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constrictor clutches

How fussy?

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#1 Vincent DePillis

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 01:25 PM

Have been noodling use of constrictor clutches.  Wondering how fussy they are in terms of lead angle.  if the clutched line is not exactly in line with the clutch, does it overload one side of the sock at the point where the sock attaches to the metal part?  Or does the sock self align so the the loads at the sock/metal part interface are relatively evenly distributed?  



#2 zoomtripp26

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 01:58 PM

I have been using two constrictors  for about a month on my boat... main and jib halyard..Attached them to my mast rather then deck... since the sock conforms to the shape of the line  I don't think the lead angle  is overly critical,  I ensured the opening at the top of the sock was in line with the exit point in the mast... and attached the shock chord above the mast exit... so its aligned relatively straight, but having said that we coluld change the angle by cinching one side of th shock chord versus the other... not that that is necessary.  It basically self aligns.

 

Really like the set up... if I had one suggestion it would be to make the metal base smaller and flatter... no need to make it look like a clutch, then it would be less intrusive.

 

I think these things are ingenious... its sort of the reverse of a normal clutch they are always on unless you actively release them.  Each time we get new crew on the boat we give them a little lesson in use of the constrictor clutch and everyone lieks them.  So easy to release the clutch under load... way better then the old school ones.

 

I suspect over time the shock chord will be the first thing to give out...



#3 jaybird1111

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Posted 07 October 2013 - 02:25 PM

I've got nine. Yes, nine of the things. I agree with zoomtripp on all points. Greatest thing since sliced bread, these constrictors are. My wife made some covers for them, effectively cylinders of Sunbrella with snaps along one of the long sides.



#4 tridownunder

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 10:24 AM

I have them and have been getting a bit of 'creep' from them... When halyards are loaded up then a few mins later you notice not so much tension... Seems to help if the sock is 'milked' down its length to promote max contact...but in heavy airs they don't hold...for me..

#5 Vincent DePillis

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 05:01 PM

"...but in heavy airs they don't hold...for me"

 

Very intersting-- might be helpful to know what kind of boat, and size, type,and condition of halyard.  Do you think that your experience might be related to those kinds of issues?

 

  From your screen name, I assume your boat is a trimaran.  I wonder if the relatively higher righting moment puts more load on the halyard... Does not seem like it should make a difference, but what do I know.

 

With my corsair 31, I ended up with a Spinlock XX series clutch because the lesser clutches were not holding and were tearing up the cover.  Works a treat, but is expensive, heavy and complex.   That is why the constrictor clutch is so attractive.

 

What I do not understand is why no one is making a cost effective jammer.  Spinlock introduced a ZR jammer for "highly loaded lines on larger production yachts" but the line sizese were too big for me.  The ZS is absurdly expensive.  The Jammer seeems to me to be a stone simple device.  Should cost about $150, and hold an 8mm halyard to 4000 lbs with no sweat.  

 

Harken, Schaeffer, Garhauer, are you listening?

I have them and have been getting a bit of 'creep' from them... When halyards are loaded up then a few mins later you notice not so much tension... Seems to help if the sock is 'milked' down its length to promote max contact..



#6 trispirit

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 04:50 AM

We have installed three of these type on Spirit and just used them intensively over the Australian Nationals.  They're used on the large reacher/assym, small reacher/assym and mainsail halyards and we have had no issues at all with them.
 
We have however had user error with them.  You'll notice on the photo below that there is a small black ball on the release line.  This has become caught in out mast rotation and not noticed when the mast was being rotated.  On a couple of occasions when all hells breaking loose in the cockpit or snake pit as the crew like to call it, the mast has been rotated and the ball has been caught in the line dumping about 1m of halyard.  Once stopped though the constrictor grabs the halyard again and all is fine just a meter of halyard to crank back in.
 
We haven't had any issues with creep but we do milk them before removing them from the winch.  We love the light weight and the simplicity of them.  No moving parts just a alloy housing with a rope sock! simple and extremely practical.  Love the way you can mount them anywhere, even at the mast head to reduce compression and love the fact they are a 1/3 the size of the old ones and have double or more holding power, and weigh next to nothing.  And there's absolutely no wear on the halyards anymore.
 
We have them wound up when sailing up wind with our small reacher for luff tension and they hold rock solid.  I think they're a no brainer and will be slowly replacing all out standard clutch type jammers for these in the future.
 
In the photos below you can see them installed on the outside of the old jammers.  Not the best shot but all I have at the moment.
 
Attached File  IMG_8775.JPG   120.17K   165 downloads
 
We are using this type 
 
 
We get them from Allyacht spars here in Australia for a great price and our halyards are 12mm dyneema. Hope this helps.
 

 



#7 Speng

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 03:13 PM

We haven't had any issues with creep but we do milk them before removing them from the winch.  We love the light weight and the simplicity of them.  No moving parts just a alloy housing with a rope sock! simple and extremely practical.  Love the way you can mount them anywhere, even at the mast head to reduce compression and love the fact they are a 1/3 the size of the old ones and have double or more holding power, and weigh next to nothing.  And there's absolutely no wear on the halyards anymore.

have you actually done this or is it just a plan?

 

I like the look of the Ronstan versions. Definitely cleaner looking that many of the others out there especially the original manufacturer



#8 SimonN

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 06:09 PM

I think the clue is in the fact he has provided a photo of his boat using them.... :blink:

 

And the Ronstan  are no different from the original ones because they are the original, made by cousin-trestec. I don't know whether Ronstan are distributing them only in Oz or whether it is worldwide, but they don't make them. If you check the Ronstan site, the brochure they have is even the cousin-trestec one! So, what were the differences you liked so much :P



#9 jaybird1111

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 06:45 PM

Ronstan are distributing the Cousin-Trestec ones, that's what the label said, anyway. In the US, got mine via Mauri Pro Sailing

 

My line is all Warpspeed, except for the topping lift and outhaul which are a blend (similar to Swiftcord)

 

--oh, and I shortened the length of the tails (the ball end) which seems to keep 'em a bit tidier. Mine are mounted similar to those pictured, boat is a Catana 40S

 



#10 Vincent DePillis

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 07:30 PM

Questions for you early adopters:

 

Does the system seem to be particularly sensitive to the nature of the the line being held?  Does old line hold better than new line?   Can you make it hold better by treating the line with Spinlock’s RP25 or some such?  Does firm line hold better than looser line?

 

When dropping a sail that you want to come down fast (e.g spinnaker) is there additional friction to deal with?



#11 trispirit

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 10:33 PM

Questions for you early adopters:

 

Does the system seem to be particularly sensitive to the nature of the the line being held?  Does old line hold better than new line?   Can you make it hold better by treating the line with Spinlock’s RP25 or some such?  Does firm line hold better than looser line?

 

When dropping a sail that you want to come down fast (e.g spinnaker) is there additional friction to deal with?

 

Ours seem to hold any rope well whether it be old or new, I was running old line through one for a bit and it seemed fine, if anything I would think an older line would hold easier as it's been under load and is a firmer tighter braid giving the sock something harder to bite onto when it constricts.  But to be honest it doesn't seem to mind either new or old.  Also the sock is about 12 inches long and only about the first 5 inches seems to bite/constrict the rest doesn't get constricted, it seems as though there is a lot more holding power there if needed.

 

They do add some friction to the halyards when easing.  Our main halyard which is 2-1 and on old slides with a mast length of 18mts has to be pulled down.  It's always had to be pulled down though as the slides and square top add a lot of friction but the constrictor definitely adds to this.  Reachers are all 1-1 and come down fine.

 

They are made by Cousin-Trestec and distributed in Australia by Ronston.  Also with regard to the mast mounting we don't have this onboard but I have heard of it being done and also know people that are installing it.  We also like the fact we can dump lines under load  safely and with ease.



#12 BigSquid

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 01:03 AM

Has anybody put them aloft with long trigger lines in place of halyard locks?

#13 Trov„o

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 04:03 AM

Has anybody put them aloft with long trigger lines in place of halyard locks?

 

this is the real million dollar question.



#14 BigSquid

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 04:14 AM

main + trinquette + solent + code 0 + gennaker = $20,000 question anyway

I was going to try it but didn't want to be the first so I opted for a jammer and 4 locks






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