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Bob Perry's Cool Rowboat

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#201 Bob Perry

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 03:47 PM

I don't want no stinkin' plastic rowboat. 



#202 Rasputin22

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 05:35 PM

It sure would stink using that plastic welding machine! You'll get your Tin Lizzie Bob.

 

Here is a little spinoff of the BobPod that I've been playing around with as a CNC cut 'Stitch and Glue' version of the stinkin' plastic 'playboats' that will be littering the Pacific Gyre until the end of time. This could be cut from 2 4x8 sheets of 3mm ply. Pretty minimal but what these little playboats can do on a standing wave in a whitewater river or even a decent drainage ditch is pretty amazing. I could see myself putting around the bayou in this. I've had a hankering for an SUP lately but I watch the rental customers from the guy a few doors down who is doing a pretty good job renting them and I think that standing up and the windage is pretty inefficient. I watched a couple of online playboat (C-1) reviews and like the way they use gallons as displacement (hull volume actually).

 

   

 

After watching this compilation, I think that I'll name my little playboat "TIDYBOWL".  

 

Heck, you don't even need a river!

 

http://www.today.com...824858#55824858

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#203 Ned

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 05:57 PM

I'm with Ned on the benefits of alu over Titanium. That said, the idea of having a titanium rowboat does have a certain panache.

Whooo Hooo! Look at me!

The Blingy Bob Pod.  



#204 Jose Carumba

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 03:34 AM

If you can find the right adhesives, perhaps the ones car builders use these days for gluing together alu autos then I think think using thin sheets of the gauge the alu skiff builders use would work well for a light peenpod. Those skiffs (Duroboat etc) get beat up on PNW and Alaska beaches all the time and although dented they last a long time. Maybe the bottom strakes can be heavier pl. _/\_ shaped long'l stiffeners can be made up using a modest press brake with the flanges giving enough bonding area for whatever adhesive you are using. Not sure how tight you could bend them so some experimenting would be in order.

#205 Rasputin22

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 06:36 PM

Hey Jose!

 

     I'm looking at using brake pressed v shaped stringers as you suggest on a proposed project. In aluminum, one might be able to use extruded angle but that wouldn't give the bonding flange that you describe. I looked into 3M structural tape a few years ago for a really absurd jet boat design. Thin stock that would have been difficult to weld and the 3M stuff looked promising except for melting it when adjacent joins needed welding. I was told that 3M had done a field test by giving a bunch of 1" bonding tape to the Mississippi DOT which were used to stick aluminum highway road signs to the hat section steel uprights. When Hurricane Katrina came through all the newly done signs had held but bent the standards over right at the ground with no tape failures. The older signs with carriage through bolts had torn the aluminum signs right off leaving the standards upright. I think that those tapes are used in most highway trailer side panel construction these days. 

 

http://solutions.3m....ds/3M-VHB-Tape/

 

Looks like the top rated VHB tape has a shear and tensile strength of around 90 lbs per sq inch. 



#206 Jose Carumba

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 06:55 PM

A few years ago I did a little research on structurally bonding aluminum and cam across an experimental aircraft forum where a guy had done some methodic testing of the bonds on aircraft skins.  From what I can remember he key to a good bond was using an adhesive with some flex to it.  Some epoxies worked and others didn't.  IIRC methacrylates (Plexus etc) worked best.  He used an old hacksaw blade to screed the adhesive on the samples to get a controlled thickness.  I guess there is a problem with some adhesives weakening when the temperature gets above 150 degrees F.  That would be worth looking into.

 

The VHB tapes hold really well but I would rather use an adhesive to assure gaps are filled, and you know there will be gaps no matter how miniscule they may be.  Clamping the parts until cured may pose a problem but maybe a few rivets would work for that.



#207 SemiSalt

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Posted Yesterday, 03:09 PM

I think it was in a book by Sam Rabl there was a this advice: If you ever get the urge to build a small boat of metal, lie down until it goes away.



#208 SemiSalt

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Posted Yesterday, 03:16 PM

I've had a hankering for an SUP lately but I watch the rental customers from the guy a few doors down who is doing a pretty good job renting them and I think that standing up and the windage is pretty inefficient.

 

Based on about 5 minutes (literally) of SUP experience, the secret is that standing allows you to get the bigger muscles of the legs and back into the game where the regular kayak is pretty much arms and shoulders only.  I think you're right that the top wind limit for a SUP is lower than for a kayak, but in regular SUPping weather, not a problem.



#209 Rasputin22

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Posted Yesterday, 03:51 PM

I've had a hankering for an SUP lately but I watch the rental customers from the guy a few doors down who is doing a pretty good job renting them and I think that standing up and the windage is pretty inefficient.

 

Based on about 5 minutes (literally) of SUP experience, the secret is that standing allows you to get the bigger muscles of the legs and back into the game where the regular kayak is pretty much arms and shoulders only.  I think you're right that the top wind limit for a SUP is lower than for a kayak, but in regular SUPping weather, not a problem.

 

Right about the legs Semi, at least what I have seen on the girls and ladies SUPping about in the Bayou out in front of my house! Yoga classed on SUP boards is really catching on with the gals over in Pensacola. I just love a 'Downward Dog' on the water...

 

o-PADDLEBOARD-YOGA-900.jpg?1






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