working on both solutions, simple/complicated and everything in between. These boats can be customized.

 

Flames?



#120 starkindler

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Posted 08 October 2013 - 11:25 PM

Zeyang is building a big, heavy, Colin Archer type boat in China, not Norway. You just wanted to keep the boat girls warm. Your wife was right to hit you on the head.

 

Alubat does use jigs, as expected:

 

http://www.northseam...ge/ALUconst.htm

 

Don't be so selfish. Include the movable rowlocks and mark me down for one of your damn boats. I need the exercise.



#121 Bob Perry

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 12:00 AM

Starkers:

I was sure Zeyang is in Norway. You had better check on that. It sure as hell doesn't look like China to me. But China is a lot of places.

 

Norway. It's Norway. He explained that choice early on.

 

Selfish? Me?

 

You are totally correct. Jody won't let me make a stupid decision. He won't tell me I'm being stupid or pig headed. Between you and me I have Jody figured out. What he'll do is start presenting me with alternative ideas. I'll comment in my typical annoying way. He can interprit those annoying comments better than anyone. Pretty soon he'll show me a solution that is perfect and he'll make me think that it was my idea. Oh yeah, I know his ways. Obama should be so clever.



#122 steele

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 01:43 AM

These are the transportation methods I use on my DE St. Lawrence River Skiff.....the wheels are a PITA and the trailer is heavy.

 

So please keep posting your better ideas, I am getting good ideas from you guys!

When I was a teenager I built a dolly for my Laser using the rear plastic wheels from a kids Big Wheel trike,

 

Attached File  high-roller-photo-462699-s-520x318.jpg   36.13K   0 downloads

 

They are wide and flat and went over sand well, and becuase they are hard plastic will skid accross surfaces that will not alow them to roll.  They are smaller and lighter than the pneumatic tires used on skiff dollys.  I recall the laser is about 140 lbs and they held up pretty well.



#123 Brodie

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 02:31 AM

We sold the C-tug carts at the kayak shop I worked at. Ok for a kayak but I don't think it would stand up to that beach. They are basically a big plastic jigsaw puzzle. I've probably assembled 50 of them. Clever design, though.

We sold carts that had a collapsible frame that one end of the boat fit into. I liked them a lot - if you hit a bump the cart stayed with the boat rather than each one heading off on its own as a center cart like the Ctug will do no matter how tight you tie down the boat. I use a small cart that cradles the end of the kayak and has a hook that catches on the cockpit coaming. Only disadvantage to a cart closer to the end of the boat is that you are lifting a lot more of the boat. Tried walking my 50 lb kayak about a quarter mile back to the car once and I think my arms are now permanently longer. But for trips in between that and short enough to just carry the boat the cart is great.

#124 JBE

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:51 AM

Olaf, the oar is just to position the dolly. One handed lift of the bow, push the thing into the right spot, pull the oar and tow or launch with the bridle and bow together. beam ? can't remember, ..how unusual.oo look an aeroplane. I'll check tomorrow.

JBE, what is the beam on your stripper?

 

I have a similar dolly, but instead of the oar I use webbing strap that goes around the hull, through two eye bolts that insert into the rowlock holes, and clips together in the center of the boat.

 

So the boat itself becomes the lever.



#125 Bob Perry

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 07:06 PM

Just got a contact from another builder. Rozema Boatworks in Mount Vernon, Wa. That's just up the freeway from me. I have been there. They do amazing alu work boats. I stopped in there once just to oogle.

This little fun project is starting to snowball.



#126 Brodie

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 11:50 PM

I mentioned boat carts over a week ago and forgot to post pics... this is the cart I use for my kayak.  Obviously a lighter boat (55 lbs) but I think the idea would work for a larger boat (this cart is designed to stow inside the hatches) and is very easy to use and stays with the boat over bumps and rough terrain.  It's supposed to hook onto the cockpit coaming but my kayak is so long (17') that the straps are too short so I hook it into the locking bar - mentioned it cuz it looks a little weird in the 2nd pic as the lock bar isn't visible.  Only drawback is that you are lifting essentially 1/2 the weight of the boat.

IMG_1539_zps1b1e17c8.jpg

IMG_1540_zps3f15becf.jpg



#127 Bob Perry

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 12:28 AM

Brodie:

I have a set of those already for my CF kayak. I seldom use them though. It's light enough to carry easily. I was thinking I should try them on POPEYE.

Had a phone call with Betts today. We will huddle on Monday.



#128 Brodie

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 12:38 AM

I carry the kayak on my shoulder if it's a reasonably short distance.  Some launch points are too far away, though, I can't carry it 1/4 mile - it weighs nearly half what I weigh....



#129 Remodel

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 03:45 PM

Modify a set of Catrax (pricy) or fab up something similar?

 

CattrackwCradle.jpg



#130 Bob Perry

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 04:18 PM

My neighbor has a horrible alu skiff. He modified a large wheelbarrow and lays the skiff sideways on the wheelbarrow and hauls it up the beach. I used a nice beach dolly when I had my Tasar dinghy up here. I am already working on a retracting wheen hung oiff the alu "sternpost". I'm pretty sure it would work but it ain't pretty.



#131 Remodel

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 08:40 PM

I've seen a number of so-called wheel barrow boats. None are what I would call pretty:

 

4dd5c0f77dd5f.preview-300.jpg

 

b8715883d528d609d9b56f5b8223b72e.gif



#132 fng

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 10:04 AM

there's a dinghy drawing in one of the William Gardner design books that shows a wheel in the stem head fitting, and two scallops in the transom. it shows the oars under the thwart with the hand ends out the transom. so you could wheel it upside down like a wheelbarrow



#133 Bob Perry

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 01:55 PM

fng:

Sit down. Now sit up straight. Spit out your gum. Pay attention. Take out a pen and some paper and write 1,000 times:

"William Garden." G  A  R  D  E  N !

 

William Gardner was the designer of the Star class. William Garden is the PNW designer of the character boats who died about three years ago.

 

RTe: the wheel barrow thing.

I have zero interest in a wheel barrow boat for this project. They are cute and clever but I don't want one. My reference to a wheel barrow was to illustrate that my neighbor uses an actual wheel barrow to get his skiff up and down the beach. That's all.



#134 SloopJonB

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 06:24 AM

Thanks for that Bob - Gawd I get sick of seeing him called Gardner or Gardener. Someone as good as him deserves more respect.



#135 SCANAS

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 06:52 AM

I'm jealous of all you guys who live on the water, this year I moved from 1000m to the water to 200m and it is light years better, but being right on the water must be heaven!



#136 Elegua

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 08:22 AM

This is just like television, only you can see much further



#137 Bob Perry

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:31 AM

Depends on the tide Jaimie. When you can't drive down he street because it's flooded due to high tide and storm surge you begin thinking.



#138 view at the front

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 04:54 PM

My house is 38 feet from the water, and this spring/summer I need to repair/improve my bulkhead.  High tides and SE wind with a storm surge tries to remove my kayak and skiff from the bulkhead, and leaves driftwood behind.

 

I'm beginning the permit process now, I can only hope that it is approved by then.



#139 Bob Perry

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 09:39 PM

Good luck with your bulkhead permit.

 

Here is my front yard during a high tide with storm surge. That is not my dink.

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#140 Great Red Shark

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 10:00 PM

Beach-combing not for the faint-hearted there !

#141 Bob Perry

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:13 PM

Shark:

You got that right. One of my Walker Bay's went walkabout in a storm like that last year. I caught up to it about 6 houses down but I couldn't get to it due to the  logs crashing in the waves. I finally snagged it with a long boat hook and with the help of a Friend wrestled it into what was left of the beach at that tide. When you have a 50' Long,24" dia. log crashing around against the other logs at the shoreline you don' really want to get your leg in between them.

 

Met with Jim Betts the builder of the Peen Pod today. I got to hold and bring home a piece of the .09 shell alu. It's robust. We have some thinking to do because as thick as this shell is Jim is still worried about weld distortion and simply moving the big sheets of alu around the shop without "wrinkling" them. He is seriously considering some kind of male plug that he will drape the alu over for welding. But it is coming together. I hope to have my boat before I have my brand new grandson. That's right folks. I'm going to re-Grampy. The ever lovely Violet is getting a little brother.

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#142 sailman

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:50 PM

Congrats on the soon to be new grand rug rat!

#143 kimbottles

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:54 PM

Good luck with your bulkhead permit.

 

Here is my front yard during a high tide with storm surge. That is not my dink.

storm surges are interesting.........here is one of ours....next door neighbor is a couple feet below us so the surge flows from her yard into our, fortunately our house is 25 feet higher up the slope.....

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#144 view at the front

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:19 AM

Bob

 

Here's a link to the NOAA Tsunami model for Anacortes/Whidbey Island.  I'm inside and North of Deception Pass ~3/4 mile.  We seem to be OK, but we're not getting off Fidalgo Island for a long time.

 

http://nctr.pmel.noa...tions/whidb.mov



#145 Bob Perry

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 12:38 AM

Thank you Sailman. I am excited.

" Now look little whatever, this is what we call a ship's curve."

 

The last time we had a huge high tide was about 30 years ago. I had never noticed before but with the water as a reference I realized that the old shack sat about 10" higher than the neighbors. They got flooded. I did not.
We have never seen it anything like that in 30 years. But, when we built the new shack I told the contractor that I did not want to lose one fucking inch in elevation. We had to bring dirt in but we got it.

 

So when my neighbors flood the next big tide, I'll row around in my Peener Pod with a sort of half grin.



#146 view at the front

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 01:36 AM

I think that your half-grin would frighten me?



#147 floating dutchman

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:01 AM

Bob, would it be possible to create some corrugations in the alloy to stiffen it?

 

Random google image to show what I mean:

 

Attached File  alloy dink.jpg   28.07K   18 downloads



#148 Elegua

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 05:34 AM

I still think you should weld a small alu sawtooth or ram to the front - ya know, to keep the debris away. Those logs look mighty mean. A ram might serve as a bulbous bow to reduce wave drag. 



#149 view at the front

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 06:37 AM

Actually the debris (drift logs) do a great job of helping to protect the shoreline.  I try to anchor some of the big ones to deflect some of the big waves, and is an approved shoreline protective barrier by Shorelines Management Authorities.



#150 Bob Perry

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 11:40 AM

Like this?

 

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#151 Bob Perry

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 11:41 AM

Floater:

That's not the look I am after.



#152 Jose Carumba

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 03:28 PM

Actually the debris (drift logs) do a great job of helping to protect the shoreline.  I try to anchor some of the big ones to deflect some of the big waves, and is an approved shoreline protective barrier by Shorelines Management Authorities.

 

That's for sure.  Our beachhouse (white roof in the attached image) had a concrete bulkhead and so did the houses to the north of us (red arrow).  To the south were no bulkheads.  You can see how the tide and wave action scoured out the beach in front of our house (light blue line).  Some years the bulkhead footings are exposed.

 

Attached File  FI Beach.JPG   321.62K   73 downloads



#153 Bob Perry

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:08 PM

I leave all the log debris in front of my house. I have a few reallly big, "resident" logs that hold the newcomers in place for a season. But any big storm can rearrange the non resident logs very easily. If you ever want a very real sensation of how much power can be in waves you should see how the waves  toss around huge logs. Scary sometimes. With a strong breeze coupled with a strong tidal current it's fun to watch the logs march by the shack. Our logs make a great "bulkhead". It's called a "soft bulkhead" and the environmentalists prefer this type. We have to muck out trail down to the beach each spring. We muck with chain saws and peavies.

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#154 Paul Romain Tober

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:32 PM

Floater:
That's not the look I am after.


I don't think the suggestion was about the look, but rather the technique. I understand you don't want a faux-lapstrake aluminum peapod, but I assume you want light weight without oil-canning hull panels.

Romain

#155 Bob Perry

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:39 PM

Roms:

Right. No faux anything for me. I want a smooth welded finish to the skin and damn it, I'm a gonna git it.

Betts is thinking about some kind of plug. He is a magician with alu and I have no doubt he will get this right. He said the other day if we have to blow through a few sheets of skin alu to figure out the technique that's not a problem. I like that attitude. We are assuming some framing. We can use the seat supports for the framing.

 

I will post pics of the build. The yard is a beautiful one hour back roads drive from my shack. The drive goes through the Tulip farms of the Skagit and lots of dairy farms, even a miniature donkey farm. I'm not a donkey man but I do have this dairy cattle thing. I'll be at the yard when the bending begins.



#156 Ishmael

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:43 PM

Roms:

Right. No faux anything for me. I want a smooth welded finish to the skin and damn it, I'm a gonna git it.

Betts is thinking about some kind of plug. He is a magician with alu and I have no doubt he will get this right. He said the other day if we have to blow through a few sheets of skin alu to figure out the technique that's not a problem. I like that attitude. We are assuming some framing. We can use the seat supports for the framing.

 

I will post pics of the build. The yard is a beautiful one hour back roads drive from my shack. The drive goes through the Tulip farms of the Skagit and lots of dairy farms, even a miniature donkey farm. I'm not a donkey man but I do have this dairy cattle thing. I'll be at the yard when the bending begins.

 

Take lots of pictures.



#157 Bob Perry

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 04:49 PM

Rev:

I will. I'm not a very good photographer but having a granddaughter has taught me to take lots. I'll make certain you see each and every step of the build.



#158 kimbottles

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 05:19 PM

I leave all the log debris in front of my house. I have a few reallly big, "resident" logs that hold the newcomers in place for a season. But any big storm can rearrange the non resident logs very easily. If you ever want a very real sensation of how much power can be in waves you should see how the waves  toss around huge logs. Scary sometimes. With a strong breeze coupled with a strong tidal current it's fun to watch the logs march by the shack. Our logs make a great "bulkhead". It's called a "soft bulkhead" and the environmentalists prefer this type. We have to muck out trail down to the beach each spring. We muck with chain saws and peavies.

Yeah, log "bulkheads" are great, I tie some of the bigger logs together so they kinda behave, but I love the ever changing scene down on our beach.

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#159 Jose Carumba

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 06:57 PM

So what's the story on the chair with the sign on it Kim?  Did you forget to do an environmental impact study for it?



#160 Bob Perry

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 08:03 PM

We've tried tieing some logs together but they generally just float off together.



#161 kimbottles

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 08:42 PM

So what's the story on the chair with the sign on it Kim?  Did you forget to do an environmental impact study for it?

 

Had to post notice of my dock project near the water (so more people could complain about it.)

 

You can see the Jet Float dock cubes sitting behind it waiting to be installed as I knew I would win as the law was 100% on my side.

 

Three year battle with the city to get exactly what their law/zoning already allowed on my property all along as a permitted use (which I checked carefully before I bought the place.) The city and many people wanted to ignore the law/zoning and tried to stop my project anyway. They thought they could intimidate me, apparently they do not understand the makeup of Highland Scots.

 

Right after I won they changed the law/zoning to ban future docks.

 

Last photo above was taken after I won the battle, the dock took about three hours to install. Jet Float (also sold as Jet Dock.) Great stuff and the most environmentally sensitive dock you can build. Screw anchors and .04 pounds per square inch.



#162 Elegua

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 10:15 PM

Like this?
 


Yeah! Exactly.

#163 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 02:23 PM

So what's the story on the chair with the sign on it Kim?  Did you forget to do an environmental impact study for it?

 

Had to post notice of my dock project near the water (so more people could complain about it.)

 

You can see the Jet Float dock cubes sitting behind it waiting to be installed as I knew I would win as the law was 100% on my side.

 

Three year battle with the city to get exactly what their law/zoning already allowed on my property all along as a permitted use (which I checked carefully before I bought the place.) The city and many people wanted to ignore the law/zoning and tried to stop my project anyway. They thought they could intimidate me, apparently they do not understand the makeup of Highland Scots.

 

Right after I won they changed the law/zoning to ban future docks.

 

Last photo above was taken after I won the battle, the dock took about three hours to install. Jet Float (also sold as Jet Dock.) Great stuff and the most environmentally sensitive dock you can build. Screw anchors and .04 pounds per square inch.

The joys of being a waterfront homeowner in an ecologically sensitive time.  I have a number of old sheds that are in the "Critical area buffer"  and date back to the 50's.  In the mid 80's, they passed the "Critical areas act" prohibiting construction and/or impervious surfaces inside the buffer.  Makes sense from a runoff perspective but the enforcement means I can;t tear down and old shed and later replace it.  It has to be done all at once or, once removed, the right to have that "impervious" area is lost forever.  

 

SO if you come to visit, you'll see several old sheds "protecting" their grandfathered status.  



#164 fifo

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:57 PM

Nothing wrong with cows and donkeys. If you put a donkey in with the herd when they become to ,arr, amorous with each other the donkey will go over and stop this behaviour. Course you end out with donkeys. Always wanted a Zebra myself.

#165 bert s

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 07:41 AM

For light foam floatation, has any one considered adding ping pong balls or such to pour foam?

#166 Tom Ray

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 11:13 AM

I think if you poured foam over ping pong balls it would not seep in far and if you threw ping pong balls on top of poured foam they would float. Interesting idea, but just not sure it would work.



#167 rantifarian

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:35 PM

Lots of solvents in poured foam, a good chance your ping pong balls would melt



#168 Trickypig

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:45 PM

Lots of solvents in poured foam, a good chance your ping pong balls would melt

I suppose you could do a test first.



#169 Ishmael

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 11:43 PM

Lots of solvents in poured foam, a good chance your ping pong balls would melt

I suppose you could do a test first.

 

What, and spoil the surprise?

 

A fine net would hold the p-p balls in place if they didn't melt.



#170 Bob Perry

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 11:54 PM

We are working on it. All will be revealed. When we know what it is.



#171 redviking

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 08:32 AM

I love sliding seat rowing - one of the best aerobic exercises out there. I still have my oars, maybe someday I'll find a nice Maas Aero relatively cheap and start rowing again. I rowed on the Charles in Boston for several years, amazing experience. But the boats are really only good for one thing - to go fast in a straight line. They excel at that, and suck at anything else.


Love that dirty water.... My homeport before mid-life cruising. Still at Harborage?

#172 Brodie

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 01:06 AM

Yup still there. Might move over to the close side for living aboard, though, I don't like that back parking lot at night.

#173 nroose

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 05:45 AM

Brodie, I didn't realize there was an operation building shells in Richmond, CA!



#174 Brodie

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 01:27 PM

Maas has been there for a while. They build great open water boats. Alden on the East coast competed with them for a while but haven't been doing much lately.

#175 robertfraser

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 03:20 AM

 A guy on another site mentioned an alu whaleboat. I didn't think much about it. Then I woke up around 2am and couldn't think of anything else. I wanted to sleep but the idea kept working it's way into my thoughts and by 5am I had it pretty well laid out in the acad in my brain. The only minor question remaining was, could it be done in flat plate. I called Jody early in the morning and asked him if he wanted an adventure in design. He said something that I interprited as "sure". I knew he would. He loves this stuff. Like I do. I laid out the parameters and told him I'd send him a drawing soon . In about three hours Jody started sending me images. He hadn't seen my drawings yet but he has a knack of understanding my design rants. He was 98.5% spot on wirth his first try.

 

He's right. It is good to know the "best in the business". I do and he's one of them.

 

Looks like 120 lbs. since we gussied it up with some trim. Not sure how the oarlocks ( I call them row locks) are going to be handled. Jody found some really Gucci ones with really Gucci prices. I'm still leaning towards a more Popeye look. But after thinking about this detail most of today I think Jody may be right. These images show my rowlock brackets designed to take a vartiety of thole pin holes for different sized rowers. We wil try to stick with the classic 7-11 relationship for rowlocks and seat. Fact is I don't have a fucking clue where the tholepins go but Jody came up with this 7-11 rule and we will go with that for now.

 

I'm pretty excited because nobody builds a boat like this in alu. Of course I want a varnished mahogany planked peapod. I want the new S Class Mercedes too. But a beautiful wooden peapod would get beat to shit on my beach. Better keep it for a salad bar in a nice restaurant. I want a work boat. Maybe I will call mine POPEYE.

 

When I look at it I think it's one of the coolest boats I have ever seen. Rowing a great pulling boat is so satisfying.

 

7-11 always worked for me.

 

Popeye is a great name

 

"I yams what I yam"

 

Ag-ag-ag-ag-ag!



#176 familysailor

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 04:59 PM

What's the latest on the rowboat? Has the prototype build started yet?






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