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2013 mini transat


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#101 torpenboat

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 02:08 PM

If any of you find any good huge wave videos from the fleet post them here please.

Done!!!



#102 torpenboat

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 03:19 PM

Nice vid of the start

http://www.dailymoti...nsat-2013_sport



#103 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 04:03 PM

Thanks Torpen!



#104 BalticBandit

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 09:04 AM

Speaking of "Don't know when to quit".... Just got an FB post from Craig Horsfield -- The Naked Retreats boat has been splashed by friends in Sada, and Craig is literally in the plane from Seattle.  Should be touching down within an hour or two!!!  

 

Another "don't know when to quit".   Yes its not the Protos, its "only the Series" - but that's the other "'mercun" boat



#105 Presuming Ed

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 11:01 AM

Starting on Monday direct for Pointe-a-Pitre. Gate at Lanzarote, and competitors may stop there if they wish. 

 

http://www.minitrans...e-pitre?lang=en

 

Those in Gijon leave in convoy today, 6pm. 



#106 Icedtea

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 11:03 AM

Starting Monday? So today? Sounds good! 

 

Sucks for MacFarlane though



#107 Presuming Ed

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 11:05 AM

Next Monday - 11th. Start is from Sada.



#108 Joan Pons Semelis

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 02:36 PM

Starting the 12th so everyone can retrieve things send in advance to Lanzarote for the cancelled stop over.

#109 torpenboat

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 02:40 PM

there will be a gate in front of Lanzarote,

so anyone who want to make a pit stop

could do it



#110 prime8

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 03:37 PM

Brief audio interview with Jeff from 11/4 can be found here:

 

http://www.minitransat.fr/sons?lang=en

 

Think he's got enough time to round up a new rig by the 12th?



#111 nkb

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 03:43 PM

Brief audio interview with Jeff from 11/4 can be found here:

 

http://www.minitransat.fr/sons?lang=en

 

Think he's got enough time to round up a new rig by the 12th?

 Problem I think is more about getting his boat back than finding another rig, it was 120 miles offshore yesterday....



#112 BobJ

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 04:54 PM

Okay, I'll go ahead with my dumb/obvious question since I don't see where anyone else asked it...

 

The MT site has a history page that mentions the race being moved to September.  Why is it now scheduled for late October when weather like this could be expected?



#113 us7070

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 08:08 PM

Okay, I'll go ahead with my dumb/obvious question since I don't see where anyone else asked it...

 

The MT site has a history page that mentions the race being moved to September.  Why is it now scheduled for late October when weather like this could be expected?

 

I have no idea what their reasoning is...., but generally speaking, September - October is not a great time to be sailing to the Caribbean...

 

I got caught in tropical storm sailing there from the Canaries in mid December, so anything can happen.., but waiting till November is a bit safer  - at least on that end of the trip.



#114 BalticBandit

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 09:56 PM

Late September is the best they could have   They had to wait until the Caribbean Hurricane season was over (downside of having a finish in the Caribbean) which means that they cannot launch before Sept 10th which statistically is the most active Hurricane season date.  And at that point it was scheduling and Weather Window



#115 BalticBandit

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 08:24 AM

BTW here's a visual of the "tropical cyclone" tracks through Sept. 

 

 Notice how the old route crossed the cyclone line at a point that they would be storms but not fully grown tropical cyclones yet.   Notice how the new course crosses right across Hurricane Alley in the Carribean

 

http://upload.wikime...cane_tracks.jpg

800px-Atlantic_hurricane_tracks.jpg


#116 bruno

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 09:17 AM

That is a tricky transition, avoid the bay of biscay around the equinox or later and the caribbean until Nov, why cruisers hang out in the canaries.

#117 BalticBandit

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 09:40 AM

That is a tricky transition, avoid the bay of biscay around the equinox or later and the caribbean until Nov, why cruisers hang out in the canaries.

And in part why much of Africa had been sailed to well before North America (at least using central and southern europe as the starting point.   you could get to Cape Horn without braving hurricanes that the ships of that time did not do well in.



#118 Icedtea

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 11:29 AM

Can't imagine the Harbour in Lanza is too happy about the change, they would have made serious money out of this. 

 

At least the race is still on, one of my favourite races to follow by far



#119 torpenboat

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Posted 06 November 2013 - 03:47 PM

First leg to sada



#120 Presuming Ed

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 08:37 AM

Falling off a mini. (No time for a proper translation - google.translate it is)

 

http://www.voilesetv...-la-1ere-etape/

 

 Tuesday, October 29 , 5:45 am , Douarnenez. It is still dark outside . I open the latest weather file. The lull that we watch for several days and that will finally allow us to take the start of the Mini is there. By cons, it seems to be even smaller than expected to pass Cape Finisterre before the bad weather we will have to give everything from the beginning. I hope the series boats will pass in time too .. not in fact it will not do for them, they will take expensive, or when Denis will further postpone the start ? We go back to bed ? Do not think , go go!
 
7:30 . The sun rises , there is wind , the first boat out of the harbor, with a lot of delay, the 709 and I are stuck in the bottom of the harbor and can not move until the other does not come out . These moments are long, I'm surrounded by my family, it's cool, I see a lot of riders who are there alone, their families could not come back, or they already expect to Lanzarote ...
 
Say goodbye to my family is a very strong point , we do not talk a lot but it is not useful , we all waited for this moment with great anticipation , so much work , so much time, so much help , I think of all those who could not come , thank you , what we have is a huge success , despite the small size of our boat !
 
8:30 . I leave the dock , a few meters away from the port, and we are quickly in the subject, around twenty knots, a background swell and some grains which pass the departure looks sporty !
 
9am few . The start is given , I'm on the far right of the line , I leave with a little late because I want to avoid flying start , avoid breaking the boat in a collision , and I especially want to make sure to tack when the line is crossed . Everything is going well , and I 'm the only one from the right, in addition to being on the side I chose it allows me to digress a little from the danger of collisions.
 
After a few minutes on this board, I turn and go back to the middle of the water , it looks good ... It even will go very well since I'm in the lead and the second crosses almost 100 meters behind me ! A large grain with rain and a significant reinforcement of wind arrives while we 're tacking toward the exit of the bay, the second is now Gwénolé Logways and his boat , the choice is more suitable for sailing in the wind that became stronger he catches me , but the others are still at a safe distance .
 
It is about noon. We have taken two-thirds of the bay Gwénolé and I are in contact , the wind abated slightly , I re- distance a little. It is now time for me to turn and heading direct to the Pointe du Raz . Gwénolé chasing group and continue on the right side of the water. I 'm alone on my side , direct focus on the Raz de Sein , at the moment it is quite positive for me, I even wonder why they continue so far . They eventually fired, I am always happy with me , they seem to have come a long way in too . The minutes passed , they now have the very fast air to rise on the horizon is impressive, while I understand where they are , the wind shifted and allows them to open a few more sails and thus to accelerate frankly . I have a good lead , but will she be enough to keep his head up out of the bay ? Well no, just before reaching the Raz Gwénolé another boat and I doubled , prosecutors are about them behind me . This is not so bad!
 
Just past the Raz de Sein , I send the gennaker , it goes fast, a dozen nodes on average! Our group began to spread , some are high while others choose to dive southward , I chose a middle option. For now the important thing is to go fast . There are around twenty knots , no seasickness , hollow at least 5 meters. A new grain approaches us , the strong wind comes , I finally ranks the gennaker , but continues to go as fast as possible.
 
By mid afternoon , the grain is past, but I have a beginning of seasickness , I force myself to vomit quickly, but difficult , I have not eaten for the day , take a pill, and returns the gennaker . I lost a little ground , while I was busy with my stomach , my closest competitors continued to attack . The gennaker is back, and it's gone.
 
The sea is high on sky background with good drags large cumulus clouds behind us rainbows rainbow appear and disappear , the landscape is magical, only downside , there is as a karcher on the deck and there is not pass 30 seconds without the waves explode on our faces.
 
By late afternoon , two reefs in the mainsail, one reef in the jib and gennaker is in place. The wind abated slightly , I hesitate to return a reef in the mainsail. I finally opted for the risk in the Solent .
 
Before going ahead, I shocked the mainsail slightly to slow down a little boat, I hang one of my loins on the lifeline that runs on the deckhouse , and won the other cockpit bottom . I crawl to go to the beach before , pick the risk of solent somehow , and begins in the opposite direction by the rise on the side of the boat.
 
At this point, I 'm back to the wind with one hand on the line, I feel the boat off suddenly in a wave , I 'm off with and even catapulted up , I feel helpless as my hand is hanging on the chain passing under I finally falls off the boat, the violent motion of the ship added to my weight let me die .
 
I get almost the first in the water head, and I already feel the harness that pulls me while the vest inflates. A split second later I pulled back on the boat continues its wild ride, fast remote control to turn the boat into the wind. Damn, she is trapped under the vest ! I struggle a long time with the waves clap my back, I hit regularly drift in the wind with my shoulder, pointed toe hurts, I start to get tired and lose all hope of getting there , every time I ' happens to reach under the vest wave my spring ...
 
After maybe five minutes to try to catch this remote , I finally grasp , this time it is good I am saved , I press a button and let him go , the boat is supposed to be facing wind in this case (I think ) . He luff very suddenly , I feel caught me in the boat , he passes the wind and continues his turn , we tacked , all the sails to take against , I am now back from the guy , the boat is highly cottage with the sails against the tilted downwind keel and the weight of the material loaded in the wind.
 
The boat is drifting fast, so much so that my legs were trapped under the boat , I feel the chains on my belly , the harness still holds me forward - fortunately at any time , the vest keeps my head out of the water ... or more or less out of the water !
 
Well, the situation is not much better , finally . Unable to extricate myself from the grip of the boat ... A hope , perhaps : even if the boat is drifting especially laterally, advance a little, I feel the tension in the harness. I then decided to hold the second along the chain against which I and dropping the other to make me slide back hoping me clear of the boat , it works more or less since I can not after lot of effort to get close to the rear.
 
Then I tired and do not move , I lose hope for a few moments and realizes that reach my left hand is the cleat backstay . I open it hoping that it will release the mainsail and the boat can be put in a more consistent basis . In the next second , I feel the boat pick up, I think even be left hanging in the sector and therefore almost out of the water , but at the same time , I fall heavily into the water.
 
I then realize that the runner who dropped , I dropped the mast - big moment of despair . I even forget for a moment that I am in the water trough in the middle of four or five meters, I 'm exhausted and the cold begins to be felt .
 
I am now back in the boat. I try to get out of the water thanks to a kind of work that we have in the back of our boats , I do not put my foot on it , it moves too , and I 'm too tired . Finally, I decided to go through the hatch survival , I open it and pulls out the life raft with a hard , shot gauge refusing to yield and effort to make me seem huge. Once the raft out I start trying to remove the life jacket to go through the door ( inflated, it is bigger than the hatch ) , not open loop voltage vest . I realized afterwards that I had a floating hand knife and I could use it to cut the vest, but I did not think about that time ... I am disappointed , I began to surrender , my only hope is when a competitor passes close quickly. That's it, I tremble .
 
A few minutes later , I realize that the boat is strongly depressed - the door is not closed. I realize at the same time that the starboard side is under water: I do then slide over and get in the cockpit, I turn the two tags , and tell me that it might be well to release the rig to protect what remains of the boat. Just cut the first guy I fell to the lack of water. I finally wisely ramp to the cockpit and not moving.
 
At the same time , I see the top of a veil Mini fifty yards coming right behind me on the waves. He rolls his gennaker disaster - it's Tanguy Le Turquais who was then in the lead group of Series boats . It slows down and passes very close to me . I later learned that seeing my eyes a little stunned , he quickly understood my distress , he called the emergency VHF and stayed by my side to help me find this a little rough sea .
 
The paramedics arrived about ten minutes later and despite the seas , put a boat in the water to pick me up . It is night . I am very happy to see and feel the heat in shipping aboard PSP Cormoran !
 
A huge thank you , therefore , to Tanguy, commander Lore PSP Cormoran , as well as the whole crew ! I spent the next few days with them accompanying the rest of the race , they were very attentive , and very concerned about the rest of the fleet to be as available as possible to the measurement capabilities of their boat .
 
I am now back in La Rochelle, our beautiful boat waiting for me quietly in a yard in Loctudy where I go with the expert ...
 
The result ? We'll see !
 
The lessons ? The dry suit has kept me from the cold by delaying the invasion . The harness has kept me hooked to the boat. The vest kept my head above water . Rescuers pulled me out of trouble. If any of these parameters had missed, I 'm not sure I will be writing these lines .


#121 BalticBandit

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 09:09 AM

WOW!!!



#122 jiauka

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 10:23 AM

The Aussy Katrina Ham capsizes.

 

The Australian navigator was on the delivery from Gijon to Sada when she was struck by a breaking swell in the entrance channel to Ribadeo.  She was recovered immediately by an accompanying support boat and was taken to the hospital where she underwent health checks.

 

http://www.minitrans...ribadeo?lang=en



#123 Icedtea

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 10:46 AM

FUCK. 

This winter is taking no prisoners. Is the boat in any way salvagable?



#124 redboat

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 01:16 PM

Amazing tale.

 

Truly front page worthy. Anyone who can read Snaggy's posts should have no problem with the choppy translation.



#125 jiauka

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 01:15 PM

About KAtrina Ham:

 

Boat is lost, here you can find full info in spanish.

 

http://www.lavozdega...311X8C59911.htm

 

In short, the  towline from the "organization" to the boat broke, Katrina felt onto the water, another boat from the harbour rescued her, also another guy from the saving boat felt on the water too. No personal damage, but very close to have serious injuries or even death.

 

The boat struck against the rocks and is a total lost.

 

Sorry for my english, I'm spanish.

 

yours!!

 

j.



#126 BalticBandit

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 02:55 PM

Wow this is being a really tough round



#127 TheFlash

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 03:07 PM

About KAtrina Ham:

 

Boat is lost, here you can find full info in spanish.

 

http://www.lavozdega...311X8C59911.htm

 

In short, the  towline from the "organization" to the boat broke, Katrina felt onto the water, another boat from the harbour rescued her, also another guy from the saving boat felt on the water too. No personal damage, but very close to have serious injuries or even death.

 

The boat struck against the rocks and is a total lost.

 

Sorry for my english, I'm spanish.

 

yours!!

 

j.

gracias



#128 BitBrace

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 04:04 PM

Arthur is a family friend and his story NEEDs to be on the front page, obviously google translate isnt the best but the emotions and exeperience he has needs to be read by anyone considering singlehanded ocean racing.

Falling off a mini. (No time for a proper translation - google.translate it is)

 

http://www.voilesetv...-la-1ere-etape/

 

 Tuesday, October 29 , 5:45 am , Douarnenez. It is still dark outside . I open the latest weather file. The lull that we watch for several days and that will finally allow us to take the start of the Mini is there. By cons, it seems to be even smaller than expected to pass Cape Finisterre before the bad weather we will have to give everything from the beginning. I hope the series boats will pass in time too .. not in fact it will not do for them, they will take expensive, or when Denis will further postpone the start ? We go back to bed ? Do not think , go go!
 
7:30 . The sun rises , there is wind , the first boat out of the harbor, with a lot of delay, the 709 and I are stuck in the bottom of the harbor and can not move until the other does not come out . These moments are long, I'm surrounded by my family, it's cool, I see a lot of riders who are there alone, their families could not come back, or they already expect to Lanzarote ...
 
Say goodbye to my family is a very strong point , we do not talk a lot but it is not useful , we all waited for this moment with great anticipation , so much work , so much time, so much help , I think of all those who could not come , thank you , what we have is a huge success , despite the small size of our boat !
 
8:30 . I leave the dock , a few meters away from the port, and we are quickly in the subject, around twenty knots, a background swell and some grains which pass the departure looks sporty !
 
9am few . The start is given , I'm on the far right of the line , I leave with a little late because I want to avoid flying start , avoid breaking the boat in a collision , and I especially want to make sure to tack when the line is crossed . Everything is going well , and I 'm the only one from the right, in addition to being on the side I chose it allows me to digress a little from the danger of collisions.
 
After a few minutes on this board, I turn and go back to the middle of the water , it looks good ... It even will go very well since I'm in the lead and the second crosses almost 100 meters behind me ! A large grain with rain and a significant reinforcement of wind arrives while we 're tacking toward the exit of the bay, the second is now Gwénolé Logways and his boat , the choice is more suitable for sailing in the wind that became stronger he catches me , but the others are still at a safe distance .
 
It is about noon. We have taken two-thirds of the bay Gwénolé and I are in contact , the wind abated slightly , I re- distance a little. It is now time for me to turn and heading direct to the Pointe du Raz . Gwénolé chasing group and continue on the right side of the water. I 'm alone on my side , direct focus on the Raz de Sein , at the moment it is quite positive for me, I even wonder why they continue so far . They eventually fired, I am always happy with me , they seem to have come a long way in too . The minutes passed , they now have the very fast air to rise on the horizon is impressive, while I understand where they are , the wind shifted and allows them to open a few more sails and thus to accelerate frankly . I have a good lead , but will she be enough to keep his head up out of the bay ? Well no, just before reaching the Raz Gwénolé another boat and I doubled , prosecutors are about them behind me . This is not so bad!
 
Just past the Raz de Sein , I send the gennaker , it goes fast, a dozen nodes on average! Our group began to spread , some are high while others choose to dive southward , I chose a middle option. For now the important thing is to go fast . There are around twenty knots , no seasickness , hollow at least 5 meters. A new grain approaches us , the strong wind comes , I finally ranks the gennaker , but continues to go as fast as possible.
 
By mid afternoon , the grain is past, but I have a beginning of seasickness , I force myself to vomit quickly, but difficult , I have not eaten for the day , take a pill, and returns the gennaker . I lost a little ground , while I was busy with my stomach , my closest competitors continued to attack . The gennaker is back, and it's gone.
 
The sea is high on sky background with good drags large cumulus clouds behind us rainbows rainbow appear and disappear , the landscape is magical, only downside , there is as a karcher on the deck and there is not pass 30 seconds without the waves explode on our faces.
 
By late afternoon , two reefs in the mainsail, one reef in the jib and gennaker is in place. The wind abated slightly , I hesitate to return a reef in the mainsail. I finally opted for the risk in the Solent .
 
Before going ahead, I shocked the mainsail slightly to slow down a little boat, I hang one of my loins on the lifeline that runs on the deckhouse , and won the other cockpit bottom . I crawl to go to the beach before , pick the risk of solent somehow , and begins in the opposite direction by the rise on the side of the boat.
 
At this point, I 'm back to the wind with one hand on the line, I feel the boat off suddenly in a wave , I 'm off with and even catapulted up , I feel helpless as my hand is hanging on the chain passing under I finally falls off the boat, the violent motion of the ship added to my weight let me die .
 
I get almost the first in the water head, and I already feel the harness that pulls me while the vest inflates. A split second later I pulled back on the boat continues its wild ride, fast remote control to turn the boat into the wind. Damn, she is trapped under the vest ! I struggle a long time with the waves clap my back, I hit regularly drift in the wind with my shoulder, pointed toe hurts, I start to get tired and lose all hope of getting there , every time I ' happens to reach under the vest wave my spring ...
 
After maybe five minutes to try to catch this remote , I finally grasp , this time it is good I am saved , I press a button and let him go , the boat is supposed to be facing wind in this case (I think ) . He luff very suddenly , I feel caught me in the boat , he passes the wind and continues his turn , we tacked , all the sails to take against , I am now back from the guy , the boat is highly cottage with the sails against the tilted downwind keel and the weight of the material loaded in the wind.
 
The boat is drifting fast, so much so that my legs were trapped under the boat , I feel the chains on my belly , the harness still holds me forward - fortunately at any time , the vest keeps my head out of the water ... or more or less out of the water !
 
Well, the situation is not much better , finally . Unable to extricate myself from the grip of the boat ... A hope , perhaps : even if the boat is drifting especially laterally, advance a little, I feel the tension in the harness. I then decided to hold the second along the chain against which I and dropping the other to make me slide back hoping me clear of the boat , it works more or less since I can not after lot of effort to get close to the rear.
 
Then I tired and do not move , I lose hope for a few moments and realizes that reach my left hand is the cleat backstay . I open it hoping that it will release the mainsail and the boat can be put in a more consistent basis . In the next second , I feel the boat pick up, I think even be left hanging in the sector and therefore almost out of the water , but at the same time , I fall heavily into the water.
 
I then realize that the runner who dropped , I dropped the mast - big moment of despair . I even forget for a moment that I am in the water trough in the middle of four or five meters, I 'm exhausted and the cold begins to be felt .
 
I am now back in the boat. I try to get out of the water thanks to a kind of work that we have in the back of our boats , I do not put my foot on it , it moves too , and I 'm too tired . Finally, I decided to go through the hatch survival , I open it and pulls out the life raft with a hard , shot gauge refusing to yield and effort to make me seem huge. Once the raft out I start trying to remove the life jacket to go through the door ( inflated, it is bigger than the hatch ) , not open loop voltage vest . I realized afterwards that I had a floating hand knife and I could use it to cut the vest, but I did not think about that time ... I am disappointed , I began to surrender , my only hope is when a competitor passes close quickly. That's it, I tremble .
 
A few minutes later , I realize that the boat is strongly depressed - the door is not closed. I realize at the same time that the starboard side is under water: I do then slide over and get in the cockpit, I turn the two tags , and tell me that it might be well to release the rig to protect what remains of the boat. Just cut the first guy I fell to the lack of water. I finally wisely ramp to the cockpit and not moving.
 
At the same time , I see the top of a veil Mini fifty yards coming right behind me on the waves. He rolls his gennaker disaster - it's Tanguy Le Turquais who was then in the lead group of Series boats . It slows down and passes very close to me . I later learned that seeing my eyes a little stunned , he quickly understood my distress , he called the emergency VHF and stayed by my side to help me find this a little rough sea .
 
The paramedics arrived about ten minutes later and despite the seas , put a boat in the water to pick me up . It is night . I am very happy to see and feel the heat in shipping aboard PSP Cormoran !
 
A huge thank you , therefore , to Tanguy, commander Lore PSP Cormoran , as well as the whole crew ! I spent the next few days with them accompanying the rest of the race , they were very attentive , and very concerned about the rest of the fleet to be as available as possible to the measurement capabilities of their boat .
 
I am now back in La Rochelle, our beautiful boat waiting for me quietly in a yard in Loctudy where I go with the expert ...
 
The result ? We'll see !
 
The lessons ? The dry suit has kept me from the cold by delaying the invasion . The harness has kept me hooked to the boat. The vest kept my head above water . Rescuers pulled me out of trouble. If any of these parameters had missed, I 'm not sure I will be writing these lines .


#129 Icedtea

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 04:44 PM

Ouch. Tough for her the towline broke.



#130 prime8

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 07:27 PM

Arthur is a family friend and his story NEEDs to be on the front page, obviously google translate isnt the best but the emotions and exeperience he has needs to be read by anyone considering singlehanded ocean racing.

 

Yes, it'd be great to get a better translation of this somehow. There are a few parts that I didn't quite get.



#131 BitBrace

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 09:35 PM

Arthur is a family friend and his story NEEDs to be on the front page, obviously google translate isnt the best but the emotions and exeperience he has needs to be read by anyone considering singlehanded ocean racing.

 

Yes, it'd be great to get a better translation of this somehow. There are a few parts that I didn't quite get.

im working on a proper translation, if anyone beats me too it then all the better!



#132 jiauka

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 10:23 PM

from:

http://www.minitrans...er-sada?lang=en

 

"and her boat is not seaworthy."

 

The "organisation" should be a litle bit less optimistic.

 

1012481_10152017309653734_147558055_n.jp

 

1395232_10152017302608734_1656707100_n.j

 

not fun :(



#133 BitBrace

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 12:05 AM

here is my translation of Arthur's words. I really hope this makes the front page as it is a great yet sobering tale of how quickly it can all go wrong alone at sea. I am sure this will not stop Arthur and his dreams of sailing the ocean! Follow him here: https://www.facebook...hurleopoldleger

 

apologize for any typos!

 

 

Tueday the 29th of October. 5:45 am Douarnenez. Its still dark out. I open the latest weather report. The system we have been watching for several days that will let us take the start of the Mini Transat is finally here. However the window seems even smaller then predicted, to round the Cap Finisterre before the heavy weather we will need to give everything from the start. I hope the series boats will make it around in time as well…. Maybe they wont and will get hammered, or will Denis delay the start again? Back to bed? Don’t think about it, its time to send it!
 

 

7.30 am Dawn,  its blowing, the first boats leave the harbor. 709 and me are blocked in the end and are the last to leave. These last moments are long, I am surrounded by my family which is nice, I see other competitors that are here alone, their families unable to come, or are waiting in Lanzarote…

 

Saying Farwell to my loved ones is an emotional moment, not much is said, not much is needed. We have all waited for this moment with lots of impatience. So much work, so much time, so much help, I think of those who couldn’t be here, thank you, what we have achieved is huge, even though our boat is small!

 

 

8.30, I leave the dock, and the shelter of the harbor, and we are quickly in the thick of it, a steady 20 knts, swells, and occasional squalls, the start is going to be intense!

 

9 am , the start is off. I am at the extreme right end of the line, I  start a little late because I don’t want to be over early, or involved in a collision, and most importantly I want to have room to tack as soon as I am over. Everything goes well and I am alone in taking the right hand option, giving me an added safety margin against collision.
 

After a few minutes, I take and head towards the middle of the course, seems to be going well….even very well because I seem to be in the lead with the 2nd place boat crossing about 100 m behind me! A big squall with rain and a important gust arrives will we tack our way towards the mouth of the bay, behind me is now Gwenole and his boat, Logways, his sail selection seems  better suited to the building breeze, and he starts making gains on me, but we are still a ways ahead of the rest of the fleet.

 

It is about noon and we have covered 2/3rds of the bay, Gwenole and me are in touch, the wind drops a bit however and I extend. It is now time I tack and lay the point of Raz. Gwenole and the next closest group continue on the right side. I find myself alone on layline to the Raz de Sien, positive for the moment, I even ask myself why they continue so far. They finally tack, and I am still happy with my position, they seem to have sailed much farther then needed. The minutes pass, and now they look very fast, their progress on the horizon is impressive. I understand now that they found a different breeze which allowed them to ease their sails a bit and accelerate. I have a good lead but is it enough to get me out of the bay in first place? Well no, just before I reach the Raz de Sien, Gwenole and another boat pass me, and the rest are right behind me. Still not bad!

 

Ahead of us the Atlantic opens up, , direction Lanzarote
 


 

As soon as I am clear of the Raz, I hoist the gennaker, and we start to fly, about 12knts sustained! Our group of front runners start to spread out, some stay high while others turn down and to the south, I chose the middle option. For the moment, the focus is on boatspeed. Its blowing about 20,  and an important sea state wth 5 m swells. A new squall is approaching, and I finally have to douse the gennak but continue to go as fast as possible.
 

We are now in the middle of the afternoon, the squall is passed, but seasickness starts to set in, I force myself to vomit quickly but difficultly, I haven’t eating anything all day, but I just take a pill and redeploy the gennak. I lost some ground, while dealing with my nausea, and my closest rivals continue their attacks, so the gennak is out and we are off.
 

The sea is strong and the sky filled with big cumulus, behind us rainbows appear and disappear, nothing short of magical. The only downside is the firehosing on deck, not 30 seconds go by without a wave exploding in our face.

 

Dusk approaches, with 2 reefs in the main, one in the solent and the gennaker up. The wind weakens a bit. I heisitate to shake out a reef in the main so I finally decide to shake out the solent.
 

Before going forward, I ease slightly the main to slow the boat a little, I clip into the rooftop safety line, and unclip from the cockpit floor. I crawl on to the foredeck and loose the reef in the solent, and start my return across the boat. At this moment, my back is to the wind and I have a hand on the lifeline, I feel the boat suddenly take off a wave top and I feel myself go up and over my hand holding the lifeline, I fall past it and that force of the boat movement and my weight make me let go.  I land pretty much head first into the water, and feel my harness go taunt while my life vest inflates. A fraction of a second later I am on my back being towed by the boat still underway. Quickly I reach for the autopilot remote to put the boat head to wind. Shit, its stuck under the life vest. I struggle a long moment with the waves that smack my back, and regularly slam into the windward daggerboard with my shoulder. The leading edge is painful and I start to lose strength and hope. Everytime I get my hand under the jacket a wave rips it out… after about 5 minutes of effort, I manage to grab it, and finally I am saved. I push the button and don’t let go., the boat is supposed to go head to wind( atleast I think) .  Instead it tacks violently. I fell myself trapped under the boat. The sails all backwind, and I am now behind the stays. The boat is heeled over because the keel is canted to leeward and the whole stack below is to leeward.

 

The boat drifting quickly which traps my legs under the boat, I feel the lifelines cut into my stomach,  the harness is still holding me forward,  the life jacket keeps my head above the water, well more or less out of the water!

 

 Well the situation isn’t much better. Impossible to pull myself from under the boat.  A hope comes to me, even though the boat is mainly moving laterally, it still has some forward movement. I feel the tension in the harness, so I decide to attach my 2nd leash to the lifeline against which I am, while releasing the other one, this should push me to the back of the boat and hopefully release me from under the side of the hull.  This works more or less as I thought because after considerable effort I manage to reach the stern. Then fatigue hits me and I stop moving. I  lose hope for an instant, but realize that within arms reach of my left hand is backstay cleat. I pop it, it hoping that it will ease the main and flatten the boat somewhat.  In the following second, I feel the boat right itself, I even stay hooked on the lifeline and am almost lifted out of the water. But I immediately crash back in.

 

 

I realize that when I blew the backstay, the mast fell. Big moment of despair, I almost forget that I am in the water with 4-5 meter waves, exhausted, and starting to feel the cold.
 

I am now at the back of the boat, and try to get back in the cockpit using the sort of step built into the stern, but I cant get my foot on it, its moving too much and I am too tired. Finally I decide to try and enter the boat using escape hatch on the stern.  I open it and pull out the liferaft with much difficulty.  Once its out, I have to remove my life jacket to get through the hatch, because inflated it is too big.  But impossible to unbuckle it under tension. In hindsight I did have a knife within arms reach that I could have used to cut it off, but I didn’t think of it at the time…   cold and exhausted, I start to capitulate and resign myself to the hope that someone passes close to me soon.


A few minutes go by and I realize that the boat is listing and low in the water, the escape hatch isn’t closed. At the same moment I see that the starboard side is under water, so I slide over it and into the cockpit. I turn on my emergency beacons, and tell myself that it would be good to free the rig to protect the rest of the boat.  Barely through the first stay, I am almost tossed overboard again. So I wisely crawly back into the cockpit and don’t move. At the same moment I see the top of a mini sail about 50 m away heading straight at me.  He furls his gennaker  and I see it s Tanguy le Turquais  who was in the lead pack of the series boats,, he slows down and passes close to me. I learned later that when he saw the look in my eyes he quickly called in a rescue by VHF and stayed at my side so they could find me in the waves.

 

Ten minutes later they arrive, and despite the conditions put out a tender to come get me. It is night and I am happy to see them and feel the heat upon boarding the PSP Cormoran !
 

So a huge thank you to Tanguy, to Commander Lore of the PSP Cormoran and the rest of her crew! I spent the next few days in their company as we followed the rest of the minis. They were very attentive and preoocupied with the safety of the fleet, as to be as available as possible within the capacity of their ship.

 

I am now on my way to La Rochelle. Our boat waits for me in the yard Loctudy were I will meet wensday morning with the experts….


What next? We will see!
 

The lessons? The drysuit kept the cold out. The harness kept me attached to the boat. The lifevest kept my head out of the water. The rescue came when the situation was dire. If only one of these was missing, or faulty, I am not sure I would be writing these lines.
 



#134 Mel

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 09:14 AM

Seeing those photos of Kat's boat is so disappointing. She fought so hard to be there.

#135 BalticBandit

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 10:02 AM

some minor correctionss

here is my translation of Arthur's words. I really hope this makes the front page as it is a great yet sobering tale of how quickly it can all go wrong alone at sea. I am sure this will not stop Arthur and his dreams of sailing the ocean! Follow him here: https://www.facebook...hurleopoldleger

 

apologize for any typos!

 

 

Tueday the 29th of October. 5:45 am Douarnenez. Its still dark out. I open the latest weather report. The system we have been watching for several days that will let us take the start of the Mini Transat is finally here. However the window seems even smaller then predicted, to round the Cap Finisterre before the heavy weather we will need to give everything from the start. I hope the series boats will make it around in time as well…. Maybe they wont and will get hammered, or will Denis delay the start again? Back to bed? Don’t think about it, its time to send it!
 

 

7.30 am Dawn,  its blowing, the first boats leave the harbor. 709 and me are blocked in the end and are the last to leave. These last moments are long, I am surrounded by my family which is nice, I see other competitors that are here alone, their families unable to come, or are waiting in Lanzarote…

 

Saying Farwell to my loved ones is an emotional moment, not much is said, not much is needed. We have all waited for this moment with lots of impatience. So much work, so much time, so much help, I think of those who couldn’t be here, thank you, what we have achieved is huge, even though our boat is small!

 

 

8.30, I leave the dock, and the shelter of the harbor, and we are quickly in the thick of it, a steady 20 knts, swells, and occasional squalls, the start is going to be intense!

 

9 am , the start is off. I am at the extreme right end of the line, I  start a little late because I don’t want to be over early, or involved in a collision, and most importantly I want to have room to tack as soon as I am over. Everything goes well and I am alone in taking the right hand option, giving me an added safety margin against collision.
 

After a few minutes, I take and head towards the middle of the course, seems to be going well….even very well because I seem to be in the lead with the 2nd place boat crossing about 100 m behind me! A big squall with rain and a important gust arrives will we tack our way towards the mouth of the bay, behind me is now Gwenole and his boat, Logways, his sail selection seems  better suited to the building breeze, and he starts making gains on me, but we are still a ways ahead of the rest of the fleet.

 

It is about noon and we have covered 2/3rds of the bay, Gwenole and me are in touchclose, the wind drops a bit however and I extend. It is now time I tack and lay the point of Raz. Gwenole and the next closest group continue on the right side. I find myself alone on layline to the Raz de Sien, positive for the moment, I even ask myself why they continueare going  so far. They finally tack, and I am still happy with my position, they seem to have sailed much farther then needed. The minutes pass, and now they look very fast, their progress onagainst the horizon is impressive. I understand now that they found a different breeze which allowed them to ease their sails a bit and accelerate. I have a good lead but is it enough to get me out of the bay in first place? Well no, just before I reach the Raz de Sien, Gwenole and another boat passes me, and the rest are right behind me. Still not bad!

 

Ahead of us the Atlantic opens up, , direction Lanzarote
 


 

As soon as I am clear of the Raz, I hoist the gennaker, and we start to fly, about 12knts sustained! Our group of front runners start to spread out, some stay high while others turn down and to the south, I chose the middle option. For the moment, the focus is on boatspeed. Its blowing about 20,  and an important significant sea state wth 5 m swells. A new squall is approaching, and I finally have to douse the gennak but continue to go as fast as possible.
 

We are now in the middle of the afternoon, the squall is passed, but seasickness starts to set in, I force myself to vomit quickly but difficultlyit is difficult as I haven’t eating anything all day, but so I just take a pill and redeploy the gennak. I lost some ground, while dealing with my nausea, and my closest rivals continue their attacks, so the gennak is out and we are off.
 

The sea is strong and the sky filled with big cumulus, behind us rainbows appear and disappear, nothing short of magical. The only downside is the firehosing on deck, not 30 seconds go by without a wave exploding in our face.

 

Dusk approaches, with 2 reefs in the main, one in the solent and the gennaker up. The wind weakens a bit. I heisitate to shake out a reef in the main so I finally decide to shake out the solent.
 

Before going forward, I ease slightly the main to slow the boat a little, I clip into the rooftop safety line, and unclip from the cockpit floor. I crawl on to the foredeck and loose the reef in the solent, and start my return across the boat. At this moment, my back is to the wind and I have a hand on the lifeline, I feel the boat suddenly take off a wave top and I feel myself go up and over my hand holding the lifeline, I fall past it and that force of the boat movement and my weight make me let go.  I land pretty much head first into the water, and feel my harness go taunt while my life vest inflates. A fraction of a second later I am on my back being towed by the boat still underway. Quickly I reach for the autopilot remote to put the boat head to wind. Shit, its stuck under the life vest. I struggle a long moment with the waves that smack my back, and regularly slam into the windward daggerboard with my shoulder. The leading edge is painful and I start to lose strength and hope. Everytime I get my hand under the jacket a wave rips it out… after about 5 minutes of effort, I manage to grab it, and finally I am saved. I push the button and don’t let go., the boat is supposed to go head to wind( atleast I think) .  Instead it tacks violently. I fell myself trapped under the boat. The sails all backwind, and I am now behind the stays. The boat is heeled over because the keel is canted to leeward and the whole stack below is to leeward.

 

The boat is drifting quickly which traps my legs under the boat, I feel the lifelines cut into my stomach,  the harness is still holding me forward,  the life jacket keeps my head above the water, well more or less out of the water!

 

 Well the situation isn’t much better. Impossible to pull myself from under the boat.  A hope comes to me, even though the boat is mainly moving laterally, it still has some forward movement. I feel the tension in the harness, so I decide to attach my 2nd leash to the lifeline against which I am, while releasing the other one, this should push me to the back of the boat and hopefully release me from under the side of the hull.  This works more or less as I thought because after considerable effort I manage to reach the stern. Then fatigue hits me and I stop moving. I  lose hope for an instant, but realize that within arms reach of my left hand is backstay cleat. I pop it, it hoping that it will ease the main and flatten the boat somewhat.  In the following second, I feel the boat right itself, I even stay hooked on the lifeline and am almost lifted out of the water. But I immediately crash back in.

 

 

I realize that when I blew the backstay, the mast fell. Big moment of despair, I almost forget that I am in the water with 4-5 meter waves, exhausted, and starting to feel the cold.
 

I am now at the back of the boat, and try to get back in the cockpit using the sort of step built into the stern, but I cant get my foot on it, its moving too much and I am too tired. Finally I decide to try and enter the boat using escape hatch on the stern.  I open it and pull out the liferaft with much difficulty.  Once its out, I have to remove my life jacket to get through the hatch, because inflated it is too big.  But impossible to unbuckle it under tension. In hindsight I did have a knife within arms reach that I could have used to cut it off, but I didn’t think of it at the time…   cold and exhausted, I start to capitulate and resign myself to the hope that someone passes close to me soon.


A few minutes go by and I realize that the boat is listing and low in the water, the escape hatch isn’t closed. At the same moment I see that the starboard side is under water, so I slide over it and into the cockpit. I turn on my emergency beacons, and tell myself that it would be good to free the rig to protect the rest of the boat.  Barely through the first stay, I am almost tossed overboard again. So I wisely crawly back into the cockpit and don’t move. At the same moment I see the top of a mini sail about 50 m away heading straight at me.  He furls his gennaker  and I see it s Tanguy le Turquais  who was in the lead pack of the series boats,, he slows down and passes close to me. I learned later that when he saw the look in my eyes he quickly called in a rescue by VHF and stayed at my side so they could find me in the waves.

 

Ten minutes later they arrive, and despite the conditions put out a tender to come get me. It is night and I am happy to see them and feel the heat upon boarding the PSP Cormoran !
 

So a huge thank you to Tanguy, to Commander Lore of the PSP Cormoran and the rest of her crew! I spent the next few days in their company as we followed the rest of the minis. They were very attentive and preoocupied with the safety of the fleet, as to be as available as possible within the capacity of their ship.

 

I am now on my way to La Rochelle. Our boat waits for me in the yard Loctudy were I will meet wensday morning with the experts….


What next? We will see!
 

The lessons? The drysuit kept the cold out. The harness kept me attached to the boat. The lifevest kept my head out of the water. The rescue came when the situation was dire. If only one of these was missing, or faulty, I am not sure I would be writing these lines.
 



#136 r.finn

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 03:17 PM

How was that necessary BB? Your corectionss.

Thanks for the translation bitbrace.

By "not seaworthy", do you think they meant "able to go to see" because Katrina's boat has been turned into a bag of popcorn?

Both stories are alarming, and I'm very glad to hear everyone survived.

#137 BalticBandit

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 05:56 PM

Practicing my own french translation Ryan. 

 

I like the "not SEEworthy"   in a gallows humour kind of way.   My heart really toes out to her since it was initially just a gooseneck failure as I understand it.



#138 r.finn

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:46 AM

Well then!

From Te Daily Sail:

"30 days have now elapsed between the theoretical start date of the Mini Transat from Douarnenez and the race has still yet to get further than Northern Spain.

The new start date from Sada, close to La Coruna, is 12 November for what will be the longest leg ever sailed in the history of the Mini Transat.

With the majority of skippers having had to deliver their boats from Gijon in heinous conditions, with huge seas and winds gusting up to 40 knots - many competitors admitting that it was the first time they faced such difficult conditions.

Sofie de Clercq on Ville de Marseillan reported: "During my delivery, I had an autopilot problem. To get some rest I decided to heave to several times. But at no time did I think to stop. In any case, I'm really glad I did that. The scenery was really beautiful and I discovered something that I never would have known otherwise. In Minis, 35 knots is acceptable, but 40 knots, it's just too ... "

Hugues Chollet on Soutenez le Bel Espoir added: "I never thought I'd be able to do what I did. When we left Gijon, we were not making headway, we couldn't make decent progress. Like many others, I stopped at Moras. At this time, I was at the bottom of a hole, really depressed. With some other competitors we found ourselves on one of the accompanying support boats where they gave us a good meal. The next day, morale had returned, it was almost beautiful. We knew there would be wind, but I told myself, this is a challenge, you have to go. We took a good bashing, but we made it. Looking back, I am proud to have managed it. "

#139 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 01:06 AM

here is my translation of Arthur's words. I really hope this makes the front page as it is a great yet sobering tale of how quickly it can all go wrong alone at sea. I am sure this will not stop Arthur and his dreams of sailing the ocean! Follow him here: https://www.facebook...hurleopoldleger

 

apologize for any typos!

 

 

Tueday the 29th of October. 5:45 am Douarnenez. Its still dark out. I open the latest weather report. The system we have been watching for several days that will let us take the start of the Mini Transat is finally here. However the window seems even smaller then predicted, to round the Cap Finisterre before the heavy weather we will need to give everything from the start. I hope the series boats will make it around in time as well…. Maybe they wont and will get hammered, or will Denis delay the start again? Back to bed? Don’t think about it, its time to send it!
 

 

7.30 am Dawn,  its blowing, the first boats leave the harbor. 709 and me are blocked in the end and are the last to leave. These last moments are long, I am surrounded by my family which is nice, I see other competitors that are here alone, their families unable to come, or are waiting in Lanzarote…

 

Saying Farwell to my loved ones is an emotional moment, not much is said, not much is needed. We have all waited for this moment with lots of impatience. So much work, so much time, so much help, I think of those who couldn’t be here, thank you, what we have achieved is huge, even though our boat is small!

 

 

8.30, I leave the dock, and the shelter of the harbor, and we are quickly in the thick of it, a steady 20 knts, swells, and occasional squalls, the start is going to be intense!

 

9 am , the start is off. I am at the extreme right end of the line, I  start a little late because I don’t want to be over early, or involved in a collision, and most importantly I want to have room to tack as soon as I am over. Everything goes well and I am alone in taking the right hand option, giving me an added safety margin against collision.
 

After a few minutes, I take and head towards the middle of the course, seems to be going well….even very well because I seem to be in the lead with the 2nd place boat crossing about 100 m behind me! A big squall with rain and a important gust arrives will we tack our way towards the mouth of the bay, behind me is now Gwenole and his boat, Logways, his sail selection seems  better suited to the building breeze, and he starts making gains on me, but we are still a ways ahead of the rest of the fleet.

 

It is about noon and we have covered 2/3rds of the bay, Gwenole and me are in touch, the wind drops a bit however and I extend. It is now time I tack and lay the point of Raz. Gwenole and the next closest group continue on the right side. I find myself alone on layline to the Raz de Sien, positive for the moment, I even ask myself why they continue so far. They finally tack, and I am still happy with my position, they seem to have sailed much farther then needed. The minutes pass, and now they look very fast, their progress on the horizon is impressive. I understand now that they found a different breeze which allowed them to ease their sails a bit and accelerate. I have a good lead but is it enough to get me out of the bay in first place? Well no, just before I reach the Raz de Sien, Gwenole and another boat pass me, and the rest are right behind me. Still not bad!

 

Ahead of us the Atlantic opens up, , direction Lanzarote
 


 

As soon as I am clear of the Raz, I hoist the gennaker, and we start to fly, about 12knts sustained! Our group of front runners start to spread out, some stay high while others turn down and to the south, I chose the middle option. For the moment, the focus is on boatspeed. Its blowing about 20,  and an important sea state wth 5 m swells. A new squall is approaching, and I finally have to douse the gennak but continue to go as fast as possible.
 

We are now in the middle of the afternoon, the squall is passed, but seasickness starts to set in, I force myself to vomit quickly but difficultly, I haven’t eating anything all day, but I just take a pill and redeploy the gennak. I lost some ground, while dealing with my nausea, and my closest rivals continue their attacks, so the gennak is out and we are off.
 

The sea is strong and the sky filled with big cumulus, behind us rainbows appear and disappear, nothing short of magical. The only downside is the firehosing on deck, not 30 seconds go by without a wave exploding in our face.

 

Dusk approaches, with 2 reefs in the main, one in the solent and the gennaker up. The wind weakens a bit. I heisitate to shake out a reef in the main so I finally decide to shake out the solent.
 

Before going forward, I ease slightly the main to slow the boat a little, I clip into the rooftop safety line, and unclip from the cockpit floor. I crawl on to the foredeck and loose the reef in the solent, and start my return across the boat. At this moment, my back is to the wind and I have a hand on the lifeline, I feel the boat suddenly take off a wave top and I feel myself go up and over my hand holding the lifeline, I fall past it and that force of the boat movement and my weight make me let go.  I land pretty much head first into the water, and feel my harness go taunt while my life vest inflates. A fraction of a second later I am on my back being towed by the boat still underway. Quickly I reach for the autopilot remote to put the boat head to wind. Shit, its stuck under the life vest. I struggle a long moment with the waves that smack my back, and regularly slam into the windward daggerboard with my shoulder. The leading edge is painful and I start to lose strength and hope. Everytime I get my hand under the jacket a wave rips it out… after about 5 minutes of effort, I manage to grab it, and finally I am saved. I push the button and don’t let go., the boat is supposed to go head to wind( atleast I think) .  Instead it tacks violently. I fell myself trapped under the boat. The sails all backwind, and I am now behind the stays. The boat is heeled over because the keel is canted to leeward and the whole stack below is to leeward.

 

The boat drifting quickly which traps my legs under the boat, I feel the lifelines cut into my stomach,  the harness is still holding me forward,  the life jacket keeps my head above the water, well more or less out of the water!

 

 Well the situation isn’t much better. Impossible to pull myself from under the boat.  A hope comes to me, even though the boat is mainly moving laterally, it still has some forward movement. I feel the tension in the harness, so I decide to attach my 2nd leash to the lifeline against which I am, while releasing the other one, this should push me to the back of the boat and hopefully release me from under the side of the hull.  This works more or less as I thought because after considerable effort I manage to reach the stern. Then fatigue hits me and I stop moving. I  lose hope for an instant, but realize that within arms reach of my left hand is backstay cleat. I pop it, it hoping that it will ease the main and flatten the boat somewhat.  In the following second, I feel the boat right itself, I even stay hooked on the lifeline and am almost lifted out of the water. But I immediately crash back in.

 

 

I realize that when I blew the backstay, the mast fell. Big moment of despair, I almost forget that I am in the water with 4-5 meter waves, exhausted, and starting to feel the cold.
 

I am now at the back of the boat, and try to get back in the cockpit using the sort of step built into the stern, but I cant get my foot on it, its moving too much and I am too tired. Finally I decide to try and enter the boat using escape hatch on the stern.  I open it and pull out the liferaft with much difficulty.  Once its out, I have to remove my life jacket to get through the hatch, because inflated it is too big.  But impossible to unbuckle it under tension. In hindsight I did have a knife within arms reach that I could have used to cut it off, but I didn’t think of it at the time…   cold and exhausted, I start to capitulate and resign myself to the hope that someone passes close to me soon.


A few minutes go by and I realize that the boat is listing and low in the water, the escape hatch isn’t closed. At the same moment I see that the starboard side is under water, so I slide over it and into the cockpit. I turn on my emergency beacons, and tell myself that it would be good to free the rig to protect the rest of the boat.  Barely through the first stay, I am almost tossed overboard again. So I wisely crawly back into the cockpit and don’t move. At the same moment I see the top of a mini sail about 50 m away heading straight at me.  He furls his gennaker  and I see it s Tanguy le Turquais  who was in the lead pack of the series boats,, he slows down and passes close to me. I learned later that when he saw the look in my eyes he quickly called in a rescue by VHF and stayed at my side so they could find me in the waves.

 

Ten minutes later they arrive, and despite the conditions put out a tender to come get me. It is night and I am happy to see them and feel the heat upon boarding the PSP Cormoran !
 

So a huge thank you to Tanguy, to Commander Lore of the PSP Cormoran and the rest of her crew! I spent the next few days in their company as we followed the rest of the minis. They were very attentive and preoocupied with the safety of the fleet, as to be as available as possible within the capacity of their ship.

 

I am now on my way to La Rochelle. Our boat waits for me in the yard Loctudy were I will meet wensday morning with the experts….


What next? We will see!
 

The lessons? The drysuit kept the cold out. The harness kept me attached to the boat. The lifevest kept my head out of the water. The rescue came when the situation was dire. If only one of these was missing, or faulty, I am not sure I would be writing these lines.
 

Link to pics of Arthur please?



#140 Icedtea

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 09:58 AM

Jesus that is fucking terrifying.



#141 LeoV

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 11:18 AM

I only wonder why after he did got the liferaft out, he did not use it. It is supposed to be tethered to the boat so that on removal it will inflate.

I know they need a bit of force on the rope to open though. Probably wind and sea state did hamper him to use the raft. But armchair sailors always wonder, its not a critic.

Glad he survived...



#142 Icedtea

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 12:25 PM

I only wonder why after he did got the liferaft out, he did not use it. It is supposed to be tethered to the boat so that on removal it will inflate.

I know they need a bit of force on the rope to open though. Probably wind and sea state did hamper him to use the raft. But armchair sailors always wonder, its not a critic.

Glad he survived...

I guess the liferaft would have been as difficult to climb into as the boat really.

 

Amazing story though



#143 Joan Pons Semelis

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 05:40 PM

Start delayed to tomorrow morning.

It seems that Thomas will not have to slalom thru 70 minis with Sodebo :)



#144 Panoramix

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 06:57 PM

They shoud be off tomorrow.

 

With so much downwind, I am wondering if one of the old finot-Conq could surprise everybody.



#145 prime8

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 07:00 PM

I guess the liferaft would have been as difficult to climb into as the boat really.

 

Amazing story though

 

Is some kind of fold-down stern ladder out of the question on a mini?



#146 r.finn

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 07:06 PM

Apparently they didn't want the boats sailing in conditions which may see gusts to 40 knots.  Considering that many of the boats had to be delivered from Gijon in conditions with gusts over 40 knots, because they were trying to keep the sailors out of those conditions during the race, I , eh, fft...

 

Whatever... Do whatever.   I'll watch this one too.



#147 BalticBandit

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 07:31 PM

As I understood the Meteo, the real issue was the fog after the storm.  that part of the coast is notorious for fishing boats with no AIS and they didn't want to loose 70 boats off into the fog



#148 Joan Pons Semelis

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 12:34 AM

All adds up: the fog, the ship lanes, the non-AIS fishing boats, the 40+ knots gusts, a racing fleet of 70 boats ...  



#149 Sailbydate

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 04:16 AM

All adds up: the fog, the ship lanes, the non-AIS fishing boats, the 40+ knots gusts, a racing fleet of 70 boats ...  

Sounds like the North Atlantic.

 

So what's new (apart from a 70 boat fleet)?

 

Get the bloody race underway again already.



#150 BalticBandit

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 07:02 AM

One hour to the start!

 

http://www.minitrans...-mercredi-matin



#151 BalticBandit

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 08:11 AM

And THEY'RE OFF  here's the meteo http://www.minitrans...fr_20131112.pdf



#152 Presuming Ed

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 06:49 PM



#153 r.finn

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 08:09 PM

Is anybody here badass enough to overlay the minis with the class 40 fleet?

#154 Roleur

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 08:48 PM

Aren't all of the Class 40's clear ahead of the Mini's, except 11th Hour? 



#155 r.finn

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Posted 13 November 2013 - 09:03 PM

For the most part,yes

#156 Sailbydate

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 12:52 AM

Prysmian (747) on the charge again. It ain't pretty but it is certainly fast.



#157 BalticBandit

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 08:52 AM

First night

 

C’est comme ci cette nuit avait voulu faire payer le plaisir d’un départ de rêve. Si le passage du cap Finisterre s’est passé sans trop de soucis, c’est plus au sud que la flotte a rencontré des conditions difficiles, avec comme conséquence de la casse sur plusieurs bateaux.

Quatre concurrents se sont réfugiés à Baiona, à l’entrée de la ria de Vigo, victimes d’avaries plus ou moins graves. Sébastien Picault (Kickers) victime d’une avarie de barre, Yann le Pautremat (PrépaNautic Echo mer pour la planète), qui a besoin de réparer après un gros vrac, Maxime salle (Bongo) pour des problèmes de barre, et Richard Hewson (RG650.com) en délicatesse avec sa quille.

Trois concurrents ont signalé aux bateaux accompagnateurs des avaries de safran : Erwan Pellen (Mordilou), François Guiffant (Scidiam) et Clément Bouyssou (No War).

Enfin Ian Lipinski (Pas de Futur sans Numérique) a démâté. Il a pu prévenir la direction de course par l’intermédiaire d’Eric Cochet (Abers &Co) qui a fait le relais auprès d’un bateau accompagnateur.

 

So here goes my less than stellar french in translation

Its as if the previous difficulties wanted to make amends with a dream start.  So while passage of Cape Finisterre took place with few worries, futher south the fleet has encountered difficult conditions with adverse consequences to several boats
 

Four competitors have taken refuge in Baiona, at the entrance of the River de Vigo, victims of more or less serious damage. Sébastien Picault (Kickers) damaged tiller , Yann Pautremat (Prepanautic Echo sea for the planet), who needs to repairs to his aft bulkhead, Maxime room (Bongo) tiller problems, and Richard Hewson (RG650.com) problems with his keel.
Three competitors have reported  rudder damage to their vessels: Erwan Pandian (Mordilou), François Guiffant (Scidiam) and Clément Bouyssou (No War).

Finally Ian Lipinski (Pas de Futur sans Numérique) has dismasted.  Eric Cochet (Abers & Co) is standing by as a relay for the escort boat


#158 torpenboat

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 01:22 PM

Epic!

http://www.dailymoti...s-de-sada_sport



#159 torpenboat

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 01:27 PM

All their stats : http://www.minitrans...es-statistiques



#160 Big Show

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 01:50 PM

Epic!

http://www.dailymoti...s-de-sada_sport

+1 Great vid plus everything is better to The xx.

 

Looks like the scow kept high with 667 and off they go on the fleet.

 

How'd they do that? Separation on stbd gybe from the fleet who were mostly on port gybe? 



#161 prime8

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 03:23 PM

There's nothing like following the mini transat to teach you how to say "dismasted" in French...



#162 r.finn

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 04:13 PM

Prysmian (747) on the charge again. It ain't pretty but it is certainly fast.

 

 

Fast is pretty though, and it's definitely that.  Besides she looks good from behind, which is the only view she is willing to show the fleet.



#163 LeoV

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 04:19 PM

And I thought Raison was a nice guy, so ugly, but that designer proved again his ability to design out of the box minis.
Think first offshore chined hull

Hope 747 wins again, then Raison is a hero in mini designer land.

No Farr, Johnstone Rogers Mills etc but Raison :) With Magnan a super designer.

 

And keep Fermin in your favourite list too, own design, self build, self sailed. the best combination.



#164 r.finn

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 04:29 PM

+1.  A very nice guy, brilliant designer and excellent sailor.  The current pilot of 747 is doing a good job of it too.



#165 TheFlash

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 05:00 PM

Pulling for 747 here. I don't find it ugly at all.



#166 Big Show

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 05:45 PM

Go the scow!



#167 Lost in Translation

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 05:52 PM

Me too. The scow is very cool. Was it hard to get the very appropriate 747 number? Not many more well suited.

#168 Sailbydate

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 06:50 PM

Prysmian (747) on the charge again. It ain't pretty but it is certainly fast.

 

 

Fast is pretty though, and it's definitely that.  Besides she looks good from behind, which is the only view she is willing to show the fleet.

Ha, ha. How true...on both counts.  :)



#169 Panoramix

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:16 PM

26 miles ahead in just 36 hours. That's nearly 10% extra speed.

 

It looks like that if you are into winning the mini-transat, you need to either buy or build a scow!

 

There are some light air ahead and it will be interesting to see what happens.

 

I also wonder if the scow bow could be applied succesfully to a class40 or an IMOCA or if it is just a border case due to 6.50 being very small boats with a very tall rig.



#170 Presuming Ed

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:23 PM

Not legal in Class 40  http://www.class40.c...ssrules2013.pdf

 

215 – BOW VOLUME
The maximum width 200 mm aft of the forwardmost point used to determine Lh shall not exceed 450 mm. Viewed from above, there can be no inverted curve in the sheer.
 
And on it's way to being illegal in IMOCA? 
 
B.3.3 Limitation de la section avant de la coque (article à finaliser)
Article à compléter
 
 


#171 Sailbydate

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:25 PM

26 miles ahead in just 36 hours. That's nearly 10% extra speed.

 

It looks like that if you are into winning the mini-transat, you need to either buy or build a scow!

 

There are some light air ahead and it will be interesting to see what happens.

 

I also wonder if the scow bow could be applied succesfully to a class40 or an IMOCA or if it is just a border case due to 6.50 being very small boats with a very tall rig.

Think I read somewhere that the Class40 rule had outlawed scow bows. Suggests owners/rule makers know they'd be too blisteringly fast, for the conventional fleet. Wouldn't at all be surprised if IMOCA60 rule excluded them as well.

 

See PE's post above.


Edited by Sailbydate, 14 November 2013 - 09:27 PM.


#172 r.finn

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Posted 14 November 2013 - 09:45 PM

<p>I think Imoca has a max righting moment rule which could effect the power benefit of the scow hull, however it might allow a skinnier hull to reach that RM #, allowing less material in the hull and therefor a lighter boat for the same power. Certainly some designer has explored it since 747's last win. I'd love to see something come of it. I would also like to see how the D S S mini does. (I wrote it like that so dum-dumb doesn't ruin this thread. ) Anyway, there is still a lot of race left no matter how fast one boat is.</p>

#173 Tanton Yacht Design

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 12:25 AM

I also wonder if the scow bow could be applied succesfully to a class40 or an IMOCA or if it is just a border case due to 6.50 being very small boats with a very tall rig.
[/quote]

Yes,change to the Class 40 is implemented. My rendering shows to what limits the bow can be modified. I believe it would work very well.
Attached File  282scowpic3.jpg   25.02K   94 downloads

#174 ctutmark

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:58 AM

The new Botin class 40 (Tales/123) is not small in the front, neither is the Ker (Concise) or the Mach 40s (Mare, and GDF-Suez).

 

Here are some pics of Tales:

Attached File  S2610001_620.jpg   258.07K   42 downloads

Attached File  S2610006_800.jpg   343.61K   55 downloads

Attached File  S2610003_800.jpg   418.31K   42 downloads

 



#175 Panoramix

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 09:07 AM

<p>I think Imoca has a max righting moment rule which could effect the power benefit of the scow hull, however it might allow a skinnier hull to reach that RM #, allowing less material in the hull and therefor a lighter boat for the same power. Certainly some designer has explored it since 747's last win. I'd love to see something come of it. I would also like to see how the D S S mini does. (I wrote it like that so dum-dumb doesn't ruin this thread. ) Anyway, there is still a lot of race left no matter how fast one boat is.</p>

If I understand it well the scow bow intent is to increase the longitudinal stability thus I don't think that it has much of an effect on righting moments.

 

Thank for your answers, so basically other classes are scared of seeing scows becoming the norm!



#176 BalticBandit

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 09:23 AM

it increases immersed volume when the boat heels, thus increasing RM



#177 Icedtea

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 09:31 AM

it increases immersed volume when the boat heels, thus increasing RM

And by extension the boat can carry more sail higher in the wind range- along with the benefit of being easier to control. Basically, it's just fuckin' fast.

 

I don't agree that it's ugly, I think it's beautiful in a functional kinda way



#178 mrming

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 01:10 PM

The scow is now in the lead by 42nm. There can be no arguments, the design is faster.

 

Justine Mettraux is also kicking some ass - now up to second in the series class.



#179 Tanton Yacht Design

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 01:39 PM

it increases immersed volume when the boat heels, thus increasing RM

As can be seen in my rendering of the fish view of a "normal" Mini versus 747 at 20 deg. of heel.
Attached File  250HY20PV-NR26-11.jpg   22.66K   28 downloads

#180 Bob Perry

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 02:52 PM

Yve-Maries rendering also shows it's increasing the Cp as it heels which increases the S/L. Scows have always worked this way. Sticking a pointy bow in does nothing for Cp. The more breeze you have, the more you heel, the more Cp you have the faster you go. I think that's how it works. Maybe Yves-Marie can double check my logic.

 

Think of what Beneteau could do with that bow volume in their mom and pop cruising boats. It makes me shudder.



#181 TheFlash

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:09 PM

double v-berths?



#182 Roleur

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:12 PM

Bob, would you design a scow bow cruiser for a client if they wanted one? 

 

* This makes me laugh just thinking about it...



#183 Icedtea

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:20 PM

Someone has already done it in France- In fact I think it was Raison himself, basically designed a cruising version of his scow.



#184 Panoramix

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:28 PM

it increases immersed volume when the boat heels, thus increasing RM

Isn't immersed volume just dependant on displacement? At least in displacement mode.



#185 Bob Perry

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:36 PM

Rols;

Youi bet your ass I would. They don't call us "Spreadwider Yacht Designs" for nothing.

But once you added all the performance compromises you inevitably add  on a cruising boat the small advantage of that bow would have dissapeared and there you would fit looking fat and stupid.

But it would be fun to try.



#186 r.finn

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 03:41 PM

It moves the center of boyancy further outboard (think catamaran) hence more RM.  There are certainly other benefits, but that's the RM one. 

 

They better not outlaw this kind of volume in the series boat.  Someone needs to put some cash into testing it out in series.

it increases immersed volume when the boat heels, thus increasing RM

Isn't immersed volume just dependant on displacement? At least in displacement mode.



#187 LeoV

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 04:07 PM

Damn, a few protos drifting along with the skipper saved, 562 and 800.



#188 Stanuel

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 06:16 PM

What I'm trying to understand, is why no one has built another scow since the last event? Given it was so dominate...

 

Also if you want to see the king of lake scows, check out A - scows...38 ft and 1800 lbs. We race them on days when the other boats aren't racing for safety reasons...so fast  we have 5 minute downwind legs. 



#189 r.finn

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 06:36 PM

Who cares if it's faster!?!  It doesn't meet my preconcieved notion of what "right" looks like.  That's a good enough reason, right?



#190 BalticBandit

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 06:57 PM

What I'm trying to understand, is why no one has built another scow since the last event? Given it was so dominate...

 

Also if you want to see the king of lake scows, check out A - scows...38 ft and 1800 lbs. We race them on days when the other boats aren't racing for safety reasons...so fast  we have 5 minute downwind legs. 

Well it wasn't clear it was "so dominant" - yes it won.  But there were parts of the race other hulls were going faster, and in general Raison sailed a strategically brilliant race. 



#191 TheFlash

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 06:58 PM

It's not the first time, won't be the last.

 

Question is, with the class outlaw it?



#192 r.finn

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:08 PM

Is this going to be an "Oracle was slower than TNZ" thing?  :)

 

Raison led a bit through the doldrums, but once in the reaching conditions south of the equator he extended 20 to 30 miles a day and won by the largest margin Ive ever seen.  That was just boat speed.  He did a brilliant job holding the fleet off up to that point though, true. 

 

I want to see how it plays out after they go through the gate.

 

 

What I'm trying to understand, is why no one has built another scow since the last event? Given it was so dominate...

 

Also if you want to see the king of lake scows, check out A - scows...38 ft and 1800 lbs. We race them on days when the other boats aren't racing for safety reasons...so fast  we have 5 minute downwind legs. 

Well it wasn't clear it was "so dominant" - yes it won.  But there were parts of the race other hulls were going faster, and in general Raison sailed a strategically brilliant race. 



#193 Sailbydate

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:12 PM

It's not the first time, won't be the last.

 

Question is, with the class outlaw it?

If it makes all other minis obsolete - YES.

 

When was the last time you saw an International Moth competitive without foils?



#194 r.finn

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:17 PM

Seems crazy to outlaw something that has a speed advantage, no moving parts, and requires nothing more from a technology standpoint.  To me you can't green light canting keels and forbid wide bows.  It's stupid. 



#195 Sailbydate

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:29 PM

Is this going to be an "Oracle was slower than TNZ" thing?  :)

 

Raison led a bit through the doldrums, but once in the reaching conditions south of the equator he extended 20 to 30 miles a day and won by the largest margin Ive ever seen.  That was just boat speed.  He did a brilliant job holding the fleet off up to that point though, true. 

 

I want to see how it plays out after they go through the gate.

 

 

 

What I'm trying to understand, is why no one has built another scow since the last event? Given it was so dominate...

 

Also if you want to see the king of lake scows, check out A - scows...38 ft and 1800 lbs. We race them on days when the other boats aren't racing for safety reasons...so fast  we have 5 minute downwind legs. 

Well it wasn't clear it was "so dominant" - yes it won.  But there were parts of the race other hulls were going faster, and in general Raison sailed a strategically brilliant race. 

Sadly, OTUSA wasn't slower than ETNZ. Quite the reverse. But that's another story.



#196 Sailbydate

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 07:31 PM

Seems crazy to outlaw something that has a speed advantage, no moving parts, and requires nothing more from a technology standpoint.  To me you can't green light canting keels and forbid wide bows.  It's stupid. 

Yet likely. 



#197 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 08:31 PM

It's not the first time, won't be the last.

 

Question is, with the class outlaw it?

If it makes all other minis obsolete - YES.

 

When was the last time you saw an International Moth competitive without foils?

And they let them in, and the Class is at its healthiest ever.  Amazing!

 

I dig the scow look. Finally the Midwest can claim it has a major effect on ocean sailing.



Damn, a few protos drifting along with the skipper saved, 562 and 800.

Huh?



#198 BalticBandit

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 10:05 PM

does it make for a safer and seakindlier boat?



#199 frede

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 10:07 PM

What I'm trying to understand, is why no one has built another scow since the last event? Given it was so dominate...

 

I believe that only one new proto has been built since the last race (850, the Lombard proto), maybe two if you count the Wellbourne proto.  So, the prototypes are quite stagnant now at least as concerns new constructions and almost all the growth is in series boats.

 

Frede



#200 ctutmark

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Posted 16 November 2013 - 12:30 AM

Clean,

 

800 broke a keel bearing, skipper on a fishing boat headed to Portugal.

 

562 hit a tree/log, skipper on one of the escort boats






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