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Rescue off Scilly Isles. Bernard Stamm?


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#1 Presuming Ed

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 08:59 AM

Yesterday & last night, conditions here were heinous. To illustrate, in the Solent, it gusted up to 55kts. 

Anyway, there's a news report that a boat broke, and 2 people had to be rescued, 170 miles off the Scilly Isles - so 210 miles from the mainland UK. Force 9 and 10 metre waves. 

 

http://www.thisiscor...l#axzz2oNcb4H44

http://hmcoastguard....volved.html?m=1

 

Reports mention the TJV, and that the boat was Rivages. Was the Bernard Stamm delivering back Cheminees Poujoulat? Looks like it. 

 

http://www.bernard-s...om/prehome.html



#2 Presuming Ed

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 09:15 AM

If I'd done a bit more research, I would have found that it was. 

 

http://poujoulat.ber...e-bretonne.html



#3 edouard

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 10:02 AM

Bernard seems doomed with this boat. He can't get a break.

 

The crew is now safe (http://poujoulat.ber...s-et-saufs.html). I hope they can salvage the boat later.



#4 CharlieBurton

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 10:19 AM

In Plymouth we has gusts of 77 knots, I would not have wanted to be out there in that. Glad they're safe

#5 Cyrille Hydrogene

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 11:22 AM

Bernard seems doomed with this boat. He can't get a break.

 

The crew is now safe (http://poujoulat.ber...s-et-saufs.html). I hope they can salvage the boat later.

 

"Le voilier « Cheminées Poujoulat », a, quant à lui, coulé."

 

The boat has sunk, says your link. :(

 

Bernard is really unlucky with his boats. But the most important is that he is safe.



#6 edouard

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 11:27 AM

Bernard seems doomed with this boat. He can't get a break.

 

The crew is now safe (http://poujoulat.ber...s-et-saufs.html). I hope they can salvage the boat later.

 

"Le voilier « Cheminées Poujoulat », a, quant à lui, coulé."

 

The boat has sunk, says your link. :(

 

Bernard is really unlucky with his boats. But the most important is that he is safe.

 

Yup. Should have read the whole thing. Sad for the boat.



#7 GnarlyItWas

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:15 PM

Unlucky, gotta wonder how many other people were out in that storm in a sailboat on a fricken delivery.

 

Hard to second guess it but WTF was even doing there ?



#8 jb5

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:16 PM

wonderful that they are safe but i really feel sad for Bernard loosing his boat.  can't imagine how he feels.



#9 edouard

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:48 PM

The boat actually broke in half and was sinking when the cargo arrived.

 

http://www.liberatio...e-couler_968772



#10 verneuil

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 01:50 PM

idiot sailor



#11 Swanno (Ohf Shore)

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 01:52 PM

idiot sailor


Uneducated writer

#12 Tucky

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 01:58 PM

A friend of mine was asked to deliver one of the Class 40's back to Europe after the TJV. It is a nightmare passage. There are reasons for choosing a race course  that sometimes make for real problems afterwards. In this case, you arrive back to European winter at a time that you can't choose.

 

My friend opted out of the trip.



#13 mad

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 02:20 PM

Another Juan K keel problem? :ph34r:



#14 edouard

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 02:29 PM

Another Juan K keel problem? :ph34r:

 

First dismasting then breaking in two doesn't sound like a keel problem.



#15 moody frog

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 02:59 PM

Bernard Stamm's report by phone at:

http://www.letelegra...013-2350307.php

Fast translation below:

Bernard, can you debrief for us? What happened?
"Damien and I were sailing 200 NM from Land’s End and 180 NM from Brest. We were slightly ahead of the front and sailing downwind,. The wind was at 43 to 45 knots but quite sailable. We had set ourselves up for that gale as testifies our configuration with storm-jib and the fourth reef taken down. In other words we had the handbrake operating! But, crossing one wave, the yacht broke in two just forward of the dagger-boards. The mast did not fell down immediately. We quickly shut all water-tight doors onboard and then the mat fell backwards. Very quickly we called for help and started organizing survival."

In which way?
"We made ourselves ready to leave the boat. The waves were strong so we tried and evaluated any risk of Cheminees Poujoulat to be further degraded. Together with Damien, we tried separating the mast from the yacht, but did not succeed. It was far too dangerous to do. We succeded, though, in making it drown a little so that it stopped hitting the hull nastily. Immediately after, we have regrouped the safety equipment inside the boat. Clearly, we did not know how long the boat would float. "

How did the rescue operation proceed ?
" A Navy Falcon 50, from Hyeres arrived on zone at around 23.30, having re-fuelled in Bordeaux. They coordinated the rescue operation before a naval-patrol aircraft took over at around 6.00am. In the mean time a British RNAS Sea-King helo attempted an heli-vac. They asked for us to launch a life-raft so that a diver could come and fetch us. This is what we did but Damien and I never succeeded getting the raft away from the yacht. It was very dangerous as we always came back hitting the broken bow. In the end, we had to go back onboard Poujoulat, abandoning next to all our water, the survival kit, our phone, flares… At that point we had just shot a very strong one in our few bullets "

What did happen next?
" The SAR people suggested that we went swimming so that they could try and fetch us in the water. Unfortunately this did not work either. Worse I had much difficulty to get back on board. Actually at that point I got very shocked. Then, as we did not have access to the sail-locker, where our second raft was, anymore, the plane dropped 5 rafts one after the other but they all ended at too big a distance from us. Then the cargo M.V arrived and manoeuvered to be alongside us. They threw a line to us, but in doing so, we nearly crashed on the ship’s side wall, while Poujoulat was floundering ever more. The ship’s crew threw another line as we were drifting along the ship’s aft-half, by standing-up on the push-pit we succeeded in catching the line and stopping the IMOCA. They then let a rope down to us, but we were airborne by it and brutally crashed on the yacht’s roof-top. Damien was blocked there while I was trailed 80m under water, sometime swallowing sea-water, till I could catch the ship’s rescue net. Damien was swimming next to the ship, but thanks to a life-buoy in which he had been able to slid, he was able to catch the net as well and save himself. The situation was very, very hot, as I told it previously the sea was huge and Poujoullat was nearly fully under water by then. Only a small part of the aft deck was above water as well as the bow, hanging from the forestays. A very awful vision for me".

DREADFUL!


Boat breaking in two (in front of daggerboards) first: dismasting only a consequence. Bad !

Engineering office should look twice at their files !
(same as Artemis ?)



#16 Mash

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 03:08 PM

First dismasting then breaking in two doesn't sound like a keel problem.

 

According to the news piece on Stamm's website, they were under storm jib + 4 reef in the main in 43 to 45 knots and under control when the boat broke in half on a wave (my guess would be, dropping from one but this is not clearly stated), just in front of the daggerboards. The mast stayed upright for some time, they had time to close all watertight doors / bulkheads before the stick went over the stern. And from then on, they basically had a pretty bad day (well, night), before they were picked up by a cargo . If Stamm's recounting is to be believed, getting on said ship wasn't a walk in the park, neither.

 

So, based on this webpage, it sounds like a catastrophic structural failure of the hull...

 

M. - total loss any way you look at it

 

Edit: Moody beat me to it with a comprehensive translation



#17 Rasputin22

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 03:59 PM

Must be a cardboard derivative since the 'front fell off'! Was it towed out of the environment?  Seriously scary stuff. These guys aren't the type to embellish a bad situation.



#18 edouard

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 04:02 PM

First dismasting then breaking in two doesn't sound like a keel problem.

 

According to the news piece on Stamm's website, they were under storm jib + 4 reef in the main in 43 to 45 knots and under control when the boat broke in half on a wave (my guess would be, dropping from one but this is not clearly stated), just in front of the daggerboards. The mast stayed upright for some time, they had time to close all watertight doors / bulkheads before the stick went over the stern. And from then on, they basically had a pretty bad day (well, night), before they were picked up by a cargo . If Stamm's recounting is to be believed, getting on said ship wasn't a walk in the park, neither.

 

So, based on this webpage, it sounds like a catastrophic structural failure of the hull...

 

M. - total loss any way you look at it

 

Edit: Moody beat me to it with a comprehensive translation

 

Ok. First broke then dismasted. Sounds even less like a keel problem.



#19 Estar

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 04:36 PM

on the positive side . . . . sounds like watertight compartments and doors worked well and probably saved their lives.

 

That's nice to hear . . . I have always been a bit curious how well they would actually work in a major structural failure.



#20 Presuming Ed

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 04:47 PM

Left the Azores on ?Friday?

#21 mad

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 05:05 PM


First dismasting then breaking in two doesn't sound like a keel problem.

 
According to the news piece on Stamm's website, they were under storm jib + 4 reef in the main in 43 to 45 knots and under control when the boat broke in half on a wave (my guess would be, dropping from one but this is not clearly stated), just in front of the daggerboards. The mast stayed upright for some time, they had time to close all watertight doors / bulkheads before the stick went over the stern. And from then on, they basically had a pretty bad day (well, night), before they were picked up by a cargo . If Stamm's recounting is to be believed, getting on said ship wasn't a walk in the park, neither.
 
So, based on this webpage, it sounds like a catastrophic structural failure of the hull...
 
M. - total loss any way you look at it
 
Edit: Moody beat me to it with a comprehensive translation
 
Ok. First broke then dismasted. Sounds even less like a keel problem.
Fair enough, who did the engineering?

#22 EarthBM

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 05:08 PM

A multihull wouldn't have sunk.

#23 mad

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 11:58 PM

A multihull wouldn't have sunk.

Thanks for your input.

Please Fuk off whenever you feel, thanks.

#24 17mika

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 02:08 AM

Bernard Stamm's report by phone at:

http://www.letelegra...013-2350307.php

Fast translation below:

Bernard, can you debrief for us? What happened?
"Damien and I were sailing 200 NM from Land’s End and 180 NM from Brest. We were slightly ahead of the front and sailing downwind,. The wind was at 43 to 45 knots but quite sailable. We had set ourselves up for that gale as testifies our configuration with storm-jib and the fourth reef taken down. In other words we had the handbrake operating! But, crossing one wave, the yacht broke in two just forward of the dagger-boards. The mast did not fell down immediately. We quickly shut all water-tight doors onboard and then the mat fell backwards. Very quickly we called for help and started organizing survival."

In which way?
"We made ourselves ready to leave the boat. The waves were strong so we tried and evaluated any risk of Cheminees Poujoulat to be further degraded. Together with Damien, we tried separating the mast from the yacht, but did not succeed. It was far too dangerous to do. We succeded, though, in making it drown a little so that it stopped hitting the hull nastily. Immediately after, we have regrouped the safety equipment inside the boat. Clearly, we did not know how long the boat would float. "

How did the rescue operation proceed ?
" A Navy Falcon 50, from Hyeres arrived on zone at around 23.30, having re-fuelled in Bordeaux. They coordinated the rescue operation before a naval-patrol aircraft took over at around 6.00am. In the mean time a British RNAS Sea-King helo attempted an heli-vac. They asked for us to launch a life-raft so that a diver could come and fetch us. This is what we did but Damien and I never succeeded getting the raft away from the yacht. It was very dangerous as we always came back hitting the broken bow. In the end, we had to go back onboard Poujoulat, abandoning next to all our water, the survival kit, our phone, flares… At that point we had just shot a very strong one in our few bullets "

What did happen next?
" The SAR people suggested that we went swimming so that they could try and fetch us in the water. Unfortunately this did not work either. Worse I had much difficulty to get back on board. Actually at that point I got very shocked. Then, as we did not have access to the sail-locker, where our second raft was, anymore, the plane dropped 5 rafts one after the other but they all ended at too big a distance from us. Then the cargo M.V arrived and manoeuvered to be alongside us. They threw a line to us, but in doing so, we nearly crashed on the ship’s side wall, while Poujoulat was floundering ever more. The ship’s crew threw another line as we were drifting along the ship’s aft-half, by standing-up on the push-pit we succeeded in catching the line and stopping the IMOCA. They then let a rope down to us, but we were airborne by it and brutally crashed on the yacht’s roof-top. Damien was blocked there while I was trailed 80m under water, sometime swallowing sea-water, till I could catch the ship’s rescue net. Damien was swimming next to the ship, but thanks to a life-buoy in which he had been able to slid, he was able to catch the net as well and save himself. The situation was very, very hot, as I told it previously the sea was huge and Poujoullat was nearly fully under water by then. Only a small part of the aft deck was above water as well as the bow, hanging from the forestays. A very awful vision for me".

DREADFUL!


Boat breaking in two (in front of daggerboards) first: dismasting only a consequence. Bad !

Engineering office should look twice at their files !
(same as Artemis ?)

Holy xxxx!

 

Really thanks for the translation :)



#25 shaggybaxter

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 02:28 AM

A multihull wouldn't have sunk.

Ever heard of Team Phillips?



#26 Rail Meat

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 02:36 AM

Stamm is one of the really good guys.  I remember seeing him on the docks and admiring the way that he interacted with fans.  Very approachable, very friendly, always willing to take time to talk. 

 

 

I am relieved to hear that they are safe.



#27 dogwatch

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 01:24 PM

Unlucky, gotta wonder how many other people were out in that storm in a sailboat on a fricken delivery.

 

Hard to second guess it but WTF was even doing there ?

 

This storm was forecast at least 10 days in advance. I can't see the reason for being out there on a delivery trip. I know I'm talking about someone with vastly more experience than me but even so.



#28 couchsurfer

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 02:26 PM

Unlucky, gotta wonder how many other people were out in that storm in a sailboat on a fricken delivery.

 

Hard to second guess it but WTF was even doing there ?

 

This storm was forecast at least 10 days in advance. I can't see the reason for being out there on a delivery trip. I know I'm talking about someone with vastly more experience than me but even so.

.

 

.....I'm sure that area can be a real mix-master,,but would you really avoid 40-45knots with that level of experience?

 

''they were under storm jib + 4 reef in the main in 43 to 45 knots and under control when the boat broke in half'



#29 jb5

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 03:34 PM

They were in a big rush to get the boat back home for some reason skipping the ferry back that others took from the TJV.  Maybe because of planned work for the upcoming season, its not clear from what I see on Bernard's web site.  I would speculate they at least wanted to redo the cockpit protection as that has been an issue with this boat from the start.

 

Regardless, IMOCA 60s are supposed to be built for exactly those types of conditions and certainly experience isn't an issue.  Who is even remotely qualified to second guess Bernard's decisions at sea on a sail boat in those conditions?  Very very few.

 

Imagine if that break up took place much further away from rescue, say half way across the south pacific or Indian oceans. They were very lucky.  Structural failure maybe due to fatigue somewhere? They say the boat slams massively.  Maybe they hit something. A somewhat similar thing happened to Bernard and this boat in the previous TJV, They hit something (container?), almost sank, and spent a huge amount of time recovering and fixing the boat which ultimately impacted the last Vendee Globe preparations.

 

The IMOCA web site indicates that the class has a kind of group insurance with Tolrip (www.tolrip.com).  Anyone know how this works?

 

You've got to feel for Bernard through this.  He's been through a lot in the past 6 years or so.  I really hope that if he decides to continue (and I hope he does) that he gets a good boat together quickly and can do the Route du Rhum and Barcelona WR.  He in my opinion is by far the most interesting and most enjoyable of all the IMOCA sailors. 



#30 Presuming Ed

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 03:37 PM

Lowest depression since 1886.

http://uhi-mahara.co...iew.php?id=5156

#31 couchsurfer

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 03:42 PM

Lowest depression since 1886.

http://uhi-mahara.co...iew.php?id=5156

.

 

....sounds like the same system that gave eastern NA their harshest winter  storm -ever- recorded,,

,,,but I'd beleive Stamm when he says it was ~45Knots with max reefs--or did he mean -boatspeed- :blink:



#32 Rail Meat

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 05:28 PM

This was the boat that got holed by some UFO.  I can't remember where the hole was.... I wonder if the hull broke anywhere close to that repair?



#33 mad

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 11:27 PM


This was the boat that got holed by some UFO.  I can't remember where the hole was.... I wonder if the hull broke anywhere close to that repair?


Was that the last Solo RTW/Vendee?

#34 jb5

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Posted 25 December 2013 - 11:52 PM


This was the boat that got holed by some UFO.  I can't remember where the hole was.... I wonder if the hull broke anywhere close to that repair?


Was that the last Solo RTW/Vendee?

that was the previous TJV.  If I recall correctly the impact was port side forward of the shrouds. the mast didn't fall.



#35 dogwatch

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:00 AM

.


Lowest depression since 1886.

http://uhi-mahara.co...iew.php?id=5156

 

....sounds like the same system that gave eastern NA their harshest winter  storm -ever- recorded,,

,,,but I'd beleive Stamm when he says it was ~45Knots with max reefs--or did he mean -boatspeed- :blink:

 

Sounds like it was the swell that got them, not (directly) the wind and there was a hell of a lot more than 45 knots out there at times.



#36 dogwatch

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 08:27 AM

Regardless, IMOCA 60s are supposed to be built for exactly those types of conditions

Up to a point. Wave conditions in the open ocean and in the Western Approaches are two different things. Storm Wave, meet Continental Shelf.

#37 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 09:04 AM

In case you don't remember Bernard too well, here he is with me and Ronnie at the 2012 Vendee.

 



#38 BalticBandit

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 09:14 AM

Well that sort of break should have all the boats looking - BG what 18 mos ago?  and now this?  CF is great, until it fails.  then it goes BANG



#39 Chris 249

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 09:59 AM

A multihull wouldn't have sunk.

 

And when any offshore mono class gets close to the same atrocious record as the ORMA 60s did when almost the whole fleet DNFd a few years ago, please tell us.

 

Multis are great, bigoted multi sailors aren't. 



#40 spin echo

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 01:25 PM

This was the boat that got holed by some UFO.  I can't remember where the hole was.... I wonder if the hull broke anywhere close to that repair?

 

 

2008 Vendee. Collided with a fishing boat. Broke his sprit.  Just big scratches on the hull.

Attached Files



#41 hump101

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 01:51 PM

.


Lowest depression since 1886.

http://uhi-mahara.co...iew.php?id=5156

 

....sounds like the same system that gave eastern NA their harshest winter  storm -ever- recorded,,

,,,but I'd beleive Stamm when he says it was ~45Knots with max reefs--or did he mean -boatspeed- :blink:

 

Sounds like it was the swell that got them, not (directly) the wind and there was a hell of a lot more than 45 knots out there at times.

We had 70kts (130kmh) max on our mooring at Dinard.



#42 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 01:59 PM

This was the boat that got holed by some UFO.  I can't remember where the hole was.... I wonder if the hull broke anywhere close to that repair?

 

 

2008 Vendee. Collided with a fishing boat. Broke his sprit.  Just big scratches on the hull.

different boat.



#43 jb5

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 02:08 PM

good summary

http://www.yachtingw...wam-for-my-life



#44 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 02:15 PM

That was the old Virbac-Paprec, the same that Stamm dominated the V5O race with.  This is the JuanK that was new last year - or actually, November 2011 IIRC.  



#45 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 02:17 PM

According to the YW story this is the same boat that and was holed near the azores, not the same boat that crashed into the cargo ship in '08.  Jesus this guy's luck is even worse than I thought! "Collision with an unidentified object, boat nearly sank...holed at the waterline"



#46 r.finn

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:29 PM

I think the V5O boat was his original Rolland design. The second black pussy was the Farr which restarted after the collision mentioned above and was then grounded to death later in the race on some island in the south. Can't remember the details. It's been a rough trajectory since. What good 60s are left on the market for him to take over? Hope he and his sponsor can tough this ordeal out.

#47 Tanton Yacht Design

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:33 PM

Black cat with a black eye. I had great expectation with this JK. boat and with the skipper.Cats havAttached File  CHPO2-021313.jpg   32.72K   76 downloadse seven lives.
Attached File  CHPO1-021313.jpg   35.5K   69 downloads

#48 carcrash

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:51 PM

That boat looks an awful lot stronger than a Cal 40, or a Santa Cruz 70.

Average of 5.5 feet between full bulkheads. Interesting: that is how far apart Dennis Choate told me to put ring frames on the boat he is building for me. As several reps for composite companies told me, "Dennis knows more about build composite boats than anyone in this company."

#49 edouard

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 04:52 PM

For those who want to track down which boat Bernard raced (or any other IMOCA 60)

 

http://www.thedailys...re-are-they-now



#50 jb5

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 05:19 PM

also this site...

http://www.histoired...ste des 60'.htm



#51 Potter

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 07:00 PM

That boat looks an awful lot stronger than a Cal 40, or a Santa Cruz 70.

Average of 5.5 feet between full bulkheads. Interesting: that is how far apart Dennis Choate told me to put ring frames on the boat he is building for me. As several reps for composite companies told me, "Dennis knows more about build composite boats than anyone in this company."

Those renderings bare no resemblance to the actual boat.

#52 r.finn

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Posted 26 December 2013 - 09:38 PM

Is Acciona still alive?  I see it was towed to the Azores.



#53 mad

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 09:42 PM


Is Acciona still alive?  I see it was towed to the Azores.


The hull and deck is. Not sure what the story is about the keel failiure though.

#54 mad

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 09:46 PM


That boat looks an awful lot stronger than a Cal 40, or a Santa Cruz 70.

Average of 5.5 feet between full bulkheads. Interesting: that is how far apart Dennis Choate told me to put ring frames on the boat he is building for me. As several reps for composite companies told me, "Dennis knows more about build composite boats than anyone in this company."

Those renderings bare no resemblance to the actual boat.
Toooo late now;

Its been published in SA, it must be the truth.

#55 MR.CLEAN

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 10:58 PM

Black cat with a black eye. I had great expectation with this JK. boat and with the skipper.Cats havattachicon.gifCHPO2-021313.jpge seven lives.
attachicon.gifCHPO1-021313.jpg

I don't quite understand how anyone can have great expectations of anything JuanK has done other than a Volvo in a decade.  How he keeps getting work is amazing to me given the track record, though I understand after Artemis mess he laid off most his staff...can't be much business left now.  Off to powerboat designs, probably.  



#56 rmb

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 09:01 AM

This was the boat that got holed by some UFO.  I can't remember where the hole was.... I wonder if the hull broke anywhere close to that repair?

 

 

2008 Vendee. Collided with a fishing boat. Broke his sprit.  Just big scratches on the hull.

Old boat, Farr designed Virbac 1



#57 Rail Meat

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Posted 28 December 2013 - 11:24 AM

 

This was the boat that got holed by some UFO.  I can't remember where the hole was.... I wonder if the hull broke anywhere close to that repair?

 

 

2008 Vendee. Collided with a fishing boat. Broke his sprit.  Just big scratches on the hull.

Old boat, Farr designed Virbac 1

 

Ryan - never got to express thanks for the help you gave Hannah and Rob in Lorient with the forestay.  You are a righteous dude....



#58 Presuming Ed

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 04:39 PM

http://nautisme.lefi...aze---13043.php

(Google translate. No time for more from me, I'm afraid)

 

Bernard Stamm: "I am not a kamikaze"
     
The voice is still shaky. Bernard Stamm is still in shock. Under the shock of losing his boat, but of course especially under the shock of being brought on board the cargo ship came to rescue them without knowing if his teammate left behind on a sinking ship, would succeed to follow. Bernard Stamm and teammate Damien Guillou went very close to the worst in the night of Monday to Tuesday when their IMOCA 60 broke in two in a storm and they had to board a cargo ship at night in rough seas. Joint Sunday morning, Bernard Stamm returned to his shipwreck for Boating Figaro. It also explains how he ended up in this strong wind and justifies his choice sailor to be out to sea despite the weather announced.
 
Le Figaro Boating -. How did you wreck?
Bernard Stamm -. Chimneys Poujoulat was about 180 miles from Brest to 200 miles from the southwestern tip of England. The sea was formed, it swept regularly, but had been anticipated on board to deal with this gale we were under storm jib with 4 reefs in the mainsail. Everything was under control: we were wearing our road and looked a bit like a leak in the strong wind. Boat moving at 12-13 knots out of snowboards and behaved very well. I was at the card table with my teammate Damien Guillou when in a wave, we heard a huge crack: the ship had broken in two. It was then about 20:30 Monday night in France.
 
Then all rushed?
Yes. Damien immediately went on deck shouting "the mast fell," but he immediately saw that this was the boat that was broken. The bow was at 45 degrees to the axis of the boat. I immediately closed the watertight bulkheads so it does not run too fast. Moments later, the mast fell and we raised relief because we had to leave the boat. Help arrived quickly enough area. We were first flown by an aircraft and a helicopter were asked to put a life raft into the water to try to hélitreuiller us. But we never got to the raft away from the boat and had to abandon it with all our safety equipment on board: water, survival tin, telephone Iridium flares to be spotted ... A this time, our situation is really tense. And we did not have access to our second liferaft which was at the bottom of the boat. The aircraft then dropped five rafts above our heads but we never managed to recover one. It was night, we saw nothing and the sea was really bad. A cargo ship that was diverted to provide assistance when we arrived near Poujoulat Chimneys.
 
To board a cargo ship in a storm at night must be a very dangerous operation?
Yes, it was far from won. The ship maneuvered to get wind Poujoulat Chimneys. Its crew launched after us with their line-throwing but we never managed to see the line in the dark. During the maneuver, we derived and found ourselves at the bow of the ship. There was a disaster. Poujoulat chimneys banged against the bulbous bow of the freighter and began to be seriously damaged. The sailors did not see us the bridge, they did not hear what I was screaming to their VHF. Fortunately, the cargo was loaded and does not get up too in the waves. He could crush us 
Our boat started to sink seriously. The ship then made ​​a new maneuver to get our wind and we place closest to his back. This maneuver lasted very long. We asked them to send us a life raft as it was out of the question to board with waves so violent. Be fired on the freighter was a blow to be broken in two. 
Finally, they did not hear us and sent a large mooring. I got tied up with Damien and was brutally thrown against the roof of my boat with Damien behind me. He thought it more prudent to detach and I've been shot on board. The crew of the ship fired me for 60 meters. I spent time in the water but I thought only one thing: Damien I had left behind me. I tried not to lose sight of. I saw the light of his headlamp, it was a good sign. Arriving on board, I yelled my teammate had remained on the sinking ship. Sailors seized me and told they were dealing with. They threw a buoy and is fired. It went better for him, he spent less time under water and quickly found himself on board. From this experience, what impressed me most is the fear of losing Damien.
 
Was it reasonable to sail in such a sea ferry?
It is sure that there was a lot of wind but we went knowingly. We first made a northern route on port tack at the start of the Azores and have jibe on Sunday morning at 22 to the west and sail to Brest. Throughout this phase we sailed slowly to 60% polar (target boat speed ed) to let the worst of the storm ahead. On Sunday, the wind is strong enough back then he eased to 35-37 knots with even a short time at 27 knots. We had a clear outline of the situation and what was coming behind.
We knew we would have three or four hours of very strong but these boats are made for that wind. We had 45 knots and 50 regular (90 km / h). Are not prepared for round the world sailing by 15 knots of wind in Britain. Shortly before the accident, we never felt the need to slouch all, which is a possibility in excessive conditions. The boat behaved well. The front had passed and we were in the depression dug in front.
The big wind was before. It is important that people understand that we do not have 75 nodes they had in their garden in Britain. When we broke, we still had an hour before the strong wind wind mollisse. Later, the wind is strong left at rescue but we never had to find ourselves in if we continued on our way.
I have a reputation of head burned, it sticks to my skin but it's not that at all. I am not a suicide bomber. We do things thoughtfully. The problem is this boat, which is expected to face rough seas, which broke in two. It was dark and I was in the cabin. But one thing is certain: while sailing under speed come we did, Chimneys Poujoulat could not bake a lot, that's what is amazing. When you attack as "nags" race, then yes it shoves and pulls on our boats. But there, we sailed completely safe and the boat was little used. It is incomprehensible.
 
How do you see the future?
For now, the future is written in the short term for me. I have arrived to ask me to understand why my boat broke in two like that. The same accident in the Great South the Vendée Globe, it's a potential death. It is necessary that we understand and only then can think of more.
 


#59 SCANAS

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 11:11 PM

So the sinking might have been casued or accelerated by the bow of the ship?



#60 Spargo

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 12:17 AM

BeLZb87.jpg



#61 r.finn

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 02:12 AM

That looks like the Farr boat. Thanks for posting that story. Sounds like a really terrible event.

#62 Presuming Ed

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 09:59 AM

Yup. I think that photos' from the 08 Vendee, in the Kergulens? The JK had the yellow coachroof, with the mickey mouse ears helming positions.

 

cheminees-poujoulat-sous_voile.jpg



#63 r.finn

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 12:10 PM

That looks more like it. A flying brick. For whatever its worth, it was at least a fast boat when staying together.

#64 mad

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 03:04 PM

Who handled the composite engineering part of the project?

#65 moody frog

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 04:45 PM

Who handled the composite engineering part of the project?

Usual JK's engineering sub-contractor, same as most VO 70s + Artemis #1

#66 LeoV

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 08:55 PM

So:

engineer; abstructures.com  (well respected)
builder: decision (quality builders)

owner : sandoz family (rich)

 

Enough skills brains and money there. So lets hope they find out the source of the problem and learn to build design and finance even better boats.



#67 mad

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Posted 31 December 2013 - 10:13 PM


Who handled the composite engineering part of the project?

Usual JK's engineering sub-contractor, same as most VO 70s + Artemis #1
Really?

There seems to be a LOT of unanswered questions over the years, from both structural and plain crazy.

Maiden Hong Kong?

#68 edouard

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:10 AM

I wouldn't be surprised if the reason for this structural failure came down to the repairs made to the boat after it nearly sank following a collision with a container in the 2011 TJV.

 

Bernard said in one of his interviews that the boat snapped in two ahead of the mast when they hit the bottom of a wave.

 

That is precisely where the hull was repaired with a plug, as the following videos show.

 

At 0.23 one really sees the extent of the damage

 

At 0.14 one can see that the plug is almost flush with the bulkhead. Just behind that bulkhead are the keel and the mast.

 

That area of the hull, just ahead of the main bulkheads supporting the keel and mast, is under huge compression loads when the boat slams in a wave. And that is exactly where there was a "seam" following the repairs. 

 

We'll probably never know exactly what broke since the boat sank. But it seems to me that they should thoroughly review the way the boat was repaired, in particular:

- How did they evaluate the impact of the repair on the structural integrity of the vessel.

- Was the repair executed properly (some workers from Decision were involved but I am not sure they as a contractor were in control)



#69 Rail Meat

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 04:31 PM

That was my guess. Thanks for pulling the video together.

#70 jb5

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 03:54 PM

Looking at the videos of the 2011 damage and the comments from Bernard's interview with Le Figaro (http://www.yachtingw...t-broke-in-half) after the sinking it seems the boat broke in half just behind the dagger boards.  It looks like the earlier damage was just in front of them from the videos and the placement of the sponsor graphics on the boat.



#71 edouard

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 04:43 PM

Looking at the videos of the 2011 damage and the comments from Bernard's interview with Le Figaro (http://www.yachtingw...t-broke-in-half) after the sinking it seems the boat broke in half just behind the dagger boards.  It looks like the earlier damage was just in front of them from the videos and the placement of the sponsor graphics on the boat.

 

No, the dagger boards are ahead the mast and keel. (i.e. just ahead of the main bulkheads). The main damage was ahead of the dagger boards but extended behind them
and the plug therefore as well  (You can see the casing of the starboard one in the second video)

 


Attached File  Cheminées-Poujoulat-22082-b27b8b.jpg   99.49K   11 downloads

Attached Files



#72 edouard

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 05:54 PM

it may be some of these boats do not have sufficient framing to allow for the dss

 

DSS wouldn't be considered anyways since IMOCA rules only allow 5 appendages. (Besides, these boats have plenty of righting moment.)



#73 Speng

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 06:12 PM

Guess it's what happens when your NA didn't graduate from uni...



#74 mad

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 06:18 PM

it may be some of these boats do not have sufficient framing to allow for the dss

As your last 2 posts have proven, you have no clue, so please be quiet?

The grown ups are trying to talk.

Thankyou

#75 r.finn

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 06:20 PM


it may be some of these boats do not have sufficient framing to allow for the dss

 
DSS wouldn't be considered anyways since IMOCA rules only allow 5 appendages. (Besides, these boats have plenty of righting moment.)

You don't have to use two daggerboards.

#76 edouard

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 06:45 PM

 


it may be some of these boats do not have sufficient framing to allow for the dss

 
DSS wouldn't be considered anyways since IMOCA rules only allow 5 appendages. (Besides, these boats have plenty of righting moment.)

You don't have to use two daggerboards.

 

The daggerboards are ... asymmetrical. And that makes a huge difference upwind.



#77 r.finn

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 06:57 PM

You don't say...



#78 mad

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 07:41 PM

Be nice to the new expert ;)

#79 Left Hook

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 08:41 PM

In reading the report of the CP rescue the name of the ship which stood by and picked up Bernard and Crew seemed familiar. So I did a little googling. Turns out that the Star Isfjord was the same ship which carried USA 17 (DoGZilla) back to San Francisco from Valencia after it won the 33rd Americas Cup. It was a fairly high profile transit and was widely reported on. Cool!

 

The Daily Sail Story reported that conditions were so heinous in the area that many ships trying to come to rescue weren't able to deviate and were hove-to. The SI seemed to be willing to risk it and crawled to CP for hours at 3 knots where they stood by for more hours in order to rescue them. 

 

Maybe it was just dumb luck that the Star Isfjord was close by and able to effect a rescue after government options failed. I prefer to think that the attention and love heaped upon them by the sailing community for transporting USA17 home made them willing to take the risk for our community and go after Bernard and his crew. 

 

Either way it's a cool connection.



#80 Icedtea

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 09:15 PM

In reading the report of the CP rescue the name of the ship which stood by and picked up Bernard and Crew seemed familiar. So I did a little googling. Turns out that the Star Isfjord was the same ship which carried USA 17 (DoGZilla) back to San Francisco from Valencia after it won the 33rd Americas Cup. It was a fairly high profile transit and was widely reported on. Cool!

 

The Daily Sail Story reported that conditions were so heinous in the area that many ships trying to come to rescue weren't able to deviate and were hove-to. The SI seemed to be willing to risk it and crawled to CP for hours at 3 knots where they stood by for more hours in order to rescue them. 

 

Maybe it was just dumb luck that the Star Isfjord was close by and able to effect a rescue after government options failed. I prefer to think that the attention and love heaped upon them by the sailing community for transporting USA17 home made them willing to take the risk for our community and go after Bernard and his crew. 

 

Either way it's a cool connection.

Funny the way things like that happen. 

Did an offshore earlier in the year and a ship passed close- turned out it was a ship that one of our crew had did officer training on- in Tokyo two years ago- they get around! 






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