Jump to content


Watertribe race reports


  • Please log in to reply
89 replies to this topic

#1 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 05 March 2014 - 06:26 PM

I was thinking it might be  nice to have a thread for paople to post race reports in for the EC 2014 rather than mucking up the FrankenScot thread further.  I will type mine and post it here in a little while



#2 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 05 March 2014 - 07:06 PM

After last year's EC my wife and I were thinking that we would need to wait a little while to do an EC again as it was a load on our family having us both away.  Then over last summer I got a call from DonKeyHoTey asking if I would like to go again.  I jumped at the chance.  On the Tuesday before the start I flew to West Palm where DKHT lives and we started working on the boat.  It turns out we had a lot of work to do.  Our boat was once a Int. Lightning but is so far out of class spec that it really is more a unique sharpie now.  Per Had cut out much of the side thwarts (seats) to give us a place to lie down, and cut two holes in the aft deck for storage bins or for someone to sit in to keep the bow up if it was fresh.  Also completed was a new rudder that could be lifted and could kick back.  The ability for the rudder to kick back is a must in this event.  What was not completed or fully sorted was the mizzen mast (yup, that's right, mizzen mast)and the  various sail controls.  Most of the work was done but it needed the final setup.  We worked on punch lists on both Wed. and Thursday before finally heading to Clearwater on Thursday afternoon.  More work on Friday morning in a parking lot of a condo association (much to their dismay!).  Then it was off to the beach where we did more work, finally getting booted off the beach at sunset.  

 

The mizzen, while it seems wacky to most was actually quite effective.  First, we could fly more sail, a mizzen opti sail and a JY jib as a mizzen staysail (notice how tall the mast is).  Second, the sail area was low making it manageable.  Third, in very shallow water we could sail the boat more or less upwind without the blades down by balancing the trim and digging in the chine.  We used this in FL Bay and it was successful.  However one big issue was with the staysail set there was no way to tack or jib which made me very nervous.

Attached Files



#3 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 05 March 2014 - 07:45 PM

Day 1.

It was a beautiful start with the winds out of the East/ North East.  We pushed off the beach with no problems and headed for the outside route down to CP 1.  Right away there was tension as a tanker steamed through just as many of the tribers were crossing the channel.  A little too close for some.  We headed around the point on the south side, crossing over a few shoals and bars and tested our skinny water abilities.  The wind died a bit as we made our way south and backed to the North.  Once the shift was complete the wind started to build.  We were near several Hobie AI's and TI's and also Jarhead and Leather lungs.  The I550 (not Hot Canary) was behind us a ways but we had already seen the FrankenScot leave us in the dust as well as the Core Sound 17 of SambaSailor.  We sailed downwind making good time with the Lightning spinnaker. main, mizzen staysail and mizzen mainsail.  Seas built to about 4 feet or maybe a bit more and we had some great surfs hitting 11 knots.  That same I550 eventually passed us and pulled out about a mile or so lead on us.  Later afternoon we saw them round up, recover, and then several minutes later round up hard.  Keel partially out of the water, kite in the drink.  Shortly after they switched from their red kite to a black one, smaller I am guessing.  The jibed onto port for the approach to Stump Pass but we stayed on several more miles till we got the angle.  We dropped the mizzen staysail, took down the kite and jibed for Stump.  At the point we jibed we were about 5 miles out.  As we got closer to the beach we could see a parade of boats heading for the pass.  Stump Pass can be very dicey as there is a bar on the north side and the channel is very narrow and frequently fills in.  With high surf it can close out and then you either have to harden up and go North 9 miles to Venice, just run it, or head south to Gasparilla Pass.  We approached it cautiously, sailed through the zone where the waves stacked up, and then slid over the bar without issue.  We pulled in behind a double sea kayak with Hobie AI mamas and a sail.  I guess everyone was fast!  PenguinMan was a little way aft as well.  We made it through the pass, bore off into the ICW and I started dinner.  Some Mountain House freeze dried meals in a Mountain House Oven.  By the time we made the CP they were ready.  Hot food!  We pulled into the marina, tied up, hit our Spot's. and changed into our night clothing.  Then we ate, a quick chat with a few others and it was time to leave.  Total stopped time, about 1 1/2-2 hours.  The wind seemed to die while we were there but we pushed off to head south in the ICW, headed for Gasparilla and back outside.



#4 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 05 March 2014 - 08:19 PM

Looking forward to the rest of your story, Zero. Interesting addition of the mizzen sail. During leg1 Frankenscot was exceeding 16 knots (territory not explored during testing) and began having difficulty as the waves built. As they were exceeding wave speed, they would either lauch over the top, airborne, and land in front with a crash; or would plow into the back of the wave, stopping with a jolt, and causing gushes of watercoming in through bowsprit. Both situations placing tremendous loads on rig. They switched spinnakers, from the MH asymmetrical to the small symmetrical, and reduced speeds to a very comfortable and manageable 12kn, which also allowed them to sail a much deeper angle. No problem running Stump Pass, as they did so on a fast angle staying in front of breakers. At CP1 they duct-taped over and around the bowsprit to reduce water intake; and they dropped the mast to retrieve the lower spin halyard which they lost during the change. They had the fastest turn-around while I was there...roughly 10-15 minutes. They were really eager to get back out there... re-entered Gulf through Little Gasparilla Pass.

#5 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 05 March 2014 - 08:34 PM



#6 slip knot

slip knot

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 281 posts
  • Location:Ontario

Posted 05 March 2014 - 08:55 PM


What a fantastic collection of boats.
This race must be amazing to be part of.

#7 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 05 March 2014 - 09:00 PM

This race had a Lightning with an Opti mizzen.

 

That seems like a claim that needs a pic to back it up.

 

1911937_10202568727933448_1934191808_o.j



#8 DaveK

DaveK

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 6,706 posts
  • Location:Austin, TX

Posted 05 March 2014 - 09:02 PM

Yay! Thanks Tom!! I love the annual beach walk!!



#9 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 05 March 2014 - 09:26 PM

Thanks for the photo, Tom! I'm looking forward to hearing more story from Zero about the ketch-rigged Lightning.

#10 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 05 March 2014 - 09:33 PM

In case anyone missed these, Checkpoint 1 footage

 

 

And some pics and video from Checkpoint 2:

 



#11 everydaysailor

everydaysailor

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 05 March 2014 - 11:19 PM

ZTH, you guys looked amazing. You were sailing next to us (EHemmingway and Everyday) not Canary. We started slow and conservative having very little time in the boat (me none), and even went through the Southwest channel putting us way back - whatever, long race and we found a bit more breeze on the outside. We did have a couple of decent wipeouts but never put the kite in the drink- and yup, the black kite was a reacher for throttling down. Seems we took too much weight as we were often plowing not skimming. Our elongated keel with tons of surface area (no more bulb) didn't help. A bit edgy this little gal as both bodies are needed to recover from round ups, but she always came back - whew.
It was nice to finally pull away from you guys but it sure looked like you were snubbing the sheet down. Very impressed with the seaman like maneuver to go way out getting your angle. We were concerned as 1st timers in getting in before dark so we kept on trucking.
Everything was peachy until an unfortunate incident (not a grounding) that ended with a badly broken tiller (the kite was already down). We limped to the Southwest for sea room and Macgyvered a fix but thought it prudent to continue 11 miles to the South to Charlotte Harbor where we ended up anchoring for the night. We decided any jury rig was not acceptable and withdrew.
Lovely sail the next day to CHaze rowing in around 11AM where there just happens to be a rack and launch for 2 bucks a foot!
Canary team gave us a lift to Desoto to pluck trailor and car and we were heading North by dusk.
No regrets, much learned and some sweet sailing!
Congrats on an amazing effort ZTH - seems y'all sailed the smartest race.

#12 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 06 March 2014 - 04:49 AM

EverydayDailor, sorry if I mistyped. We saw you have a few scary moments and honestly my recollection of everything is a little fuzzy. Your boat looked great and you were really doing well. Hope the fix is not to expensive and that we might see you again

#13 everydaysailor

everydaysailor

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 121 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 06 March 2014 - 06:59 AM

ZTH - no worries, just meant to clarify. I'll be PMing to gather more info. Hope to meet up in the future. Once again, masterfully done.

#14 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 06 March 2014 - 02:25 PM

So where was I.....

 

  Left Cp1 and began paddling out to the ICW.  The little channel into CP1 is narrow and at night it's hard to find.  There was a cat coming into the CP and at first we were going to let them pass on our port side so we headed up.  As we got closer I could hear them swearing up a storm and I got a glimpse of an exposed mud bank they were sitting on.  Hard to port!  We cleared into the ICW and a few minutes later we had a boat along side.  Per thinks maybe they haven't been to CP1 so I ask them and they realize they have sailed right past it.  Around they go, heading North to get back to it.  Right near the CP is a ferry that crosses and Chief warns everyone to stay away from it.  Thinking it's an issue I hug the East side of the channel and promptly run us aground.  It won't be the last time.  The wind is light so Per decides to try out one of his new mods, the stand up rowing stations by the shrouds.  Now we had on;y finished installing these the day before the race and lets say they were not properly tested.  Per sets up the starboard oar, gives it a go, and crack, the deck fitting begins to come out.  So he decides to try port.  Same thing except this time the deck fitting and the base fitting fail.  Oops.  So he sets up the normal rowing setup and starts pulling.  We catch the Core Sound 20 of Doug Cameron (sp?) and have a little chat about what we are both going to do.  At the bridge Doug stays inside and we turn west and head for the outside.  Getting out was interesting since the channel along the causeway is not in the gps chart so I am flying blind.  Manage to get out the pass with a few moments of concern including one where we were sailing at 6 knots and Per seas an exposed bar about 60 feet ahead!  Once out in the open gulf the seas are still as big as they were earlier in the day but the wind has clocked back more to the east.  We settle in and Per gets some rest in the back of boat.  I had an awesome run that night sailing alone on the rail.  The boat was really flying.  No moon, but the stars were pretty good.  We eat up miles.  For a while I think I see a competitor ahead and am excited that we are gaining.  Turns out it's just a house.  Jedi mind tricks, just the beginning.  Per is up a few times but I am wired and can't sleep so I sail much of the night.  As we finally start rounding Sanibel Per jokingly says to me before he drifted off "Now it's easy, just go due south."  So for an hour or so I steer 180.  Then suddenly I think about it, check the gps and realize next stop is Cuba!  So I harden up a bit and have a course lay Marco Island.  The wind is East and as we get more and more exposed it starts to get rough.  After a while, I think around 2 a.m., I am beat and Per takes over.  I can't say I slept very well but it was better than nothing.  Not sure when I woke but Per says we just passed someone.  Sure enough I can still make out the sail.  Here we are 6 or so miles off shore and we pass someone just yards apart.  We sail together a while, strategizing and then a little before dawn Per goes off watch again.  A fog bank envelops us for a while.  Great, cold and wet!  At night we both wore our drysuits.  We also slept in them.  There was always water in the boat and it was the only way to do it.  Per would tuck in under a tarp, but I was worried about a capsize and being caught up in the thing so I would sleep out in the open.  No matter what system, we both woke up stiff with cold.  A little after dawn the fog lifted and we could finally see shore again.  We converged with the shore between Naples and Marco, intent on sailing Caxambas pass for a shorter distance and better angle to CP2.  Caxambas didn't work out as the tide was against us.  It's a fools errand to try so we just headed south and went around Cape Romano.  The wind got light and we struggled to get into CP2.  Looking at the tide charts it looked like the tide was going to be against us so Per decided to pour on the steam.  Sailing into Indian Key pass we had up the big symmetrical kite, the staysail, the main, the mizzen staysail, and the mizzen main.  Five sails up and pulling!  Turned out the tide was doing the predicted thing and we were riding the end of the flood in.  In no time we were in the bay and turning south.  I had Havanah Cafe on speed dial so we ordered dinner to go before hitting the CP.  Arriving at peak tide we totally avoided the mud.  Chokoloskee mud is legendary in the tribe for sucking boots off and making competitors cry.  In 2 years I have yet to experience it.  Total time in CP2 was about 45 minutes.  We headed out on falling tide.  Another huge bonus.  There is 2.5-3 knots of tidal current in the channels.  Trying to go against it is futile.



#15 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 06 March 2014 - 03:56 PM

So dinner in the boat was a bad idea for me.  After clearing the last of the mangroves we settled in on port and after about an hour Per got to dinner.  Earlier my cafe con leche had spilled in the bilge and I had only gotten a few sips.  Oh well.  The dinner had also fallen in the bilge but I thought I had saved them.  Turned out I had saved the top one.  So after Per ate I opened my container to find it full of water!  Not eating that.  Per had been peeing in the bailer which had a crack in it so who knows what was in that water!  Per analyzes the numbers and declares under current conditions we will need to head out 25 miles to lay the cape.  I declare there is no way I am sailing 25 miles off shore in a Lightning, at night.  We analyze the conditions constantly and come up with a theory, the wind will back more and more and we may not have to tack at all.  The wind was strong and we were going to weather making sleep very difficult.  We both managed a little but really not enough.  I developed a headache and wasn't feeling great, I was starting to not take care of myself properly and this would become an issue later.  That night I had vivid hallucinations.  The stars were traced into made up constellations, it was very cool but unnerving at the same time.  I kept thinking I could see shore even though I knew we way too far offshore.  There was a phantom palm tree following me just off to port.  We were 11 miles off the Everglades.  While sailing along in the dark we suddenly stopped, and a really weird feeling came over me.  I clicked on my head lamp and looked at the water, we were in the middle of a huge boil of water upwelling from below.  The water was full of sand and grit and had a strange color to it.  Spooky.  We pulled up the cb and rudder and drifted off the boil, finally free of it's grip.  All in all an unsettling experience.  Even as far off shore as we were the water depths are only around 20 feet or so and there are several currents converging out there.  Our theory on the wind played out and we kept getting lifted.  A little before dawn we passed East Cape close enough to hear the birds.  As dawn broke SOS and Poptarp came screaming out of CP3 in their tri, Mosquito.  They gybed, and passed us to close to leeward.  Great looking boat.  In our 2 second conversation we learned they were going outside, the long way around.  Not so painful in a boat that can do 20+.  We continued tacking up into CP3 and a while later we saw Sambasailor leaving the CP.  This put the fire in Per.  We analyzed their course and figured they too were going south too.  Per decides we are going to strike out across the bay, it's our only option if we want to try and beat Sambasailor.  We get into the CP, grab some food and caffeine, use the facilities and leave.  Total time in CP3, about 20 minutes.  Up next the exciting finish.......



#16 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 06 March 2014 - 05:11 PM

The strange upwelling you encountered could have been an artesian spring. Did you smell sulfur?



#17 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 06 March 2014 - 06:26 PM

Tom, you're probably correct.

#18 sailwriter

sailwriter

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 486 posts
  • Location:Tampa Bay

Posted 06 March 2014 - 09:07 PM

Fishing boats in the 17 - 1800's knew of at least five of those big upwellings in the Gulf of Mexico along the Florida west coast.

When they found themselves with a big storm coming they would find one nearby and stay in it for the duration.

Waves would break around them, but would be nearly smooth in the upwelling of these major springs.

Sadly, most of them are just trickles now, found by divers and fishermen to be of interest, but not upwelling to the surface as yours was.

Dave Ellis

Really old guy from Florida



#19 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 06 March 2014 - 10:14 PM

There is an artesian spring in Charlotte Harbor that you can still find by surface disturbance on a calm day.

 

There is also one in my yard. As far as I can tell, it is flowing at the same rate as it did when we first discovered it in the 1980s: about 60 gallons per minute. Keeps the pond nice and clear!



#20 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 07 March 2014 - 01:37 AM

I think that's it!  There was a smell!  Once we sailed onto it we just stoped.  It was a really strange situation.  Very odd.  We only got off by letting the boat drift off.  I'll finish in the morning.



#21 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 07 March 2014 - 01:38 AM

oh, by the way, there was another Coast Guard rescue tonight.  More later



#22 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 07 March 2014 - 04:16 AM

I think that's it!  There was a smell!  Once we sailed onto it we just stoped.  It was a really strange situation.  Very odd.  We only got off by letting the boat drift off.  I'll finish in the morning.


The smell is confirmation. Regular current eddies don't smell.

Fresh water is lighter than salt water so it floats on top. If you're a really thirsty old-time Cuban fisherman, you can dip it off the surface and drink it.

#23 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 07 March 2014 - 12:07 PM

I'm surprised those offshore springs still exist, saltwater intrusion into the aquifer is becoming a problem. BTW, Moresailesed's sister is a Geologist with USC&GS, I can direct her here if you want to learn more.

#24 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 07 March 2014 - 12:11 PM

Tom, I'm surprised your well is still going. My family had property E of Venice with an artesian well (3" pipe hammered into ground). Somebody from some govt agency came by and asked us to plug it, to save water.

#25 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 07 March 2014 - 01:23 PM

There are different aquifers. I don't know much about it, but my understanding is that salt water intrusion is a problem for the surface aquifer. It doesn't penetrate the deeper artesian layers because they are under pressure, coming from places uphill from here.

 

There is one at about 100 feet and another at about 300-400 feet here. The one that feeds my pond is in the deeper artesian layer, or so we think.

 

They tried to plug it a long time ago, without success. There's no well casing left to plug, just a bunch of quicksand. My brother said they put a shitload of concrete down there and the well just spat it out. How do you plug this? ;)

 



#26 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 07 March 2014 - 01:50 PM

Ah, I see. It sounds like yours is a natural spring. Yeah, tough to plug. In our case it was def man-made... someone hammered the pipe into the ground. It was easy to plug, but I suppose someday the pipe will rust through. We sold the property with the well a few years ago, so I dont know current status. Peep drove right by it on way to CP1, its within a stone's throw of I-75 exit...75 went right through middle of property with interchange smack in center.

#27 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 07 March 2014 - 02:25 PM

Ah, I see. It sounds like yours is a natural spring. ...

 


I've got a pretty funny story about that subject, but I only tell it in person. ;)



#28 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 07 March 2014 - 02:37 PM

LOL, got a few of same myself. Only one I can publicly tell is that my brother and I built a dirt-track stock car, and used to test it on I-75 before it was paved. No lights, no windows, no mufflers, sliding it around in the dirt.... what a blast!

#29 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 07 March 2014 - 04:24 PM

So we head out of CP3 figuring we are about 1.5 hours behind Samba sailor and no idea how far behind TwoBeers as they didn't put a time in the log at the CP.  Not sure if it was just forgotten but the rule state you need to put in a time.  We were a little miffed to not have that info but whatever, nothing to do but get out and sail.  After clearing most of the channel we turn east into a very light easterly and begin to strategize how we are going to get across.  The first obstacle is Tin Can Channel.  On the west end it's wide and we can tack up it, but by the East end it's about 30 feet wide or less and too shallow for the boards.  The tide is falling and the current is fairly strong going against us.  We decide to use a row-sail combination developed by Jarhead in his SeaPearl.  The idea is one person rows to leeward while the other sails the boat.  Each time we tack the other person rows.  This helps move the boat forward, generates apparent wind, and keeps flow over whatever underwater surfaces we have that are helping us go straight.  We deploy this tactic for about 2 hours and we can still see the CP behind us.  Pretty discouraging.  After what seems like forever we break free of Tin Can and head for the next channel.  Winds are light out of the east but we are able to sail bit a get a break.  We alternate between sailing and rowing for the next few hours slowly ticking away the miles.  It's hot and sunny and I have not been drinking enough water.  A mild headache sets in but I ignore it.  The forecast we had seen was for the wind to go south, then southwest, but so far it is still east, southeast.  We are constantly looking at the course ahead trying to figure out which way to go, TwistyMile, or CrocDragover.  Fl. Bay is a weird place, not conducive to sailing.  Water depths are generally 4 feet or less and you can not miss a channel.  The channels are often little more than a 1-2 foot deep ditches that the power boats and currents keep open.  In many places they are wide enough for 1 boat and one boat only.  It can be windy there with no ripples on the water.  It is unlike any other place in the world.  Very alien, very beautiful.  We settle in on CrocDragover since it will be a reach to get to it and then a beat in the deeper water on the other side to get to the finish.  Per tries to catch a quick nap.  Then My wife calls.  She is very excited on the phone, "Get across the bay NOW!  If you can cut across do it.  you are almost ahead of TwoBeers!"  I ask her about SambaSailor.  She says he is too far south, we already have a lead over them.  This news jolts Per up and we immediately start looking at what is the shortest course to the finish.  It's Twisty Channel.  We are a bit low but I can sail a course for the entrance so it's all hands to get the boat moving.  My wife also told us our Spot was not reporting.  We had both ditched our pfd's in the back of the boat and the Spot was pointed down.  I flipped it over and hit the "OK" button.  I look to Per and say "I bet that stops a few hearts!  Lets give the fans something to cheer for!"  We found out later it had the intended effect, TwoBeers wife saw us pop up on the tracker very close to them and was very surprised.  We now row-sailing again and hard.  We had to keep the speed up to get through Twisty Channel.  Man it is twisty!  Breaking free of that channel we head for Jimmy Channel, which we can sail to, the Manatee Pass, a run.  As we approach Manatee Per prepares to pour on more sail area.  We hoist the spin before Manatee and run down it.  Then we harden up to as high as we can sail with it to see if we can lay the finish.  We are low, but we are much faster than with just the jib.  Per hoists the staysail and mizzen staysail and we are sailing 5 sails again.  Then the header comes, and then the next.  Soon we are forced to drop the spin and staysails, hoist the jib and try and get through the last few islands.  The wind is dying too.  We break out the oars.  Where is TwoBeers?  We think we see him several times but can never make him out for sure.  Soon the wind is down to zip.  Initially I think we can go through the last few islands until I look at GoogleEarth.  The last sand bar is dry at low tide and l doubt we will make it over.  So I alter to the east heading for the ICW.  The sun is now down and the wind is zero.  I call Amber and just from her hello I know we lost TwoBeers.  She tells us they are finished.  We are about 3 miles from the finish.  We both deflate like balloons.  We have nothing left.  We alternate rowing and during one off shift Per falls asleep at the helm.  My head is pounding now.  I haven't been drinking nearly enough water.  Those last miles are agony.  My mind is totally scattered, I can't really focus.  Everything hurts.  We limp in to the finish.  We finish 2nd in class 4, 5th overall.  The boats that beat us are Scissors (SewSew), The modified Tornado (SwampMonkey), Mosquito (SOS), and FrankenScot (TwoBeers).  I hobble off the boat, grab a few beers and let it settle in.  We left St. Pete Saturday at 7 a.m. and finished Monday night at 9:40-ish p.m.  2 guys, a 40 year old Lightning, and 270 +- miles.  We secure the boat, and too tired for anything else, go to sleep.



#30 Just a Skosh

Just a Skosh

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 523 posts
  • Location:DC
  • Interests:sailing, backpacking

Posted 07 March 2014 - 04:36 PM

Fantastic race!!!!



#31 Steam Flyer

Steam Flyer

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 5,928 posts
  • Location:Eastern NC

Posted 07 March 2014 - 04:46 PM

Fantastic race!!!!

 

+1j

 

Thanks ZTH and everybody.

 

FB- Doug



#32 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 07 March 2014 - 05:06 PM

You guys gave it your all, good job! Taking the east route was a great decision, you had everything to gain and nothing to lose. A pretty fancy bit of navigating, too... AFAIK no other sailboat made it through that route this year.

#33 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 07 March 2014 - 05:12 PM

ZTH, I sense some disappointment in your result, but can't understand it. Frankenscot is a fast boat and the crew did a great job. You finished close behind. In a race this long, I call that essentially a tie.

 

How is this result bad??? From my perspective, you kicked serious butt!

 

The only bad part I see is not taking care of your health out there.



#34 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 07 March 2014 - 05:22 PM

ZTH, I sense some disappointment in your result, but can't understand it. Frankenscot is a fast boat and the crew did a great job. You finished close behind. In a race this long, I call that essentially a tie.
 
How is this result bad??? From my perspective, you kicked serious butt!
 
The only bad part I see is not taking care of your health out there.

I agree totally. You guys gave 110%, and even almost pulled off a furious rally at the end. Thats one hell of a remarkable feat.

#35 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 07 March 2014 - 05:34 PM

Zero, there was a whole group that helped TwoBeers put together FrankenScot... sailmakers, boat designers, other industry people. TwoBeers himself has won three world championships, too many National Championships to count, and is a Rolex Yachtsman of the Year. Moresailesed owns J-World Annapolis and is a USNA Offshore Sailing coach. Thats some serious competition you were up against, and you nearly pulled off a stunning upset. You guys definately had the FrankenScot crowd nervous as hell... I know, I'm part of them. Absolutely nothing for you to be disappointed about... you did one hell of a great job.

#36 slip knot

slip knot

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 281 posts
  • Location:Ontario

Posted 07 March 2014 - 06:21 PM

I absolutly have to get involved with this race. I love the all out adventure of it.
I assume the navigation is the most difficult part, what is the usual equipment?

#37 r.finn

r.finn

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,022 posts

Posted 07 March 2014 - 06:34 PM

ZTH, Thanks so much for taking the time to write all that out for us, and a definite congratulations on your result.  You should be very proud.



#38 Hobie Dog

Hobie Dog

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,782 posts
  • Location:Chesapeake Bay

Posted 07 March 2014 - 07:00 PM

ZTH, Thanks for the race report, was really fun to read. Congrats on your finish, you guys rocked it!



#39 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 07 March 2014 - 07:17 PM

I absolutly have to get involved with this race. I love the all out adventure of it.
I assume the navigation is the most difficult part, what is the usual equipment?

The navigation is a challenge for sure, and extremely important. I believe the kayakers just carry a GPS. Many of the sailboats carry a GPS (plus a spare), an iPad or tablet, and nav functions on their phones. The most important thing (other than a boat that doesn't break) is managing your sleep. You can tell from ZTH's account, sleeping on a small open boat is tough. Yet sleep you must, because even a short stop loses places. FrankenScot's crew had maybe two hours of sleep each by CP3, they were practically delerious. Yet they had to continue, heading south towards the ICW (and water deep enough to sail in)... at times they had to wade across the mudflats pulling the boat behind rfhem, looking for a swash channel. Positively grueling. Plus, with the likelyhood of encountering rough weather during the trip, just making it to the finish is a considerable feat. In fact, just getting to the start is a major accomplishment... takes a whole lot of preparation, training, testing, and practice.

#40 LLD

LLD

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 131 posts
  • Location:Halfway between equator and north pole

Posted 07 March 2014 - 07:23 PM

I absolutly have to get involved with this race. I love the all out adventure of it.
I assume the navigation is the most difficult part, what is the usual equipment?

 Here's the link to the Water Tribe site.   http://watertribe.org/

 

Under the "read this" tab you'll find the boat classes, warning, required equipment, and rules.



#41 MisterMoon

MisterMoon

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,105 posts
  • Location:Acworth, GA

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:31 PM

We had a good event, if a bit more conservative and slower than ZTH's. We arrived at 0533 on Thursday morning for a time of 4 days 22 hours and 27 minutes. We were 6th out of 21 monohulls and I think 31st overall out of ~115 starters. We were on the boat sailing for all but 5 or 6 hours, most of the break was in Choko waiting for the tide to turn. I'll write up a longer report when I get home and have access to a real keyboard. We've had a great time hanging out with ZTH and all the other tribers today. This is my fourth year involved with the tribe and can't say enough good things about it. The best thing is the people: watertribers are the most psi rice, passionate, committed, and get'r done group of folks anywhere. There are no whiners, no victims, and no one you would not want be associated with in the lot. Best week ever.

#42 MisterMoon

MisterMoon

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,105 posts
  • Location:Acworth, GA

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:37 PM


I absolutly have to get involved with this race. I love the all out adventure of it.
I assume the navigation is the most difficult part, what is the usual equipment?

 Here's the link to the Water Tribe site.   http://watertribe.org/
 
Under the "read this" tab you'll find the boat classes, warning, required equipment, and rules.

I'd be happy to talk to anyone about the EC if you read the site and have more questions. . Send me PM I'll give you my number.

#43 MisterMoon

MisterMoon

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,105 posts
  • Location:Acworth, GA

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:37 PM


I absolutly have to get involved with this race. I love the all out adventure of it.
I assume the navigation is the most difficult part, what is the usual equipment?

 Here's the link to the Water Tribe site.   http://watertribe.org/
 
Under the "read this" tab you'll find the boat classes, warning, required equipment, and rules.

I'd be happy to talk to anyone about the EC if you read the site and have more questions. . Send me PM I'll give you my number.

#44 MisterMoon

MisterMoon

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,105 posts
  • Location:Acworth, GA

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:37 PM


I absolutly have to get involved with this race. I love the all out adventure of it.
I assume the navigation is the most difficult part, what is the usual equipment?

 Here's the link to the Water Tribe site.   http://watertribe.org/
 
Under the "read this" tab you'll find the boat classes, warning, required equipment, and rules.

I'd be happy to talk to anyone about the EC if you read the site and have more questions. . Send me PM I'll give you my number.

#45 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 07 March 2014 - 11:37 PM

No disappointment here, just for a moment, it looked like we were going to slay the dragon.  I sailed to the best of my ability, pushed hard and had a great time.  I made mistakes, suffered and had great joy in our success.  More stories to come about late finishers, rich kids, a golf cart, trespassing, and Wolf Hounds.  Btw, both windsurfers finished.



#46 slip knot

slip knot

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 281 posts
  • Location:Ontario

Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:06 AM

Windsurfers????
Holy shit.
I thought the guy on the laser was hardcore.

#47 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:22 AM

I saw the windsurfers on Fort Desoto beach and thought "not again"

I saw a pic from CP2 and thought WTF? Really?

So they made it, huh? That's right up there with Shane the mad paddle boarder. Do they plan to follow his lead and continue on to Key West?

Crazy, lovable Watertribers!

#48 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 08 March 2014 - 12:45 AM

A SUP made it to the finish this year, too. Beat the windsurfers. Thats whats great about the EC, ya never know...

#49 bluelaser2

bluelaser2

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 250 posts
  • Location:CLE
  • Interests:Uh...Sailing ?

Posted 08 March 2014 - 01:07 AM

Superb writeup ZTH and congrats on a genuine, badass achievement.  My old body could not cash the check, but I enjoy the dream of still being able to write it someday....next best thing is detailed narrative from people who can get it done....



#50 eric nelson

eric nelson

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 126 posts
  • Location:Colorado
  • Interests:F-25C hull 22
    f-25c.blogspot.com

Posted 08 March 2014 - 02:01 AM

A SUP made it to the finish this year, too. Beat the windsurfers. Thats whats great about the EC, ya never know...

 

That is funny.  Last year Seadogrocket paddled a sea kayak and with good wind dreamed of windsurfing instead.  This year he windsurfed and had light wind, but at least he finished!



#51 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 08 March 2014 - 04:14 AM

the windsurfers finish was epic, as was the Scamp.  I will write it tomorrow on the plane as I head north again, back to the frozen tundra of VT.  Won't likely post it till Sunday afternoon though.



#52 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 08 March 2014 - 04:17 AM

A SUP made it to the finish this year, too. Beat the windsurfers. Thats whats great about the EC, ya never know...

 

That is funny.  Last year Seadogrocket paddled a sea kayak and with good wind dreamed of windsurfing instead.  This year he windsurfed and had light wind, but at least he finished!

except for today when it blew 25+ out of the West all day.  Double reefed they were hauling ass.



#53 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 09 March 2014 - 03:15 PM

Ok More stories.  First the Scamp.  For those that don't know I am including a pic of the Scamp.  Scamp was designed for the EC some years ago and so far two have attempted the race.  This year Fat Bottom Girl finished.  The boat is cute as a bugs ear and really a remarkable little craft.  Not for everyone but who cares.  So on Thursday afternoon a really nasty front came through and gave many of the remaining competitors a real challenge.  One was Wildblue in his Sirrocco 15 day sailor.  Wildblue was being blown into Snake Bay, dragging 2 anchors as he went.  He was pulling up so much stuff off the bottom he had several sharks circling his anchors snapping up any morsels that were disturbed.  Once the storm cleared Wildblue couldn't get his centerboard down.  Watching the tracker it looked like he was sailing with Fat Bottom Girl to get across the bay.  As they came into sight of the finish it became clear that he was actually being towed by FBG.  Wildblue was bare poled dragging a sea anchor and FBG was double reefed and they were still doing about 5 knots!  They got a helpful hint as to where the finish was from a Hobie AI and made just about the best landing ever.  The tow was dropped at just the right time, both boats knew what to do, and were in with little fuss moments later.  It was text book sailing and secured the crew of FBG instant tribe epic-ness.  Legendary stuff!



#54 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 09 March 2014 - 03:17 PM

oops, SCAMP link.

https://www.ghboats....-8-ft/12-scamp/

Attached Files



#55 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 09 March 2014 - 03:49 PM

Now on to the finish of BermudaBoy.  BermudaBoy and SeaDogRocket are both fellow Eckerd Gards who were attempting to be the first sailboars to finish an EC.  SDR did the EC last year in a kayak and had a good idea what he was getting himself into.  Both SDR and BB had the same setup and traveled the trip together.  On Friday as they crossed FL Bay winds were 20+ all day long.  After 6 days on the water you knew these guys were going to be fighting for every inch.  Their progress was steady on the tracker as they gybed their way down FL Bay.  Finally after many anxious hours (they had about 20 family and fans at the finish) they came into view.  Both had reefed down by zipping off the top 2 sections of the sail, a mod they said was well worth it.  As they made the last gybe for the finish one sail went down.  It turned out to be BB.  SDR made his way in to show BB where to go and after a few spills landed safely on the beach.  But BermudaBoy's sail wasn't coming back up.  It almost did a few times but we watched as he drifted past the finish.  It looked to us like he was in trouble.  MisterMoon, myself, SDR, and a few others took off running North to try and find where BB would make landfall.  Initially I was running through the backs of the little beach hotels but soon came to private property so I turned inland and headed for the road.  Wearing flip flops I wasn't exactly fast, the 4-5 beers in me weren't helping either.  I found a side road and ran down it.  A few driveways down I ran across in front of a guy in a golf cart.  Uh-oh, security?  Not sure.  I kept running, all the while thinking I would love a ride in that cart.  A minute or so later the cart comes up along side.  Now there is a passenger.  Turns out it is to local kids.  They think I have lost a boat and when I say no I am looking for a guy they get all excited and invite me to grab on the back.  I jump on and fill them in on what is going on.  They decide the best place to look is the little sailing club at the end of the road.  We arrive and I run out on the dock to see, nothing.  No BB!  Crap!  An employee runs up to find out what the hell is going on and after another quick explanation she offers a few suggestions.  The kids and I jump back on the cart and tear off again.  Wheels spitting sand as we go.  One kids says, "Hey, we ought to get my Dad's boat!", and of course I think this is a great idea.  Wer pull back into the kids driveway and I am instantly impressed.  Several windsurfers, a rib, and loads of sailing stuff in the open garage.  I ask if we are using the rib and the kid says no.  Good, that would have taken too long to launch.  One kids runs in teh front door and the other kid is going on about how he wants to do the EC now that he has heard of it in his 29'er.  I am all wet from helping other boats in and I offer to go around the house.  The kids says not to worry so we run inside.  Wow, somebody's parents did well!  Great house, high ceilings, nice kitchen, pool.  And 2 center console high end fishing boats on lifts just past the pool!  Nice!  One kid grabs the keys and we tear out past the pool, and run right into MisterMoon and the others hovering over BB!  BremudaBoy has the rig stowed and is getting on the board to paddle in.  "Don't touch him!" everyone yells at once.  BB is going to do this thing, he is going to finish.  So he takes of paddling straight into the wind.  We are all yelling encouragment and he slowly makes it out past the piers.  I thank the kids, tell them where to get info on the Tribe and we start to head back.  Well this little beach we are standing on is the kids neighbors backyard and suddenly two of the biggest Wolf Hounds I have ever seen come running out the back slider!  Time to go!  There was a low fence but the dogs could have walked over it.  Fortunately they were well trained an only made us soil ourselves, they didn't attack!  So back to the finish we go, through all the back yards cheering BB on.  A few minutes later he arrives to his well wishers and it's a mob.  His wife is in hysterics, crying as she hugs him in the surf.  His son (?) tries to spray champaign on him but winds up tossing the bottle as he runs and gives BB a huge hug.  Not a dry eye in the whole place!



#56 Doug Lord

Doug Lord

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,022 posts
  • Location:Cocoa Beach, FL
  • Interests:Foiler design and development,.........sailing fast,
    movable ballast systems and..... justice.

Posted 09 March 2014 - 04:40 PM

ZTH- your reports have been magnificent-thanks!



#57 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:45 PM

Any of you swabs drink beer enroute?



#58 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 09 March 2014 - 06:53 PM

SteerswithBeers did.  CrazyLugan had some rum onboard.  Not sure but I am sure others did.  The kayakers sometimes bring a flask.



#59 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 09 March 2014 - 07:54 PM

Made my day...thanks!



#60 Snore

Snore

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 102 posts
  • Location:S FLA
  • Interests:Sailing,

Posted 09 March 2014 - 10:25 PM

First congrats to all.


I absolutly have to get involved with this race. I love the all out adventure of it. I assume the navigation is the most difficult part, what is the usual equipment?

 

The navigation is fairly easy. Keep the infield on your left, just like NASCAR. When I paddled the race I carried a GPS to make sure I paddled a straight line, allowing myself to go only 50-75' off the course line. Sailing a Kruger was slightly different. The keys for a single hander are sleep management and as ZTH discovered, eating right. This event proves the classic GIGO, eat heavily processed food and your body does not perform well and you see strange things. Eat simple/healthy, be in decent condition, get good sleep cycles and you can make yourself go 24-36 hours.

 

Any of you swabs drink beer enroute?

.

Always did the race with a bottle of Jack. Did the round Florida race with the "magnum" size bottle and ran out coming down the Suwannee. Single handing, a big dinner and a taste both puts you to sleep and eases the arthritis pains.

Anyone thinking of doing the race, should do their homework and then go for it. The biggest mistake the virgins make is taking the event too lightly. Feel free to PM.

Bill
A/K/A SnoreBringGator
5-EC and 1-UFC

#61 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 10 March 2014 - 12:11 AM

Great finish line reports, ZTH!

#62 MR.CLEAN

MR.CLEAN

    Anarchist

  • Reporters
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 32,318 posts
  • Location:Everywhere you want to be
  • Interests:.

Posted 12 March 2014 - 02:42 AM

nice work ZTH.  edited you a bit and posted up front.

 

http://sailinganarch.../11/the-glades/



#63 Groucho Marx

Groucho Marx

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 154 posts
  • Location:auckland, nz
  • Interests:varied

Posted 12 March 2014 - 05:59 AM

Great writing Zerohero - heroic effort; - we HAVE to organize a similar race challenge here.

#64 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 12 March 2014 - 04:18 PM

Nice writeup, ZTH. TwoBeers wife, Bookworm, was contacted by a National mag to do a writeup on the Challenge, so she can't comment here. But she did start putting together some snippets of GoPro video here:
http://m.youtube.com...e&v=gysVX948iKY

#65 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 12 March 2014 - 07:16 PM

I got a pretty good shot of Frankenscot while standing on the "beach" at CP1. Let Bookworm know she's welcome to it if wanted.

 

frankenscot-cp1.jpg



#66 Geff

Geff

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,288 posts
  • Location:Ann Arbor, MI

Posted 12 March 2014 - 07:44 PM

Excellent write up, and congratulations!  Swamp Monkee was who I kept track of the most, but seeing you all nearby was just as edge of the seat exciting.  Nicely done!  Thanks for all of this!



#67 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 13 March 2014 - 04:45 AM

Nice writeup, ZTH. TwoBeers wife, Bookworm, was contacted by a National mag to do a writeup on the Challenge, so she can't comment here. But she did start putting together some snippets of GoPro video here:
http://m.youtube.com...e&v=gysVX948iKY

snif, nobody contacts me!



#68 taobsu

taobsu

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 44 posts

Posted 14 March 2014 - 01:31 AM

Terrific write-up!   Thanks!

 

It  just like reading the book of that heroic Everest adventure ("Into the thin air").  

 

The story line has all the ingredient of an INDIE documentary film !



#69 couchsurfer

couchsurfer

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 9,068 posts
  • Location:NA westcoast
  • Interests:...pimping HOOTs
    ...i550 NW circuit

Posted 14 March 2014 - 05:41 AM

.

 .......... I'm a bit late t'join in ,,what was the story for the two modified i550's??



#70 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 14 March 2014 - 09:48 AM

Hot Canary broke a rudder approaching CP 1 and were towed in and withdrew. They were not far behind Frankenscot at the time. I don't remember what happened to the other.



#71 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 14 March 2014 - 11:58 AM

Nice writeup, ZTH. TwoBeers wife, Bookworm, was contacted by a National mag to do a writeup on the Challenge, so she can't comment here. But she did start putting together some snippets of GoPro video here:
http://m.youtube.com...e&v=gysVX948iKY

snif, nobody contacts me!

Like lots in the human world, ya didn't have the clout.



#72 SoAPieceOfStringWalksIntoABar...

SoAPieceOfStringWalksIntoABar...

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 600 posts
  • Location:N E MO

Posted 14 March 2014 - 01:15 PM

I think these are pics of the other i550's tiller breakage:
http://storyhouse.or...o/Pages/18.html

#73 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 14 March 2014 - 01:21 PM

Couchsurfer, the second i550 broke their tiller and went in at Boca Grande and anchored. Couldn't effect an adequate repair and withdrew. The C Scow was taking on water (from the waves, I assume), and beached the boat nearly swamped at Sanibel Lighthouse Sunday morning.

ZTH, maybe no national mag, but front page of SA. Not bad, and probably similar viewership numbers.

#74 RKoch

RKoch

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 490 posts
  • Location:da 'burg

Posted 14 March 2014 - 01:23 PM

Couchsurfer, the second i550 broke their tiller and went in at Boca Grande and anchored. Couldn't effect an adequate repair and withdrew. The C Scow was taking on water (from the waves, I assume), and beached the boat nearly swamped at Sanibel Lighthouse Sunday morning.

ZTH, maybe no national mag, but front page of SA. Not bad, and probably similar viewership numbers.

#75 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 14 March 2014 - 03:07 PM

RKoch, no worries I was kinda joking.  Per and were wondering about the C Scow.  Early in day 1 they walked away from us pretty quick.  As the seas picked up we were wondering how they would make out.  That first night there was pretty decent wind on the outside route around Sanibel Island.  As we started to get exposed to the east it got rough.  We still had the remains of the swell from the north from the day, but now had chop from the Easterly.  The chop wasn't too big but it made for interesting sailing.  We were not quite hard on the wind on Port and the swell would lift our stern and we would take off surfing.  As we gained speed I would head off a little to keep the sails from luffing and the boat would start slapping the bow on the chop, which was going across the swell.  It sounded bad and Per would wake up wondering what the hell I was doing.  It wasn't terribly wet but it was confused.  We were seeing boat speeds from the low 6's to the about 9 knots.  A scow could easily have had it's hands full.  We took on water the whole race.  Getting the boat off the trailer at the start we banged the open bailer on the trailer frame.  Not sure if that was the issue or if it was the two Holes Per drilled in the transom for the boomkins downhaul.  They were very close to the waterline.  We found out later they were under when we healed.  It just meant we had to bail a lot.  



#76 Tom Ray

Tom Ray

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 25,623 posts
  • Location:Punta Gorda FL
  • Interests:~~/)/)~~

Posted 15 March 2014 - 11:34 AM

That's why I love Watertribers. Inventing and installing propulsion systems right up to, and sometimes after, the start of the race.

 

I hope the scow people keep trying. One of these years, one of them has got to stay intact the whole way, right?



#77 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 15 March 2014 - 12:35 PM

Tom Ray, may happen but they are not called inland racers for nothing...simply not big water...and there are many boats that operate on the same principle that are designed for big water, but what the hay...what the event is all about!



#78 GybeSetŪ

GybeSetŪ

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,217 posts
  • Location:the 'River of Light', Tomorrow-morrow Land

Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:25 PM

E=scow with double floor ?



#79 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:31 PM

A C boat, only one I have sailed, with a double floor or E boat might as well have no cockpit...not much cube and so spendy...but full deck would make it near indestructible, no doubt.

 

And lighten the sucker a hundred pounds or so...they are not light.

 

Might be better with a decked MC boat or even a lightened X. Fun thoughts. Me? I will show next year with modern Malibu Outrigger...simple works best, cept maybe in Scizzors' case?

 

Okay, I want to know how the surf-boarders and even kayakers carry all the required stuff...I am already preparing and I do not know if my rig will float evenly...?

 

They tow it?



#80 GybeSetŪ

GybeSetŪ

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 21,217 posts
  • Location:the 'River of Light', Tomorrow-morrow Land

Posted 15 March 2014 - 01:43 PM

nevertheless it could be done



#81 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:04 PM

Most definitely...fun too! Crazy idea...like a giant surf board with scow sailing lift.

 

So, how do the small crafts carry the stuff?



#82 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 15 March 2014 - 03:51 PM

BobBill, you have to pick your gear carefully.  The kayaks carry everything required, the sailboards and SUP's too.  You have to get creative.  A sleep system can be a tent, sleeping bag, pad, and pillow.  Or it can be a hammock with a rain fly.  Or a bivy sack, with sleeping bag.  For hot food you can get freeze dried meals from Mountain House and Backpackers Pantry and either use a jet boil or a Mountain House Oven.  Other food is usually canned meats (Spam, Tuna, Chicken, Salmon), energy bars, water (about 4 gallons usually), nuts, etc.  You need the ability to boil water.  Some bring the Jetboil, others smaller camp stoves, some just bring waterproof matches and tinder. Clothing is fairly easy.  For camp clothing I carry a fleece hat, a wool Buff, a clean pair of wool socks, EMS boxers, and a windproof top and bottom (cool weather running clothing).  I put that in an E-Vent dry bag (EMS).  For sailing clothing I bring a baseball hat, cotton Buff, 2 Techwick sort sleeve t shirts, 2 long sleeve Techwick shirts, a fleece, 2 pairs of quick drying zip off pants (pants and shorts in one), 2 pairs technical socks, 2 pairs of boxers, a dinghy top, dry suit, 2 pairs sailing gloves, and watershoes.  You could easily just pack 2 swimsuits and skip the boxers.  Don't forget you be wearing some of this stuff at the start and at all times so it isn't all in the dry bags.  I start with 1 pair socks, one pair boxers, one pair shorts, one t-shirt, usually the fleece, one pair gloves, the water shoes, pfd, and the drysuit on.  You still need a place to put it, but you will never be storing everything at once. Then you have your electronics which isn't much.  Kayaks usually have them mounted on deck or in a deck bag.  You need a gps, Vhf, Spot, Plb, smart phone, headlamp, solar charger or battery backup, flash light.  Many have GoPro's but those are usually on their mounts so no issues there.  Many kayakers also carry an under deck bag for little stuff.  Mounts between the knees.   A lot of stuff will be on your pfd (PLB, VHF, Spot, etc.) Water is either in bottles or dromedary bags, usually just behind the seat in a kayak.  The trick is to buy the stuff early, like 8 months minimum before the race.  Get all the dry bags you need and then some, and practice packing.  Pack and unpack, practice at night, in the rain, when it's cold, etc.  Imagine a scenario where you need something specific, like your fleece, and try and get it out quickly.  This applies to sailboats too.  Practice sailing at night and practice packing and unpacking at night.  Once you get a few practices in you will get a feeling for what you need to put where.  Always pack the boat the same once you know what you are taking and where you are putting it.  



#83 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 15 March 2014 - 03:54 PM

This is by no means a complete list, btw.  There are lots of little things that you will need/want as well.  If you are practiced it goes well, if not you won't know till it's an issue



#84 DonKeyHoTey

DonKeyHoTey

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Location:SE FL
  • Interests:Small, fast boats.

Posted 15 March 2014 - 09:24 PM

Excellent writeup and packing list, amigo (BTW, I think the 'yakkers can get it down to about 40# of stores and gear, minimum). 

 

If we do another campaign together, I'll put you in charge of packing for me.  I hate packing, as you've noticed.  Rather be working on the boat, putting holes in the hull -- or sailing it.  Blaming my ADD.

 

Thanks for documenting our voyage, and helping make it so successful.  Your helming -- and rowing -- were impressive! 

 

I'm still trying to figure out what was our secret sauce.  Maybe having still not packed my bags 6 hours before the start?  :D  

 

More seriously, I do think that the particularly extensive modifications to the 45 year old Hare-on-Fire (ex-Lightning #11379) for this year's EC have made her a MUCH better EC sled than the first year I entered her in EC'11.  That year Anarchist MicroTom and I couldn't find ANYWHERE on the boat to get some sleep without getting a nasty crick in the neck, and having replaced much of the hard (uncomfortable) cockpit thwarts/flotation with the inflatable rollers this year made a huge difference.  I slept like a baby (except for the incessant/scary Lightning flat-forefoot pounding in the lumpy GoM that I heard super-loud now that I could get my ear down on the cockpit floor).  Sorry you didn't fare as well.  Was it my driving?  

 

As you already mentioned, also very important was the new, simple and sturdy rudder.  After two EC broken rudders in a row, each due to a single bolt failure, Hare's '14 rudder, which re-purposed the wet part of last year's busted "steampunk" kickup rudder with 2-dozen+ bolts(!), has NO BOLTS.   Its simple, sturdy OZ-box (cassette) allows for altering not just draft, but wetted surface (helm balance) responsive to conditions and CE/CLR changes depending on whether or not the mizzen is stepped and flying, c/b raised, etc. Bingo!

 

The most obvious and important physical mod was of course the removable mizzen.  ZTH, I know that from your sprint-to-the-weather-mark one-design dinghy perspective, my split-rig bodge seemed dodgy at first.  But -- until this year -- a sloop had never won Class 4 (monohull sailboat) -- and there are good reasons for that. 

 

Admittedly, the Opti-mizzen could well have proven a big waste of time, effort, some money, and some unnecessary holes, hardware, weight, etc in the Hare's tail.  It's hard to figure out how to get something like that right the first time, so I did no end of hemming, hawing, and head scratching before firing up the RotoZip and hole saw.  Especially those holes in the hull!  And the mizzen's Heath Robinson appearance, steppable either port or starboard side, with super-long twin boomkins, was not helped by all the wrinkles and rips in my son's 20+ year old Opti sail-now-mizzen sail, and your none-too-crisp JY15 jib-now-mizzen-stay'sl.  Who knows what could have happened if we had a nice high-perf sail on there, or I'd at least gotten the mizzen-tops'l sorted in time.

 

But even without that 6th potential sail ;), the rig worked even better than I could have hoped just in terms of adding easily-handled SA down low and helping to balance the helm, particularly in super-skinny water, etc.  And thankfully we didn't even have to test out some of my many reasons for adding an easily stepped/unstepped mizzen.  Such as loss of the (main)mast, which HAPPENS in the EC -- particularly to folks who are leading at the time, like Ridgerunner in '12 -- whose mizzen saved them from being blown offshore to Mexico or Cuba, or SOS last year -- who actually finished under mizzen alone -- and in record time. 

 

I'm frankly a little surprised that neither Frankenscot with its 500sf mast-head spin (etc etc) nor the Hare with its slightly less ambitious but still pretty aggressive stock Lightning mainsail plan (plus assy) didn't see our 45-year old rigs go overboard.  I'll credit the Goldilocks winds this year.  This old salt DEFINITELY does not want to be out there in a howler in the middle of the night, trying to figure out for the first time in 60+ years how to use my main-boom as a jury-rig mast......

 

The bottom line is that you gotta get to that finish line, because if you don't make it to the finish, you can't get your sharks-tooth, much less win...   That is the key lesson that newbies in particular tend to find out the hard way.  This is not an inshore round-the-buoys drag-race with lots of close-hauled roll-tacks, and crash boats to save your sorry freezing soul and sinking hardware.  Folks don't appreciate either how rough it can (and usually does) get out there in early March, nor how incredibly tired (and stupid) they can become, trying to keep their skittish skiffs right-side-up and off the scallop bars and mud flats for at least a couple of long, long days and inevitably DARK nights.  Having the fastest Ferrari is good for nothing if you can't drive it off-road in the skinny or gnarly stuff or it can't be rowed decently or slept in, or it's too breakable.  Inevitably, much of the 300 miles is a reach or run, and often in conditions where the sport-boats can't perform to their published DP-Ns -- especially if that requires more than 2 crew and/or someone out on a trap.

 

And some reserve scantlings, key spares, and realistic contingency plans (including a good anchor and rode) are essential, because this event has a large "luck" element to it, and sometimes you're just plain unlucky. 

 

And sometimes you're just incredibly lucky, and nothing critical breaks, and the tides and winds are with you, and and.....   Thank you, ye gods and sea-demons, for smiling on us this time!

 

DonKeyHoTey (Per)

 



#85 BobBill

BobBill

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,768 posts
  • Location:Wakes in Gingerville, SE Minnesota.
  • Interests:Just a tinge of gray hair but you name it!

Posted 16 March 2014 - 01:17 AM

First, ZerotheH and DonKeHoTe...merci...amazing pragmatic minds...



#86 CrazyR

CrazyR

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 183 posts

Posted 19 March 2014 - 08:35 PM

There is a good write up in Tampa Bay Times about windsurfers

http://www.tampabay....allenge/2170114



#87 hendrix1

hendrix1

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts

Posted 21 March 2014 - 03:37 PM

https://www.youtube....e=youtube_gdata

 

 

Here is video of me Crazylugan and WildCard doing the race in our Hobie 16.



#88 Hobie Dog

Hobie Dog

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,782 posts
  • Location:Chesapeake Bay

Posted 21 March 2014 - 05:07 PM

https://www.youtube....e=youtube_gdata

 

 

Here is video of me Crazylugan and WildCard doing the race in our Hobie 16.

Awesome!



#89 LLD

LLD

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 131 posts
  • Location:Halfway between equator and north pole

Posted 22 March 2014 - 09:01 PM

https://www.youtube....e=youtube_gdata

 

 

Here is video of me Crazylugan and WildCard doing the race in our Hobie 16.

 

What a hoot - congrats!  Gee, you guys smoked Fred.  

 

Great to see Michigan so well represented - though had to be tough returning to the land of ice and glaciers.  



#90 zerothehero

zerothehero

    Anarchist

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,362 posts
  • Interests:sailing. Duh.

Posted 23 March 2014 - 02:37 AM

Another great write up

 

http://smallcraftadv...-blog/?author=1






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users