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The Coming ObamaCare Train Wreck

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#2201 Raz'r

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 10:06 PM

It's simple. Dems like Obamacare.  Working class Republicans like it, as long as it's called something else.



#2202 A_guy_in_the_Chesapeake

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 10:18 PM

It's simple. Dems like Obamacare.  Working class Republicans like it, as long as it's called something else.

 

I'd hazard a guess that the only people who liike it do so because A) They're getting something for free or B) They like the idea that the people getting something for free are going to equate to votes for the Democratic party. 

 

I'm neither, and I think it's an expensive debacle, the true cost of which will amaze and dismay us all. 



It's simple. Dems like Obamacare.  Working class Republicans like it, as long as it's called something else.

 

I'd hazard a guess that the only people who liike it do so because A) They're getting something for free or B) They like the idea that the people getting something for free are going to equate to votes for the Democratic party. 

 

I'm neither, and I think it's an expensive debacle, the true cost of which will amaze and dismay us all. 



#2203 Folding prop

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 10:28 PM

It's simple. Dems like Obamacare.  Working class Republicans like it, as long as it's called something else.

You forgot to add illegal aliens and felons. Oh and unions... unions love Kenyancare....well they got a waiver because they loved it so much. 



#2204 Raz'r

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Posted 25 September 2014 - 10:39 PM

It's simple. Dems like Obamacare.  Working class Republicans like it, as long as it's called something else.

 

I'd hazard a guess that the only people who liike it do so because A) They're getting something for free or B) They like the idea that the people getting something for free are going to equate to votes for the Democratic party. 

 

I'm neither, and I think it's an expensive debacle, the true cost of which will amaze and dismay us all. 



>It's simple. Dems like Obamacare.  Working class Republicans like it, as long as it's called something else.

 

I'd hazard a guess that the only people who liike it do so because A) They're getting something for free or B) They like the idea that the people getting something for free are going to equate to votes for the Democratic party. 

 

I'm neither, and I think it's an expensive debacle, the true cost of which will amaze and dismay us all. 

 

I like the portability afforded by the law. It has given me flexibility I didn't have before. I don't believe it will add or reduce overall cost as there's nothing in the law that addresses cost.  As long as the nation continues to spend about 20% of GDP on healthcare, any cost movements are just a balloon squeeze. It's very possible that costs/person will go down as overall spend stays flat, but more people are in the system.



#2205 Saorsa

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 12:37 PM

If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor.

 

The state's largest health insurers are sticking with their often-criticized narrow networks of doctors, and in some cases they are cutting the number of physicians even more, according to a Times analysis of company data. And the state's insurance exchange, Covered California, still has no comprehensive directory to help consumers match doctors with health plans.

 

...

 

Some consumers have been saddled with huge medical bills after insurers refused to pay for care deemed out of network. These complaints have sparked a state investigation and consumer lawsuits against two big insurers.

 

...

 

Covered California endorses the industry's narrow network strategy as a way to keep premiums affordable. The state has credited it for helping produce two straight years of lower-than-expected premiums for individual coverage. Rates for 2015 are expected to increase 4.2%, on average.



#2206 White Cracker

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Posted 29 September 2014 - 06:50 PM


If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor.
 


The state's largest health insurers are sticking with their often-criticized narrow networks of doctors, and in some cases they are cutting the number of physicians even more, according to a Times analysis of company data. And the state's insurance exchange, Covered California, still has no comprehensive directory to help consumers match doctors with health plans.
 
...
 
Some consumers have been saddled with huge medical bills after insurers refused to pay for care deemed out of network. These complaints have sparked a state investigation and consumer lawsuits against two big insurers.
 
...
 
Covered California endorses the industry's narrow network strategy as a way to keep premiums affordable. The state has credited it for helping produce two straight years of lower-than-expected premiums for individual coverage. Rates for 2015 are expected to increase 4.2%, on average.

Those were doctors who worked for "lousy, bait and switch" insurers anyway.
We should be happy we can't go back to our doctor.

#2207 Regatta Dog

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:35 AM

District cuts hours amid health insurance cost concerns

 

TWIN FALLS -- The Twin Falls School District says the Affordable Care Act is causing them to make tough decisions when it comes to some of their employees' hours.

 

The school board made the decision this spring to reduce paraprofessional hours from 30 a week down to 27.5 hours a week.

 

It affected 150 employees throughout the district, including positions like janitors, substitute teachers, and food service workers.

 

Previously, they were part-time employees receiving part-time benefits, at 30 hours a week.

 

Now, they are still part-time employees receiving part-time benefits, but working a half hour less each day.

 

The school board made the decision because under the Affordable Care Act, if an employee works 30 hours a week, they must be be offered full-time benefits.

 

The district estimated that would cost about $7,000 per employee, totaling more than $1 million. (link)



#2208 Regatta Dog

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 02:24 PM

This could be a game changer --

 

U.S. Judge Blocks Obamacare Rule for Non-Exchange States

 

An Oklahoma federal judge dealt a blow to President Barack Obama’s health-care law, invalidating IRS rules aimed at making policies affordable for consumers around the country.

 

U.S. District Judge Ronald White in Muskogee ruled today that subsidies, in the form of tax credits, apply only to consumers in the 14 states that have set up insurance marketplaces and not to individuals who buy insurance on the federal marketplace, as in Oklahoma. An Internal Revenue Service rule says needy customers in both the federal and state marketplaces are eligible for subsidies. (link)



#2209 Saorsa

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Posted 03 October 2014 - 05:19 PM

This could be a game changer --

 

U.S. Judge Blocks Obamacare Rule for Non-Exchange States

 

An Oklahoma federal judge dealt a blow to President Barack Obama’s health-care law, invalidating IRS rules aimed at making policies affordable for consumers around the country.

 

U.S. District Judge Ronald White in Muskogee ruled today that subsidies, in the form of tax credits, apply only to consumers in the 14 states that have set up insurance marketplaces and not to individuals who buy insurance on the federal marketplace, as in Oklahoma. An Internal Revenue Service rule says needy customers in both the federal and state marketplaces are eligible for subsidies. (link)

 

Isn't there some equal protection clause somewhere?







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