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e scow bilge boards


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#1 jbatstl

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Posted 04 July 2014 - 06:44 PM

I have an old (1977) 27' e scow that is damaged. (tree fell on it!) I have been stripping off the hardware and everything usable. Rudder system was easy although because its the original system I don't know that anyone will want it. I am trying to remove the bilge boards. Fins? Not sure exactly what to call them. I can't figure out how. There are three 7/16 square plug looking things built into the glass that contains the fins. But they are soft and won't turn. When I try to look down in the crack between the fins and the fiberglass it only looks like there is one stud running through.

 

Any ideas besides just breaking out the grinder and cutting everything out of the way?

 

I greatly appreciate any help!

 

Jeff

 



#2 kgs113

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 04:42 AM

I would just go after it with a grinder if you are just trying to salvage the hardware.  Did that with a wood E scow a few years back. It sat in the back yard long enough that the Sawzall I bought my wife for Mother's day was the perfect present.

 

Kevin



#3 jbatstl

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 05:05 PM

Perfect Mothers Day Gift:)

 

I know the grinder will work. Just seemed like there would be an easy way but I sure don't see it. Thanks for the reply!

 

Jeff



#4 bruno

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 02:10 AM

Old school centerplates had an ovoid slot, sometimes with a lock screw, sometimes without. Pin was fixed in and board lifted forward and off.

#5 jbatstl

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 01:43 PM

Bruno,

 

All I see are these three 7/16 square plugs? Maybe this picture will help? On the back side there are just nodules in the fiberglass with nothing coming through.

 

Thoughts?

Attached Files



#6 bruno

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 04:49 PM

Not sure, define soft? What I was thinking was that bilge boards and centerplates, usually aluminum, cut out of sheet stock, 1/4"+, then would set over a fixed pin. What is that, a bearing or something? Unless you get a scow specialist to chime in probably have to peel the glass to see it.

#7 jbatstl

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:35 PM

Soft is when I put a good wrench on the 7/16 square and try to turn it strips. With a Snapon wrench. Haven't heard from any scow specialist so I may be taking out the grinder this weekend:)



#8 bruno

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 05:04 PM

Bronze or brass pins, 3 in a row may mean thet are locking a disc in place

#9 learningj24

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 12:20 AM

Skilsaw with a cutoff blade. Much faster than a grinder. Burned up two grinders on an E

#10 jbatstl

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 02:44 AM

The area where this plate must be very close to the centerboard itself. Don't think I can cut straight through. The square pins are steel color so I don't think brass but not sure. Can't find much detail on these old thinks. (And my '65 Columbia is even older:). I do have a cutting wheel for my grinder. I am going to have to start chipping away in the next few days.



#11 scowlover

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 02:16 PM

That is the old Johnson system. That plug threads into a tube that holds the pins. If the threads are seized, you may need to take out the grinder. I would take off about 1/4" of the "nub" and if you haven't removed all of the plug, keep going a little at a time until the pin is exposed. The pin will only be in one of those 3 holes. The pin usually has a threaded hole (usually 10-32) for you to thread a screw into. Lift the board to unload the pin, then pull the pin. 



#12 jbatstl

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 12:58 PM

Thanks scowlover! That is what I needed. I think I understand. I will get to work on it from that angle.



#13 scowlover

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Posted 10 July 2014 - 04:49 PM

Capture.JPG

 

This is a rough cross section of how the pin fits into the assembly. 






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