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VOR 2014-15 - Leg 1

VOR Volvo Ocean Race

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#2801 couchsurfer

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 04:22 PM

Does VOR HQ have the ability to switch on the cameras and see what people are up to? 


I can't imagine any team agreeing to that.

.

 

.....I'd enjoy some footage from a camera at masthead and stern....no OBR's or commentary required!   ;)


#2802 chuso007

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 04:23 PM

I think Mapfre would be better off keeping MD and booting Iker, but hey, What do I know?



#2803 couchsurfer

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 04:26 PM

I think Mapfre would be better off keeping MD and booting Iker, but hey, What do I know?

.

....yeh,,,what'll things look like when Iker departs for his dinghy junket!?  :unsure:



#2804 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 04:26 PM

Did anyone catch that some of the guys from Brunel got on a boat and went Great White watching? Infamous spot in South Africa.

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#2805 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 04:45 PM

The Leg 1 Daily Photo Contest has now come to an end, and we can proudly present the overall winner: Matt Knighton & Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing! Congrats on the achievement, and many thanks to all our amazing Onboard Reporters for the great photos we've received during this spectacular 6,487nm journey.

The Daily Photo Contest will return for Leg 2, which will see the teams set out from Cape Town toward Abu Dhabi. Until then, keep coming back to our online photo gallery and Facebook page for more great photos!

Daily photo contest: Leg 1 results Total
Brian Carlin - Team Vestas Wind 2983 Votes
Amory Ross - Team Alvimedica 2631 Votes
Matt Knighton - Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing 3341 Votes
Corinna Halloran - Team SCA 2161 Votes
Francisco Vignale - MAPFRE 2396 Votes
Yann Riou - Dongfeng Race Team 1310 Votes
Stefan Coppers - Team Brunel

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#2806 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 04:51 PM

From Alvimedica site.

Team Alvimedica Leg One Debrief: High Marks for Team Work while Looking to Improve Performance

November 10, 2014 - In reviewing their Leg One performance in the Volvo Ocean Race, Team Alvimedica skipper Charlie Enright and navigator Will Oxley both gave the crew a passing grade while also noting theres plenty of room for improvement.

In reviewing their Leg One performance in the Volvo Ocean Race, Team Alvimedica skipper Charlie Enright and navigator Will Oxley both gave the crew a passing grade while also noting theres plenty of room for improvement.

I have mixed feelings about the leg, said Enright, the 30-year-old skipper of the youngest crew in the race. Theres a sense of accomplishment for getting it done, and we finished ahead of two good teams. In some regards we surprised ourselves, but there were also some opportunities we didnt capitalize on. The teams in a good spot moving forward.

Leg One originated in Alicante, Spain, on Oct. 11, and Team Alvimedica completed the nearly 6500-nautical mile voyage in 26 and-a-half days. For many of the young crew, four of whom, including Enright, are competing the Volvo Ocean Race for the first time, it was the longest ocean passage theyd ever undertaken.

Before the race navigator Will Oxley, the oldest member of the crew at 49, likened the sailors thirst for knowledge to a sponge soaking up water. And in retrospect, he sees a crew thats becoming wise beyond its years.

Quote Charlie Enright
In some regards we surprised ourselves, but there were also some opportunities we didnt capitalize on."
Id say were a little disappointed with fifth, said Oxley. We wouldve been thrilled with fourth but are probably a little disappointed with fifth. But we had a good leg. Importantly, the team started to gel. We learned a lot and were sailing faster at the finish than the start.

Both Enright and Oxley pointed to a jibe on Day 16 (Oct. 27) that cost them a shot at the podium. Team Alvimedica was running near the back of the pack exiting the Doldrums, but made hay down the Brazilian coastline and late on Oct. 27 had climbed into third place, just 56 miles behind the lead boat.

Sailing within sight and to the east of Dongfeng Race Team down the Brazilian coast, the teams were skirting to the west of the South Atlantic high pressure. Team Alvimedica then crossed paths to the west of the Chinese team. The two crews were later lifted on port, and Alvimedica opted to jibe to the south while Dongfeng continued eastwards before maneuvering. That proved to be the deciding moment that dropped Alvimedica back to fifth.

We got a bit caught out trying to get south, said Oxley, whos competing in his third Volvo Ocean Race. Its clear the high pressure was establishing far to the south, and the only way east to the finish is on a front. We didnt get as far south as we wanted, but when the ride east (the front) came along we had to get on it.

At that point the front-runners were further south than us, and the guys behind a bit further north. We did a good job over the final 10 days to stay between them and the finish and protect our fifth place, said Oxley.

Quote Will Oxley
"We learned a lot and were sailing faster at the finish than the start.
That hurdle was hard to overcome, said Enright. It was a conscious, calculated decision that didnt work out, but everyone agreed it was the right thing to do. The pressure we were headed to would pay dividends, but we werent able to get as far south as the leaders. Dongfeng continued on 17 miles from us before jibing. (Dongfeng placed second on the leg.)

Overall, Enright and Oxley are pleased with the development of the team. They both acknowledge that there are areas where the boatspeed needs to be improved and they need to sail with more conviction in terms of tactics and routing.

Im happy with our competitiveness around other boats, said Enright. Ive said before, we should be and will be one of the fastest improving teams. We still have that in us. Were happy to be in Cape Town, but also want to get back into it.

#2807 Peragrin

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:00 PM

From the front. http://sailinganarch...eased-from-jail

Brunel talks over their strategies for leg 1 nice insight. And all of brune is heading out for leg 2. So brune should be out in front again.

#2808 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:01 PM

^ Explains a lot. They were tough to figure out.

"Overall, Enright and Oxley are pleased with the development of the team. They both acknowledge that there are areas where the boatspeed needs to be improved and they need to sail with more conviction in terms of tactics and routing."

They did seem conservative but they are positioned well to move up the ladder in the next leg.

#2809 couchsurfer

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:10 PM

^ Explains a lot. They were tough to figure out.

"Overall, Enright and Oxley are pleased with the development of the team. They both acknowledge that there are areas where the boatspeed needs to be improved and they need to sail with more conviction in terms of tactics and routing."

They did seem conservative but they are positioned well to move up the ladder in the next leg.

.

 

Overall the Alvi's sailed a good conservative leg-they had the lead for a short while,but were otherwise the least time at front -or- back. I dare say their approach to the leg did them much better than being aggressive,and likely a good confidence builder.



#2810 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:12 PM

From the front. http://sailinganarch...eased-from-jail
Brunel talks over their strategies for leg 1 nice insight. And all of brune is heading out for leg 2. So brune should be out in front again.


Interesting.

"The reports Volvo organization is sending 4 times a day don’t mean any thing: we are actually only use the position of the other boats and having our own leaderboard / scoring system. The Volvo score might have a boat in the lead, meaning shortest distance away from Capetown, but in reality this boat can be last , if you take the routing into the account. One gybe can cost tremendously. So we always look at crosswinds, bearing and distance, that really says if we do well or not. As well of course we know if we had any hick-ups during a so-called schedule."

#2811 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:14 PM

^ Explains a lot. They were tough to figure out.
"Overall, Enright and Oxley are pleased with the development of the team. They both acknowledge that there are areas where the boatspeed needs to be improved and they need to sail with more conviction in terms of tactics and routing."
They did seem conservative but they are positioned well to move up the ladder in the next leg.

.
 
Overall the Alvi's sailed a good conservative leg-they had the lead for a short while,but were otherwise the least time at front -or- back. I dare say their approach to the leg did them much better than being aggressive,and likely a good confidence builder.

I don't disagree.

#2812 couchsurfer

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:19 PM

.

.....I'm certain that in the end,many thousands of miles away, we'll see that attrition plays a much bigger role than anyone 'winning'  a leg or the race. How likely is it for Mapfre to win the race now,unless most all other teams have to score a blunder??

 

...Alvi did well.



#2813 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:28 PM


Getting the feeling that unless some bold moves are made it's going to be a race of attrition. And barring any major errors it's going to be like the Stanley Cup Playoffs in the end. Last crew standing.


Yep

#2814 couchsurfer

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:33 PM

 Yep

.

 

...indeed.



#2815 Peragrin

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:38 PM

SCA has 360 images of the interior. So as some one asked 6 berths per side of boat with windward berths favored.

What gets me is the nav stations. Carbon fiber work space I get. Why are they using such thick laptops? Thinkpads I understand but wouldn't using some of the newer ultralight laptops with flash memory be better? Save a kilo in weight. And flash storage has no moving parts which should help reliability. It isn't like they need a ton of computing power to run the navigation software. Maybe it is a ports/interface issue?

Lastly I apologize for misspelling Brunel. I have two words on that subject. Damn autocorrect.

#2816 Peragrin

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:42 PM



Getting the feeling that unless some bold moves are made it's going to be a race of attrition. And barring any major errors it's going to be like the Stanley Cup Playoffs in the end. Last crew standing.

Yep
quoting yourself is meta man.

Lastly all long distance racing are races of attrition. In the last volvo it was physical breaks. Which boat broke what. This one is more mental attrition. Who snaps first, who doesn't getting along with whom. Who has the most cooperative on boat crew. Who has the most dysfunctional on boat crew.

Car wrecks are exciting. But dangerous to everyone.

#2817 couchsurfer

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:49 PM

.

 

....SC= meta man??...does that mean he carries a man-bag?  :P

 

 

...yes,,,attrition=obvious,,but always worth remembering the game is often opposite of what seems to be focused on.

 

....it wouldn't be surprising to see some equipment issues come into play as well-it's a long race.



#2818 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 05:50 PM




Getting the feeling that unless some bold moves are made it's going to be a race of attrition. And barring any major errors it's going to be like the Stanley Cup Playoffs in the end. Last crew standing.

Yep
quoting yourself is meta man.

Lastly all long distance racing are races of attrition. In the last volvo it was physical breaks. Which boat broke what. This one is more mental attrition. Who snaps first, who doesn't getting along with whom. Who has the most cooperative on boat crew. Who has the most dysfunctional on boat crew.

Car wrecks are exciting. But dangerous to everyone.

LOL. I know it's a faux pas. But who better to quote. 😀

Not to bypass your comments about the laptop - I have no idea - but I saw the 360 views of the interior on SCA and couldn't get over the view from the head. Imagine staring at that bulkhead while the boat is screaming down a wave at 27 knts. And on SCA of all boats wondering "did this boat really start to delaminate?"

#2819 Sailbydate

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 07:26 PM

.

...a bit of a spacefiller while we wait for VO to open the flow a bit .....beats watching more slug-races! :)

 

......you can see why these make good 'trainers' for the VO's

 

....jump-in at 20:00 for the start.......

 

 

 

 

...some great tight-reaching!

Great racing. Best part for me is the race commentary from Kilo, Bucko and Warwick. Those boys are on to it. Obviously ex 18' racers themselves. Very knowledgeable and lots of funny comments like, "those guys are 3 post codes away from this part of the fleet!". Sydney Harbour is an amazing place to race too. Thanks CS.



#2820 The Main Man

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:06 PM

I think Mapfre would be better off keeping MD and booting Iker, but hey, What do I know?


MD is out!

http://www.thedailys...head-of-leg-two

#2821 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:06 PM

Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?

I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.

Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.

#2822 The Main Man

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:12 PM

I think Mapfre would be better off keeping MD and booting Iker, but hey, What do I know?


MD is out!http://www.thedailys...head-of-leg-two

More detail already posted in The Leg 2 thread. Very interesting!

#2823 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:13 PM


I think Mapfre would be better off keeping MD and booting Iker, but hey, What do I know?

MD is out!http://www.thedailys...head-of-leg-two
More detail already posted in The Leg 2 thread. Very interesting!

Posted here on the previous page too.

#2824 The Main Man

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:18 PM


I think Mapfre would be better off keeping MD and booting Iker, but hey, What do I know?

MD is out!http://www.thedailys...head-of-leg-two
More detail already posted in The Leg 2 thread. Very interesting!

Posted here on the previous page too.

Oops, sorry! Stupid iPad decided to miss out a load of posts from earlier today I hadn't seen

#2825 Trickypig

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:21 PM

Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?

I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.

Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.

 

These RTW races used to tackle the Southern Ocean all the way. Trouble is… it is the bottom of the world and miles from anywhere.

 

Given the types of sponsors and markets they are trying to get brand awareness in, I think diving off into the Southern Ocean to get to Sydney makes the fleet disappear common man's radar. 

 

The travelling circus needs to go to new and high population markets.



#2826 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:25 PM


I think Mapfre would be better off keeping MD and booting Iker, but hey, What do I know?

MD is out!http://www.thedailys...head-of-leg-two
More detail already posted in The Leg 2 thread. Very interesting!

Posted here on the previous page too.

Oops, sorry! Stupid iPad decided to miss out a load of posts from earlier today I hadn't seen

No worries. My iPad has gotten stupid too since the update.

#2827 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 08:28 PM

Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?
I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.
Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.

 
These RTW races used to tackle the Southern Ocean all the way. Trouble is… it is the bottom of the world and miles from anywhere.
 
Given the types of sponsors and markets they are trying to get brand awareness in, I think diving off into the Southern Ocean to get to Sydney makes the fleet disappear common man's radar.
 
The travelling circus needs to go to new and high population markets.

Yeah. I guess Sanya to Sydney would kind of be back-pedaling.

#2828 RenBoss

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 09:07 PM

What i do notice is that i'm sitiing here with my Camper shoes, Puma boxer, socks and hoody, put on my Helly Hanson jacket and get some money at the atm from ABN-Amro to get in my (6th hand) Volvo and go out to dinner.

 

This time i can't say i hook myself of the Alvimedica medical breathing apparatus, to get in my DongFeng truck who had it's battery charged with Vestas windturbine to go to my job as a highly payed Brunel consultancy person. That is a differance...

 

That's good.  A neat explanation of how the sponsorship market has moved more towards B to B/hospitality over branding/retail for this round.  Because they have easier-to-meet expectations, I expect it these sponsorships to be quite a bit more sustainable, at least until the sport doubles in popularity in major markets.

Yes it's good for the sport we all love so much but it is a worrying sign if you ask me.

 

“As a retailer or restaurant chain, if you’re not at the really high level or the low level, that’s a tough place to be,” Mr. Maxwell said. “You don’t want to be stuck in the middle.”

 

A nice read form NYT:

 

http://www.nytimes.c...world.html?_r=0

 

And sailing has historicaly been a middle class and up sport.

 

For all who are serious and don't like a small funny note on a serious subject, stop reading now please.

 



#2829 Trickypig

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 09:10 PM

 

Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?
I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.
Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.

 
These RTW races used to tackle the Southern Ocean all the way. Trouble is… it is the bottom of the world and miles from anywhere.
 
Given the types of sponsors and markets they are trying to get brand awareness in, I think diving off into the Southern Ocean to get to Sydney makes the fleet disappear common man's radar.
 
The travelling circus needs to go to new and high population markets.

Yeah. I guess Sanya to Sydney would kind of be back-pedaling.

It would be interesting to see how the Chinese report the race on their TV news. The idea must be a complete unknown to much of the population.



#2830 gybe-ho!

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 10:21 PM

Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?
I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.
Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.


The race used the Sydney-Hobart as a partial leg in 2001-02, News Corp were first out of the Heads. The boats had a 3.5hr stop in Hobart and then went on to finish in Auckland. Assa Abloy won line honours that year, then 15mins after was Ludde Ingvall with Nicorette, and then the rest of the VO60's piled in, Amer Sports One, Tyco, Djuice Dragons, Newscorp, Illbruck and then Amer Sports Too.

#2831 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 10:36 PM


Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?
I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.
Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.

The race used the Sydney-Hobart as a partial leg in 2001-02, News Corp were first out of the Heads. The boats had a 3.5hr stop in Hobart and then went on to finish in Auckland. Assa Abloy won line honours that year, then 15mins after was Ludde Ingvall with Nicorette, and then the rest of the VO60's piled in, Amer Sports One, Tyco, Djuice Dragons, Newscorp, Illbruck and then Amer Sports Too.

I remember that but oh so vaguely. Nicorette was a yellow boat?

#2832 Southern Cross

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 10:42 PM

Nicorette had Green lettering. Not even close.

#2833 Trickypig

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Posted 10 November 2014 - 11:44 PM

Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?
I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.
Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.


The race used the Sydney-Hobart as a partial leg in 2001-02, News Corp were first out of the Heads. The boats had a 3.5hr stop in Hobart and then went on to finish in Auckland. Assa Abloy won line honours that year, then 15mins after was Ludde Ingvall with Nicorette, and then the rest of the VO60's piled in, Amer Sports One, Tyco, Djuice Dragons, Newscorp, Illbruck and then Amer Sports Too.

I met a bloke (non sailor) who was involved in promoting the 2008 edition of the race. 

 

The organisers approached each potential stopover city and offered the city to pay for the rights to host the stopover. This is part of the business model since it would give that city a focus to boost tourism and business. Sydney and Melbourne didn't want to pay the monies and the sponsors also saw more value in some Asian stopovers hence the change to the course. I don't know what response the Kiwis had to the asking price.



#2834 Sailbydate

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 12:30 AM

 

Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?
I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.
Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.


The race used the Sydney-Hobart as a partial leg in 2001-02, News Corp were first out of the Heads. The boats had a 3.5hr stop in Hobart and then went on to finish in Auckland. Assa Abloy won line honours that year, then 15mins after was Ludde Ingvall with Nicorette, and then the rest of the VO60's piled in, Amer Sports One, Tyco, Djuice Dragons, Newscorp, Illbruck and then Amer Sports Too.

I met a bloke (non sailor) who was involved in promoting the 2008 edition of the race. 

 

The organisers approached each potential stopover city and offered the city to pay for the rights to host the stopover. This is part of the business model since it would give that city a focus to boost tourism and business. Sydney and Melbourne didn't want to pay the monies and the sponsors also saw more value in some Asian stopovers hence the change to the course. I don't know what response the Kiwis had to the asking price.

We paid up, obviously.  :)



#2835 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 12:33 AM

Indeed.  Hosting a stopover isn't free.  You pay for the right, and you are expected to put on a good show.  Last time in Oz was Melbourne.  The famous video of Pirates with the hammer down surfing ocean waves was shot as they left on their way to Auckland.

 

There seems to be a clear relationship between having a team in the race and hosting a stopover.  Although obviously not rock solid, it is a pretty good start.  Sadly no-body here n Oz has been interested in sponsoring a team for a long time. Everyone thinks the SH is the pinnacle of ocean racing.  So we are simply left with filling the other teams boats, along with the Kiwis.

 

Running an inshore race with the VO65s in Sydney Harbour would be pretty difficult.  Things get awfully crowded in there.

 

Anyway, once I'm insanely rich, my team will result in a stopover in Adelaide. :P



#2836 Terrafirma

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 01:13 AM

Mapfre ringing out the changes as expected..

 

http://www.sail-worl...d-Mapfre/128839



#2837 Oscar Whitbread

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 01:18 AM

SCA has 360 images of the interior. So as some one asked 6 berths per side of boat with windward berths favored.

What gets me is the nav stations. Carbon fiber work space I get. Why are they using such thick laptops? Thinkpads I understand but wouldn't using some of the newer ultralight laptops with flash memory be better? Save a kilo in weight. And flash storage has no moving parts which should help reliability. It isn't like they need a ton of computing power to run the navigation software. Maybe it is a ports/interface issue?

Lastly I apologize for misspelling Brunel. I have two words on that subject. Damn autocorrect.

 

RE the laptops, you have to remember they are operating in a pretty extreme environment. They are a pretty vital bit of equipment so I'd tend to want something that can take a beating and is relatively waterproof & impact proof. They might be like carrying a house brick but they need to last the distance.



#2838 Heriberto

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 02:51 AM

From the front. http://sailinganarch...eased-from-jail

Brunel talks over their strategies for leg 1 nice insight. And all of brune is heading out for leg 2. So brune should be out in front again.

 

Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and don’t split."

 

And at the end, he describes how they broke from the leaders and they lost 22 and 44 miles. Clearly, they are going to even more strictly "follow the leaders". And yes, that is the best strategy. Follow the leaders and win with boat speed.



#2839 Southern Cross

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 02:59 AM


From the front. http://sailinganarch...eased-from-jail

Brunel talks over their strategies for leg 1 nice insight. And all of brune is heading out for leg 2. So brune should be out in front again.

 
Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and dont split."
 
And at the end, he describes how they broke from the leaders and they lost 22 and 44 miles. Clearly, they are going to even more strictly "follow the leaders". And yes, that is the best strategy. Follow the leaders and win with boat speed.

That has the potential to be a little boring to watch after a while.

#2840 couchsurfer

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 03:08 AM

 


From the front. http://sailinganarch...eased-from-jail

Brunel talks over their strategies for leg 1 nice insight. And all of brune is heading out for leg 2. So brune should be out in front again.

 
Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and dont split."
 
And at the end, he describes how they broke from the leaders and they lost 22 and 44 miles. Clearly, they are going to even more strictly "follow the leaders". And yes, that is the best strategy. Follow the leaders and win with boat speed.

That has the potential to be a little boring to watch after a while.

.

 

....can certainly see the influence. Works well if you've got good boatspeed.....there'll always be variations on the theme though--lots of wildcards



#2841 Trickypig

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 03:12 AM

 

 


From the front. http://sailinganarch...eased-from-jail

Brunel talks over their strategies for leg 1 nice insight. And all of brune is heading out for leg 2. So brune should be out in front again.

 
Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and dont split."
 
And at the end, he describes how they broke from the leaders and they lost 22 and 44 miles. Clearly, they are going to even more strictly "follow the leaders". And yes, that is the best strategy. Follow the leaders and win with boat speed.

That has the potential to be a little boring to watch after a while.

.

 

....can certainly see the influence. Works well if you've got good boatspeed.....there'll always be variations on the theme though--lots of wildcards

 

I think this next 3 legs will see `funkier' weather patterns and routing choices.



#2842 Southern Cross

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 03:19 AM

I thought the most interesting thing about what he said was that the reports from VOR they were getting were essentially meaningless.

#2843 Trickypig

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 03:27 AM

I thought the most interesting thing about what he said was that the reports from VOR they were getting were essentially meaningless.

Yes well... earlier in this thread there was endless debate about what the VOR distance to leader meant and whether the leader was the leader.

 

They probably had the same discussion on board. 



#2844 Southern Cross

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 03:30 AM


I thought the most interesting thing about what he said was that the reports from VOR they were getting were essentially meaningless.

Yes well... earlier in this thread there was endless debate about what the VOR distance to leader meant and whether the leader was the leader.
 
They probably had the same discussion on board. 

Damn it. Where was the footage of that?!

#2845 Trickypig

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 03:33 AM

 


I thought the most interesting thing about what he said was that the reports from VOR they were getting were essentially meaningless.

Yes well... earlier in this thread there was endless debate about what the VOR distance to leader meant and whether the leader was the leader.
 
They probably had the same discussion on board. 

Damn it. Where was the footage of that?!

Having trouble sleeping are you?



#2846 Southern Cross

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 03:37 AM



 




I thought the most interesting thing about what he said was that the reports from VOR they were getting were essentially meaningless.

Yes well... earlier in this thread there was endless debate about what the VOR distance to leader meant and whether the leader was the leader.
 
They probably had the same discussion on board. 
Damn it. Where was the footage of that?!
Having trouble sleeping are you?
Watching Lalaloopsy with my little girl. Anything would do.

#2847 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 04:39 AM

Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and don’t split."

 

This strategy fails if by some bit of luck they end up in the lead. 

 

At what point do they break?  Or is the strategy to win the VOR with a string of second places? (Which would probably work)



#2848 tigrah

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 10:16 AM

Running an inshore race with the VO65s in Sydney Harbour would be pretty difficult.  Things get awfully crowded in there.

 

We already do it, and it's called the Big Boat challenge. The next one is coming up soon in early December. It's an invitational for all the Hobart maxis. Expect to see all the new maxis in full force on the day.



#2849 hiroller

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 12:36 PM

An interesting write up from Matt Sheahan on the Vestas performance.
They were sailing "blind" with limited electronics, no computing power for weather and started the leg with no polars!
http://www.yachtingw...tas-4th-smiling

#2850 hiroller

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 01:06 PM

Despite the presence of a full time reporter on board, one of the better blog posts was from Vestas' Rob Salthouse, who only took the reins after the OBR got "writers block".
http://www.volvoocea...-the-boats.html

Well sports fans - this is Salty, and I've been asked to do a guest blog for the day as Alan (formally known as Brian Carlin) has writers block (I think thats what they call it).
So I will start by apologising for my grammar and spelling which was never a strong point, especially after 26 days at sea.
With the finish of leg 1 drawing ever closer to completion, and not helped by the lack of wind from any favorable quarter I might add, Ive been thinking of the journey so far for Team Vestas Wind.
It is still less than 3 months ago that I met my new team mates in the sheds at Green Marine, UK to help pull this project together - and compete in this years race.
But yet here we are close to the end of Leg 1 which is pretty gratifying, Im sure, to all involved.
Along the way there have been some great milestones and great friendships that have started developing. Nico has done a great job in selecting our three Under 30s and they have come with a great attitude and willingness to learn and develop.
To say they were green to this type of sailing would have been a big understatement, especially for our two Danes. Their first overnight experience was the first night of our trip to Alicante and from there on in they have been soaking up every little aspect of offshore yachting whilst trying to enjoy it at the same time.
Some of Petes comments to date have summed that up, such as "I thought they were just clouds but now I understand much more what they mean" and "whats a good or bad cloud".

One of his best comments though was after sailing at pace on the helm for an hour or so one day - "youve wrecked the rest of my sailing now, how can I go back to sailing those slower boats ever again?"
The three boys have been a pleasure to work with and have developed and picked things up really quickly from day one, and this in itself will put us in a good place for the rest of the race.
So as a team we have started to come together and gel as one as Leg 1 has progressed, for sure we still have lots to learn both about ourselves and our boat but I think we are in a great place to do this in a quick manner.
We have had some very strong points in leg 1 and have given ourselves many opportunities to mix it with the favorites and have a crack at them and to let them know that we are definitely in this race.
This is very pleasing given the timeframe and sailing time weve had in these boats compared to our competitors - at the end of this leg we'll have tripled the number of sailing miles we have done onboard. The learning curve has been short and steep over this period and Im sure there is lots more we can get out of the boat yet to close the gap on our friends in front of us.
Onboard, we're certainly looking forward to getting to Cape Town - hopefully sometime today! - and catching up with family, enjoying a cold well-deserved beer, but I think mostly I am looking forward to my first day off since start with the team at the beginning of August, a sleep-in followed with a lazy lunch and some time to just chill recharge the batteries.
Then it will be back to business. There's lots to do, lots to learn and plenty of fire and passion to hit Leg 2 with the desire and burn to be first into Abu Dhabi.
Thanks for reading this.
Salty
Rob Salthouse, Sailor
Team Vestas Wind
Go to team website

#2851 JBSF

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 03:06 PM

Writer's Block???  YGBSM?  OBR's are not there to write fiction or wax poetic.  Just fucking tell us what's going on!  FFS, how hard can that be?



#2852 couchsurfer

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 04:17 PM

 
Vestas were sailing "blind" with limited electronics, no computing power for weather and started the leg with no polars!
http://www.yachtingw...tas-4th-smiling

.

 

.I have trouble fully believing that...sounds more like boat-yard bluster from 18's back home!  :lol:  

 

...''"This race has a reputation for being a full pressure cooker and a key to success is about who can keep the lid on best."

 ..certainly there's truth to this,some of which we've seen already...but the closeness of the competition will certainly keep that test going  :mellow:



#2853 couchsurfer

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 04:23 PM

Writer's Block???  YGBSM?  OBR's are not there to write fiction or wax poetic.  Just fucking tell us what's going on!  FFS, how hard can that be?

.

 

......just. turn. the. camera. ON. 



#2854 Left Hook

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 05:10 PM

An interesting write up from Matt Sheahan on the Vestas performance.
They were sailing "blind" with limited electronics, no computing power for weather and started the leg with no polars!
http://www.yachtingw...tas-4th-smiling


This is such a great article. You all know my policy on getting people under-25 out and ocean racing and to hear the way they talk about their under-30s just validates something I've always known. Snapping up guys with a ton of these races is good for a team but there's so much that the youths can offer to a boat even with little to no experience on the race (or any overnight sailing for that matter)

Here's to hoping that more teams do that next time around.

#2855 Icedtea

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 05:23 PM

Hoping for a ride are we LH?



#2856 Left Hook

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 05:27 PM

I've burned too many bridges by being vocal on here with dubious results.

There are good (and quieter) people waiting in the wings for their chance though.

#2857 couchsurfer

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 05:38 PM

.

...^...best be careful what yer wish for!  :mellow:  :rolleyes:

 

 

 

 

 

....AM I MISSING SOMETHING!?....usually people post all interesting and relevant articles to these pages,,,admittedly I often rely on that,rather than traipse around the VO site....but a look over there seems to show a complete DUST-BOWL,,not even a new article posted in 2 DAYS!!!

 

...sure the sailors have and deserve some time-off,,but surely out of the ''24/7'' 3 shifts of media crew,,,someone could get out of their stupor(??) long enough to turn a frikken camera on and take a walk around the boat park,,,maybe even talk to a couple of sailors or maintenance guys!?  <_<

 

 

 

....aowww,,,waidaminute......just remembered that Clean's soon to land in CT. I guess that can only help  :mellow:

 

........be careful what yer wish for......indeed! .......have-at-it, Clean. Do us proud!



#2858 Potter

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 07:50 PM

.

...^...best be careful what yer wish for!  :mellow:  :rolleyes:

 

 

 

 

 

....AM I MISSING SOMETHING!?....usually people post all interesting and relevant articles to these pages,,,admittedly I often rely on that,rather than traipse around the VO site....but a look over there seems to show a complete DUST-BOWL,,not even a new article posted in 2 DAYS!!!

 

...sure the sailors have and deserve some time-off,,but surely out of the ''24/7'' 3 shifts of media crew,,,someone could get out of their stupor(??) long enough to turn a frikken camera on and take a walk around the boat park,,,maybe even talk to a couple of sailors or maintenance guys!?  <_<

 

 

 

....aowww,,,waidaminute......just remembered that Clean's soon to land in CT. I guess that can only help  :mellow:

 

........be careful what yer wish for......indeed! .......have-at-it, Clean. Do us proud!

There is a shitload of contet appearing every day, just not being reposted on here. Probably, because the followers are not spending as much time on their computers whilst the race is not running. 

Head over to the sponsor sites and have a look around, or the VOR site if you can cope with it. Then at least your clicks will add to the sponsors returns...



#2859 dolphinmaster

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 11:35 PM

Well, . . ., as abysmal as the kindergarten style tracker is,  I do miss checking in on daily progress.  In port and departure can't get here soon enough. 



#2860 couchsurfer

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Posted 11 November 2014 - 11:58 PM

Well, . . ., as abysmal as the kindergarten style tracker is,  I do miss checking in on daily progress.  In port and departure can't get here soon enough. 

.

...dammit,,I'll be away again on the'weekend with shitty slow tablet   :mellow:  :(



#2861 Heriberto

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 12:33 AM

Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and don’t split."

 

This strategy fails if by some bit of luck they end up in the lead. 

 

At what point do they break?  Or is the strategy to win the VOR with a string of second places? (Which would probably work)

 

If you are in the lead, why would you ever "break", you can't cover. If you were a fast boat, doing that would potentially put you in last place if you made the wrong call. You would have to know absolutely it was the thing to do, and if you knew it, so would everybody else.

 

This is a boatspeed contest, routing has next to nothing to do with it. This is all about who has the fastest drivers and trimmers, who can find and keep the right sail combinations up for all conditions and keep the hammer down for the longest without breaking themselves or the boat. The leaders are those who sail the boat fastest and the back of the pack will have to catch a flyer to do anything. They may well win a leg, bringing home glory for their sponsors. but nobody is going to win this VOR based on what their navigators tell them. This race will be won with 1) boatspeed, 2)  playing the percentages/not splitting, 3) boatspeed, 4) not breaking the boat, and 5) boatspeed.

 

Brunel is just saying what I and others have been saying for weeks. I'm sorry if OD racing is one-dimensional that way, but it does promote close racing. The leader goes right, and the fleet goes right to stay in touch. The back of the fleet goes left to try to break with the leaders and the leaders go left to cover. The separations happen through boatspeed and small tactical decisions and over the long haul you don't win banging corners all the time. Why would anyone assume ocean racing OD strategy would be different than OD fleet racing? It has evolved that way for a reason.

 

Some people love that kind of racing.



#2862 Hank Chinaski

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 02:20 AM


Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and dont split."

 
This strategy fails if by some bit of luck they end up in the lead. 
 
At what point do they break?  Or is the strategy to win the VOR with a string of second places? (Which would probably work)
 
 
This is a boatspeed contest, routing has next to nothing to do with it... nobody is going to win this VOR based on what their navigators tell them.

That may be true for a short race but if you discount routing and don't listen to your navigator you'll find yourself falling off the back of a weather system only to wish a successful flyer is in your future.

#2863 Sailbydate

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 02:24 AM

 

Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and don’t split."

 

This strategy fails if by some bit of luck they end up in the lead. 

 

At what point do they break?  Or is the strategy to win the VOR with a string of second places? (Which would probably work)

 

If you are in the lead, why would you ever "break", you can't cover. If you were a fast boat, doing that would potentially put you in last place if you made the wrong call. You would have to know absolutely it was the thing to do, and if you knew it, so would everybody else.

 

This is a boatspeed contest, routing has next to nothing to do with it. This is all about who has the fastest drivers and trimmers, who can find and keep the right sail combinations up for all conditions and keep the hammer down for the longest without breaking themselves or the boat. The leaders are those who sail the boat fastest and the back of the pack will have to catch a flyer to do anything. They may well win a leg, bringing home glory for their sponsors. but nobody is going to win this VOR based on what their navigators tell them. This race will be won with 1) boatspeed, 2)  playing the percentages/not splitting, 3) boatspeed, 4) not breaking the boat, and 5) boatspeed.

 

Brunel is just saying what I and others have been saying for weeks. I'm sorry if OD racing is one-dimensional that way, but it does promote close racing. The leader goes right, and the fleet goes right to stay in touch. The back of the fleet goes left to try to break with the leaders and the leaders go left to cover. The separations happen through boatspeed and small tactical decisions and over the long haul you don't win banging corners all the time. Why would anyone assume ocean racing OD strategy would be different than OD fleet racing? It has evolved that way for a reason.

 

Some people love that kind of racing.

Good question. Ask MAPFRE. 



#2864 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 02:31 AM

 

Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and don’t split."

 

This strategy fails if by some bit of luck they end up in the lead. 

 

At what point do they break?  Or is the strategy to win the VOR with a string of second places? (Which would probably work)

 

If you are in the lead, why would you ever "break", you can't cover.

 

Sorry, I was trying to make two separate points. The question about breaking refers to the situation where you are running second - you are either happy to remain second (and as I said, win the VOR on that basis) or you will need to try to overtake the leader - and thus break with them.  The leader might cover, they might not.  But the call is with you as the trailing boat to drive things, not the leader.



#2865 Southern Cross

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 04:47 AM


Quote: "Our aim was always to be within 4-5 miles of whoever was leading and don’t split."

 
This strategy fails if by some bit of luck they end up in the lead. 
 
At what point do they break?  Or is the strategy to win the VOR with a string of second places? (Which would probably work)
 
If you are in the lead, why would you ever "break", you can't cover. If you were a fast boat, doing that would potentially put you in last place if you made the wrong call. You would have to know absolutely it was the thing to do, and if you knew it, so would everybody else.
 
This is a boatspeed contest, routing has next to nothing to do with it. This is all about who has the fastest drivers and trimmers, who can find and keep the right sail combinations up for all conditions and keep the hammer down for the longest without breaking themselves or the boat. The leaders are those who sail the boat fastest and the back of the pack will have to catch a flyer to do anything. They may well win a leg, bringing home glory for their sponsors. but nobody is going to win this VOR based on what their navigators tell them. This race will be won with 1) boatspeed, 2)  playing the percentages/not splitting, 3) boatspeed, 4) not breaking the boat, and 5) boatspeed.
 
Brunel is just saying what I and others have been saying for weeks. I'm sorry if OD racing is one-dimensional that way, but it does promote close racing. The leader goes right, and the fleet goes right to stay in touch. The back of the fleet goes left to try to break with the leaders and the leaders go left to cover. The separations happen through boatspeed and small tactical decisions and over the long haul you don't win banging corners all the time. Why would anyone assume ocean racing OD strategy would be different than OD fleet racing? It has evolved that way for a reason.
 
Some people love that kind of racing.

Boat speed, driving and trimming, comes into play after a good navigator has found the better pressure and the skipper has agreed with him to make the call. Doesn't do much good if you are sitting in mud.

#2866 Heriberto

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:28 AM

Stupid Brunel, they don't know anything about what they are doing with a dumb strategy like keeping the leaders in sight. Why don't they read Sailing Anarchy?

Mapfre? Apparently they have/had bigger problems. And being all over the map in every way looks like it was one of them.

The point is, you only need to beat the other boats in the majority of races, there are no extra points for being absolute fastest. Now, Volvo could have changed that with a cumulative time system rather than points, but they didn't do that.

#2867 Southern Cross

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:35 AM

Brunel's not stupid at all. They're just saying they're going to copy everything the lead boat's navigator and skipper decide to do.

#2868 Heriberto

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:38 AM


Brunel's not stupid at all. They're just saying they're going to copy everything the lead boat's navigator and skipper decide to do.

Which is The best strategy. If you gear your staff to that, you can bulk up your team with another driver or trimmer or person to keep the hammer down, rather than a routing guru, or (ouch) "professor".

#2869 Southern Cross

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:42 AM



Brunel's not stupid at all. They're just saying they're going to copy everything the lead boat's navigator and skipper decide to do.

Which is The best strategy (sorry for the sarcasm). If you gear your staff to that, you can bulk up your team with another driver or trimmer or person to keep the hammer down, rather than a routing guru, or (ouch) "professor".

You could be right. As long as it's not another skipper.

#2870 Heriberto

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:48 AM

Huh?

#2871 Southern Cross

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:51 AM

Replacing the "professor" with another skipper. Two Skippers on one boat and all that. Didn't work out too well for one boat.

#2872 Francis Vaughan

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:05 AM

Stupid Brunel, they don't know anything about what they are doing with a dumb strategy like keeping the leaders in sight. Why don't they read Sailing Anarchy?
 

It appears that they do.

 

The point is, you only need to beat the other boats in the majority of races, there are no extra points for being absolute fastest.

 

Indeed.  This is the most critical point.  However, I don't think we really understand how the combination of strategies will work out.  Some strategies won't scale, and they will mean different tradeoffs. Each leg is long enough that even the most trivial  of issues could cause a boat to lose contact, or be forced to take a different line.  Once out of line of sight or AIS reach it becomes harder to maintain touch, and over a few weeks, really hard. 

 

I would be disappointed to see the race descend into a drag race.  I remain sceptical that it will, simply because little chaotic events can act to spit boats out from the pack in unexpected ways.



#2873 couchsurfer

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:13 AM

Indeed.  This is the most critical point.  However, I don't think we really understand how the combination of strategies will work out.  Some strategies won't scale, and they will mean different tradeoffs. Each leg is long enough that even the most trivial  of issues could cause a boat to lose contact, or be forced to take a different line.  Once out of line of sight or AIS reach it becomes harder to maintain touch, and over a few weeks, really hard. 

 

I would be disappointed to see the race descend into a drag race.  I remain sceptical that it will, simply because little chaotic events can act to spit boats out from the pack in unexpected ways.

.

....I found it quite interesting to see the fleet's interaction down the African coast. It seemed that when a boat got behind,it actually gained an opportunity to play the group mind rather than remain glued to it.



#2874 Southern Cross

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:36 AM


Indeed.  This is the most critical point.  However, I don't think we really understand how the combination of strategies will work out.  Some strategies won't scale, and they will mean different tradeoffs. Each leg is long enough that even the most trivial  of issues could cause a boat to lose contact, or be forced to take a different line.  Once out of line of sight or AIS reach it becomes harder to maintain touch, and over a few weeks, really hard. 
 
I would be disappointed to see the race descend into a drag race.  I remain sceptical that it will, simply because little chaotic events can act to spit boats out from the pack in unexpected ways.

.
....I found it quite interesting to see the fleet's interaction down the African coast. It seemed that when a boat got behind,it actually gained an opportunity to play the group mind rather than remain glued to it.

It was interesting also in that I don't think any two strategies were alike. All different. Even the leaders.

#2875 couchsurfer

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:40 AM

 


Indeed.  This is the most critical point.  However, I don't think we really understand how the combination of strategies will work out.  Some strategies won't scale, and they will mean different tradeoffs. Each leg is long enough that even the most trivial  of issues could cause a boat to lose contact, or be forced to take a different line.  Once out of line of sight or AIS reach it becomes harder to maintain touch, and over a few weeks, really hard. 
 
I would be disappointed to see the race descend into a drag race.  I remain sceptical that it will, simply because little chaotic events can act to spit boats out from the pack in unexpected ways.

.
....I found it quite interesting to see the fleet's interaction down the African coast. It seemed that when a boat got behind,it actually gained an opportunity to play the group mind rather than remain glued to it.

It was interesting also in that I don't think any two strategies were alike. All different. Even the leaders.

.

....yes,,,and from the sounds of it there'll be similar variables in the next leg.



#2876 Southern Cross

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:43 AM


 



Indeed.  This is the most critical point.  However, I don't think we really understand how the combination of strategies will work out.  Some strategies won't scale, and they will mean different tradeoffs. Each leg is long enough that even the most trivial  of issues could cause a boat to lose contact, or be forced to take a different line.  Once out of line of sight or AIS reach it becomes harder to maintain touch, and over a few weeks, really hard. 
 
I would be disappointed to see the race descend into a drag race.  I remain sceptical that it will, simply because little chaotic events can act to spit boats out from the pack in unexpected ways.

.
....I found it quite interesting to see the fleet's interaction down the African coast. It seemed that when a boat got behind,it actually gained an opportunity to play the group mind rather than remain glued to it.
It was interesting also in that I don't think any two strategies were alike. All different. Even the leaders.
.
....yes,,,and from the sounds of it there'll be similar variables in the next leg.

Toughest call will be to pick who comes in last on the next leg.

#2877 HILLY

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 01:28 PM

 


Why does VOR never stop in Sydney?
I grew up a block from the harbor on the South Head. Might have been a surfer except that it was two buses to Bondi. So got into the sailing scene. Raced out of Woollahra Yacht Club in Rose Bay. First in little Sabot - types (forgot the name) except they had a jib and a spinnaker. Then moved up to Moths, the wooden ones that looked like floating doors and finally Cherubs. Got into a very bad boating accident there too. My friends older brother knew Iain Murray at the time and we got to hang out around him and his skiff, Channel 7. Never got a ride though. My friend's older brother also owned a neglected 12' skiff that we fixed up and banged around the harbour for many summers playing chicken with the hydrofoils and ferries and flying over the swells coming in through the heads. Can you still pull your boat up on the topless beaches? Fun to watch the STH every Boxing Day from Camp Cove and follow it all the way across the military barracks through the heads.
Sorry for the high jack. Brought back memories.

The race used the Sydney-Hobart as a partial leg in 2001-02, News Corp were first out of the Heads. The boats had a 3.5hr stop in Hobart and then went on to finish in Auckland. Assa Abloy won line honours that year, then 15mins after was Ludde Ingvall with Nicorette, and then the rest of the VO60's piled in, Amer Sports One, Tyco, Djuice Dragons, Newscorp, Illbruck and then Amer Sports Too.

I remember that but oh so vaguely. Nicorette was a yellow boat?

 

 

Nicorette had Green lettering. Not even close.

 

Oh dear S.C., arguing with yourself, I wonder which sock you meant to use to reply to yourself??

Remember to take your feet OUT when you change socks.

The sabot like boat at Wollahra, probably a Manly Junior.

And C.S.'s post:

."I have trouble fully believing that...sounds more like boat-yard bluster from 18's back home!   :lol:"

Is he also an ex-pat Sydney boy, or heaven forbid do you both come from the same drawer.. 



#2878 couchsurfer

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 01:35 PM

 Oh dear S.C., arguing with yourself, I wonder which sock you meant to use to reply to yourself??

Remember to take your feet OUT when you change socks.

The sabot like boat at Wollahra, probably a Manly Junior.

And C.S.'s post:

."I have trouble fully believing that...sounds more like boat-yard bluster from 18's back home!   :lol:"

Is he also an ex-pat Sydney boy, or heaven forbid do you both come from the same drawer.. 

.

 

.......twit. It's pretty clear that SC was correcting himself and I was referring to Nico and his home.

 

.                                ...maybe if you bring teacher an apple she'll give you some extra comprehension classes  :)



#2879 JBSF

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 01:39 PM



Writer's Block???  YGBSM?  OBR's are not there to write fiction or wax poetic.  Just fucking tell us what's going on!  FFS, how hard can that be?

!
 
......just. turn. the. camera. ON. 

zactly

#2880 couchsurfer

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 03:06 PM

.

...found something in the dustbowl  VO site.........some tactical chatter  :mellow:

 

 

 

Leg 1, done. The seven boats are now in the South African marina, the 66 sailors on dry land.

But what happened exactly between Alicante and Cape Town? How did Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing hang on to win, why did MAPFRE come last?

“It was all tactical, when normally you do one long gybe out to the trade winds, and one to the Doldrums.”

Team Vestas Wind’s navigator Wouter Verbraak sets the scene.

“It was very intense right from the start. It was all tactical along the African coast, with very little sleep. And the Southern Ocean was pretty intense too, with some weather systems that weren’t really in place.”

So here is a look at the four key moments of this tactical, tense and tight month of ocean racing.

Strait of Gibraltar

The gateway to the Atlantic Ocean. It took the fleet two long days of Mediterranean coastal sailing to get there, but they eventually reached the Strait.

And that’s where the first big call of this leg was made: Team SCA chose to tack north and head closer to the coast to avoid the strong currents in the middle of the Strait. The only boat to head in that direction, they took the lead an hour after.

All six other boats kept sailing southwest towards the middle and crossed closer to Morocco.

 
m28323_crop7_1024x576_1415779599764C.jpg
The Navigator's Race
 
 

“The big split happened,” said Libby Greenhalgh at the time, the navigator of the magenta boat. “We couldn’t understand why they would all choose that route – so we stuck to our guns, and got to the Rock several miles ahead.”

It was a bold move, and one that put the girls 21 nautical miles ahead as they became the first boat to escape into the Atlantic Ocean.

Cape Verde Islands

This leg usually offers two options: going west to enjoy the trade winds, or sailing along the African coast, all the way down to the Canaries and the Cape Verde Islands.

There was no such choice this time around. Because of weak trades, the whole fleet stayed close to the Moroccan shore – and close to each other.

One week after leaving Alicante, they gybed southwest towards the Cape Verde Islands.

 
m28616_crop8_1024x576_proportional_14138
Brian Carlin/Team Vestas Wind
 

It was time to make a second decision: go below or through the middle of the islands.

A split in the fleet saw Abu Dhabi, Team Brunel, Team SCA and Team Alvimedica head north, Vestas and MAPFRE go through the centre, and Dongfeng go south, between the east and central islands.

Going north, Abu Dhabi and Brunel already knew they wanted to cross the Doldrums to the west. Vestas went for the middle option with a little something in mind already.

“Our decision to cross east was taken before the Cape Verde Islands,” explained Wouter in a phone call to the boat. “We saw a tropical storm developing with good wind ahead of us, and light spots too. We went further east to avoid these calms, and managed to get the new wind from the east first.”

For others, the archipelago was where it all went wrong.

“I think it all goes back to the Cape Verde Islands,” said Anthony Marchand on the dock in Cape Town yesterday. His team, MAPFRE, had just crossed the finish line in last place.

“We should have gone north… We were close to Vestas at the time, but they crossed the Doldrums well – I don’t know how they pulled that off…”

These islands definitely played a long-term role in the leg. They shaped the next crucial move to cross the Doldrums.

Doldrums

Wonderful and terrible, fascinating and dreaded. The Intertropical Convergence Zone is a place like no other, a low-pressure area around the Equator where the winds tend to be calm, the clouds gigantic, the sunrises, epic.

It’s a lottery, and one where Abu Dhabi and Brunel made a clean sweep. They went all the way to the west of the fleet, and hardly slowed down coming out of the light wind band some 90 nautical miles ahead of their closest competitors.

“It was a no brainer for us to take the longer route,” explained Bouwe in an email from the boat. “We have seen that happening very often in Leg 1; people like to say west is best and maybe there is something to it.”

“It’s a fact that the Doldrums are narrower in the west than in the east, so it’s less risky to be in the west.”

But one boat went east – and Vestas did very well, finding a hole in the middle of the light airs to come out in a handy third position.

Having chosen the middle course, Dongfeng, Alvimedica, MAPFRE and SCA didn’t have it so easy. The Spanish boat reported a 200km cloud, and the girls got stuck for an agonising eight hours in virtually NO wind.

 
m28848_crop7_1024x576_14157795990918.jpg
West and East
 
 

It was time to cross the Equator, make way towards the Brazilian waypoint of Fernando de Noronha and finally enter the Southern Atlantic.

St Helena High

This big, fat high-pressure system drives weather experts, navigators and routing systems mad. Looming over the middle of the Southern Atlantic, creating light wind patches all over the place, the St Helena High only gives the sailors two options: rounding it, or sailing through it.

There was no way to cut the corner this time, and it was all about dealing with the elephant in the middle of the room – the High, before turning east to Cape Town.

First, a run south-southwest, sailing along the Brazilian coast in southeast trade winds.

MAPFRE tried to hook into a small low-pressure system off Rio, but that didn’t work out – they only sailed more miles.

Brunel flirted around the high-pressure system, but stumbled in light winds.

Vestas went far west and made a temporary gain, but didn’t manage to cash their investment later on.

At the back of the fleet, MAPFRE and SCA were stuck in a different system by then, but their final battle made up for this temporary lack of confrontation.

After breaking a rudder and a padeye, Dongfeng did the best of what they had: Charles Caudrelier’s team went south, gybed early and caught up with the leaders.

And there, once in the Southern Ocean, heading away from the ice exclusion zone that sits at 42º South, the leading boats found themselves once again in sight of each other. After 19 days of sailing.

 
m29449_crop7_1024x576_1415779600135E.jpg
The magic number
 

Once back with the front pack, Charles kept the pressure on Ian and his guys. Abu Dhabi arrived in Cape Town only 12 minutes before them, taking first place, and one point.

“SiFi got all the major navigation decisions right,” said an ecstatic Ian on the South African dock, speaking of his navigator Simon Fisher.

“Like the African coast, like going west of the Cape Verde islands, managing the St Helena High, and particularly gybing early in the Southern Ocean, and our final approach.”



#2881 sandgrounder

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 03:37 PM

Just been announced that Rob Greenhalgh has joined Mapfre and arriving in Cape Town on Friday. Brother and sister competing in the same VOR, that must be a first.



#2882 JBSF

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 05:38 PM

It STILL boggles the mind that 1 & 2 finished withing 12 min of each other after 20+ days and 6000 miles of sailing.



#2883 couchsurfer

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:32 PM

.

.....good t'see they had lots of beef t'chew on!  :)

 

...I enjoy the OBR blogs.......  http://www.volvoocea...-the-boats.html

 

 

 
m29831_crop8_1024x576_proportional_14151
Corinna Halloran/Team SCA/Volvo Ocean Race
 


#2884 Sailbydate

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:40 PM

.

.....good t'see they had lots of beef t'chew on!  :)

 

...I enjoy the OBR blogs.......  http://www.volvoocea...-the-boats.html

 

 

 
m29831_crop8_1024x576_proportional_14151
Corinna Halloran/Team SCA/Volvo Ocean Race
 

Good to see the handle of a "cat-o-nine-tails" hanging up there next to the white board. That'll keep the girls on their toes!   :ph34r:



#2885 couchsurfer

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Posted 12 November 2014 - 06:42 PM

 

Good to see the handle of a "cat-o-nine-tails" hanging up there next to the white board. That'll keep the girls on their toes!   :ph34r:

.

 

.....ship's bell perhaps?  :wacko:



#2886 Alinghi4ever

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 05:55 PM

Here are the Final Stats of Leg 1 btw

 

Final results:

Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing - Finished

Finish time (UTC): 15:10:44 (November 5)

Elapsed time: 25d 3h 10m 44s

Sailed Distance (nm): 8772.4

Max 24hr distance (nm): 539.3

Max 1hour average speed (knots): 26.6


Dongfeng Race Team - Finished

Finish time (UTC): 15:22:44 (November 5)

Elapsed time: 25d 3h 22m 48s

Sailed Distance (nm): 8363.9

Max 24hr distance (nm): 541.7

Max 1hour average speed (knots): 24.6

 

Team Brunel  - Finished

Finish time (UTC): 19:33:25 (November 5)

Elapsed time: 25d 7h 33m 25s

Sailed Distance (nm) 8788.9

Max 24hr distance (nm): 533.5

Max 1hour average speed (knots): 26.5

 

Team Vestas Wind - Finished

Finish time (UTC): 12:48:47 (November 6)

Elapsed time: 26d 0h 48m 47s

Sailed Distance (nm) 8531.5

Max 24hr distance (nm): 522.7

Max 1hour average speed (knots): 23.8

 

Team Alvimedica - Finished

Finish time (UTC): 01:07:38 (November 7)

Elapsed time: 26d 13h 07m 38s

Sailed Distance (nm) 8405.5

Max 24hr distance (nm): 489.5

Max 1hour average speed (knots): 27.9

 

SCA - Finished 

Finish time (UTC): 11:37:49 (November 7)

Elapsed time: 26d 23h 37m 49s

Sailed Distance (nm):  8499,9

Max 24hr distance (nm): 501,6

Max 1hour average speed (Knots):  23,8

 

MAPFRE - Finished November 7, 2014

Finish time (UTC): 12:47:32 (November 7)

Elapsed time: 27d 00h 47m 32s

Sailed Distance (nm):  8525,9

Max 24hr distance (nm): 477,5

Max 1hour average speed (Knots): 21,7



#2887 Presuming Ed

Presuming Ed

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Posted 01 May 2015 - 04:50 PM

 

Yup. IIRC, they can make food, but can't participate in sailing the boat.


That has to be a seriously boring and frustrating way to spend 3 weeks plus onboard IMO.

 

 

For those with a TDS sub. The daily life of an OBR. 

http://www.thedailys...br-other-duties



#2888 Presuming Ed

Presuming Ed

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Posted 11 June 2015 - 07:31 AM

They started well, & I'm sure they'll learn quickly. A podium by race end would be good.

 
Would you put your money on that one?

What a shame I didn't. Bugger





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: VOR, Volvo Ocean Race

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