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#1 Ron D

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Posted 29 October 2013 - 08:46 PM

In theory, you should try a boat before purchasing, but sometimes the price seems too good or the excitement takes over.  Have you ever bought a boat and later regretted the purchase?  I'm talking about the class, rather than specific boat issues like hidden rot.  What class was it and why?



#2 couchsurfer

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 05:39 AM

...a 25' cruiser

.........enjoyed cruising the gulf islands a few times,

,,,but with  moorage fees,it costs a lot even when you're -not- using it :mellow:  

 

 

http://vancouver.en....4158825346.html



#3 southseasailor

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 11:45 AM

Tiki 21 Catamaran and Laser Vago:

 

Tiki 21 has cabins, of sorts, that aren't big enough to use properly. I hardly use her now, its ideal for teaching someone to sail. Wish she was bigger, get the Tiki 26! much more you can do with this.  I would love to sell the 21 and get a small Cutter (mini Falmouth Cutter would be perfect)

 

Laser Vago, helped me learn to solo trapeze and use assymetric spinnaker. Hardly ever used these days since getting an RS700. Vago is a tough boat but very heavy.

 

Think carefully before buying a boat, especially if you live in an area where selling it on might be hard or impossible to do. I wish I could freight my boats back to the UK for peanuts. That's probably never going to happen, but I do take good care of them. One day some enthusiast might come along and buy.



#4 tbreithaupt

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 04:47 PM

an RS Feva XL, although we were beginner sailors and its a good beginner boat, we were both adults at the time and it was so incredibly cramped!

 

and it was Purple too and we're both male :) but £1400 for a good used boat with road trailer and spare mainsail was just too good at the time...
 



#5 Hobie Dog

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Posted 30 October 2013 - 05:55 PM

In theory, you should try a boat before purchasing, but sometimes the price seems too good or the excitement takes over.  Have you ever bought a boat and later regretted the purchase?  I'm talking about the class, rather than specific boat issues like hidden rot.  What class was it and why?

PHRF! :lol:



#6 zerothehero

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 04:03 PM

My Hobie17 wasn't the greatest choice in hindsight but it had more to do with the fact that Hobie 17's were poorly designed for areas where you get freezing temps



#7 southseasailor

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 06:19 PM

Hobie 17 looked to be a good boat, heard it wasn't so good two up with adults of average weight though. I got the 16 which is a fine boat, I can solo it easily enough, I cant get experienced crew but don't mind taking a passenger to give me some extra ballast.  One of the better puchases I made, good solid hulls and mast etc.



#8 Autograph

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 06:20 PM

Nope, loved every one.  So many boats, so little time.  Each one taught me something valuable, each one ruined a part of me.  No such thing as the perfect boat, but all of them are good for something.



#9 TornadoSail2016

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:16 PM

In theory, you should try a boat before purchasing, but sometimes the price seems too good or the excitement takes over.  Have you ever bought a boat and later regretted the purchase?  I'm talking about the class, rather than specific boat issues like hidden rot.  What class was it and why?

YEs, but this is the boat and not the class.  I do not know if it had a class.  A 14' MacGregor catamaran.  What a dog.  Any time the wind built the aluminum rudders would bend and you would loose much of your steerage.



#10 Ron D

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 10:51 PM

Hobie 17 looked to be a good boat, heard it wasn't so good two up with adults of average weight though. I got the 16 which is a fine boat, I can solo it easily enough, I cant get experienced crew but don't mind taking a passenger to give me some extra ballast.  One of the better puchases I made, good solid hulls and mast etc.

 

How big is your fleet?  Vago, rs700, cat...



#11 Amati

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 12:07 AM

Dufour Wing. Lousy upwind, universal was frustrating, getting on a plane was, uh, difficult, defined pearling, etc etc. Hard to sell too....

#12 gui

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 03:02 AM

Dufour Wing. Lousy upwind, universal was frustrating, getting on a plane was, uh, difficult, defined pearling, etc etc. Hard to sell too....

Humm, that wasn't an amazing board, but I was happy with mine. My first board ever! 



#13 couchsurfer

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 06:20 AM

...Laser,,as a boat I'd have to say I never really liked it.

 

 

 

 

 

..................slow learner I guess :mellow:



#14 Fretz

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 11:40 AM

Vanguard Vector. It was stored outside at a sail loft. Over the years the price went from several thousand to several hundred dollars. I couldn't pass up a deal.

By the 2nd sail I realized I overpaid. It was challenging to the point of not being fun. After 2 years I finally admitted i wasnt worthy and put it at the club and told the kids to have at it. It was used and usually resulted in story's that you hope keep kids interested in sailing.

So in that respect I'm glad I got it but as the 1st boat that broke me I'll always hate it.

#15 Ron D

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 05:32 PM

Vanguard Vector. It was stored outside at a sail loft. Over the years the price went from several thousand to several hundred dollars. I couldn't pass up a deal.

By the 2nd sail I realized I overpaid. It was challenging to the point of not being fun. After 2 years I finally admitted i wasnt worthy and put it at the club and told the kids to have at it. It was used and usually resulted in story's that you hope keep kids interested in sailing.

So in that respect I'm glad I got it but as the 1st boat that broke me I'll always hate it.

 

The hull shape does look like a good candidate for a log rolling contest.



#16 Amati

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 03:00 AM

Dufour Wing. Lousy upwind, universal was frustrating, getting on a plane was, uh, difficult, defined pearling, etc etc. Hard to sell too....

Humm, that wasn't an amazing board, but I was happy with mine. My first board ever! 

My first board too. Then I tried a Lightning D1. Then a(n) M1. Then a Sailboard 15 (which really was wonderful).

Maybe design progress was too fast then. The Wing seemed like such a great piece of industrial design when I bought it.

#17 Red Dragon

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Posted 07 November 2013 - 07:17 PM

I have owned something like 35 boats over the years. One that comes to mind was a 40' wooden sharpie schooner. Too much work, and the $400 a month dockage fee was just insane (for me).

 

Other than that? Not really. I think that I got something good out of them all.

 

Now, ask me if I regret selling any of them? One in particular? My first Dragon (USA121). I shouldn't have ever let her go, and she wound up being destroyed, mostly in a hurricane, but eventually she was just cut up and dumpstered. Arrggh! Makes me sick at my stomach to think of it.

 

RD



#18 southseasailor

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Posted 11 November 2013 - 10:01 AM

Hobie 17 looked to be a good boat, heard it wasn't so good two up with adults of average weight though. I got the 16 which is a fine boat, I can solo it easily enough, I cant get experienced crew but don't mind taking a passenger to give me some extra ballast.  One of the better puchases I made, good solid hulls and mast etc.

 

How big is your fleet?  Vago, rs700, cat...

 

5 boats in all:) collected them over the years.  Tiki 21, Hitia 14, Hobie 16, Laser Vago and RS700.  would love to sell 3 of them but cant find any interest at all. Possibly the Tiki 21 might get sold this summer.



#19 Big D

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 03:54 PM

RS600.  Boat had such terrible dock manners that it was never going to catch on here in Texas. Lots of people here don't want to get wet when sailing. It was very fast but was a mistake. Boat has moved all over the country now and still looks perfect. Gets sailed very little by each owner. Hope I sail against it again somewhere down the road. For the right owner it will be perfect. Just not me. My skinny AC is so much more manageable.



#20 sosoomii

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 06:28 PM


. Lots of people here don't want to get wet when sailing. .


Oh boy... It's a water sport for pity's sake.

#21 BobJ

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 07:49 PM

This is Dinghy Anarchy, but in 1977 I bought a new Chrysler 22.  I thought it looked a bit better than a Tuna and after all, it was designed by a Herreshoff.  'Twas an utter POS.

 

 

I should have kept our old O'Day Daysailer though.  Best boat for a quick sail and almost no ongoing costs.  Great boat.

 

Also Banshee #515.  Very fun boat and the only boat I ever re-sold at a profit.  So much better than a Laser (I had Laser #1034).



#22 Reht

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 07:54 PM

Dufour Wing. Lousy upwind, universal was frustrating, getting on a plane was, uh, difficult, defined pearling, etc etc. Hard to sell too....

Humm, that wasn't an amazing board, but I was happy with mine. My first board ever! 

I still have one for use on little cottage-country lakes. It'll go in little to nothing and floats (and sails) like a boat.

 

Sure it doesn't plane easily, and it's not the best upwind machine (though I can get mine to go upwind pretty quick in flat water), but as a toy to play about in it's not bad at all...



#23 slip knot

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Posted 15 December 2013 - 10:40 PM


In theory, you should try a boat before purchasing, but sometimes the price seems too good or the excitement takes over.  Have you ever bought a boat and later regretted the purchase?  I'm talking about the class, rather than specific boat issues like hidden rot.  What class was it and why?

YEs, but this is the boat and not the class.  I do not know if it had a class.  A 14' MacGregor catamaran.  What a dog.  Any time the wind built the aluminum rudders would bend and you would loose much of your steerage.

Haha, I had the same cat!!
I ditched the aluminum rudders, and installed a set of laser 2 rudders. Was much, much better.
After the mod, with crew on the wire, it was pretty fun.
A freak 4 foot overnight snowfall finally did it in by squashing the hulls as it sat on the trailer.
I still have 2 sets of aluminum rudders, and 2 complete rigs if anyone is interested.........

#24 jimmy kneewrecker

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 03:08 PM

only one... but it took a while to work out it was a boat specific issue, rather than a class one.



#25 cavi

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 04:36 PM

My only regret thus far is not a dinghy, it is the macgregor 22 I had. It was soo slow bought it thinking it would be great during the winter but as they dropped the lake level it hit the bottom all over the place. Also in the winter rain would get in everywhere no matter what I did. Hatted that boat

#26 High Flow

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 10:22 AM

i bought 3 boats in total sofar. in general I was satisfied with all of them but they all had the same issue:
leakage into the double floor. sometimes quite a lot. and for all but one I never found the source of the problem.

the first boat I bought was an older contender. cost me about 1000 euros in 1999. what a great boat! lots of fun. I modified it to carry a gennaker at a minimum budget (less than 100 euros).
at the beginning the sealing was ok, not dry but ok but it started to get a lot worse to really really bad. I would come back after half an hour of sailing, empty out a lot of water and went back out again. I did at some point find the deck and hull separating in the centerboard case. I did a very poor repair job and sold it for 500 euros a little later.

next boat was a modified I14 Howlett 1b. that was a great learning boat. we crashed a lot! Broke the glass top of the aluminium mast at some point which was really annoying! water leakage into the double floor was also an issue but it wasn't really bad and we never found the origin. the centerboard case looked good.
there were three separate tanks and they all had more water than I thought could get in through a couple of unsealed screws or small cracks.

next and current boat is an older flying dutchman. I have the feeling that the leakage into the double floor is getting worse all the time. for the I14 the capsizing could be used as an excuse (unsealed screws pressed under water when capsized) but with the FD we very rarely capsize and always take on water.
there is a lot of water over the cockpit while sailing but I find it hard to imagine that a small hole could take up that much water. the centerboard case looks rock solid. I think it has to below the waterline. most probably the centerboard strips (gasket) are srewed on from underneath.
I will check these.

anyway, tightness of older boats is an issue. worth checking it out as It could be a show (or fun) stopper.

I sailed for a season on a friends 49er and even though it wasn't the newest boat (somewhere in the 600 range) it was completely water tight! when leaving it in the sun for a few minutes you could hear the pressure release when opening the tanks. sweet!

#27 Ron D

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:00 PM

i bought 3 boats in total sofar. in general I was satisfied with all of them but they all had the same issue:
leakage into the double floor. sometimes quite a lot. and for all but one I never found the source of the problem.

the first boat I bought was an older contender. cost me about 1000 euros in 1999. what a great boat! lots of fun. I modified it to carry a gennaker at a minimum budget (less than 100 euros).
at the beginning the sealing was ok, not dry but ok but it started to get a lot worse to really really bad. I would come back after half an hour of sailing, empty out a lot of water and went back out again. I did at some point find the deck and hull separating in the centerboard case. I did a very poor repair job and sold it for 500 euros a little later.

next boat was a modified I14 Howlett 1b. that was a great learning boat. we crashed a lot! Broke the glass top of the aluminium mast at some point which was really annoying! water leakage into the double floor was also an issue but it wasn't really bad and we never found the origin. the centerboard case looked good.
there were three separate tanks and they all had more water than I thought could get in through a couple of unsealed screws or small cracks.

next and current boat is an older flying dutchman. I have the feeling that the leakage into the double floor is getting worse all the time. for the I14 the capsizing could be used as an excuse (unsealed screws pressed under water when capsized) but with the FD we very rarely capsize and always take on water.
there is a lot of water over the cockpit while sailing but I find it hard to imagine that a small hole could take up that much water. the centerboard case looks rock solid. I think it has to below the waterline. most probably the centerboard strips (gasket) are srewed on from underneath.
I will check these.

anyway, tightness of older boats is an issue. worth checking it out as It could be a show (or fun) stopper.

I sailed for a season on a friends 49er and even though it wasn't the newest boat (somewhere in the 600 range) it was completely water tight! when leaving it in the sun for a few minutes you could hear the pressure release when opening the tanks. sweet!

 

Have you tried pressure testing using soap and an inflatable pump to find the worst of it? 



#28 Liquid

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 10:38 PM

I bought a B3 I14.  Love it and the fleet of like minded kooks.

 

My only regret is that I can't afford to race it right now and it's sitting in storage not scaring me and the crew on a regular basis.



#29 couchsurfer

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 07:57 PM

....yesterday was perfect for a winter sail...25-30 kts,,,sunny,,mild temperatures,,had time available,,,wind's holding,,grab gear,,rig boat,,set-up cameras,,adrenaline running,,,set rig tension,,,then set mast bender..........

 

---heard a cracking noise at the forestay mount,,realized that the two tensions compound on each other,,and it would be best to take the boat to the mancave for assessment :(

 

 

 

...reminds me of graffiti I once saw in a truck-stop loo....'hear I sit ,broken hearted---took 2 bennies and my truck won't start'' :huh: 







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