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J24 PHRF tips


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#1 WINDIGO

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 12:27 PM

Hi all,
new to this forum, and also a new J24 (hull 3325) owner. First off let me say I have complete respect for the OD class and the history/integrity of the 24 class.
I live in an area with an active Wed night race series but not an active J24 fleet (currently only J24 at our club). I have no desire to trailer 10-20hrs to attend OD events where active fleets exist. I use to crew on a 24 for a few years and love the boat, hence the reason I upgraded from my Tanzer 22.
Question(s) to the group are for maximizing the J24 for PHRF club racing.
I've read a lot about adding forestay length, different sail plan other than the genoa, crew weight (I'll likely only be sailing 3, maybe 4 on windier days), station length, Spin halyard location plus size/type of spin, adding a full batten to the main and many other things.

- I will be getting new sails for the boat
- plan on a carbon spin pole
- I sail inland lakes with a 10-15 knot summer breeze
- keel has been moved forward and faired
- has new rudder
- new deck layout

I'm in the process of having my deck professionally redone to freshin' it up. Everything resealed, adding cushions back in and re-painting/wiring my mast. I want to be fast as possible, but still enjoy the occasional overnighter on it to which the boat was originally designed.

Please chime in if you have a positive suggestion for PHRF enhancement  :)



 



#2 WINDIGO

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 01:22 PM

sorry for the multiple posts. It was showing me it wasn't posting. If the admin can remove the others that would be great!



#3 Bill's Sock Puppet

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 01:39 PM

The J24 is a fun boat to sail as-is.  I'd sail it a bit, and get a feeling for what the boat can do first, it's different when you are the one on the tiller.  

 

Don't go crazy with mods right off the bat.  Remember, in the PHRF comm's opinion, any changes you do will make the boat go faster.  I remember a guy in NJ who put a bulb on a J24, he got a rating hit and proceeded to sail slower to boot.

 

Is the J24 class carbon pole still the same weight as the aluminum pole?



#4 WINDIGO

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 03:25 PM

I'm only interested in mods that won't affect PHRF ,but make the boat easier to sail, like a smaller head sail (less wear & tear) that would compliment a lighter crew weight. Something in a 130 range? Adding the lower life line to get bodies out, adding more rake in the mast to point higher etc.

Not interested in a bulb :)

#5 BalticBandit

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 03:50 PM

I would suggest not messing with the stock J24 much for PHRF.  the rating is based on the class boat and its a fair - though challenging rating (since many who sail PHRF also sail OD and thus are much better than the avg PHRFer)

 

if you have light winds you might consider getting a Daisy/Windseeker  And installing a lifting boom vang/kicker is nice for that as well. 

 

but frankly unless you are doing some very long races in areas that have current (in which case a GPS based device like RockBox would be nice)  there isn't much I would do for PHRF that I haven't done for OD.   I used to do both - using the early season PHRF races as a tune up for the summer OD series.  And we won Whidbey Island Race Week in a stock J24 under PHRF.



#6 Turd Sandwich

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 06:49 PM

Anything you do to that boat that is not class legal and you no longer qualify for the OD rating. Unless you get the boat re rated someone could protest you and you will get chucked. Sail it like it is



#7 Schnick

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:24 PM

J24 is a good phrf boat in stock form.  In my region at least, I think you could build a better mainsail (longer battens, slightly more roach, higher boom) with no penalty and I would consider a more all-purpose spinnaker even if it gave up a bit of area.  But that wouldn't make the boat a whole lot faster, just maybe easier to sail fast.

 

You could probably also get carried away and move the spin halyard half way to the top of the mast, but not necessary.



#8 Ned

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 07:55 PM

24's are so highly evolved relative to the average PH boat that most of what you do involves showing up with a boat in OD tune and prep and she'll find trophies for you.  Put the mast in the proper place, use last years OD sails unless it's an important race, sail with max weight, have lots of fun with the crew swapping out driving etc.  

 

Make sure you comply with the safety regs etc.  And remember to have fun.  It's not all about the trophies.  



#9 Great Red Shark

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:18 PM

Something to remember is that the rating is likely based on the boat being OD compliant - God Forbid you win something and the boat isn't class legal, because they every hack with a gripe to pick can/will try to mess with you, and not without cause - because if you aren't class legal then perhaps there SHOULD be an assessment ( oversized kite, penalty pole, carbon rudder ) - and, it's not like the boat is going to go planning off in a ball of spray if you remove the bow pulpit, afterall.

We recently got protested by a 'competitor' (and I use that term loosely) because we had "modified the hull" of a Moore 24 that I crewed on, to a race win. The boat had the open-transom mod done to it - which, luckily for us, is not only Class legal - but it's expressly approved on Page One of the class measurement documents.

#10 BalticBandit

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:35 PM

J24 is a good phrf boat in stock form.  In my region at least, I think you could build a better mainsail (longer battens, slightly more roach, higher boom) with no penalty and I would consider a more all-purpose spinnaker even if it gave up a bit of area.  But that wouldn't make the boat a whole lot faster, just maybe easier to sail fast.

 

You could probably also get carried away and move the spin halyard half way to the top of the mast, but not necessary.

No you cannot add more roach without taking a rating hit.  in fact if you sail go for rerating the sail area, odds are you will get hit with a penalty because of the way J24 mains are cut the Mid Girth Upper measurement ends up being like 1" over the boundary of a "normal" sail -but as an OD they let you get away with iit.

 

Put an Full batten on and theoretically you will need to get remeasured and odds are you will take a 3 second a mile hit 

 

But there are mods you an do that are not "class legal" that PHRF won't ding you for.  Examples would be a lighter kite and a daisy/seeker.     But no way can you play the games you are looking to do with a full batten and smaller headsails and keep the same rating.  You will need to get re-rated and odds are it won't pay.



#11 usa 917

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:40 PM

I agree leave the boat in OD mode.

#12 WINDIGO

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 09:28 PM

I had read in this forum about someone using a 5-6" extension on the fore-stay which helps upwind pointing. Anyone thoughts on that?

Again, not interested in OD racing at all as the nearest J24 fleet is 8hrs away, only club PHRF racing.

Thx for the tips so far!
 



#13 Ned

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 01:25 AM

Set her up in full optimized OD mode.  Max class legal forestay.  Use the same tuning numbers from your sail pusher and keep after the tensions.  That way the highly developed sail designs will be set properly.  You will go very fast relative to the rating and can crush the fleet using get this, used sails.  And this will happen repeatedly as long as you set up and sail by the numbers.  

 

So rather than fiddling with sail mods that take you out of OD configuration, review the important stuff:

 

Keel on straight and in the correct place (don't laugh, it's a J). Also, symmetrical and faired is nice (don't laugh it's a J). 

 

Mast at max shortness and forestay at max length. Confirmed by class measurer or at least use their same method.  See if the mark is on the front of your mast where it is supposed to be.

 

Rudder on straight, symmetrical, faired (see keel notes).

 

Rig set up per tuning guide. 

 

Crew at max weight but not over, be careful of this one in PHRF because it can make you vulnerable to out of OD spec protests. 

 

Cold beer in cooler, no bottles.  

 

Beer holders installed on traveller bar. 

 

Windward sheeting setup. 

 

Everything works perfect.  

 

Crew practice and all the basic maneuvers are working well.  

 

 

Get a decent start and hang on the proper side of the course and you will finish in the trinkets consistently.  Guaranteed. 



#14 stinger

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 03:45 AM

The OD setup is more than good enough to bring home trophies in PHRF ratings.  Don't mess with the forestay.  Get newer sails, learn how to sail downwind  with the boat.



#15 BalticBandit

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 07:51 AM

I had read in this forum about someone using a 5-6" extension on the fore-stay which helps upwind pointing. Anyone thoughts on that?

Again, not interested in OD racing at all as the nearest J24 fleet is 8hrs away, only club PHRF racing.

Thx for the tips so far!
 

Well it would in 12 knots and under.  The problem J24s have is that the keel is in the wrong place: too far aft by about 1".  So in under 12 knots you start to get lee helm from the genoa, which progressively gets worse as the air gets lighter.

 

one way to deal with this is to sail  with a little bit of heel - but the keel is so stubby that you loose height that way.  So  you  rake the rig aft as much a possible and learn to drive with lee helm    Once we sorted this out, it would be common for my tactician to turn back  in say 6-8 knots of breeze and ask me "how does she feel"  to which I would answer "feels like shit but fast"..

 

Now you COULD add 5"-6" more rake to the forestay.  But now

  1. All your sail tuning guides are useless
  2. you need to have new sails designed because the OD sails are designed for a shorter Forestay and will not sit properly
  3. none of the trimming guides you read on J-24s work
  4. you will have to have your sails remeasured by PHRF

#2 is particularly important because you are going from a set of sails that because of the fleet size, competitiveness and longevity, has tens of thousands of design hours behind them, to a set of sails that will have a handful of design hours behind them.

 

Furthermore there are reams and reams of text written about how to trim your OD sails and change gears and drive through waves and when to change down and what rig tune to use and why.

 

and NONE of that will apply.

 

 

So stay with the stock sails and stock forestay.    Learn to drive it.  Its a fast boat if sailed right.  Even in our first season, when we struggled to not be DFL in a 30 boat OD fleet, we were in the top 3 in PHRF and in one race were 2nd overall out of 150+ boats.



#16 sail611

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 12:46 PM

I did PHRF with our 24 for a bunch of years, and will second the advice the given about OD configuration.  Keep it.  The boat has been refined since the late 70's and the current thinking and practices of the class, especially the national and world champions, makes the boat go very well.  If you are sailing short handed and thus a little lite on crew weight, switch from the genoa to the jib a bit early, say 15 kts.  Set the rig up for 12 kts to get a bit more power in those conditions.  The boat will sail great.  You won't be as fast as the OD guys that carry a genoa in 20kts, but you will be as fast or faster than most PHRF boats (when on corrected for rating). 

 

If I were you, I would keep the boat in OD configuration, then learn how to sail it.  The 24 rewards a crew that is will to work her.  Don't set and forget the spin pole downwind.  Play the guy constantly to keep the kite drawing.  Learn to cross sheet the genoa (if you don't already) so that you can play the genny in the gusts.  Ease off a few inches, bear away 3-5 degrees, and go fast.  Once the puff is off, sheet in, head up and point, while going fast.  Again, learn to really SAIL the boat.  The boat is great, but to get the most of it, you have to stay on top of it and work it.



#17 PATSYQPATSY

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 01:42 PM

Don't bother with a carbon spin pole.  It will make zero difference as the aluminum pole weighs next to nothing.  The weight is all in the end fittings.  If foredeck can not easily handle the stock pole, you have a crew issue.  Plow that money into new sails.



#18 USA4182

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 02:17 PM

Do be careful how much you mess with the boat.  Many of the ideas above, hiking on lowers, raking mast, changing sails, etc will result in a rating hit.

The problem is the hit will more than likely be greater than the performance increase.  Any changes should be reviewed with your local committee before implementation.

 

Bottom line, the boat can and will sail to its rating, the rating is neither generous, nor restrictive, but it does require proper preparation and sailing.

OD J24's sailing in PHRF win when sailed well, not because of the rating, unless your at my club.  At my club, the best sailors(by far), all sail J24's and everyone complains that they win all the time, what they can not come to grips with is that its not the boat, or the rating, its that the 24 sailors are way better and also its that they SUCK.  But its always easier to blame the rating and the boat than come to grips with one's own lack of talent.

 

P



#19 BalticBandit

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 02:34 PM

Actually hiking on lowers will not hit the rating, that, and carrying more than the 400kg crew weight are two things ou can and should change.

 

At my club, the best sailors(by far), all sail J24's and everyone complains that they win all the time, what they can not come to grips with is that its not the boat, or the rating, its that the 24 sailors are way better and also its that they SUCK.  But its always easier to blame the rating and the boat than come to grips with one's own lack of talent.

 

My response has always been - ok lets race for pink slips - but lets switch boats.  you sail my J24 and I'll sail your Islander 30.  And whoever wins, gets to keep the boat...

 

Never had a taker.



#20 WINDIGO

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 03:34 PM

Great advice all thx. I see a wealth of information available online with sail tuning etc for OD, so not going to change much there other than a fresh set of sails. Have a lightweight aluminum pole already, just like carbon - comes from my windsurfing background.
I'm still very much a beginner driver when it comes to a boat (since 5 yrs now) but have competitively course raced windsurfing for 20 yrs to understand wind shifts, lay lines, sail shape, starts etc. very comfortable when it blows hard too. May be a different story on the 24 though!

Thank you all for the honest feedback! Looking forward to get out and sail this spring.

#21 Turd Sandwich

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 04:01 PM

Actually hiking on lowers will not hit the rating, that, and carrying more than the 400kg crew weight are two things ou can and should change.

 

 

At my club, the best sailors(by far), all sail J24's and everyone complains that they win all the time, what they can not come to grips with is that its not the boat, or the rating, its that the 24 sailors are way better and also its that they SUCK.  But its always easier to blame the rating and the boat than come to grips with one's own lack of talent.

 

My response has always been - ok lets race for pink slips - but lets switch boats.  you sail my J24 and I'll sail your Islander 30.  And whoever wins, gets to keep the boat...

 

Never had a taker.

Adding lower lifelines and the boat is no longer OD period. As far as crew weight goes most phrf boards go by number of people on a length range.



#22 sail611

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 04:21 PM

24 in a breeze aren't too bad.  Flatten the sails a bit, go to the jib around 15kts instead of 18-20kts, and play the traveler/mainsheet/jib sheet in the gusts to sail the boat as flat as you can.  24's do not sail fast when heeled.  It is better to bear off and sail more distance in a puff, but keep her upright, than head up and heel excessively.  

 

As noted, getting performance out of the 24 requires you to work the boat.  The more you work the boat, and know how to work the boat, the better you become at boat handling, and then you become a better sailor.  Then you make the other PHRF guys cry by winning, because you are better than them.

 

I always hated the "rating" argument, so I try to race OD when possible.  At least then its mostly the sailor.  Though I know for a fact if your mast is too far back and your forestay too tight, you will be slow.

 

CG



#23 White Wing

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 04:25 PM

Two suggestions:  1st: Leave the dock with the rig tuned right for the conditions.  J/24s are SLOW when you are rigged tight in light winds or tuned light for higher winds. This means upper and lower shroud tension primarily, but also includes mast butt location (partners should be as far aft as the rule allows).  Nail those and you have the platform ready to sail as fast as possible.

 

2nd: Since you state that you are a relatively new helmsman, I suggest that you invest in making your helming job easier so that you can focus on driving.  If your boat doesn't have a fixed mainsheet swivel and a Harken windward sheeting traveler car (stock J/24s came with the lower mainsheet fiddle block on the traveler car - no centerline fixed swivel/block) that's the first thing I'd do.....let's you adjust traveler and mainsheet without having to look into the cockpit to adjust.

Next, make sure your backstay controls are at your fingertips (on edge of the cockpit) - backstay is super important in maxing J/24 boat speed.  Pretty much any of the J/24 resources online will give you excellent diagrams and deck layouts.  You'll make big perf gains if you can keep your concentration on driving....the J/24 doesn't have a lot of feel and will wander (go slow) if you don't focus.

 

After doing those, invest in excellent ratchet block setup on your genoa tracks - your cockpit crew will be able to tack and get to the weather rail faster without putting the sheet onto a winch.  Some trimmers love the "Lopez block" setup for genoa sheets (has a cam cleat w/block) - not everyone.  A straight Harken Hexaratchet is an excellent choice.

 

Tacking faster and keeping your focus on driving and keeping the boat flat will do waaaay more for winning silver than tinkering with carbon pole, extra roach main, blah blah blah.  The boat is very competitive in PHRF if you just sail the OD config well.

 

WWing 



#24 WINDIGO

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 05:34 PM

Two suggestions:  1st: Leave the dock with the rig tuned right for the conditions.  J/24s are SLOW when you are rigged tight in light winds or tuned light for higher winds. This means upper and lower shroud tension primarily, but also includes mast butt location (partners should be as far aft as the rule allows).  Nail those and you have the platform ready to sail as fast as possible.
 
2nd: Since you state that you are a relatively new helmsman, I suggest that you invest in making your helming job easier so that you can focus on driving.  If your boat doesn't have a fixed mainsheet swivel and a Harken windward sheeting traveler car (stock J/24s came with the lower mainsheet fiddle block on the traveler car - no centerline fixed swivel/block) that's the first thing I'd do.....let's you adjust traveler and mainsheet without having to look into the cockpit to adjust.
Next, make sure your backstay controls are at your fingertips (on edge of the cockpit) - backstay is super important in maxing J/24 boat speed.  Pretty much any of the J/24 resources online will give you excellent diagrams and deck layouts.  You'll make big perf gains if you can keep your concentration on driving....the J/24 doesn't have a lot of feel and will wander (go slow) if you don't focus.
 
After doing those, invest in excellent ratchet block setup on your genoa tracks - your cockpit crew will be able to tack and get to the weather rail faster without putting the sheet onto a winch.  Some trimmers love the "Lopez block" setup for genoa sheets (has a cam cleat w/block) - not everyone.  A straight Harken Hexaratchet is an excellent choice.
 
Tacking faster and keeping your focus on driving and keeping the boat flat will do waaaay more for winning silver than tinkering with carbon pole, extra roach main, blah blah blah.  The boat is very competitive in PHRF if you just sail the OD config well.
 
WWing 


Have all the goodies mentioned above with regards to traveller plus ratcheting blocks for the jib and spin. One of the previous owners also did the new deck layout for winch locations and cleats. All Halyards are done from the mast as well, so I do look forward to just drive as opposed to driving and flying the spin as I did on my Tanzer 22. Was fun, but a handful on the windy days!

Clear consensus here on leaving the forestry length alone as to utilize all the tuning information available. So check!

Good tips on keeping the boat flat as well, my Tanzer liked a bit of heel so it will be a bit of a mental adjustment there.

Thank you all for the great tips!!

#25 BalticBandit

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 10:13 PM

Go out and practice- and  for driving practice you don't need a full crew, just a trimmer.

 

1) particularly if it is under 12 knots... start with the jib 6' off the spreaders (you should have a 6" and 2" tape mark on the spreaders - that's what the upper window in the main is for to sight the spreaders offset)  and close your eyes and learn to 'stay in the groove'.

 

2) once you can stay in the groove for a full minute with your eyes closed, bring the jib in to 4".. then 2" then 1".      It will take quite some time before you can "stay in the groove at 2" off the spreaders in under 10 knots of breeze, but when you can, you will be faster and higher than most boats in your class

 

3) downwind, over square the pole by 5-10 degrees by dropping it 4"-6" lower than you think it should be - and your trimmer should only cleat the guy if it is over 15 or the AWA is beam on or closer



#26 Bash24

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 08:02 PM

I agree with the others that say keep the boat in One Design trim.  It will do two things for you:

 

1) It will give you rating insurance if you start doing really well as the J24 PHRF rating is pretty much set in stone in most regions.

2) You will be able to take advantage of all the tuning and sail trim info that is readily available.

 

Now, if you really want to do well, put the boat on the trailer and hit some One Design regattas.  It will probably be a humbling experience at first, but the lessons that you are forced to learn in a hurry in a OD fleet will make you very strong on the PHRF racecourse.

 

Good luck !



#27 BalticBandit

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Posted 27 October 2013 - 07:52 PM

If you get a chance to sail OD..

 

a) get a good start.  if you fail - sail to a clear air lane - don't try to tack your way out, you won't succeed

 

B)  once in a clear air lane - focus on getting your boat speed to equal the boats next to you THEN and ONLY THEN try starting to point as high as they do. 

 

step by step



#28 Gouvernail

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 01:04 AM

You could add a decent Margarita machine and change over to wheel steering

#29 WINDIGO

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 03:28 AM

Ummm, Gouvernail: for all the 20 thousand plus post you've made, it would have been nice to have one with some real information...
Just so you know (again). I have no interest in OD as I live 10-20hrs from the nearest 24 fleet. I am an active racer in our local club (current Commodore as well). Have been to many World Championships for windsurfing - yes, I am a fierce competitor!!! If it was OD I was interested in I would be asking all sorts of OD design questions wouldn't I?
I appreciate all of the SOUND advice I have been given so far from the generous forum users that are willing to share (the welcomed) J24 knowledge to a new J24 owner in myself. I completely respect the OD class and wish I lived closer to mix it up with everyone, cause I WOULD!!
In windsurfing years ago when I was 'getting better', I was the first to ask questions from the top guys about their tactics on the course, checking out their gear etc, etc. Not one would have ever said "go take up skateboarding" (or like you said, "go buy a Hobie"... really?)
If you just troll this forum to give useless posts, well, I can see why you're at the 20+K post mark now. So a big congrats to you!! Looks like you're in first place somewhere...

 



#30 Mr. Fixit's brother,, Mr. Fixit

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Posted 28 October 2013 - 04:59 PM

Correct me if I'm wrong but PHRF allows shroud adjustment while racing right?  If so this is one item you can do on a OD J24 to really boost performance while racing.  You might want to then consider a turnbuckle/tool setup like the M24 class has so you can wind the rig up and down with the breeze.



#31 USA4182

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 01:39 PM

You might want to check the PHRF regs as not all of them allow shroud adjustment.

Also, hiking off lower life lines would probably be a no no since the class rules do not allow it.

 

Set it up in class config and go sail, practice is the one thing that will help more than anything else and its also the cheapest.

Learn to tune the rig properly, trim the sails properly, and drive the boat properly.

When all of that comes easy then consider mods, with careful consideration of your local PHRF.

 

P



#32 sail611

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 05:09 PM

I don't know if I would consider modding a J24.  There may be a time when you want to sell the boat.  I am not sure how mods would affect the resale value.  If the potential buyer is a member of your local PHRF fleet, then maybe modding it would be worth it.  If the potential buyer were interested in OD racing, then they may not be.  I know if I were looking at a 24 and the owner told me all the mods he did to it for PHRF racing, I would ask politely that he not include them in the sale/sale price.  If he were unwilling to do so, I would look elsewhere.

 

Not trying to be a D here...just saying that modding a 24 for PHRF may not be the best use of resources.  Like for the cost of 135 headsail for a J24, you could hire a coach for a day and have someone that really knows how to sail the boat get you up to speed.  Money spent that way will give you more speed for the dollar than any practical mod to a J24 (though, it would be cool to put a carbon rig, sprit and masthead assy kite on a 24...completely silly and frivolous, but most likely fun).



#33 Mr. Fixit's brother,, Mr. Fixit

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 02:42 PM

If any of your PHRF racing includes point to point or distance races you'll want to consider setting up barber-haul padeyes for genoa and jib.  The early One Design Championships had distance races and all the former champions (Ploch, Scott etc) modified their decks for this.



#34 Gouvernail

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 05:08 PM

Serious J-24 PHRF tips??

Get a thousand pound team together

Ride wakes of faster boats whenever possible. If you hook onto a J-29 wake you gain a minute a mike as long as you hang there

Screw over the less manouver able boats before the start. Just be certain you still get a great start

If there are boats that rate similarly to yours, force them into no exit poditions and cause them to do turns

Tack on everybody, relentlessly, but only if you are going to be on the lifted tack

Tack to starboard at the leeward mark and screw everybody who is taking down a spinnaker

Use the shrouds to roll tack, its a class rule not a PHRF rule.

Adjust your shrouds during the races for every change in wind velocity

Empty the boat of all extra crap and remove corrector weights . Most local J-24 PHRF ratings were assigned long before the class decided to measure all up weights

Most local PHRF do not penalize for a 170 or smaller. Get one.


Of course you COULD get a gang of friends together and spend all your non race days practicing tacks, launches , douses, gybes and speed testing with a few friends who also have J-24s
You could join a local Laser or sunfish fleet and polish your sailing skills in the five or six starts they usually have each week.


But

You are a serious racer

So you probably ought to stick to gimmicks that don't involve much personal commitment to improving your skills

#35 WINDIGO

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 12:39 PM

We do plan on getting out early in the year to practice, practice, practice! Study lots of the available youtube videos for the J24 as well.
we do race primarily in light winds. Does a 1000lb crew make sense even in the light air? I'd think lighter is faster no?
I was dinged 3 seconds for my 170 on my Tanzer 22 even though it was class legal, but the PHRF committee considered it oversize.
Thanks for the tips!
 

 



#36 bloodshot

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Posted 31 October 2013 - 01:08 PM

does Gouvernail's vagina always get this sandy?



#37 Gouvernail

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:14 AM

Only when I am fucking with crabs




But



Seriously



I was being annoying


And when he called me out

I tried to actually be helpful

Sorta



In a SA way to actually be helpful.



And


The one time I did do it on a beach


Sand did get involved


It wasn't good


So we adjourned to the water



Which was cold


And



#38 BalticBandit

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Posted 01 November 2013 - 04:25 PM

Water also is a lousy lubricant



#39 some dude

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 03:51 AM

Get a good stereo
And don't put wires in the mast. You don't need wind instruments-you only have 2 jibs to choose from.

#40 learningj24

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Posted 02 November 2013 - 11:12 AM

If any of your PHRF racing includes point to point or distance races you'll want to consider setting up barber-haul padeyes for genoa and jib.  The early One Design Championships had distance races and all the former champions (Ploch, Scott etc) modified their decks for this.

Back in the Olympic course days, we had a barber hauler on the boat for close reaches that was simply a ratchet block that clipped to the aft stanchion base.  Had a sheet and hook to go into the clew.  No modifications.  If you've run your tweakers to the rail, they would work as barber haulers with some reinforcement.

 

Don't mod the boat; optimize it for OD.  The beauty of the class is not that the boat is so great (it's not) but that there is a database of experience like almost not other class on how to fix, tune, sail, repair and crew the boat so that it goes as fast as it's going to.  By keeping it in OD trim, we can respond to your questions about how the boat feels ('cause we've all been there) and what to change to make it faster.  If you add a roachy main, for example, the change in the way the helm feel will invalidate ALL of the collective experience that could help.

 

Like Gouv's.  Having been around these boats since they've come out, he's a great source of experience, advice and support.  The input may be unvarnished but it's always solid.






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