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Six Miles of Ocean Imploded a Robot Submarine


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#1 Face_

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 09:22 PM

RIP Nereus (Unmanned ROV)

 

Thoughts on Deep water exploration?

 

Good quote by Jonathan Copley, University of Southampton:

The loss of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) or autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is utterly crushing for those aboard a research expedition and their colleagues ashore. But whenever we send something into the ocean depths, there is never an absolute guarantee that it will come back. There is always a risk involved, although we minimise risk through preparation and manage it in our expedition plans.

 

The only way to avoid risk completely is not to go at all; some risk will always be there, and that means that sometimes the dice will not roll in our favour.

 



#2 R Booze

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 09:27 PM

Oh lord, it wasn't like a greyhound bus full of smoking hot lingerie models got killed in a lava flow----its a f'ng machine. Build another one. That's what Eddie would have done.....

#3 TheFlash

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:00 PM

"is utterly crushing"

 

Ha!



#4 Innocent Bystander

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:13 PM

Think how many grant proposals they had to write to convince someone to buy them a new toy and then they went and broke it. Their spirits must have sunk to the bottom.

#5 Face_

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:18 PM

ha! I just found this on TheRealCape done by locals. I live a short distance from WHOI.

 

 

 

RawStory.com – Hollywood director James Cameron on Tuesday mourned a “tragic loss” after a deep sea research vessel imploded nearly 10 kilometres (six miles) beneath the surface of the Pacific Ocean.

The Nereus robotic research vehicle was exploring the Kermadec Trench, several hundred kilometres north of New Zealand, when it was crushed by the extreme water pressure.

“I feel like I’ve lost a friend,” Cameron posted Tuesday on the Facebook page of the US-based research body the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), which was operating the Nereus.

“Nereus was an amazing, groundbreaking robot and the only currently active vehicle in the world that could reach the extreme depths of the ocean trenches. This is a tragic loss for deep science.

“They’ve not only lost a child, they’ve lost a great opportunity to explore one of the ocean’s deep trenches — the last great frontier for exploration on our planet,” Cameron wrote.

The “Titanic” and “Avatar” director is also a renowned deep sea explorer. In 2012 he made a record-setting solo dive to the world’s deepest ocean point in the Marianas Trench in his Deepsea Challenger submersible, which he later donated to WHOI.

 

Holy shit James take it down a notch will ya? I think all of those deep sea dives gave you permanent vertigo or something. I get that it’s tragic to lose such an expensive machine that so many people put a ton of time into, but it’s a fucking MACHINE! This guy just took irrational correlation to an entirely new level. You feel like you’ve lost a friend? Really? I’m going to guess you’ve never lost a friend then, because there’s zero chance that losing a robot is anything like losing a friend. I don’t care how many nights you spooned with The Terminator.

 

Then he takes it one step further, he doesn’t say it’s “like” they lost a child, he says they did lose a child. Ummm… no they fucking didn’t James. None of those scientists carried Nereus in their uterus for 9 months. The robot was not spawned from any of their sperm. They don’t share DNA with the god damn thing James. They didn’t bring it bowling, they aren’t renting it shoes, their not buying it a fucking beer. I think you might need to take a break from technology for a while and get some intimate human contact before YOU turn into a robot.

P.S. Seriously though, tragic loss for WHOI, as tragic as losing any robot on earth can be, a ton of work gone in an instant, sorry guys.



#6 R Booze

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 10:37 PM

I think Cameron took his break-up with DiCaprio a bit harder than previously though....

#7 Ancient_Mariner

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 11:00 PM

I just got a sinking feeling and I'm drowned in deep sorrow.



#8 Mark K

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 11:30 PM

 Don't let the pressure get you down.  



#9 Point Break

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 11:32 PM

Don't you hate it when they just collapse under pressure..........HTFU sub.

#10 MaxHeadroom

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 11:50 PM

Given the pressure they were working under, they knew, deep down inside, in that place where nobody want's to go - They ran the risk being subjected to a crushing defeat.



#11 R Booze

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 11:58 PM

Given the pressure they were working under, they knew, deep down inside, in that place where nobody want's to go - They ran the risk being subjected to a crushing defeat.



I can hear Cameron's screenwriters now:

'I'm at the bottom of the world!.....

#12 Pete M

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 12:25 AM

wtf - none of it was a real pressure vessel - eutectic foam and some black boxes and batteries and propulsion motors- most filed with fluids to equalize the pressure difference

#13 2to1

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 12:51 AM

RIP Nereus (Unmanned ROV)

 

Thoughts on Deep water exploration?

 

Good quote by Jonathan Copley, University of Southampton:

The loss of a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) or autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) is utterly crushing for those aboard a research expedition and their colleagues ashore. But whenever we send something into the ocean depths, there is never an absolute guarantee that it will come back. There is always a risk involved, although we minimise risk through preparation and manage it in our expedition plans.

 

The only way to avoid risk completely is not to go at all; some risk will always be there, and that means that sometimes the dice will not roll in our favour.

or; you fuck with the bull, you get the horns.



#14 Sol No-Ebola Rosenberg

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:02 AM

Those up above never care about the pressure felt by those in the trenches.  



#15 Dorado

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:07 AM

wtf - none of it was a real pressure vessel - eutectic foam and some black boxes and batteries and propulsion motors- most filed with fluids to equalize the pressure difference

 

The Fools !

 

If only they had used some solid copper heat diffusers and defroster plates,

this tragedy could have been averted.



#16 R Booze

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:09 AM

wtf - none of it was a real pressure vessel - eutectic foam and some black boxes and batteries and propulsion motors- most filed with fluids to equalize the pressure difference

 
The Fools !
 
If only they had used some solid copper heat diffusers and defroster plates,
this tragedy could have been averted.


And if only they had painted it yellow orange.....

#17 Dorado

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:12 AM

Those up above never care about the pressure felt by those in the trenches.  

 Werd

 

Of course this brings up the age old question

 

Ginger or Marianas ?



#18 Snaggletooth

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:14 AM

wtf - none of it was a real pressure vessel - eutectic foam and some black boxes and batteries and propulsion motors- most filed with fluids to equalize the pressure difference

 

The Fools !

 

If only they had used some solid copper heat diffusers and defroster plates,

this tragedy could have been averted.

A shifster woud of helped to.              :)



#19 Snaggletooth

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:16 AM

Ginger or Marianas ?

Undere pressiure...... Marrianas            :)



#20 Tunnel Rat

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:18 AM



#21 Snaggletooth

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:20 AM

Greate toone TR!          :)



#22 Dorado

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:24 AM

This thread needs some Toots



#23 Timo42

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 01:47 AM

This thread needs some Toots

 

 

What the hell, I don't have any warning points yet. B)



#24 Dorado

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 02:20 AM

Hey now !

 

Fire up that Toots vid. Let it get rolling . . .

 

 

and then scroll up to Snaggy's cat.

 

:lol:  



#25 R Booze

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 02:28 AM

Hey now !
 
Fire up that Toots vid. Let it get rolling . . .
 
 
and then scroll up to Snaggy's cat.
 
:lol:  



Jello submarine?....

#26 Snaggletooth

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 02:41 AM

Tottalle deraille.....

 

:)



#27 Timo42

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 04:32 AM

Little detour...

 



#28 Ancient_Mariner

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 04:40 AM

The obvious....

 



#29 JBSF

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 04:44 AM

Someone needs to do a deep dive into its design parameters.  Maybe the engineers were a bit out of their depth.



#30 Ned

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 10:19 AM

So what they killed a robot.  They'll likely kill more.  

 

First rule of ocean research.  Anything that goes over the side is disposable.  It's best to understand that before starting, and especially before they close the hatch on the subs pressure sphere and you are on the inside of the sphere.  



#31 mikewof

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 12:31 PM

Laker, you around buddy? interested in the backstory on this one.

#32 Laker

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 04:35 PM

There really isn't a back story on this one because its not known what caused the implosion and since a federal inquiry is not going to be done to satisfy the widows, it probably wont.  There does seem to be a bit more cavalier approach to check-lists, etc. upon diving as there is no pilot, but the number of dead ROVs, especially in the early years, that were pulled back by their tether are legion.  Flooded control cans were a biggy.



#33 Mark K

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 04:50 PM

So what they killed a robot.  They'll likely kill more.  

 

First rule of ocean research.  Anything that goes over the side is disposable.  It's best to understand that before starting, and especially before they close the hatch on the subs pressure sphere and you are on the inside of the sphere.  

 

 Not sure you have grasped the gravity of the situation. 



#34 IrieMon

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 05:28 PM

Anything that goes over the side is disposable

 

 

Including foredeck crew.....    (and James Cameron)



#35 Shaggy

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 05:42 PM

wtf - none of it was a real pressure vessel - eutectic foam and some black boxes and batteries and propulsion motors- most filed with fluids to equalize the pressure difference

 

The Fools !

 

If only they had used some solid copper heat diffusers and defroster plates,

this tragedy could have been averted.

I thought it was all about ball bearings....  



#36 Laker

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 08:30 PM

So what they killed a robot.  They'll likely kill more.  

 

First rule of ocean research.  Anything that goes over the side is disposable.  It's best to understand that before starting, and especially before they close the hatch on the subs pressure sphere and you are on the inside of the sphere.  

I don't know about you, but I am not disposable.  Staying around this long is a result of being the Chicken of the Sea, really taking care of your check lists and making sure that the sub has an up to date inspection report. 



#37 Nacradriver

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 08:47 PM

 

wtf - none of it was a real pressure vessel - eutectic foam and some black boxes and batteries and propulsion motors- most filed with fluids to equalize the pressure difference

 
The Fools !
 
If only they had used some solid copper heat diffusers and defroster plates,
this tragedy could have been averted.


And if only they had painted it yellow orange.....

Isn't orange the new black



#38 Nicolations

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 09:03 PM

Awesome science trips up annnnd....

Sailing Anarchy to the rescue!

funny stuff guys

#39 Ned

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Posted 14 May 2014 - 09:21 PM

So what they killed a robot.  They'll likely kill more.  

 

First rule of ocean research.  Anything that goes over the side is disposable.  It's best to understand that before starting, and especially before they close the hatch on the subs pressure sphere and you are on the inside of the sphere.  

I don't know about you, but I am not disposable.  Staying around this long is a result of being the Chicken of the Sea, really taking care of your check lists and making sure that the sub has an up to date inspection report. 

Once upon a time when I was doing deep submergence I was always grateful that the mechanics who worked on the sub were also the pilots.  I thought that gave them a proper incentive.  Losing the hydraulics at 1250M on the summit of an active volcano did however cause a brief bit of concern but the pilot knew the sub and systems so well we got home no problem.  Had a bunch of bad components, aborted 4 out of 5 dives that week.  Very expensive batch of bad O-rings if I recall.  

Keeping the windows away from hydrothermal vents is also a good idea.  



#40 mikewof

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 04:19 AM

There really isn't a back story on this one because its not known what caused the implosion and since a federal inquiry is not going to be done to satisfy the widows, it probably wont.  There does seem to be a bit more cavalier approach to check-lists, etc. upon diving as there is no pilot, but the number of dead ROVs, especially in the early years, that were pulled back by their tether are legion.  Flooded control cans were a biggy.

 

I remember that old Synchronar Sunwatch from the 1970s, it was a digital watch with a little solar panel on the top, so no battery inside and they were able to fill it with rubber, taking up all the airspace, so it was waterproof to at least 100 meter, and supposedly more.

 

I guess these robots, must be filled with some kind of incompressible goo?



#41 Laker

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 05:23 AM

There really isn't a back story on this one because its not known what caused the implosion and since a federal inquiry is not going to be done to satisfy the widows, it probably wont.  There does seem to be a bit more cavalier approach to check-lists, etc. upon diving as there is no pilot, but the number of dead ROVs, especially in the early years, that were pulled back by their tether are legion.  Flooded control cans were a biggy.

 

I remember that old Synchronar Sunwatch from the 1970s, it was a digital watch with a little solar panel on the top, so no battery inside and they were able to fill it with rubber, taking up all the airspace, so it was waterproof to at least 100 meter, and supposedly more.

 

I guess these robots, must be filled with some kind of incompressible goo?

Depends on the payload and design of the unit.  For the Titanic ROV "Snoop" we filled everything with kerosene.  Motor, electronics and motor controller.  The only thing that ran dry was the camera.  Our usual ROVs had all dry compartments and filled the motors with an extra light silicon fluid.  There are some motors that run dry and use a magnetic coupling to the propellor.  A company named Technadyne, which is used by a lot of the not-make-your-own thruster people uses the magnetic coupling for instance.   Each approach has its joys and pains.



#42 Surfari

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 01:32 PM

Having been an avid sailing anarchy reader for the last 5 years I've finally found something worth commenting on!

 

I heard Nereus implode 10km away while I was reading in my rack. I had a hand in dissassembling her main electronics housing less than a week ago to replace a hard drive, I helped co-ordinate the predive checks, and I've spent the last 40 days on the R/V Thomas G. Thompson supporting her day and night. And I can honestly say from experience that losing Nereus was nothing like losing a friend. We will indeed have the ability and know how to build a new better prototype with time.

 

The oil compensated systems used carnation/mineral oil and the thursters/HPU used a special custom mixed super low viscocity marine hydraulic oil made by Royal Purple to handle these extreme depths. There was very little syntatic foam on the vehicle, the buoyancy came from 3.5" ceramic spheres. Since the failure modes of brittle materials can be very unpredictable, there is obviously a huge level of risk involved in sending a vehicle to 10,000m, and this is exactly why there are no other vehicles out there that can do it. At some point you've got to accept those risks rather than spend millions on destructive testing.

 

I've also taken apart Cameron's Deep Sea Challenger vehicle after he donated it to WHOI and that was basically just one huge and expensive movie prop. The only way he can possibly relate to our loss is that he also invested many many millions of dollars (3-4 times the Nereus design and build budget) on something that is now just as useless as Nereus.



#43 Surfari

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 01:33 PM

Oh, and (*) (*).



#44 JBSF

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 01:47 PM

Surfari, welcome.  Nice tits!   :lol:



#45 artie_pitt

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 02:41 PM

Having been an avid sailing anarchy reader for the last 5 years I've finally found something worth commenting I can contribute. on!

 

I heard Nereus implode 10km away while I was reading in my rack. I had a hand in dissassembling her main electronics housing less than a week ago to replace a hard drive, I helped co-ordinate the predive checks, and I've spent the last 40 days on the R/V Thomas G. Thompson supporting her day and night. And I can honestly say from experience that losing Nereus was nothing like losing a friend. We will indeed have the ability and know how to build a new better prototype with time.

 

The oil compensated systems used carnation/mineral oil and the thursters/HPU used a special custom mixed super low viscocity marine hydraulic oil made by Royal Purple to handle these extreme depths. There was very little syntatic foam on the vehicle, the buoyancy came from 3.5" ceramic spheres. Since the failure modes of brittle materials can be very unpredictable, there is obviously a huge level of risk involved in sending a vehicle to 10,000m, and this is exactly why there are no other vehicles out there that can do it. At some point you've got to accept those risks rather than spend millions on destructive testing.

 

I've also taken apart Cameron's Deep Sea Challenger vehicle after he donated it to WHOI and that was basically just one huge and expensive movie prop. The only way he can possibly relate to our loss is that he also invested many many millions of dollars (3-4 times the Nereus design and build budget) on something that is now just as useless as Nereus.

<<slight correction>>



#46 DA-WOODY

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    COUGARS COUGARS & More COUGARS

Posted 15 May 2014 - 03:08 PM

Having been an avid sailing anarchy reader for the last 5 years I've finally found something worth commenting on!

 

I heard Nereus implode 10km away while I was reading in my rack. I had a hand in dissassembling her main electronics housing less than a week ago to replace a hard drive, I helped co-ordinate the predive checks, and I've spent the last 40 days on the R/V Thomas G. Thompson supporting her day and night. And I can honestly say from experience that losing Nereus was nothing like losing a friend. We will indeed have the ability and know how to build a new better prototype with time.

 

The oil compensated systems used carnation/mineral oil and the thursters/HPU used a special custom mixed super low viscocity marine hydraulic oil made by Royal Purple to handle these extreme depths. There was very little syntatic foam on the vehicle, the buoyancy came from 3.5" ceramic spheres. Since the failure modes of brittle materials can be very unpredictable, there is obviously a huge level of risk involved in sending a vehicle to 10,000m, and this is exactly why there are no other vehicles out there that can do it. At some point you've got to accept those risks rather than spend millions on destructive testing.

 

I've also taken apart Cameron's Deep Sea Challenger vehicle after he donated it to WHOI and that was basically just one huge and expensive movie prop. The only way he can possibly relate to our loss is that he also invested many many millions of dollars (3-4 times the Nereus design and build budget) on something that is now just as useless as Nereus.

 

Are you our friend from Fiddler's when in town ??



#47 Laker

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 03:27 PM

the unpredictability of ceramics is why we have stayed away from using them as floatation.  There was a manned berylium-ceramic bodied vehicle made back in nineties if I remember, but I heard nothing of it after the initial hoopla.  I like a little bit of ductility.  There was a boron-titanium matrix around, I believe there was a mast section for one of the twelve meters made from it, that shows promise, but nothing seems to have happened making parts with it.

 

Pure fibre-glass/epoxy works well until it turns into a tennis ball due to the differential young's modulus of the two materials.  Very good, but only for two or three drops.



#48 Pete M

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 04:45 PM

There was a boron-titanium matrix around, I believe there was a mast section for one of the twelve meters made from it, that shows promise, but nothing seems to have happened making parts with it.

hijack - yes there was a boron fiber mast made for one of DC's IACC stars and stripes boats, unknown by me if it was ever used, but it was not allowed by class rules anyway - / hijack



#49 Yukon

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 11:07 PM

Surfari. . . . Sorry for the loss to WHOI and JC, but it is all about the Hardtack Racing team.  Their loss is our (Hardtack Racing) gain.  Glad to have Surfari back on the east coast racing with us. 

 

Build the next one out of old Volvos, they can't implode.  http://m.youtube.com...h?v=JJ0nkStZnWo

 

 

New Zealand is for winter, and tricks are for kids.  See you June. 



#50 Dorado

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 01:12 AM

Good post Surf

 

The fact that a thread has nothing worth commenting on,

 

Hasn't stopped anybody here yet.

 

Hell, we got people here who are absolute experts on nothing.



#51 JBSF

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 03:42 AM

Hell, we got people here who are absolute experts on nothing.

 

And woofey is their spiritual leader.



#52 sunseeker

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 04:20 AM


wtf - none of it was a real pressure vessel - eutectic foam and some black boxes and batteries and propulsion motors- most filed with fluids to equalize the pressure difference

 
The Fools !
 
If only they had used some solid copper heat diffusers and defroster plates,
this tragedy could have been averted.
I thought it was all about ball bearings....  

They forgot to check the fetzer valve.

#53 DA-WOODY

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    COUGARS COUGARS & More COUGARS

Posted 16 May 2014 - 04:45 AM

Good post Surf

 

The fact that a thread has nothing worth commenting on,

 

Hasn't stopped anybody here yet.

 

Hell, we got people here who are absolute experts on nothing.



#54 Capt MArc

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 03:37 PM

You guys have really sunk to a new low...



#55 Timo42

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 03:46 PM

You guys have really sunk to a new low...

 

I don't think you fathom the depths to which we will sink.



#56 Point Break

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Posted 16 May 2014 - 04:17 PM

Hell, we got people here who are absolute experts on nothing.

That is balanced by the fact that we also have people who are absolute experts on everything...........



#57 Laker

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 05:33 AM

http://www.911metall...clipperton-zone



#58 Ned

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Posted 17 May 2014 - 06:57 AM

So manganese noodles are back in fashion now?  We worked on those in the 80's and then moved to crusts for the cobalt.  Should probably dig into this a bit since on paper, I may have some qualifications.  

 

Thanks for posting the article.  



#59 Laker

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 01:26 AM

So manganese noodles are back in fashion now?  We worked on those in the 80's and then moved to crusts for the cobalt.  Should probably dig into this a bit since on paper, I may have some qualifications.  

 

Thanks for posting the article.  

I was wondering about that too.  I was involved in the early 80s with a Lockheed project to mine to the south of Hawaii.  It was stopped by a moritorium that I thought was still in place.  Something about ruining the economies of emerging countries.  I still have some nodules in the back room brought back from the Glomar Explorer trip (which I was not on).  I love the large shark's teeth at the core of some of them.






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