Jump to content


All is Lost: *Spoilers / mistake list


  • Please log in to reply
123 replies to this topic

#1 dcnblues

dcnblues

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 28 October 2013 - 08:55 PM

*This thread is for those who have seen the movie. SPOILERS AHEAD*

 

I'm curious as to how many mistakes were made in the movie. I know I probably didn't catch all of them.  But I thougth it might actually be educational to find the ones I'd missed.  I'll start with the most obvious I remember, and we can take it from there.

 

By the way, I like this comment about the movie on another thread, and somewhat agree with it:

 

It's not a movie about sailing, so criticism at that level misses the point.  It's an allegory, sailing as a metaphor for life.  We travel through life solo, make good decisions, make bad decisions, have good luck, have bad luck, and die.

 

Step back and forget about sailing.

 

So I'd like this thread to be critical, but just about technical details, those which will be interesting and educational.

 

-The lack of radio equipment. Had they set the movie pre-gps, it would have been much more credible. But I'm just not sure the premise of the movie works today: If you're in the middle of an ocean and you don't have  backup radios, epirbs, gps tracking services, satellite phones, VHF handhelds, etc, you're pretty much so stupid you deserve to die. The premise of the movie doesn't work. That's a problem.

-For a singlehander, he doesn't spend much time sailing. We never see an autopilot, he doesn't have a windvane, and we don't even see him rigging the boat to heave to. The movie gives the impression that boats don't need someone steering, or watching where they're going. That's counterintuitive even, I think, to non-sailors.

-The time to go to bare poles / storm sails is BEFORE the squall line gets to you, not DURING. Again, even non-sailors would sort of get to that conclusion.

-Granted, it's been 30 years since I've cracked open my Bowditch copy, but I don't think using a sextant to shoot the sun is any use unless it's sunrise, sunset, or high noon.

-It's very unlikely he could get any kind of accurate fix. If he wasn't familiar with the sextant, he had no reason to have his watch be accurate to the second, and even if it was accurate within ten seconds, and he's got clear skies and an accurate fix, that's 1200 miles of longitude that's ambiguous. Not to mention figuring out those friggin tables so close to the dateline, having relevant tables, etc. Not many could get a fix by reading the manual for the first time.

-The contrast between conditions that would roll a boat tethered to a sea anchor, and the bathtub conditions we see when he leaves the interior are way too high.  I get that they shot it in a tank on a limited budget, but it just didn't work for me. You have to help me out with better effects.

-Again, we don't see him actually sailing.  Like tuning the lenght of the line for the sea anchor to the length of the swells, or adjusting the angle of that line to the ship. Throwing it and forgetting it would be worse than useless.

-He doesn't know how to rig a tether. If you can go overboard, you've done it wrong.

-He's singlehanding in the middle of the Indian Ocean, but doesn't know how to set off a flare? And we're supposed to feel sorry for him?

-He's got a huge sunhat, with a chinstrap, yet gets badly sunburnt. Why?

-He's got yummy small sharks in the area of his raft, line, hooks, and a knife, but isn't interested in dinner? (granted, landing one and cleaning it without damaging the raft or dealing with larger sharks would be tricky).

-He rides out a squall in his raft at night, but doesn't turn his light off to conserve battery. Ultimately, he has to set his raft on fire for lack of a light. What's wrong with this picture?

-It bugged me that he didn't clear the line to his sea anchor when he's walking it off the container. Just one of those moments any experienced sailor would watch and have his hands twitch wanting to do it right...

 

What else?



#2 MR.CLEAN

MR.CLEAN

    Anarchist

  • Reporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,659 posts
  • Location:Everywhere you want to be
  • Interests:.

Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:18 PM

it is hard to cheer for a guy who is so incompetent.  but there are plenty of folks out there who know about as much as the redford character.  with that in mind, the realism is pretty sick.  And it's the first imagery I've ever seen that captures just how big a monster container ship is when you are on a little boat.



#3 Life Buoy 15

Life Buoy 15

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,247 posts
  • Location:The great southern land

Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:31 PM

Sailing movies are the same as anything else. They are made for entertaining a mass market and for turning a dollor. Remember 'wind'
Do Americias cup syndicates really test sails by pulling a truck? I liked the bit where the US skipper brought his girlfriend on as tactician.
And what about dead calm? At one point Nicole Kidman tacked the swan 65 single handed whilst standing on the second spreader.
But you did get to see her arse. And it has a far greater range of expressions than her face.

#4 Larry

Larry

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,727 posts
  • Location:Chicago IL, U.S.A.
  • Interests:Owned Paceship Eastwind 25, then C&C 26 long ago. Love yacht racing and cruising, golf, billiards, yacht photography, one wife, two grown kids, and now am grandfather of three, Hanna and Ava, and a new grandson, Parker. : )

Posted 28 October 2013 - 09:36 PM

I've only seen a trailer, but any sailor with a radio should know the difference between using "SOS" and "Mayday."

 

If sending Morse code, I suppose it might be different.  Isn't MAYDAY used on radios all over the world?



#5 Dixie

Dixie

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,695 posts
  • Location:SF

Posted 28 October 2013 - 10:05 PM

Mistakes that bothered me: 

What's the first thing you'd do when waking up and faced with water plunging in over the nav station?

Tacking onto port when he's still not patched the hole on his starboard side.  

Leaving the cabin top open Every Single Time he went top sides no matter how hard it was raining. 

Tether on much later than seemed reasonable given the conditions, same w/ foulies.  Not to mention PFD.  

Fancy new life raft, but no radio.   

Getting onto the life raft when he could still (IMO) save his boat.  

 

However many accidents at sea happen as a result of one bad decision and / or a cascade of failures, sometimes resulting in death.  It's how you handle it that makes the story.   



#6 NoStrings

NoStrings

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 10,077 posts
  • Location:Richmond, CA

Posted 28 October 2013 - 11:31 PM

If you're single handing offshore, what exactly is the purpose of a PFD?

#7 MR.CLEAN

MR.CLEAN

    Anarchist

  • Reporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,659 posts
  • Location:Everywhere you want to be
  • Interests:.

Posted 28 October 2013 - 11:50 PM

shark bobber



#8 Life Buoy 15

Life Buoy 15

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,247 posts
  • Location:The great southern land

Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:30 AM

You get to live an hour longer.

#9 DTH

DTH

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 176 posts

Posted 29 October 2013 - 12:51 AM

Hanging net full of nice fresh fruit in the middle of the ocean .....
Leaving the companionway open every single drove me nuts too

#10 born2sail

born2sail

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,782 posts
  • Location:Pacific Northwest

Posted 29 October 2013 - 01:34 AM

Well, the list of things can be a long one.

Skipper had to fish his harness out of a settee storage compartment.
6-8-man raft packed in a 2-4 man pack and stored in the forward wet locker not near the companionway.
Skipper clipped onto the lifeline, not a jackline.
No handheld GPS or VHF.
No ER water supply.
How did he fire up his propane stove with no electrics?
How do you plot a position on a folder chart where the lat/lon references are not visible?
The repair work deserves a thread of its own.
What kind of mast climbing gear was that?
How'd he clear the broken mast without snipping the stays with a bolt cutter? (Note: shrouds were torn out of the deck on stbd).

On the plus side, I thought using the drogue on the container was a smooth move, but why not tie the boat to the container and use it as a dock while doing repairs?

#11 MaxHeadroom

MaxHeadroom

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 944 posts
  • Location:20 Minutes into the future

Posted 29 October 2013 - 01:57 AM

Both Marsek freighters were flying a US courtesy flag on starboard, yet they were suspose to be in the Indian Ocean.

#12 born2sail

born2sail

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,782 posts
  • Location:Pacific Northwest

Posted 29 October 2013 - 02:42 AM

Both Marsek freighters were flying a US courtesy flag on starboard, yet they were suspose to be in the Indian Ocean.


That's a good catch...

#13 couchsurfer

couchsurfer

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,813 posts
  • Location:NA westcoast
  • Interests:...pimping HOOTs
    ...i550 NW circuit

Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:13 PM

If you're single handing offshore, what exactly is the purpose of a PFD?

 

 

You get to live an hour longer.

 

.

....once talked to an oldtimer who was s'handing at night,,,fell off his boat,,,,watched it sail away into the night.........

...........then somehow it self-tacked and sailed right back to him......what's th'chance??** :o

 

 

 

 

 

 

.......**..yes,,th'oldsalt was rather known for his tall-tales :mellow: .



#14 Foolish

Foolish

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 892 posts

Posted 29 October 2013 - 03:58 PM

He did have a wind vane steering system, and you can seen the line around the wheel axel.   After the roll you can see the broken wing on the vane.

 

All of my criticisms are related to his ability to handle the problems.  I felt that he had never been on a boat before this trip.

 

Why did he take no immediate steps at all to plug the hole?  Even stuffing a seat cuishon into the hole would have been something, but he did absolutely nothing.  Instead he tacked onto port and put the hole back underwater.  NO sailor in the world would have done that.

 

Why did he use the hand pump for endless hours when he could have used a bucket to empty the cabin at 5X the rate.  

Later, why did he not empty the cabin at all? He just walked around in chest deep water.   Anyone would empty the cabin of water first.  He was not taking on water at the time and he could easily have saved the boat.

 

Why did he climb the mast to fix the antenna.  The radio was already fried at that point.  We did not see him attempting to use the radio again after he climbed the mast.

 

In the opening monolog he says he has only 1/2 day's ration left.   Why?  He had a long, long time in the boat before abandoning.  Why did he not take more food and cans of juice and beer.  

 

Why did he have such trouble changing to his storm jib.  This is normal sailing and has nothing to do with the hole in the side.

 

Why kind of idiot would start a fire inside a plastic container, inside his boat?   Even a child would not do such a thing. 

 

Why do they make liferafts that are flammible.  It lit up as if it was covered in oil.  I did not know that liferafts are made like this.  (and I hope mine is not).

 

Why did he give up on life so soon after jumping off the liferaft?   Considering that he wanted to get the attention of the boat, would he not realize that a big honking fire would do just what he wanted?



#15 DISHONEST ASSHOLE

DISHONEST ASSHOLE

    Anarchist

  • Banned
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 314 posts
  • Location:Quohog, RI
  • Interests:Rum and Cougars

Posted 29 October 2013 - 04:50 PM

Lighten up. It's a movie. And the guy is a Downhill Racer. Not a sailor.

If you want to see where there is a lot if bullshit in movies, go watch any Oliver Stone movie based on a real historical figure.

#16 kent_island_sailor

kent_island_sailor

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,539 posts
  • Location:Kent Island!

Posted 29 October 2013 - 05:16 PM

FYI - You can take a sun sight anytime you can see the sun and the horizon.



#17 born2sail

born2sail

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,782 posts
  • Location:Pacific Northwest

Posted 29 October 2013 - 05:49 PM

If you watch this vid. you'll see a scene where the skipper is watching his boat go down.  In that scene, there is no windvane affixed to the stern of the boat, so all the self-steering must be accomplished by tying the wheel down.  And when the skipper is at the helm, there are several instances where he is going hard over from one tack to the other.  One can only assume he's hoving to, eh?

 

http://www.sailingsc...-behind-scenes/



#18 Foolish

Foolish

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 892 posts

Posted 29 October 2013 - 05:50 PM

Lighten up. It's a movie.

I don't really agree.  This was not presented as a fantasy - It was presented as a depiction of reality.   With just a tiny bit of thought it could have been made much better.  Inattention to details makes for a bad movie, just like it makes for a bad sailing voyage :wacko:



#19 reverend mother

reverend mother

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 39 posts
  • Location:Lake Michigan

Posted 29 October 2013 - 07:32 PM

I concur with so many of these points. But one of the things that caught my eye in the first trip below was a 110v toaster on the counter under the companionway, plugged in. Loves his toast when in port? 

I have met sailors with all kinds of skill levels and foolish habits. There have been times heading to the start of a multi-day race I know I have the equipment on the required list, but haven't quite managed to get it installed or tested. The brand-new sextant was both a foolish move and a not-untypical situation.

Still, I enjoyed the movie and am glad someone took a flyer on telling a story about a situation few movie-goers will see.



#20 Dixie

Dixie

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,695 posts
  • Location:SF

Posted 29 October 2013 - 10:09 PM

If you watch this vid. you'll see a scene where the skipper is watching his boat go down.  In that scene, there is no windvane affixed to the stern of the boat, so all the self-steering must be accomplished by tying the wheel down.  And when the skipper is at the helm, there are several instances where he is going hard over from one tack to the other.  One can only assume he's hoving to, eh?
 
http://www..com/2013...-behind-scenes/



More direct link here: http://movies.yahoo....entsharebuttons

#21 Bump-n-Grind

Bump-n-Grind

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,445 posts
  • Location:Chesapeake Bay/Vail
  • Interests:Boats: J35, Chesapeake 20 ,Laser , 47' ChrisCraft Commander, Mainship 34, Volkl P10's 205's, Fischer Big Stix 185's, K2 Recons, K2 Xplorers, Rosi Phantoms, other boats and powder boards to be named later

Posted 30 October 2013 - 01:02 PM

I could live with most of the inconsistencies but the one that frosted my ass was when he had the "storm jib" out of the bag and trying to raise it, there' s all this wind and weather going on around the boat. I mean the rain is going sideways but the sails just hanging there limp. Having put up a jib or two on a deck that is swinging up and down thru a range of about 15-20 feet while the wind is trying to rip the sail to shreds, I found this offensive LOL

 

I did rather enjoy the movie. Not in the same sense that I enjoyed Dr Strangelove or Pirates of the caribbean, or even Little Big Man.

but once I disengaged my automatic critic of the sailing/seamanship thing, I could get the story. I think non-sailors could get to that point earlier.



#22 Sailing My Cubicle

Sailing My Cubicle

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,289 posts
  • Location:Boston/Downeast, ME

Posted 30 October 2013 - 01:35 PM

My biggest problem was that he was able to, with seeming relative ease, just climb back onto his boat during the middle of a storm.  Unless the boat was way heeled over, getting back aboard is not a simple task.

 

Oh, and when he was thrown overboard during the second capsize, he just happened to be able to swim back into the cockpit right before the boat righted itself.  Riiiiiighhhhhtttt



#23 CrushDigital

CrushDigital

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,855 posts
  • Location:New York, NY

Posted 30 October 2013 - 02:03 PM

My biggest problem was that he was able to, with seeming relative ease, just climb back onto his boat during the middle of a storm.  Unless the boat was way heeled over, getting back aboard is not a simple task.

 

Oh, and when he was thrown overboard during the second capsize, he just happened to be able to swim back into the cockpit right before the boat righted itself.  Riiiiiighhhhhtttt

 

I think a lot of people here are forgetting it's a movie, not some attempt to please all the pedants this site is populated with.  The producers in all likelihood don't give a damn about any of these issues because creating a compelling story trumps realism 9 times out of 10 for the most part.

 

Of course he was able to get back into the cockpit just before the boat righted itself, because if he hadn't the film would have been over at the 50 minute mark and that comes in just a bit short for a feature release.



#24 Sailing My Cubicle

Sailing My Cubicle

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,289 posts
  • Location:Boston/Downeast, ME

Posted 30 October 2013 - 02:18 PM

My biggest problem was that he was able to, with seeming relative ease, just climb back onto his boat during the middle of a storm.  Unless the boat was way heeled over, getting back aboard is not a simple task.

 

Oh, and when he was thrown overboard during the second capsize, he just happened to be able to swim back into the cockpit right before the boat righted itself.  Riiiiiighhhhhtttt

 

I think a lot of people here are forgetting it's a movie, not some attempt to please all the pedants this site is populated with.  The producers in all likelihood don't give a damn about any of these issues because creating a compelling story trumps realism 9 times out of 10 for the most part.

 

Of course he was able to get back into the cockpit just before the boat righted itself, because if he hadn't the film would have been over at the 50 minute mark and that comes in just a bit short for a feature release.

 

I agree with your points.  But if we're going to critique the movie on a sailing site, that's what irked me. 

 

Overall it's a solid film and worth the masses taking a look.



#25 BalticBandit

BalticBandit

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,728 posts

Posted 30 October 2013 - 03:22 PM

*This thread is for those who have seen the movie. SPOILERS AHEAD*

 

I'm curious as to how many mistakes were made in the movie. I know I probably didn't catch all of them.  But I thougth it might actually be educational to find the ones I'd missed.  I'll start with the most obvious I remember, and we can take it from there.

 

By the way, I like this comment about the movie on another thread, and somewhat agree with it:

 

It's not a movie about sailing, so criticism at that level misses the point.  It's an allegory, sailing as a metaphor for life.  We travel through life solo, make good decisions, make bad decisions, have good luck, have bad luck, and die.

 

Step back and forget about sailing.

 

So I'd like this thread to be critical, but just about technical details, those which will be interesting and educational.


-He doesn't know how to rig a tether. If you can go overboard, you've done it wrong.

 

What else?

Not necessarily.  a friend of mine almost drowned on a Mini 6.50 when he went in with his tether on.  its quite possible to do if you are midships of your jackline on relatively low freeboard.



#26 Oronoco

Oronoco

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 338 posts
  • Location:Sausalito CA USA

Posted 31 October 2013 - 02:44 AM

I think even non-sailors would be surprised about removing all the washboards every time he transited the companionway, not matter what the weather. Hatches can't be wide open in rough seas.

I don't know how that boat took so long to sink. But a high priority is stocking the the life raft. And any emergency water supplies should be checked for freshness in advance, especially considering the time he had.

#27 Oronoco

Oronoco

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 338 posts
  • Location:Sausalito CA USA

Posted 31 October 2013 - 11:32 PM

and another thing.... 

 

let's say you get past the part where there's no EPIRB   --maybe too expensive or something  --but why no air horn, fog horn, or other signaling device?  I have at least three on my boat and that's for day sailing.  One runs on canned air, one has a manual air pump, and one is a mouth-powered fog horn.



#28 Drop Bear.

Drop Bear.

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 553 posts
  • Location:UK
  • Interests:none.

Posted 01 November 2013 - 12:38 PM

If a film showed a person sticking a piece of broccoli in their ear and chewing everyone would know something was wrong.

Film makers judge accuracy against production costs and storytelling for the 95% of their audience.

#29 Oronoco

Oronoco

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 338 posts
  • Location:Sausalito CA USA

Posted 04 November 2013 - 06:14 PM

If a film showed a person sticking a piece of broccoli in their ear and chewing everyone would know something was wrong.

Film makers judge accuracy against production costs and storytelling for the 95% of their audience.

and there are threads like this for the other 5%

 

I liked the movie, and now I like discussing it



#30 kidkodine

kidkodine

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,113 posts
  • Location:Houston Texas
  • Interests:Water
    Sailing
    Neruo-
    pharmacology
    Nootropics
    Epsom salt
    Old BMW, and Diesel Benzez
    Wet plate photography
    Text based web sites
    crush on elle...

Posted 05 November 2013 - 03:32 PM

I saw the movie last weekend. I was let down, I guess I was all worked up to see some good sailing shots. NOT. Dead Calm had some great shots, Morning Light well, duh. Even Capt Ron had some good shots.  I can't think of really one shot in the whole film. In a way it was annoying as RR was so dull and sloth like...I know for sure I would be talking up shit if it were me. Was there a sailing consultant on the flick? If so, They should be fired. 

 

Yeah, I know it was not really a sailing movie and all the man for himself in the face of oblivion stuff. But, shit, what if Jeremiah Johnson had pythons and cheetahs in it...

 

Jeeez.



#31 silent bob

silent bob

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 4,480 posts
  • Location:New Jersey

Posted 05 November 2013 - 03:46 PM

If a film showed a person sticking a piece of broccoli in their ear and chewing everyone would know something was wrong.

Film makers judge accuracy against production costs and storytelling for the 95% of their audience.

and there are threads like this for the other 5%

 

I liked the movie, and now I like discussing it

 

 

Is Hot Rod going to watch it to learn how to sail?



#32 TACNI

TACNI

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 166 posts

Posted 05 November 2013 - 04:07 PM

Why in the world would he climb up the mast to re connect the VHF antenna when the VHF radio is on the deck not connected to the antenna cable?

#33 weinie

weinie

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Location:United States

Posted 05 November 2013 - 04:42 PM

and why would smacking into a container dislodge the connection in the first place?



#34 Atmo

Atmo

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Location:Santa Barbara
  • Interests:Making things. Dogs. Bicycles.

Posted 05 November 2013 - 05:33 PM

I wouldn't even bother, it's just a movie, but the writer and director made a Big Deal out of all the procedural stuff that was so wrong, so:

 

-"Storm's coming, I'd better shave!"

-Giant hole at the waterline, giant container he could use to heel the boat to port while applying fiberglass in slow motion,

but noooo.

I'll tack-around to recover my sea anchor, that's not going anywhere, while my boat swamps and I do nothing about it.

-Boat's stable and not yet sunk, but I'll get a good night's sleep on the life raft, tethered to the boat that I just abandoned because it's sinking, and I'll think about getting water, clothes and food off the sinking boat at a later date.

-The big-ass black-oxide industrial lifting ring bolted to the stbd. deck for moving the boat around on-set.

-After fixing the hole, constantly not-sailing despite the breeze and the need to get somewhere.

-Leaving the vent cap off his only source of water.

-Okay, maybe he had to light a fire in a plastic jerry can, but the sea was calm so, at least, float the can away from the raft!

-The tub hailed from Maine and, somehow, an incompetent doofus made it to the Indian Ocean without learning anything - 

I know, there's a rich history of incompetent doofuses at sea.

-A big one: A fully-clothed geezer can't just will himself to sink in salt water.

 

All the other things y'all already cited.



#35 SHNOOL

SHNOOL

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 187 posts
  • Location:NE PA
  • Interests:sailing.

Posted 05 November 2013 - 06:45 PM

I had such high hopes for this movie... the trailer came out and with the radio call of "SOS" and I was like, oh no, I JUST can't watch this.

Didn't anyone consult an actual sailor?  Shame, it could have been a helluva premise for a movie.



#36 dcnblues

dcnblues

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 05 November 2013 - 07:14 PM

On the plus side, I thought using the drogue on the container was a smooth move, but why not tie the boat to the container and use it as a dock while doing repairs?

 

-Giant hole at the waterline, giant container he could use to heel the boat to port while applying fiberglass in slow motion,

but noooo.

 

 

Damm, I'm hoping that would be obvious if it happened to me, but watching the movie it didn't occur to me. Now I feel as dumb as the filmmakers. Of course the container floating so high in the water was SO improbable maybe I just ignored it the way I'd ignore a swimming unicorn. Much more probable for it to be 99% submerged.

 

 

FYI - You can take a sun sight anytime you can see the sun and the horizon.

 

Really? Maybe with a computer in hand, but with the printed Sight Reduction Tables that came with the sextant? Wouldn't they be minimal? I'm actually curious about this, so do elucidate. Thanks.

 

I guess I really think you could have set the movie pre-GPS, and had a real sail consultant, a more competent character, and some real bad luck combine with bad timing, and make a much better movie. Specializing as much as this and getting so much wrong just seems lazy and dumb to me.



#37 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,573 posts

Posted 06 November 2013 - 01:02 PM

well . . . .there were some errors in the movie . . . . .but how many can we find in this post :)

*This thread is for those who have seen the movie. SPOILERS AHEAD*

 

I'm curious as to how many mistakes were made in the movie. I know I probably didn't catch all of them.  But I thougth it might actually be educational to find the ones I'd missed.  I'll start with the most obvious I remember, and we can take it from there.

 

So I'd like this thread to be critical, but just about technical details, those which will be interesting and educational.

 

-The lack of radio equipment. Had they set the movie pre-gps, it would have been much more credible. But I'm just not sure the premise of the movie works today: If you're in the middle of an ocean and you don't have  backup radios, epirbs, gps tracking services, satellite phones, VHF handhelds, etc, you're pretty much so stupid you deserve to die. The premise of the movie doesn't work. That's a problem.

An eprib would have solved this entire problem, but looking at his nav station, this is a '80's or early '90's set up and epirbs were not so common back then and sat phones not available at all.  There are still people out there sailing like that in a simple way with limited (vhf only) communications. Today it's a 'choice' and not an 'error'.

-For a singlehander, he doesn't spend much time sailing. We never see an autopilot, he doesn't have a windvane, and we don't even see him rigging the boat to heave to. The movie gives the impression that boats don't need someone steering, or watching where they're going. That's counterintuitive even, I think, to non-sailors.

He does have a wind vane . . . its mounted off center on the port side of the transom. We see the control lines to the wheel in several shots, and the actual (broken) vane in the transom sinking shot.

-The time to go to bare poles / storm sails is BEFORE the squall line gets to you, not DURING. Again, even non-sailors would sort of get to that conclusion.

mmmm . . . squall lines like that are very hard to judge. Usually they only have 25-30kts, but ocasionally much more. Most of us will put a couple reefs in just before it hits but not go to bare poles before hand.

-Granted, it's been 30 years since I've cracked open my Bowditch copy, but I don't think using a sextant to shoot the sun is any use unless it's sunrise, sunset, or high noon.

Yes, you can get a LOP (line of position) any time you can see the sun.  And you can do it with 'life boat tables', but in fact when he is feeding the fire some of the pages we see him burning are full tables.

-It's very unlikely he could get any kind of accurate fix. If he wasn't familiar with the sextant, he had no reason to have his watch be accurate to the second, and even if it was accurate within ten seconds, and he's got clear skies and an accurate fix, that's 1200 miles of longitude that's ambiguous. Not to mention figuring out those friggin tables so close to the dateline, having relevant tables, etc. Not many could get a fix by reading the manual for the first time.

Sextants are never 'accurate' like gps is, but a beginner could easily get a +-30nm fix (most people do on their very first fix) and with just a little practice a +-5-10 nm fix.  YEs he needed an accurate watch, but he has an expensive watch on . . . .he could well have set it before he left for passage.

 

-The contrast between conditions that would roll a boat tethered to a sea anchor, and the bathtub conditions we see when he leaves the interior are way too high.  I get that they shot it in a tank on a limited budget, but it just didn't work for me. You have to help me out with better effects.

Waves are very very difficult to capture - they always look small/flat in first person video, even when in fact huge. 

-Again, we don't see him actually sailing.  Like tuning the lenght of the line for the sea anchor to the length of the swells, or adjusting the angle of that line to the ship. Throwing it and forgetting it would be worse than useless.

In the real world, one does not actually 'tune' the length of a sea anchor.  The loads are too high to adjust it, and the wave lengths are too variable.  In the real world you just put all the rode you have out.

-He doesn't know how to rig a tether. If you can go overboard, you've done it wrong.

95% of the jackline/tether set-ups in existence allow you to go over the side from the foredeck (or the side deck on most set-ups), particularilarly when using the 2m tether leg available on most 2 leg tethers.

-He's singlehanding in the middle of the Indian Ocean, but doesn't know how to set off a flare? And we're supposed to feel sorry for him?

I have set off flares in training but would definitely take a moment to read the instructions before doing it 'for real'.

-He's got a huge sunhat, with a chinstrap, yet gets badly sunburnt. Why?

Light reflected off the water surface.  It is very bright out there.

-He's got yummy small sharks in the area of his raft, line, hooks, and a knife, but isn't interested in dinner? (granted, landing one and cleaning it without damaging the raft or dealing with larger sharks would be tricky).

You are suggesting you would land a 'small' shark  . . . with a hand line . . . in an inflatable life raft . . . .with no easy way to knock it out !? Good luck with that.

-He rides out a squall in his raft at night, but doesn't turn his light off to conserve battery. Ultimately, he has to set his raft on fire for lack of a light. What's wrong with this picture?

The light gave him comfort at that moment.  You ever been in a raft in the pitch black in a storm? As an aside near 100% of people are seasick in rafts in conditions like that. .

-It bugged me that he didn't clear the line to his sea anchor when he's walking it off the container. Just one of those moments any experienced sailor would watch and have his hands twitch wanting to do it right...

 

What else?

As New Morning said . . . this is a movie about struggle and not giving up.  We all make mistakes along the way.  Struggle and mistakes are simply part of life.  The movie's message is to  try as hard and as well (as you personally as able) with life, deal with both your own mistakes as well as the random stuff thrown at you . . . and then you die. . . . . so Redford making mistakes is NOT a filming 'mistake' . . . its an integral part of the plot (and the real world).



#38 born2sail

born2sail

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,782 posts
  • Location:Pacific Northwest

Posted 07 November 2013 - 06:11 AM

Estar...I saw the airvane, but I didn't see a windvane structure on the stern of the boat. I see a spar of some sort. Also, the skipper may have rigged jacklines but he clipped onto the lifeline.

#39 blackjenner

blackjenner

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,627 posts
  • Location:Seattle
  • Interests:MrsBlack, Brigadoon, freedom

Posted 09 November 2013 - 05:46 AM

well . . . .there were some errors in the movie . . . . .but how many can we find in this post :)

*This thread is for those who have seen the movie. SPOILERS AHEAD*
 
I'm curious as to how many mistakes were made in the movie. I know I probably didn't catch all of them.  But I thougth it might actually be educational to find the ones I'd missed.  I'll start with the most obvious I remember, and we can take it from there.
 
So I'd like this thread to be critical, but just about technical details, those which will be interesting and educational.
 
-The lack of radio equipment. Had they set the movie pre-gps, it would have been much more credible. But I'm just not sure the premise of the movie works today: If you're in the middle of an ocean and you don't have  backup radios, epirbs, gps tracking services, satellite phones, VHF handhelds, etc, you're pretty much so stupid you deserve to die. The premise of the movie doesn't work. That's a problem.
An eprib would have solved this entire problem, but looking at his nav station, this is a '80's or early '90's set up and epirbs were not so common back then and sat phones not available at all.  There are still people out there sailing like that in a simple way with limited (vhf only) communications. Today it's a 'choice' and not an 'error'.
-For a singlehander, he doesn't spend much time sailing. We never see an autopilot, he doesn't have a windvane, and we don't even see him rigging the boat to heave to. The movie gives the impression that boats don't need someone steering, or watching where they're going. That's counterintuitive even, I think, to non-sailors.
He does have a wind vane . . . its mounted off center on the port side of the transom. We see the control lines to the wheel in several shots, and the actual (broken) vane in the transom sinking shot.
-The time to go to bare poles / storm sails is BEFORE the squall line gets to you, not DURING. Again, even non-sailors would sort of get to that conclusion.
mmmm . . . squall lines like that are very hard to judge. Usually they only have 25-30kts, but ocasionally much more. Most of us will put a couple reefs in just before it hits but not go to bare poles before hand.
-Granted, it's been 30 years since I've cracked open my Bowditch copy, but I don't think using a sextant to shoot the sun is any use unless it's sunrise, sunset, or high noon.
Yes, you can get a LOP (line of position) any time you can see the sun.  And you can do it with 'life boat tables', but in fact when he is feeding the fire some of the pages we see him burning are full tables.
-It's very unlikely he could get any kind of accurate fix. If he wasn't familiar with the sextant, he had no reason to have his watch be accurate to the second, and even if it was accurate within ten seconds, and he's got clear skies and an accurate fix, that's 1200 miles of longitude that's ambiguous. Not to mention figuring out those friggin tables so close to the dateline, having relevant tables, etc. Not many could get a fix by reading the manual for the first time.
Sextants are never 'accurate' like gps is, but a beginner could easily get a +-30nm fix (most people do on their very first fix) and with just a little practice a +-5-10 nm fix.  YEs he needed an accurate watch, but he has an expensive watch on . . . .he could well have set it before he left for passage.
 
-The contrast between conditions that would roll a boat tethered to a sea anchor, and the bathtub conditions we see when he leaves the interior are way too high.  I get that they shot it in a tank on a limited budget, but it just didn't work for me. You have to help me out with better effects.
Waves are very very difficult to capture - they always look small/flat in first person video, even when in fact huge. 
-Again, we don't see him actually sailing.  Like tuning the lenght of the line for the sea anchor to the length of the swells, or adjusting the angle of that line to the ship. Throwing it and forgetting it would be worse than useless.
In the real world, one does not actually 'tune' the length of a sea anchor.  The loads are too high to adjust it, and the wave lengths are too variable.  In the real world you just put all the rode you have out.
-He doesn't know how to rig a tether. If you can go overboard, you've done it wrong.
95% of the jackline/tether set-ups in existence allow you to go over the side from the foredeck (or the side deck on most set-ups), particularilarly when using the 2m tether leg available on most 2 leg tethers.
-He's singlehanding in the middle of the Indian Ocean, but doesn't know how to set off a flare? And we're supposed to feel sorry for him?
I have set off flares in training but would definitely take a moment to read the instructions before doing it 'for real'.
-He's got a huge sunhat, with a chinstrap, yet gets badly sunburnt. Why?
Light reflected off the water surface.  It is very bright out there.
-He's got yummy small sharks in the area of his raft, line, hooks, and a knife, but isn't interested in dinner? (granted, landing one and cleaning it without damaging the raft or dealing with larger sharks would be tricky).
You are suggesting you would land a 'small' shark  . . . with a hand line . . . in an inflatable life raft . . . .with no easy way to knock it out !? Good luck with that.
-He rides out a squall in his raft at night, but doesn't turn his light off to conserve battery. Ultimately, he has to set his raft on fire for lack of a light. What's wrong with this picture?
The light gave him comfort at that moment.  You ever been in a raft in the pitch black in a storm? As an aside near 100% of people are seasick in rafts in conditions like that. .
-It bugged me that he didn't clear the line to his sea anchor when he's walking it off the container. Just one of those moments any experienced sailor would watch and have his hands twitch wanting to do it right...
 
What else?
As New Morning said . . . this is a movie about struggle and not giving up.  We all make mistakes along the way.  Struggle and mistakes are simply part of life.  The movie's message is to  try as hard and as well (as you personally as able) with life, deal with both your own mistakes as well as the random stuff thrown at you . . . and then you die. . . . . so Redford making mistakes is NOT a filming 'mistake' . . . its an integral part of the plot (and the real world).


Great response, Estar. In my review I saw it as less an opportunity to bash Redford and the movie to impress others with my mad skillz, and more of a series of lessons and an opportunity to learn.

It's funny how some have all the answers for all problems.

#40 Face

Face

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 171 posts
  • Location:Rotterdam, Netherlands

Posted 09 November 2013 - 12:00 PM

The French will no doubt do better: http://www.lexpress....re_1297211.html



#41 Joe Mama

Joe Mama

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 113 posts
  • Location:Do you care?
  • Interests:WLIS

Posted 09 November 2013 - 02:34 PM

It's the best sailing movie since John Candy in "Summer Rental"...



#42 rideorsail

rideorsail

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts

Posted 09 November 2013 - 03:05 PM

A very thoughtful technical review by three terrific and very different sailors (A former college racer/coach, a Danish Olympian and naval architect/National Sailing Hall of Fame Inductee). Nice to see the mainstream press picking this stuff up and calling it like it is once in a while!

 

http://www.<span sty...-review-sailors



#43 BitBrace

BitBrace

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Location:Newport RI
  • Interests:boatbuilding. things that go fast

Posted 09 November 2013 - 03:49 PM

trailer for the french movie ! looks really good, seems robert just needs an Imoca 60!

http://www.allocine....ilm=205978.html



#44 TACNI

TACNI

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 166 posts

Posted 09 November 2013 - 03:59 PM

I read somewhere that Lynn and Larry Pardee, (I think I have the names correct), sailing journalists, and long distance sailors were hired as consultants. If this is so, they didn't do a very good job of making the events plausible.

#45 Lame Mystery Guest

Lame Mystery Guest

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,283 posts
  • Location:Southern California
  • Interests:Soverel 33

Posted 10 November 2013 - 02:03 AM

I read somewhere that Lynn and Larry Pardee, (I think I have the names correct), sailing journalists, and long distance sailors were hired as consultants. If this is so, they didn't do a very good job of making the events plausible.

 

It's possible that any consultants involved in the movie made recommendations that were ignored by the moviemakers. I've worked for several studios, not in theatrical production or marketing, but had a conversation with a consultant who recommended against something that the moviemakers proposed that had to do with the credibility of the lifestyle sport involved. He was rather vocal. Alas, the issue involved a potential marketing partner that would bring $$$ to the table.The consultant was subsequently disinvited from any future meetings.

 

I enjoyed the movie and enjoy reading the SA experts' criticisms of the movie -- this is the site to hear it all. I'm no expert sailor but many of the movie's gaffes were obvious to me and bothered me too. I almost felt as if it would have been better if I knew nothing about sailing before seeing this movie. Among other things, I kept on thinking about how my foulies are better than Redford's, and I never go offshore.



#46 True Blue

True Blue

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
  • Interests:One design racing

Posted 10 November 2013 - 02:24 AM

How come a life raft bought for use in a major ocean doesn't come with a small water distillation device? His was creative, but ridiculously fragile for a bobbing raft.

#47 Superkilt

Superkilt

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 19 posts
  • Location:San Francisco
  • Interests:Very small rocks! Churches! A duck!

Posted 10 November 2013 - 03:09 AM

When we see "pirate movies" (Master and Commander, Pirates of the Caribbean, etc.), producers hire consultants - folks that run tall ships and other experts to insure accuracy, and they seem to to a pretty good job.  Was there no budget for this in this case?  My dish soap also can make a film.  



#48 Estar

Estar

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,573 posts

Posted 10 November 2013 - 04:37 AM

I read somewhere that Lynn and Larry Pardee, (I think I have the names correct), sailing journalists, and long distance sailors were hired as consultants. If this is so, they didn't do a very good job of making the events plausible.


Their names are Lin and Larry Pardey.

No, they were not hired as consultants for the movie.

Their book "storm tactics" was used as a source by the producers . . . Generating the idea for using the para-anchor.

But Lin & Larry must be horrified by what was actually shown in the movie. First, they would never recommend setting a para anchor off the stern in a storm . . . They recommend using a bridle so that it is 30-60 degrees off the bow. And second, tossing the whole coil of rope in the water is sure to result in a tangle . . . There are two "proper ways" to do this. One us to flake the line down on the helm seat in a big figure 8 coil (which will run out without tangling) and then it's the para-anchor in the water and let it pull the line. Or, use a "line bag" (typically tall and skinny) which also allows the line to run out without tangling. L&L are quite protective about their recommendations on how a para anchor is to be used and must be disappointed.

But, as I said above, the sailor trying but making mistakes is a part of the story.

#49 Bruce T. Shark

Bruce T. Shark

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 377 posts
  • Location:Martha's Vineyard
  • Interests:After Race Parties<br />Frank Mundus<br />Peter Benchly

Posted 10 November 2013 - 04:39 AM

IIRC, You can get LAN (highest altitude of sun) easy as that give you your rough latitude.  For longitude you DO NOT NEED AN ACCURATE WATCH...what you need is a WATCH WITH A KNOWN, CONSTANT ERROR RATE AGAINST GMT.  It doesnt matter if your watch is reading 10AM and it is the middle of the night, as long as you know the error.

 

My daily work in navigation (morning stars (which gives you a fix), morning sun line (gives you an EP), LAN - Local Apparent Noon - when the sun is highest (combined with morning sun give you an EP if i remember), afternoon sun line (with rest of sun sightings give you an EP), and Evening stars) was required.

 

BJ's got me sextant...grin..

 

I got about 5 miles on my fixes off the coast of Beriut..

 

CKoch and Stickboy saw it last night i heard - she can actually write real sentenances...



#50 Atmo

Atmo

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Location:Santa Barbara
  • Interests:Making things. Dogs. Bicycles.

Posted 10 November 2013 - 05:35 AM

Okay, more gratuitous buttholery on my part: How 'bout "Baby's First Bowline"? ...rabbit comes out of the hole, runs around the tree... More pslow-mo pseudo pseamanship. I would love to see the silver lining and give somebody the benefit of the doubt, but if the movie was supposed to be about an unprepared, inexperienced non-sailor struggling to survive, then that should have been established, maybe by "Our Man's" sea-dog buddy croaking and leaving Bob alone. As I said before; there is no shortage of incompetent doofuses lurching-about the oceans - many don't even kill themselves - but that's not what the movie was about. Was it supposed to be inspiring? A cautionary tale? Man against the elements? Man against his own dumbass self? It just wasn't well written or well directed. Bob did the best he could with a crappy script and a hapless director. And really, to top it off he willed himself to sink in salt water. All is not lost,

just $14 and 2 hours.



#51 amoviento

amoviento

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts

Posted 10 November 2013 - 06:53 AM

I thought Waterworld was a lot more entertaining and made just about as much sense ...



#52 HI808

HI808

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Location:Honolulu
  • Interests:All things boats. Power too - RIBs especially.

Posted 10 November 2013 - 09:47 AM

Okay.  Here is where I see this movie in the future:  It will be a huge cult film among sailors.  They will host "Rocky Horror Picture Show" type party/showings where yacht club members will dress up in Land's End crap and bring props to respond to classic moments in the movie.

- Such as when he first wakes up and wades through the water.  All will shout, "Use a bailing bucket." and throw buckets into the aisles.

- Later they can shout, "Where's the fucking pump handle.  It's supposed to be lashed nearby."

- They can throw butterfly bandages in the air and shout, "Not even duct tape sticks to wet skin."

- The second time it floods, the audience can shout, "Close the port light Dipshit.  Can't you see there is already a hole in the deck."

- And, on and on...

 

There are so many things to call out.  This will be the rage of YCs all over as soon as it is out on DVD - probably tomorrow.



#53 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,818 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 10 November 2013 - 10:46 AM

I read Hemingway's Old Man and the Sea a couple of time and watched Spencer Tracy match the book in the movie...I will not likely open a lid to see this piece of crappola because it is gratuitous to begin with, marketing to reality show asshat fans...who, as noted above, have not a clue.

 

But, by the same token, this site's guru's verbal spanking of what they have wrought here-see Page 1 comments Tiger Woods pic-is equally as gratuitous. It, meaning the movie, and SA are what they are. End of story and opinion.



#54 Wild Rover

Wild Rover

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Location:Canada

Posted 10 November 2013 - 02:51 PM

I enjoyed the movie but did find it hard to not be critical. Aside from a few continuity problems with the scenes the biggest most glaring issue I had was the premise. How is it that a 1970's over built fiberglass hulled sailboat received so much damage in the least likely to be damaged portion of the hull in relatively calm waters from sidling up to a shipping container? If it had been in the front quarter and he was running at over 4 knots in seas I could get behind that. A more believable premise would be it happened at night during a squall while he was at the helm.

The other bothersome thing that left me nearly yelling at out "hero" was why didn't he fight harder to save his boat? Everything was still salvageable up to the point the decks were awash. In calm water again no less. 

The batteries had power, why didn't he jury rig the bilge pump? 

His errors of judgement made him to look like this was his first hastily prepared trip on an unfamiliar boat and lord knows lots of folk have done that.

I was also going for a little more sailing scenery prior to the accident just so the audience could understand the zen of the ocean a little. It shows up after he repairs the hole, tacks the boat and smiles a little looking quite pleased.

At least when I mumbled "go back and get your sea anchor", he did!



#55 Oxygen Mask

Oxygen Mask

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,672 posts
  • Location:Oregon USA

Posted 10 November 2013 - 11:04 PM

Okay.  Here is where I see this movie in the future:  It will be a huge cult film among sailors.  They will host "Rocky Horror Picture Show" type party/showings where yacht club members will dress up in Land's End crap and bring props to respond to classic moments in the movie.

- Such as when he first wakes up and wades through the water.  All will shout, "Use a bailing bucket." and throw buckets into the aisles.

- Later they can shout, "Where's the fucking pump handle.  It's supposed to be lashed nearby."

- They can throw butterfly bandages in the air and shout, "Not even duct tape sticks to wet skin."

- The second time it floods, the audience can shout, "Close the port light Dipshit.  Can't you see there is already a hole in the deck."

- And, on and on...

 

There are so many things to call out.  This will be the rage of YCs all over as soon as it is out on DVD - probably tomorrow.

 

Freakin hilarious!  Love it.



#56 Beer Can

Beer Can

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 405 posts

Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:07 AM

I could live with most of the inconsistencies but the one that frosted my ass was when he had the "storm jib" out of the bag and trying to raise it, there' s all this wind and weather going on around the boat. I mean the rain is going sideways but the sails just hanging there limp. Having put up a jib or two on a deck that is swinging up and down thru a range of about 15-20 feet while the wind is trying to rip the sail to shreds, I found this offensive LOL

 

I did rather enjoy the movie. Not in the same sense that I enjoyed Dr Strangelove or Pirates of the caribbean, or even Little Big Man.

but once I disengaged my automatic critic of the sailing/seamanship thing, I could get the story. I think non-sailors could get to that point earlier.

I mighta had this wrong but didn't he hoist the storm jib without taking the other jib down?

 

Also, I haven't done that much off-shore work but why would he choose to sleep in the V-berth under way?  Wouldn't this be about the least comfortable place to be, motion-wise?



#57 Beer Can

Beer Can

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 405 posts

Posted 11 November 2013 - 12:12 AM

My biggest problem was that he was able to, with seeming relative ease, just climb back onto his boat during the middle of a storm.  Unless the boat was way heeled over, getting back aboard is not a simple task.

 

Oh, and when he was thrown overboard during the second capsize, he just happened to be able to swim back into the cockpit right before the boat righted itself.  Riiiiiighhhhhtttt

 

Once you're overboard with a tether on with the boat moving well one would think it would be very tough to get back on board.

 

Oh, and how about the fact that very little water came in when he rolled?



#58 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,818 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 11 November 2013 - 08:18 AM

I could live with most of the inconsistencies but the one that frosted my ass was when he had the "storm jib" out of the bag and trying to raise it, there' s all this wind and weather going on around the boat. I mean the rain is going sideways but the sails just hanging there limp. Having put up a jib or two on a deck that is swinging up and down thru a range of about 15-20 feet while the wind is trying to rip the sail to shreds, I found this offensive LOL

 

I did rather enjoy the movie. Not in the same sense that I enjoyed Dr Strangelove or Pirates of the caribbean, or even Little Big Man.

but once I disengaged my automatic critic of the sailing/seamanship thing, I could get the story. I think non-sailors could get to that point earlier.

I mighta had this wrong but didn't he hoist the storm jib without taking the other jib down?

 

Also, I haven't done that much off-shore work but why would he choose to sleep in the V-berth under way?  Wouldn't this be about the least comfortable place to be, motion-wise?

+1. Do we have the makings of another cult classic, like the Rocky Horror Show or whatever it is called, where the audience, maybe YC audiences, gather to quaff and repeat the fat lines over and over and over...year after year after year?



#59 SailorSheff

SailorSheff

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Location:Atlanta
  • Interests:Sailing
    Loose Women

Posted 12 November 2013 - 03:38 AM

I've only seen a trailer, but any sailor with a radio should know the difference between using "SOS" and "Mayday."

 

If sending Morse code, I suppose it might be different.  Isn't MAYDAY used on radios all over the world?

He's doing the wrong thing calling "SOS" anyway. If he is in an immediate threat of danger its Mayday, Mayday, Mayday, but he was only stranded, and didn't know the storm was coming. Should have used "Pan-Pan".

 

Also I was upset he abandoned when he did. Without any supplies at all, what if the Virginia Jean had sank?!

 

At least he was clean shaven....



#60 Grinder

Grinder

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,652 posts
  • Location:Chicago, IL

Posted 17 November 2013 - 03:59 AM

So in the very end, was he saved for real, or was he already dead & was caught by the hand of God reaching down to pull him up? 



#61 weinie

weinie

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 17 posts
  • Location:United States

Posted 17 November 2013 - 06:09 PM

So in the very end, was he saved for real, or was he already dead & was caught by the hand of God reaching down to pull him up? 

It was all a dream...there was no sailboat.  When he woke up, he was a tuna getting reeled in out of the water.



#62 Foreverslow

Foreverslow

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,074 posts
  • Interests:Sailing, racing sailboats,and working on sailboats.

Posted 18 November 2013 - 12:58 PM

Handy how that rig came off clean without the need for a boltcutter or ever removing a clevis pin..

Must have some new breakaway crimps on the shroud terminators.

 

Or how he caught his breath in 10 seconds after being pulled under twice. Not bad for a 70 year old guy.

Lookout Johnny Wiesmiller..

 

HIs lackadasical attitude  at the begining was killing me.

Wanted to shout at the stupid screen, PUT THE FUCKING RAZOR DOWN AND BAIL THAT BASTARD OR AT LEAST REINFORCE THE PATCH YOU DUMBASS!

Never in 30 years have I ever wanted to shave when a pitch black line of squalls was bearing down on me.

 

It seems he never heard the saying The greatest dewatering device is a frighten sailor with a 5 gallon bucket.

 

No waterproof container for the hand held with spare batteries.

 

And the fact he did not prep his bug-out bag prior to leaving his boat had me going crazy.



#63 Ajax

Ajax

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,704 posts
  • Location:Edgewater, MD
  • Interests:It's Obvious!

Posted 18 November 2013 - 01:43 PM

I'm glad I stayed out of this thread before going to see the movie.

 

As sailors, we have "the burden of knowledge" which tends to ruin the movie for us. I managed to suspend my inner critic (which was easier for me because I've never been offshore).

 

I saw the movie for what it was: A story of struggle.  I enjoyed it for that. He did make mistakes and some of them quite large, but as Estar says, I think it was more part of the plot than just ignorance about sailing.  I'm also not convinced that the movie was set in 2013, as some of his gear was quite out of date, but rather new looking.

 

For example, he wore terrible, orange rubber foulies. In the era of Gore-Tex and Helly Hansen, nobody wears that shit anymore, yet his looked fairly new.

 

Anyway, the movie was decent. Not the best or my favorite, but I did enjoy it for what it was supposed to be.



#64 Grinder

Grinder

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,652 posts
  • Location:Chicago, IL

Posted 18 November 2013 - 03:24 PM

I thought when he was first grabbing stuff off the nav station next to the hole, he grabbed a soaked computer, no?

#65 fendertweed

fendertweed

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 21 posts

Posted 19 November 2013 - 12:38 PM

I think even non-sailors would be surprised about removing all the washboards every time he transited the companionway, not matter what the weather. Hatches can't be wide open in rough seas.

I don't know how that boat took so long to sink. But a high priority is stocking the the life raft. And any emergency water supplies should be checked for freshness in advance, especially considering the time he had.

 

I didn't assume the fresh water was bad when he left the boat with it.  In the meantime he'd been on the raft for a bit and been rolled, etc., so it's possible he left the vent cap open himself (exhaustion/ not thinking clearly) or perhaps it worked loose (less likely?) in all the rollover commotion... 



#66 fendertweed

fendertweed

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 21 posts

Posted 19 November 2013 - 12:46 PM

I read Hemingway's Old Man and the Sea a couple of time and watched Spencer Tracy match the book in the movie...I will not likely open a lid to see this piece of crappola because it is gratuitous to begin with, marketing to reality show asshat fans...who, as noted above, have not a clue.

 

But, by the same token, this site's guru's verbal spanking of what they have wrought here-see Page 1 comments Tiger Woods pic-is equally as gratuitous. It, meaning the movie, and SA are what they are. End of story and opinion.

 

so you mean you hate everything?  sounds like someone pissed in your cornflakes... 

 

and you know it's "crappola" without having seen it ... clairvoyant too.   Excellent!



#67 MadRussian

MadRussian

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Location:4680 miles east of Maui
  • Interests:sailing, windsurfing, surfing, motorcycles

Posted 19 November 2013 - 10:52 PM

I thought when he was first grabbing stuff off the nav station next to the hole, he grabbed a soaked computer, no?

Yes, it was laptop.



#68 Glenn McCarthy

Glenn McCarthy

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 305 posts
  • Location:Elmhurst, IL
  • Interests:.

Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:06 PM

That movie was unbelievable!

 

un·be·liev·a·ble [uhn-bi-lee-vuh-buhthinsp.pngthinsp.pngl]  adjective
1.  too dubious or improbable to be believed: an unbelievable excuse.
 
 
Enough said.


#69 MauiPunter

MauiPunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 521 posts
  • Location:Maui, Las Vegas, Boston
  • Interests:sailing, surfing, windsurfing, scuba diving, soccer, and poker.

Posted 24 November 2013 - 08:22 AM

Finally saw this movie.  I think every sailor watching this film must have been squirming in their seat.  i couldnt stop bitching to my wife the whole movie about what I was seeing.  She told me to STFU and watch the movie.  Lol.  One thing that bothered me the entire film is that he had no sense of urgency.  Its like he took his time to do anything.  Im pretty sure if I was in his boots I would have been rushing around trying to get shit right.  Maybe thats a mistake in of itself.  Probably middle ground is better.  I did get a sense that they didnt have a sailing consultant for the movie.  It felt like there were so many times where he could have successfully saved the boat.  The last scene were he finally creates the fire he wanted to get the attention of the other boats and then decides to kill himself rather than waiting it out and seeing if the massive fire actally worked.  Bizarre.  just bizarre.

 

Anyways, the threads this movie is creating internet wide by sailors has been an education in of itself as there were many points brought up that i hadnt noticed or thought of.  So, perhaps, this movies is a good wake up call to those of us who go to sea and need to think about how you would have handled these situations and check the internet boards to see if you were on par with the more experienced members.  Anyways, at the end of the day, I enjoyed the movie.

 

One question, at the end, is he dead and going to heaven, or was he being saved?   My wife thinks it was symbolic and he was dead, and I thought he was saved. (Im the optimist in the family).



#70 Lorax

Lorax

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 117 posts
  • Location:Northeast

Posted 24 November 2013 - 04:11 PM

About "when" the movie was set:
In the scene where he is trying to dry out his VHF, he also has a waterlogged Iridium 9555 sitting next to him.
I liked that touch.
My iridium ALWAYS lives in a pelican case offshore for this reason, unless you're charging or downloading GRIBS/email.
Overall, the way he captures the exhaustion coupled with necessity gave me chills for capturing a feeling that happens out there and is so hard to describe.

#71 dcnblues

dcnblues

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 33 posts

Posted 24 November 2013 - 06:38 PM

...One question, at the end, is he dead and going to heaven, or was he being saved?   My wife thinks it was symbolic and he was dead, and I thought he was saved. (Im the optimist in the family).

 

It's red state / political marketing / pandering. Mo money if you throw the rapture believers something that will make them recommend the movie to their church. Gravity was the worst (and almost identical) example of this, but it's creeping in everywhere.



#72 MauiPunter

MauiPunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 521 posts
  • Location:Maui, Las Vegas, Boston
  • Interests:sailing, surfing, windsurfing, scuba diving, soccer, and poker.

Posted 24 November 2013 - 06:44 PM

(heavy sigh)



#73 Peenstone

Peenstone

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 332 posts
  • Location:Lower Chesapeake Bay
  • Interests:Sailing, Biking, and safe, reliable, commercial nuclear power.

Posted 24 November 2013 - 09:47 PM

No EPIRB.



#74 axolotl

axolotl

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 423 posts
  • Location:San Diego
  • Interests:Sailing, Camping

Posted 29 November 2013 - 02:32 AM

-It's very unlikely he could get any kind of accurate fix. If he wasn't familiar with the sextant, he had no reason to have his watch be accurate to the second, and even if it was accurate within ten seconds, and he's got clear skies and an accurate fix, that's 1200 miles of longitude that's ambiguous. Not to mention figuring out those friggin tables so close to the dateline, having relevant tables, etc. Not many could get a fix by reading the manual for the first time.

 

 

???

 

With the simple table in the book he had and knowledge of what day it is he could determine his latitude by observing the altitude of local apparent noon.  Latitude is easy.  

 

With a clock he could derive longitude from the same sight by observing the *time* of LAN and using an abbreviated table and computations, with clock error causing about a mile per four seconds error.  Wrong; 1200 miles error would mean your clock is off by five minutes, easily detected by LAN occurring much later or earlier than expected, dunce. 'Scuze me, 1200 miles between noon sights, even several days apart, would perk up my ears.

 

With good time and some tables longitude can be determined without a sextant by observing sunset or sunrise and rough latitude, not very accurately because of refraction, etc.  But still plenty good if you're out in the middle of the ocean. There's some tricky stuff like observing the moon, three star triangulation; I think the old man didn't pursue those.



#75 kadyca

kadyca

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,069 posts

Posted 07 January 2014 - 06:19 PM

My biggest problem was that he was able to, with seeming relative ease, just climb back onto his boat during the middle of a storm.  Unless the boat was way heeled over, getting back aboard is not a simple task.

 

Oh, and when he was thrown overboard during the second capsize, he just happened to be able to swim back into the cockpit right before the boat righted itself.  Riiiiiighhhhhtttt

 

I think a lot of people here are forgetting it's a movie, not some attempt to please all the pedants this site is populated with.  The producers in all likelihood don't give a damn about any of these issues because creating a compelling story trumps realism 9 times out of 10 for the most part.

 

Of course he was able to get back into the cockpit just before the boat righted itself, because if he hadn't the film would have been over at the 50 minute mark and that comes in just a bit short for a feature release.

 

The point is, though, that even if you do everything right, you can still lose the boat through an unfortunate series of events, no matter how well prepared you are and with all of the proper equipment. They could have made the movie just as compelling even if he had done everything right.

 

For example, let's say he had backup/spare electronics, but during one of the subsequent storms, there is a lightning strike that takes them out? What if he forgot to check the batteries on the EPIRB before he left? Or some how the case got damaged in the roll-over?

 

My problem with the movie is that non-knowledgeable people might look at this and think that he was doing everything he could and yet still lost it, not realizing all the mistakes he was making along the way.

 

And god forbid any of them might find themselves on a boat in trouble and try calling an SOS instead of a Mayday? Did the movie makers really think that the audience wouldn't understand a mayday call? And if so, they they could have had him try to call a mayday, then decide the microphone was dead, and then perhaps try to kludge a morse rig and then he could have tapped out an SOS. He could have even said S O S as he was tapping out each letter.

 

To my mind, Castaway was a much better example of the genre of a person being ripped out of the normal routine and suddenly having to figure out how to survive.

 

They could have easily made this movie with the same quality of Castaway, and yet they chose not to.



#76 JMD

JMD

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,475 posts

Posted 07 January 2014 - 06:59 PM

Hatchboards, using the pump instead of a bucket, and shaving instead of prepping for the squall were the most appalling to me.

 

One that has not been mentioned is that his bosun seat...thing...made ratchet noises in both directions.



#77 bmu

bmu

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Location:Virginia
  • Interests:sailing, what else!

Posted 08 January 2014 - 03:12 PM

I also saw many of the mistakes and was squirming in my seat during the movie, but one has to recognize that there is a very real psychological need to find fault with the victim because the implication is that we would not find ourselves in the same situation, which is comforting. In reality though, after you have used up all your energy reserves and the initial adrenaline rush is over, there is no telling how straight you will think. That is why it is important to not immediately jump into action like a headless chicken, but stop and think. If you make a big enough first mistake, it leads to another and next thing you know you are in over your head...



#78 surf_n_turf

surf_n_turf

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Location:Dallas, TX
  • Interests:Having a good time.

Posted 09 January 2014 - 04:56 AM

Yep, $3m lost on this film.  Robert Redford is not box office material.  

 

Attached File  Screen Shot 2014-01-08 at 10.07.13 PM.png   13.48K   0 downloads



#79 Tony-F18

Tony-F18

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,372 posts
  • Location:+31

Posted 21 January 2014 - 07:48 AM

I think this is actually a good movie even though I did not enjoy watching it all that much because I know that a lot of stuff he does is because of incompetence.

Like why doesn't he start the engine to get unstuck from the container?
Or jump on the container and push the boat of?
Why is the main triple reefed and fully sheeted in five knots of wind?

The thing that bothered me most though was his complete lack of urgency when he found out that his boat made water and had a huge hole in it like it was a minor inconvenience.

Ultimately it doesn't really matter because it is not a sailing movie but a story about hope, surviving, and not giving up.
Considering that Redford is 77 years old his performance is excellent, must be hard to act and not have any lines.

#80 Cruzan1

Cruzan1

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 63 posts
  • Location:El Floridita
  • Interests:Rum and bow legged woman.

Posted 22 January 2014 - 12:29 PM

Calm ocean, slight breeze and the boat is gently making its way through the ocean. All of the sudden SLAM, boat slams into a container hard enough to puncture a four foot hole through the hull, yet the Capt sleeps through it? Only waking after the boat has half filled with water.... 

 

Our hero then rises from his bunk and takes to the helm with the calmness of a Admiral Nelson during peace time. 

 

There can be only one answer - Qualudes! 



#81 MauiPunter

MauiPunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 521 posts
  • Location:Maui, Las Vegas, Boston
  • Interests:sailing, surfing, windsurfing, scuba diving, soccer, and poker.

Posted 22 January 2014 - 07:58 PM

His lack of urgency was the most maddening part of the film to me too.



#82 jzk

jzk

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 189 posts

Posted 25 January 2014 - 06:28 PM

Was there a sailing consultant hired for this movie?  You would think for a few bucks many of these errors could be easily avoided.

 

No bucket?  Portlight open after the knockdown, yet there was no water coming in from it?  Sense of urgency, storm jib, etc. etc. etc.

 

There is just no way that anyone would be so casual about that much water in the boat.  No attempt to repair the second hole?  Not even to stuff it with something? 

 

That boat could have been bailed out all the way up until just before it sank.  Ok, so you lost one hook, maybe try again?

 

Now who doesn't like a nice bon fire on occasion?  But really?  Or was that some kind of dementia setting in?

 

The thing is that this movie could have been done much more true to sailing, and still had all of the desired dramatic effects...

 

For what it is worth I fought to the end?  Really?  That was fighting? 

 

I don't mind some of the incompetence, that is human.  But the errors are just too detracting.



#83 jzk

jzk

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 189 posts

Posted 25 January 2014 - 06:47 PM


And what about dead calm? At one point Nicole Kidman tacked the swan 65 single handed whilst standing on the second spreader.
But you did get to see her arse. And it has a far greater range of expressions than her face.

I don't think the boat in Dead Calm was a swan.  It was STORM VOGEL, built from plywood.   73 foot custom.  



#84 CptRatBag

CptRatBag

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 651 posts

Posted 26 January 2014 - 02:01 AM

If there was a prologue that established that his IQ was 60 or less, the whole movie would have made perfect sense.



#85 Cruzan1

Cruzan1

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 63 posts
  • Location:El Floridita
  • Interests:Rum and bow legged woman.

Posted 26 January 2014 - 07:20 PM

If there was a prologue that established that his IQ was 60 or less, the whole movie would have made perfect sense.

Now thats some funny shit



#86 dacapo

dacapo

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,623 posts
  • Location:NY
  • Interests:walks on the beach,a good book,a good cry

Posted 26 January 2014 - 10:51 PM

i just watched it and wasted 2 hrs. of my life.....it would have been better if the damn sharks ate him...



#87 blackjenner

blackjenner

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,627 posts
  • Location:Seattle
  • Interests:MrsBlack, Brigadoon, freedom

Posted 27 January 2014 - 06:01 PM

If there was a prologue that established that his IQ was 60 or less, the whole movie would have made perfect sense.

 

Look at it again with this viewpoint.

 

This man was an alcoholic.  This isn't so much a story about sailing, as much as we really want it to be. It's the story of an alcoholic, trying to escape what he's done to his family and himself and having the ocean teach him a lesson, whether he thinks he needed it or not.



#88 Dex Sawash

Dex Sawash

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 205 posts
  • Location:NC USA
  • Interests:stuff

Posted 28 January 2014 - 03:21 AM


 
There can be only one answer - Qualudes! 


So we narrowed the date down to something like pre-1984ish.
I recon we are in the year AQ30 now.

#89 NewDogBalls

NewDogBalls

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 171 posts

Posted 28 January 2014 - 07:52 PM

i just watched it and wasted 2 hrs. of my life.....it would have been better if the damn sharks ate him...

 

shit, you beat me to it.  

 

Like the "burning ring of fire" at the end.  However, i find it highly unlikely that anyone could swim fully clothed in foul weather gear up from whatever depth he was at when he saw the boat above.  

 

Just a thought, was there anything right about the movie?



#90 MauiPunter

MauiPunter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 521 posts
  • Location:Maui, Las Vegas, Boston
  • Interests:sailing, surfing, windsurfing, scuba diving, soccer, and poker.

Posted 28 January 2014 - 09:11 PM

Just a thought, was there anything right about the movie?

 

The boat did float and the boat did sink.   Seems about right.



#91 Grinder

Grinder

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,652 posts
  • Location:Chicago, IL

Posted 28 January 2014 - 11:57 PM

i just watched it and wasted 2 hrs. of my life.....it would have been better if the damn sharks ate him...

 

shit, you beat me to it.  

 

Like the "burning ring of fire" at the end.  However, i find it highly unlikely that anyone could swim fully clothed in foul weather gear up from whatever depth he was at when he saw the boat above.  

 

Just a thought, was there anything right about the movie?

He was dead.

 Reaching for the hand of God.  

Swimming toward the light.

Get it?



#92 CptRatBag

CptRatBag

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 651 posts

Posted 31 January 2014 - 03:45 AM

Those freighters saw him but didn't stop because he never bathed and was a bit ripe.



#93 Tony-F18

Tony-F18

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,372 posts
  • Location:+31

Posted 31 January 2014 - 10:11 AM

His lack of urgency was the most maddening part of the film to me too.

I read a review in one of the big newspapers (online obviously, who still buys those?).
The reviewer applauded Redford's character for staying calm and focused during what was obviously a big problem.
This was in the perception of a non-sailor but does sort of make sense.

In the beginning of the film there is this monolog of him talking to what I can only guess was his wife and kids about how sorry he was for everything.
Some more character development would have helped, get to know his situation and maybe get to like him a bit more to forgive his incompetence.

#94 Tony-F18

Tony-F18

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,372 posts
  • Location:+31

Posted 31 January 2014 - 10:13 AM


Just a thought, was there anything right about the movie?

 
The boat did float and the boat did sink.   Seems about right.
I am not sure that the boat was afloat in at least half of the shots, it's a filmset after all :-)

#95 Omer

Omer

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 569 posts

Posted 31 January 2014 - 01:26 PM

I think the very beginning of the movie is far fetched enough. When the container and the boat made contact, there was hardly any wind, or waves. The boat could not be doing more than a couple of knots.
Under the conditions, the collision would no way cause such a big damage to a cruising boats hull. A crack maybe but such a pig puncture as if it were made of a single skin plywood is absurd.

The boat made a 360 roll which took a good part of a minute with the hatch completely open. It should have foundered right there and then. For me that was the end of belieavability.

#96 Pants on Fire

Pants on Fire

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 164 posts
  • Location:Cape Town, South Africa

Posted 05 February 2014 - 11:23 AM

Don't know if its been covered but the MOST unbelievable part is that it was approx. 1h11 into the film before he says FUCK!!!  I would have said much worse than that as the sight of the hole in the boat alone!



#97 hobie17li

hobie17li

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 405 posts

Posted 05 February 2014 - 04:35 PM

He was dead.

 Reaching for the hand of God.  

Swimming toward the light.

Get it?.....I agree, however , I  thought that at the very end

when he was reaching up I saw  the letters "RA" on the

screen. Ra: some sort of mayan god or something..it

was mystical for me...



#98 okengr

okengr

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 02 March 2014 - 09:46 PM

How about squalls with no wind? Plenty of green water coming over the rail and lots of rain, but no wind. Aren't fans within the reach of even lower budget movies? I don't think they had a fan on the set. It kind of ruined the realism for me.

Also, I have a couple of questions, doesn't international maritime regulation require someone on watch at all times while underway? How do single handers work with this? Do they heave-to to sleep?

What about AGM batteries, will they work lying on their side as his was when trying to radio for help.

#99 keneddies@gmail.com

keneddies@gmail.com

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts

Posted 02 March 2014 - 10:45 PM

When the raft flips over and he unzips to get out, he leaves the zipper open and nothing else floated out. Amazing!

 

And of all things he did save, a glass jar was there for the message 'in a bottle', and all the paper work was back in plastic envelopes and survives!

 

What kind of fisherman gives up after one catch that the mean ole shark stole from him. WAAAAHHHH I'm fwightened, I quit!

 

Tying the raft to a sinking boat then sacking out for a few hours, I was sure the next scene would be the raft getting sucked down following to boat to Davy Jones' locker.

 

Why not make a paper torch to hold in his hand instead of making a fire pit, why not lift up the fire pit and hold it up, or simply dump the flames overboard???  Was he afwaid of setting the sea on fire?

The cardboard box holding the sextant was soaked underwater, but he had trouble ripping it open... what a wimp! Hollywood, land of idiots



#100 Elegua

Elegua

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 567 posts
  • Location:The country that dare not speak its name

Posted 03 March 2014 - 12:05 AM

Who is able to sleep in the v-berth offshore? Must have guts of steel. 






1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users