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Flying Scot Mast Question

musokie

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#1 musokie

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 09:12 AM

My wife and I have not sailed in twenty-five years.  We know the basics (sunfish) but it has been along time.  So as a newbie the question is?   If you were looking at a 1973 Flying Scot with a mast by  another manufactory would that alone scare you away?  As soon to be empty nesters we thought we might take up sailing and thought the Flying Scot would be a good beginning point.  Also is the term  only "Dry-Sailed" in classified Ads referring to how they were stored when they were not being used?  Take pity and thanks for any help.



#2 Boo-Yah

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 01:27 PM

If you are willing to consider a Flying Scot there are many boats of all ages and price ranges to look at.

 

http://www.fssa.com/for-sale

 

http://www.fssa.com/for-sale

 

If there is someone near year home offering sailing lessons that may be a good place to start and see if you enjoy the time on boats and water.



#3 sailwriter

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 02:42 PM

As for the mast, it could be that somehow the original was broken. That could happen in any number of ways, from going under a tree while on the trailer, under a low bridge, stuck in the mud capsized with a "helpful" power boat pulling on the hull or being run over while laying on a parking lot. It may have even been stolen. Haven't parked on the I-5 rest stop near Bakersfield have you? Not that I have done any of these things, of course......

If the boat is not going to be raced there is no reason why a similar mast from another source would not work just fine.

The Flying Scot has a 'telephone pole', industrial strength mast. So, I'd check to see if the replacement is robust.

Oh, and the wind has not changed in the past 25 years. If you can sail a Sunfish, use the same principles, realizing that the Scot is a heavier boat.

It is like driving a rental truck when you are used to a small car. Same deal. Just plan ahead more.

I once had a couple come down to the St. Pete Sailing Center to use a Rhodes 19 with Royce's 1949 Learn to Sail book. They read it while setting up the boat, taking off and sailing around the nearby basin. I watched, as the manager of the center. They did better than most of the "expert" sailors that use those public boats.

Just go for it!

And welcome back to sailing.

Dave Ellis

Tampa Bay, Florida



#4 slip knot

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 03:16 PM

Does the new mast still use the winch system on the main and jib halyards?

#5 lindy 911

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Posted 14 July 2014 - 11:19 PM

Yes it does. If you get going with the Scot and want to race, you'll need a class legal mast. There are plenty of old boats with perfectly good masts and boom but a rotten hull. Look closely at the hull for core rot. The hull is laminated fiberglass and balsa wood. if a through deck fitting isn't installed properly with sealant, water can get in between the fiberglass and balsa causing the balsa to rot. It's not the end of the world if you find some rot and fairly straight forward to fix. You will find the Scot a very forgiving boat to sail and quite fast to boot.  



#6 Steam Flyer

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 12:01 PM

My wife and I have not sailed in twenty-five years.  We know the basics (sunfish) but it has been along time.  So as a newbie the question is?   If you were looking at a 1973 Flying Scot with a mast by  another manufactory would that alone scare you away?  As soon to be empty nesters we thought we might take up sailing and thought the Flying Scot would be a good beginning point.  Also is the term  only "Dry-Sailed" in classified Ads referring to how they were stored when they were not being used?  Take pity and thanks for any help.

 

The Flying Scot might be a good beginning point, depends on what you want. It is a very stable, rather forgiving, comfortable boat. It's relatively easy to keep dry, you can bring a cooler (several coolers in fact). The down side is that it's rather heavy and high-sided. Not so great for beaches, I see people rigging them up using small stepladders to get in & out of the boat in the parking lot.

 

The mast- if the mast is the right length & approximate thickness, and has the right rigging on it, that's fine. The problem would be if it was not set up properly... mast are more complicated than they look, I'd be suspicious. Get the seller to demonstrate stepping the mast and rigging up the sails. If it all goes together smoothly then it's probably all right. Racing? Yeah that could be a problem but not for a couple years at the soonest. If there is a local Flying Scot fleet, they'll be glad to see you participating, it's only at the regional level that it would be an issue.

 

Dry-sailed- yes that generally means the boat was kept out of the water in between being sailed. But who knows, maybe the boat has been fitted with wheels so it can be sailed across parking lots.

 

Definitely go check it out. But don't be in a sweat to buy a boat right away. Contact the local sailing club, go to wherever it is people sail in your area, and do a little scouting. Maybe even go out sailing on some other people's boats for a while before you buy one of your own.

 

FB- Doug



#7 No Bargers

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Posted 15 July 2014 - 03:27 PM

I would think a non class legal mast will effect resale value. As long as you buy right up front you should be OK.

 

Replacing the mast with class legal can get expensive because, unless you can find one locally shipping would be costly.

 

Also, there were 2 builders for a while sometime in the 70's. The Customflex's don't seem to be worth as much as the Douglas boats.






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