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Mc38 - can it be made cat 1?


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#101 us7070

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 01:51 AM

 

 

There's a mini-Transat 650 registered for Anapolis to Bermuda.  Makes the MC38 look like a luxury ride!

 

Clean, chime in any time here, didn't you sail Newport-BER on a Carkeek 40 (Decision)?  I recall seeing one of your videos with a significant amount of water sloshing around down below.  Who wants to be the designated crew to bail out down below the entire race? 

 

Short coastal races like Ft Lauderdale-Key West would be extreme enough for me on the MC38.

 

 

and 2012 was an easy race - some squalls on the way there, and a short-lived period of high winds near the finish for some boats.., but overall mostly downwind, and no large seas

You must have been way behind us.  Several line squalls well over 40 knots, seas over 4m at some points, a couple of big wipeouts, average speed of 'holy crap no 40 footer should be this fast'.  

 

 

a squall is not a storm - they don't generate big seas.

 

i certainly believe you saw 40kts - the weather at BDA was more than just a squall, but i doubt you saw 4m seas on that race - the high wind didn't last long enough.



#102 SW Sailor

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 04:11 AM

I've looked at the MC38 and 40' HPR class boats pretty closely for a few years now and am aware of some of the issues.

 

Not sure why you're poking around here for answers to your MC38 Cat 1 questions - just call Harry Dunning directly and I'm sure he'd be happy to address any questions - a nice guy.

 

Their are also other alternatives available on the market if you look around.



#103 Don

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 04:26 AM

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

Was your boat not designed to go to Osaka?

 

Absolutely not, I believe you may be thinking of the 2 Bull 12000's, one lost at sea (during the Melbourne to Osaka race), the other in Adelaide.

The Shockwave 36 was spec'd to be the fastest 36 foot "sportboat" at the time (2001).

It is also my understanding that Harry Dunning was working for Reichel Pugh at the time, and "may" have had input into the hull design.



#104 Flatbag

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 12:00 PM

 

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

Was your boat not designed to go to Osaka?

 

Absolutely not, I believe you may be thinking of the 2 Bull 12000's, one lost at sea (during the Melbourne to Osaka race), the other in Adelaide.

The Shockwave 36 was spec'd to be the fastest 36 foot "sportboat" at the time (2001).

It is also my understanding that Harry Dunning was working for Reichel Pugh at the time, and "may" have had input into the hull design.

Minor correction: The Bull 1200 Longitude pulled out of the 1999 Melbourne Osaka race after being rolled on the first night in Bass Strait. They cleaned the boat up and  later sailed it up to do Hammo that year. After the regatta the race crew flew home while the owner (MIA Anarchist Long Tim of Soto 40/30 fame on these pages) organised a delivery crew. When they arrived back up at Hammo to pick up the boat it had disappeared and was never found, believed stripped for parts and scuttled.



#105 Tucky

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 02:26 PM

I have never sailed a class 40, but think of them as reaching machines rather than upwind - is that wrong? I want a true all-a-rounder. In any case, they are bigger than the first boat I went RTW. It just more boat (and more sail cost) than I am thinking of. You need to be a successful investment banker to be able to afford to race one :)

I think a Class 40 goes upwind fine- uncomfortable maybe, but goes well. It also comes closest to your hope of other owners and some racing shorthanded here in the US. So far the boats have had decent resale value. Brian at Maine Yacht Center could easily get you on one of the new Akalarias. They certainly are Cat 1.



#106 lydia

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:15 PM

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.
 
I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.
In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.
 
Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

Was your boat not designed to go to Osaka?

That diamond later became the "ashtray" aka saltash the gladstone tool until canters came along bow

#107 Don

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 12:22 AM

 

 

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

Was your boat not designed to go to Osaka?

 

Absolutely not, I believe you may be thinking of the 2 Bull 12000's, one lost at sea (during the Melbourne to Osaka race), the other in Adelaide.

The Shockwave 36 was spec'd to be the fastest 36 foot "sportboat" at the time (2001).

It is also my understanding that Harry Dunning was working for Reichel Pugh at the time, and "may" have had input into the hull design.

Minor correction: The Bull 1200 Longitude pulled out of the 1999 Melbourne Osaka race after being rolled on the first night in Bass Strait. They cleaned the boat up and  later sailed it up to do Hammo that year. After the regatta the race crew flew home while the owner (MIA Anarchist Long Tim of Soto 40/30 fame on these pages) organised a delivery crew. When they arrived back up at Hammo to pick up the boat it had disappeared and was never found, believed stripped for parts and scuttled.

My error.

Thanks for the correction.



#108 Melbourne A31

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 07:15 AM

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

It was Harold Vaughan who sailed the Diamond to/from Port Phillip. I remember a photo of them rounding Wilson's Prom in a magazine many years ago. Harold went on to become a very well credentialled 5.5 metre sailor. I can't be bothered looking up the results but I'm tipping that Antares would feature as a Scandinavian Gold Cup or World Championship winner. I believe that the Diamond was in fact Saltash II as someone else has mentioned.

There was an Adams 10, "Spirit" that did a Sydney to Hobart. I don't know the details but I know that it has been mentioned here before.



#109 Trickypig

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 09:34 AM

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

It was Harold Vaughan who sailed the Diamond to/from Port Phillip. I remember a photo of them rounding Wilson's Prom in a magazine many years ago. Harold went on to become a very well credentialled 5.5 metre sailor. I can't be bothered looking up the results but I'm tipping that Antares would feature as a Scandinavian Gold Cup or World Championship winner. I believe that the Diamond was in fact Saltash II as someone else has mentioned.

There was an Adams 10, "Spirit" that did a Sydney to Hobart. I don't know the details but I know that it has been mentioned here before.

There have been several Adam's 10s that have done Hobart. That was part of their shtick.. i.e. that they were built to a spec to race offshore. 



#110 Flatbag

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 11:57 AM

 

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

It was Harold Vaughan who sailed the Diamond to/from Port Phillip. I remember a photo of them rounding Wilson's Prom in a magazine many years ago. Harold went on to become a very well credentialled 5.5 metre sailor. I can't be bothered looking up the results but I'm tipping that Antares would feature as a Scandinavian Gold Cup or World Championship winner. I believe that the Diamond was in fact Saltash II as someone else has mentioned.

There was an Adams 10, "Spirit" that did a Sydney to Hobart. I don't know the details but I know that it has been mentioned here before.

There have been several Adam's 10s that have done Hobart. That was part of their shtick.. i.e. that they were built to a spec to race offshore. 

A10 Zig Zag did 2 Hobarts, in 81 & 82 according to the RSHYR records.



#111 Trickypig

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 10:29 PM

 

 

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

It was Harold Vaughan who sailed the Diamond to/from Port Phillip. I remember a photo of them rounding Wilson's Prom in a magazine many years ago. Harold went on to become a very well credentialled 5.5 metre sailor. I can't be bothered looking up the results but I'm tipping that Antares would feature as a Scandinavian Gold Cup or World Championship winner. I believe that the Diamond was in fact Saltash II as someone else has mentioned.

There was an Adams 10, "Spirit" that did a Sydney to Hobart. I don't know the details but I know that it has been mentioned here before.

There have been several Adam's 10s that have done Hobart. That was part of their shtick.. i.e. that they were built to a spec to race offshore. 

A10 Zig Zag did 2 Hobarts, in 81 & 82 according to the RSHYR records.

81 and 83 according to CYCA records. Here is a link to her finishing result in the '83.. http://rolexsydneyho...d=186&raceTime=

 

There were A10s in other races, I just don't know their names.



#112 Tunnel Rat

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 06:58 AM

If it is any help an MC38 that sails here has a SSS Base Value of 20 and a STIX value of 0.

 

From Offshore Regs :

3.04.3 Yachts shall demonstrate compliance with ISO 12217-2* Design Category A or
higher, either by EC Recreational Craft Directive certification (having obtained
the CE mark) or the designer’s declaration.
* The latest effective version of ISO 12217-2 should be used unless the yacht
was already designed to a previous version

 

3.04.4 For yachts which cannot demonstrate compliance in accordance with 3.04.3, a
yacht shall provide, as specified by the race organiser, either:

a) the stability index/AVS in ORC Rating System of not less than 115;
B) IRC SSS Base value of not less than 35;
c) a minimum STIX value of 32 and AVS not less than 130 - 0.002*m (Where “m”
is the mass of the boat in the minimum operating condition as defined by ISO
12217-2.)

 

The MC38 website http://www.mcconaghy...ifications.html says that it has a Cat A ISO Structural rating.  If so it the ISO rating would get it in, but the SSS base Value and STIX do not comply.



#113 lydia

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 08:34 AM

Offshore regs are not Hobart regs so irrelevent



#114 Tunnel Rat

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 08:39 AM

Offshore regs are not Hobart regs so irrelevent

I thought the original question was "MC38 - can it be made Cat 1".  Maybe it got changed into something about the Hobart subsequently........



#115 Trickypig

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 09:43 AM

Offshore regs are not Hobart regs so irrelevent

I thought the original question was "MC38 - can it be made Cat 1".  Maybe it got changed into something about the Hobart subsequently........

Yeah I know… two different things.

 

BUT, if you think it can do Hobart then it may be OK for many offshore races.



#116 Chris 249

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 11:14 AM

 

 

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

It was Harold Vaughan who sailed the Diamond to/from Port Phillip. I remember a photo of them rounding Wilson's Prom in a magazine many years ago. Harold went on to become a very well credentialled 5.5 metre sailor. I can't be bothered looking up the results but I'm tipping that Antares would feature as a Scandinavian Gold Cup or World Championship winner. I believe that the Diamond was in fact Saltash II as someone else has mentioned.

There was an Adams 10, "Spirit" that did a Sydney to Hobart. I don't know the details but I know that it has been mentioned here before.

There have been several Adam's 10s that have done Hobart. That was part of their shtick.. i.e. that they were built to a spec to race offshore. 

A10 Zig Zag did 2 Hobarts, in 81 & 82 according to the RSHYR records.

 

Waggers II did 80 or 82, as well. Like Spirit, Waggers was a flush decker whereas the guys on Zig Zag had the luxury of a cabin top. Waggers was Radford's boat; always comforting when the assistant designer will do a Hobart. I remember Joe telling me that they were designed to be able to race offshore and to last.



#117 Trickypig

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 10:41 PM

 

 

 

I think it was in the 1960's that some guys in Sydney decided to compete in a Diamond nationals held in Melbourne, so they sailed their Diamond from Sydney to Melbourne, won the Nationals and sailed it back to Sydney.

 

I own the only Reichel Pugh Shockwave 36 ever built, completely carbon/nomex (no e-glass etc) 11 m long 3.3 m wide 2.9 m deep weighing 2488kg in Cat 6 trim.

In Port Philip in 25 to 30 knots wind we've covered 7.2 nautical miles downwind in 21 minutes with green water in the cotpit when punching through the 2 to 2.5 m waves.

 

Never would I take this boat offshore, not because it could not be done, but because the potential for something going horribly wrong is too high. Hell of an exciting ride, right up until you inflate your lifejacket and pray someone finds you.

It was Harold Vaughan who sailed the Diamond to/from Port Phillip. I remember a photo of them rounding Wilson's Prom in a magazine many years ago. Harold went on to become a very well credentialled 5.5 metre sailor. I can't be bothered looking up the results but I'm tipping that Antares would feature as a Scandinavian Gold Cup or World Championship winner. I believe that the Diamond was in fact Saltash II as someone else has mentioned.

There was an Adams 10, "Spirit" that did a Sydney to Hobart. I don't know the details but I know that it has been mentioned here before.

There have been several Adam's 10s that have done Hobart. That was part of their shtick.. i.e. that they were built to a spec to race offshore. 

A10 Zig Zag did 2 Hobarts, in 81 & 82 according to the RSHYR records.

 

Waggers II did 80 or 82, as well. Like Spirit, Waggers was a flush decker whereas the guys on Zig Zag had the luxury of a cabin top. Waggers was Radford's boat; always comforting when the assistant designer will do a Hobart. I remember Joe telling me that they were designed to be able to race offshore and to last.

More A10 trainspotting… one did Melbourne Osaka



#118 SCANAS

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 11:25 AM

I know a 13 entered I didn't know a a10 did!!

Did she finish?

#119 Trickypig

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 11:39 PM

Yep. David Pryce.

 

Here's his blog  http://davepryce.blo...adventures.html






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