Jump to content


Epoxy Compatibility with Blue PVC


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,790 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 20 October 2013 - 06:56 PM

I am crafting some cradles for a small cat out of blue sewer PVC. I had some doubts but roughed the surfaces up and added some glass cloth...did not "take." Well, it did, but I can peel it off easily, if I pry up and edge...guess it is not a good idea or I messed up by not roughing surface sufficiently.

 

Any thooughts?



#2 Gouvernail

Gouvernail

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,782 posts
  • Location:Austin Texas
  • Interests:margaritas, hippie chicks, durable flying discs for retriever dog play

Posted 20 October 2013 - 07:56 PM

When I do decide to make structures with plastic pipe and fiberglass joints....
I assume the fiberglass is nothing more than a home made elbow, coupling or whatever.

I assume the fiberglass will keep its shape but slide fight off the ends of any pipes

So I screw or through bolt any fiberglass 'sockets' to the pipes

#3 Mr. Fixit's brother,, Mr. Fixit

Mr. Fixit's brother,, Mr. Fixit

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,101 posts
  • Location:Slidell, LA

Posted 20 October 2013 - 07:57 PM

Seriously use the PVC Cement.  It's permanent.



#4 Jim Conlin

Jim Conlin

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 536 posts
  • Location:Wellesley, MA
  • Interests:Function and elegance

Posted 20 October 2013 - 09:03 PM

Use the PVC cement for joining PVC fittings.

Epoxy does not bond nearly as well.  Roughing the PVC and using G/Flex will help, but it's still not a strong bond.



#5 sailSAK

sailSAK

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,596 posts
  • Location:Seward

Posted 20 October 2013 - 09:15 PM

Sand it with 40 grit.  If you really want it to hold it needs to be mechanical. You can use a slip barb fitting, cut some shallow notches into the pipe near the end with a dremel or lathe. Had a crack in a 8" PVC pipe at 100psi.  Couldn't get to it for a real repair so glassed it up real tight.  Held just fine and was pretty much deemed permanent.  Lot of fiberglass to PVC connections used in aquaculture for 15psi or less.  They can be made to work.



#6 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,790 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 21 October 2013 - 11:14 AM

I should have offered more detail.

 

The sewer PVC being used for cradles (2, to support catamaran hull, instead of rollers) will be physically anchored to the trailer, I just wanted to add glass to make stronger and give foam cover a base as well as give flat-head fasteners more area to hold.

 

Am avoiding installing long bunks...

 

I tried but found the glass, after the epoxy cured, is easily removed if an edge is pulled. I did rough up in attempt to create physical bond using course sandpaper...appreciate the advice. May try the G-Flex...small patch and see.



#7 jaybird1111

jaybird1111

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 242 posts

Posted 21 October 2013 - 01:34 PM

G/Flex does bond PVC.

 

See article about flexible furler repair here, scroll down:

http://www.epoxywork...m/31/index.html

 

Follow the directions, including the heat treatment



#8 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,790 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 21 October 2013 - 02:32 PM

Jaybird, Thanks, I rec that pub...will look for that item/link...on the site...here is link... http://www.westsyste...h-g-flex-epoxy/

 

Will give it a shot later today. Very kewl...thanks.



#9 bruno

bruno

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,977 posts

Posted 21 October 2013 - 06:19 PM

Bonds it but not as high strength as other bonds.

#10 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,790 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 21 October 2013 - 06:35 PM

Bonds it but not as high strength as other bonds.

 

Thanks Bruno. can you be specific? What could offer a stonger bond for glass than epoxy? Not trying to be argumentative.



#11 Jim Conlin

Jim Conlin

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 536 posts
  • Location:Wellesley, MA
  • Interests:Function and elegance

Posted 22 October 2013 - 02:21 AM

The bond between the PVC and the epoxy is not nearly as strong as the glass-epoxy bond.



#12 bruno

bruno

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,977 posts

Posted 22 October 2013 - 03:38 AM

Correct

#13 knobblyoldjimbo

knobblyoldjimbo

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,532 posts
  • Location:effinque (FNQ) AUS

Posted 22 October 2013 - 10:02 PM

Sikaflex to glue pads to the plastic.  What you don't get on your hands should hold it.



#14 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,790 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 23 October 2013 - 09:55 AM

Thanks Knobblyoldjimbo. My intent is to strengthen the PVC with a glass layer, much like a tab or deck layer, so the PVC section does not crack as easily with hull shift or say a rock kicked up by tire...I guess, as long as it is not critical, heat, epoxy, glass might be the ticket, noted by Jaybird, Bruno and the folks at Epoxyworks. Temps low here now, and I burned the surface of one section and will bond when temp gets above 50.



#15 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,790 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 27 October 2013 - 09:49 AM

Just to finish this thread off...I took the above and Epoxyworks advice and torched the stuff a bit, then hit it with some 40 grit and a file, slopped some slow cure epoxy on it and lit a heat lamp...seems to have taken and if not, will not be life or boat threatening, so am leaving well enough alone. In short, PVC and epoxy not the best marriage.



#16 sam_crocker

sam_crocker

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,109 posts
  • Location:PNW

Posted 31 October 2013 - 04:54 AM

I've used the pvc cement to prime the pipe surface.  Wipe on, let sit, wipe off excess, then glass it.  Bonds pretty well.  I think the cement breaks some of the pvc molecular bonds and allows the epoxy to make a chemical bond with some of the 'broken' molecules.  Worked better than 40 grit mechanical bond which always seemed to eventually fail under stress cycling.



#17 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,790 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 31 October 2013 - 07:43 AM

Sam, That's a plan...Will give it a shot with one...thanks.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users