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Composting Heads


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#1 Touchofgray

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 11:17 AM

As I get closer to making a decision on another boat, I wanted to see what people had to say about their experiences with composting heads in boats. When I see a boat listing with one, I pretty much stop looking, even if all the other attributes are positive. I'm reacting this way due to smelly experiences with composting toilets in friend's off-grid homes, most of which have been converted to septic/flush after the pioneer phase got old. This aversion goes back 8 or 10 years, but it's a pretty strong memory. Not wanting to sell myself short, have they got this figured out?



#2 Blue Crab

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 11:34 AM

My C-Head has been just fine for over two years when the directions were followed. My 1976 boat had no holding tank so the dessicator was an easy choice. The higher dollar units doubtless have some advantages.



#3 Touchofgray

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 11:39 AM

Thanks.

 

Another question: If you are on the boat for an extended period, can it keep up?



#4 jack_sparrow

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 11:58 AM

Only if he slows down.

#5 Anomaly2

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 12:19 PM

There are composting heads and then there are urine-separating composting heads. Makes all the difference in the world...



#6 jack_sparrow

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 12:43 PM

Where does the sawdust or what ever come from/get stored??? Hope it doesn't entail sitting there working away with a rasp making the stuff until vessel disolves around you?

#7 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 02:37 PM

Let's put it this way:

 

have a catamaran. Since on one side the head flushed overboard, and now boat is in US, we replaced that with a C-Head, leaving the other side with the holding tank, just to see which one we'd like better.

 

The C-Head is so far superior, that my WIFE crawled into the bilges/engine room and removed the holding tank and all its paraphernalia. The job was not pleasant, to say the least. She didn't bat an eye.

 

As was said, follow the directions. The C-Head site, if you spend some time with it, will answer all questions, and if for some reason you have not found that to be so, Sandy or his wife will promptly answer your email queries. Also, a bit of searching on the sailnet or cruisers' forum sites have lots, and lots, of discussion in regards desiccating heads

 

As far as longevity: the C-Head site describes how to longer-term store your compost. That said, anywhere you feel like you can pump straight overboard, you could probably just dump the bucket. I'm just glad I'm not chained to pumpouts and living with that holding-tank "boat" smell anymore.



#8 Touchofgray

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 02:44 PM

Thank you Max.



#9 Point Break

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 02:52 PM

I have no experience with composting heads but I do have experience with the head smell. It was always an ongoing irritation on all 3 prior boats, especially when we lived aboard our last one for a couple years. Our current boat has fresh water heads.....no smell....zero....for 7 years now. Not a great solution for smaller boats with limited fresh water capability. However on our mid sized boat, with a watermaker its stellar. We're coastal cruisers but do spend weeks at a time anchored or moored out. We do use the adage if it's yellow let it mellow, and if brown send it down. ;)

#10 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 02:55 PM

There is the Peggie Hall book, if you just want to keep a holding tank:

http://www.amazon.co...l/dp/1892399156



#11 Steam Flyer

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 03:13 PM

There is the Peggie Hall book, if you just want to keep a holding tank:

http://www.amazon.co...l/dp/1892399156

 

 

+1

Lots of people think their holding tank or the heads hose system is causing "potty smell" in the boat when it's actually something very different. It's amazing the number of counter-productive... or downright destructive... things people do to cure that smell (which I agree is very unpleasant and a major cruise-killer).

 

I don't have any experience with compostng heads but plan to look into it for our next boat. Thanks Max and Point B.

 

FB- Doug



#12 Alex W

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 03:39 PM

I flush with fresh water most of the time, and only use salt water when I'm out cruising.  It's easy to flush with fresh water even on a small boat, as long as there is a sink next to the head.  Just close the intake through hull and leave a small pot next to the toilet.  Have people take fresh water from the sink, fill the pot, and flush with that.

 

Since my boat is day sailed or overnighted most of the year this allows me to keep the smell away without stopping to use the pumpout after every trip.

 

Also, it's not that expensive to replace the entire holding tank/toilet system on a typical boat.  If a boat came with something that I didn't think I'd like, but everything else was perfect, I'd buy it.  Worst case you replace the toilet system and get exactly what you do want.



#13 kimbottles

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 03:46 PM

We put a C-Head on FRANCIS LEE.

Sandy is a nice guy and a great customer service example, he is quick to answer any questions and his website is full of information on how to use his product correctly. Once you get use to the process it is easy and we have not had any smells.

The C-Head is about half the cost of the other two well known options (Naturehead and Airhead) and it fit our installation better than the others.

Beats any holding tank setup I have ever used.

#14 nobody.really

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 05:05 PM

This is so damn tempting, installing a C-Head. Even after a complete replacement of all hoses and tank I still have some odor. Installed a larger holding tank but the head is an older one and fills it too quickly because it just uses too much water to flush. The one thing about the C-Head is the urine collection. My existing holding tank is uphill and there is no room below for one so that means jerry cans of piss? I imagine the answer to that is it is better than living with the stink.

 

I've read all the advice about how to rid the system of odors. Easier said than done. For my system the biggest issue is probably the venting of the holding tank. Cross venting is not practical and installing big 1" diameter hose is also problematic given the location of the tank. I flush it with fresh water when I leave the boat which helps but having the hydronic heating hoses nearby the waste hoses doesn't help. Just too much shit in too little space.



#15 blackjenner

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 07:21 PM

We have a Nature's Head. We installed it almost five years ago. We will never go back to a conventional head.



#16 Touchofgray

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 09:01 PM

Thanks guys. Fears abated, and I will not discount boats with composting heads anymore. A Nordic 40 was the boat that got me thinking of getting real answers.



#17 Point Break

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 09:11 PM

We have a Nature's Head. We installed it almost five years ago. We will never go back to a conventional head.

Just curious. If composting heads do not take urine, where do you pee?



#18 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 09:19 PM

The composting, which are really desiccating, heads separate the urine via a diverter in the 'bowl'. Urine is contained separately from fecal matter.



#19 billh1

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 09:27 PM

I just installed a C-Head on my 26' Excalibur.  Spent the last week cruising down the Hood Canal with my skeptical wife.  She's sold and so am I!  

 

I couldn't bare the porta potti any longer.  I have planed to use a composter on the Cape George 40 I'm finishing. That gives me an extra 40 gallon water tank.  We went with the less expensive C-Head on the 26 to give the concept a go and see if it works for us.  So far so good.  

 

+1 what Kim says about Sandy and his service. 

 

PB- yes, the urine is separated and ends up in a plastic milk jug.  Separation is key.

 

We used a combo of Western Red Cedar and Douglas Fir saw dust and planer shavings-  Delightful.



#20 Roleur

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 09:39 PM

Another happy C-Head owner.  For 99% of our use it is odor free.  We found that during a two-week ocean crossing the poo bucket did start to smell, partly I suspect because the urine wasn't 100% separated (rolly boat, foulies, tired, etc. doesn't lead to perfect aim, especially for the ladies since they can't point and shoot).  I can live with that.  Our holding tank and head smelled 100% of time, so that is a massive, massive improvement, not to mention it is dead simple and lighter.  Works perfect for our needs.  I'm not sure I would feel the same with 4 people onboard regularly, but then our small holding tank wouldn't have kept up either.  

 

Coastal cruising we very rarely use the #2 function.  Generally use options off the boat.  That makes it overall so, so simple to use.  Occasional empty of the gallon jug is far, far easier than pumping out a holding tank.  



#21 Point Break

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 09:53 PM

The composting, which are really desiccating, heads separate the urine via a diverter in the 'bowl'. Urine is contained separately from fecal matter.

And then you periodically have to take the container filled with urine and dump it somewhere?



#22 nobody.really

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 10:11 PM

Yes. I wouldn't want to be around when you dumped a month old 5 gallon jerry can of stale urine. I don't think anyone does that anyway. They tell you that you can add some chem to the bottle to kill the odor. Off shore you can just dump it and better to do that without the chem in it. C-Head says they have a remote bottle option that is gravity fed to eliminate the 'milk jug'. But then maybe you have a stinky can of piss below deck which brings odors back into the equation.



#23 Point Break

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Posted 26 August 2015 - 10:23 PM

Yes. I wouldn't want to be around when you dumped a month old 5 gallon jerry can of stale urine. I don't think anyone does that anyway. They tell you that you can add some chem to the bottle to kill the odor. Off shore you can just dump it and better to do that without the chem in it. C-Head says they have a remote bottle option that is gravity fed to eliminate the 'milk jug'. But then maybe you have a stinky can of piss below deck which brings odors back into the equation.

Okay, I understand. Thanks.



#24 jack_sparrow

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 03:48 AM

I converted my holding tank to emergency diesel tank. I now have enough fuel to stay away from areas where I'm not allowed to feed the fish.

#25 kdh

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 11:49 AM

I'm with Max, my understanding is the idea with a composting toilet is the piss is separated so the shit can dry out. No real "composting" going on, but it sounds good. I know someone who made his own separating facilities and lives on his boat and with his diligent efforts the boat is sweet smelling.

 

I use a vacuflush fresh water system. There's a carbon filter in the tank vent which rarely gets replaced, there's no 1" pipe or anything special based on Peggy Hall's advice. Like at home the flushing action cleans out the bowl and it's easy to use. I've never used antibiotics/antibacterials anywhere on the boat. I let nature find a microbial balance in the bilge and holding, water, and fuel tanks. I sometimes add some Raritan KO or similar in the holding tank and the bilge to promote aerobic bacteria.

 

My daughter has a sensitive sense of smell and won't sail in a smelly boat. She complained a couple years ago and replacing all the head hoses solved the issue (the hoses were 8 years old).



#26 Blue Crab

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 11:56 AM

A dessicator is easy to build. What you actually pay for with a commercial unit is the proprietary urine diverter, and the professional appearance. It was worth it to me.



#27 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 01:10 PM

Already answered, but I'll second: do I have to take the urine container and dump it?

 

Yes, not unlike the fact that you have to take the whole fuckin' boat somewhere, usually several somewheres, because these marinas never maintain their pumpouts. That, and you may have to pay for the privilege of pumpout...

 

..or, you have to lug a porta-potti, with its mixed 5-gal container of nasty, and either very slyly empty into a marina bathroom because they don't allow portapotti emptying, or bring it to the house. And it's hard to be subtle in a marina, 'cause I had the decency to bring along a bottle of Clorox Cleanup for any splatters...

 

I haven't found the need, but the forum mills have it that a teaspoon of sugar in the urine jug will kill odors

 

oh, btw: IIRC, Sandy sells his diverters separately if you want to fab your own desiccator.



#28 Ajax

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 01:32 PM

When the dessicator bucket is full of poo and wood shavings, where do you dump it?

On the garden? In the garbage? Somewhere else?

 

How long does it take two people to fill it, with moderate use?



#29 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 01:41 PM

Mine goes in the garden. If you want to dump in regular garbage, just put it in a sealed container.

 

Here's the C-head FAQ. The chap is honest. Really, C-Head is just one fella who is fabricating these things himself, not a corporate entity

 

http://c-head.com/FAQ.html

 

I am incorrect in my statement in regards Chead selling diverters, upon re-reading the FAQ



#30 Gatekeeper

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 02:13 PM

This would really solve a lot of problems in a smaller yacht (like our 33)...and anyone who thinks handling the end products  ^_^  of the C-Head is disgusting obviously hasn't had the privilege of solving a clogged head hose or clearing a jammed pump.



#31 Diarmuid

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 02:37 PM

we built our own dessicator; haven't used it at sea yet, but dryland trials have gone very well. We use compressed coir for the bulking/drying material. It stores compactly, but you do need to rehydrate it before putting it into the bucket. Half an hour soaking in water will do it, and a small piece of brick will keep you for several weeks.

88936_ed3a68f553c94d1b0ec3f54696b2cf4353



#32 kimbottles

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 03:00 PM

This would really solve a lot of problems in a smaller yacht (like our 33)...and anyone who thinks handling the end products  ^_^  of the C-Head is disgusting obviously hasn't had the privilege of solving a clogged head hose or clearing a jammed pump.


Handling the end product is easy, put a plastic trash bag over the bucket and invert the bucket into the bag. Tie bag closed and throw in trash. None of the icky stuff ever touches your hands. MUCH better than clearing out a plugged head, which I have done several times in the past.

We use peat moss from the garden store. I store it in one dose containers. One dose can last at least a week or more. Clean out bucket with garden hose once in a while. Takes less than 5 minutes start to finish.

#33 Ajax

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 05:13 PM

It must have been a clever trick to design and place that urine catcher in such a manner that it works for male and female alike.

I keep seeing reference to this "ventilation hood" but I don't see any photos of it.

I know a composting head requires constant ventilation and I'm trying to see how that's achieved.

 

I'm almost sold on this. How sturdy is it?  Will it (cough) support a sea-sick, luxury yacht owner in heavy weather?



#34 Roleur

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 06:31 PM

Yes. I wouldn't want to be around when you dumped a month old 5 gallon jerry can of stale urine. I don't think anyone does that anyway. They tell you that you can add some chem to the bottle to kill the odor. Off shore you can just dump it and better to do that without the chem in it. C-Head says they have a remote bottle option that is gravity fed to eliminate the 'milk jug'. But then maybe you have a stinky can of piss below deck which brings odors back into the equation.

 

C-Head urine container is only  1 gallon.  It's nothing.  Dump it in the restroom, in the porta potty dump at the dock, or overboard it is allowed.  We just keep a spare gallon jug handy in case you wake up in the morning and discover the urine container is full or nearly full.  If you are actually on the boat then it only take 2 or 3 days to fill the gallon jug.  We always empty ours at the end of the visit so it doesn't sit for weeks.  That works well for us because we live far from the boat and visit for extended periods.  If we were visiting the boat several times a week it might not seem as convenient.  



#35 Roleur

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 06:33 PM

It must have been a clever trick to design and place that urine catcher in such a manner that it works for male and female alike.

I keep seeing reference to this "ventilation hood" but I don't see any photos of it.

I know a composting head requires constant ventilation and I'm trying to see how that's achieved.

 

I'm almost sold on this. How sturdy is it?  Will it (cough) support a sea-sick, luxury yacht owner in heavy weather?

 

No vent on ours.  Sandy advised not to install the vent unless, after installation, you identify the need.  So far, no need for us and the boat smells fresh as a daisy.  



#36 Blue Crab

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 06:40 PM

Again, a Google search will yield many discussions, particularly on Cruisers Forum. It's been two years for me. No vent. 



#37 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 07:25 PM

Your choice of medium, and need for ventilation, depends on ambient humidity and style of use.

 

I was seriously considering some sort of positive ventilation for my Chead. Boat has no AC and there have been mornings when I've woken up and found condensation on everything.

 

I had a problem once with the stirrer handle coming unglued, and so I didn't realize that I wasn't turning the medium and thus it stayed damp and attracted flies. Re-gluing the handle, and a handful of diatomaceous earth in the medium, and I was back in the dry and fly-less. So I'm still on the fence about installing ventilation as it's been ok so far. I'm not convinced that the fly eggs weren't in the peat moss, so that might have been a factor.

 

I have also found that using compressed coir/coconut, if I use very much water to hydrate the bricks, it's too wet to work well in the bucket. 

 

I'm experimenting with using pine cobble cat litter. I have read that if you can get next to sawdust, particularly cedar/pine dust, it's the best, but I don't have that opportunity

 

Ajax I'm 6'1" and 190lb, no problem with sturdy. My head is installed using lines and cleats rather than bracketed down.



#38 kimbottles

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 08:06 PM

It must have been a clever trick to design and place that urine catcher in such a manner that it works for male and female alike.
I keep seeing reference to this "ventilation hood" but I don't see any photos of it.
I know a composting head requires constant ventilation and I'm trying to see how that's achieved.
 
I'm almost sold on this. How sturdy is it?  Will it (cough) support a sea-sick, luxury yacht owner in heavy weather?

 
No vent on ours.  Sandy advised not to install the vent unless, after installation, you identify the need.  So far, no need for us and the boat smells fresh as a daisy.

Same here, Sandy said vent should not be necessary in PNW climate, so far so good.

#39 Dog

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 08:18 PM

It must have been a clever trick to design and place that urine catcher in such a manner that it works for male and female alike.

I keep seeing reference to this "ventilation hood" but I don't see any photos of it.

I know a composting head requires constant ventilation and I'm trying to see how that's achieved.

 

I'm almost sold on this. How sturdy is it?  Will it (cough) support a sea-sick, luxury yacht owner in heavy weather?

Mine has a little computer fan to keep negative pressure in the chamber. It's connected to a 1 1/2" hose which I ran to an outlet on the transom. I figured most of the time the transom is down wind. I'm also on the Chesapeake and don't know if you could get away without a fan. 



#40 Dog

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Posted 27 August 2015 - 08:26 PM

Related question.... Is it a dumb idea to try to convert my now abandoned holding tank into a second fuel tank?



#41 Gatekeeper

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 12:06 PM

You will run the risk of ending up with shitty fuel...

 

:P



#42 Ajax

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 12:19 PM

From the looks of things, you can retrofit the ventilation hood at any time, which is nice.

It gets hot and muggy as hell on the Chesapeake. Definitely not PNW conditions, so a vent might be necessary here as Dog says. I'm willing to start without one and see where it leads.

 

I think I'd like to give this a try, but it'll have to wait until next year.



#43 Blue Crab

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 01:30 PM

If you took a crap in it now, it would be composted by Spring launch.

#44 Py26129

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 01:38 PM

You will run the risk of ending up with shitty fuel...

 

:P

LOL. Seriously, converting the existing holding tank may present some problems.  

 

First and foremost, heck that the material of the tank is suitable for use with fuel.  Then you may find that the hose connections are.  i.e. the pumpout fitting would presumably be used as the fuel pickup and 1.5" is pretty large for a fuel line.  

Last, but not least check with your insurance company about converting the tank.  Don;t give them an excuse not to pay if you ever have a claim.  

 

You may just be better off to replace e the holding tank with a purpose built fuel tank.



#45 Slick470

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 02:12 PM

Do you really want to bother with cleaning the old one out? Replacing hoses is bad enough. 



#46 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 02:20 PM

Ajax

 

I've been to your neck of the woods, in summer, and I thought it was quite dry compared to the northern GOM, so you'd probably be ok without ventilation

 

for those interested, understand that these are DESICCATING heads, despite the 'composting' name tagged on them. They work by keeping the 'doo dry and urine separate. Bearing that in mind, your media should be dry, and in use, well stirred. The CH doesn't seal up like (if I recall) the other brands do so there is ventilation inherent in its design. As Marley said, 'stir it up...'



#47 kdh

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 02:55 PM

Do you really want to bother with cleaning the old one out? Replacing hoses is bad enough. 

 

Maybe as a test you could take a crap in your fuel tank.



#48 Py26129

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 03:47 PM

Good test for the fuel polishing system  <_<



#49 nobody.really

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Posted 28 August 2015 - 09:36 PM

Ajax

 

I've been to your neck of the woods, in summer, and I thought it was quite dry compared to the northern GOM, so you'd probably be ok without ventilation

 

for those interested, understand that these are DESICCATING heads, despite the 'composting' name tagged on them. They work by keeping the 'doo dry and urine separate. Bearing that in mind, your media should be dry, and in use, well stirred. The CH doesn't seal up like (if I recall) the other brands do so there is ventilation inherent in its design. As Marley said, 'stir it up...'

Maybe we're all over thinking this. One of these should do the trick.

 

17193051_SA.jpg



#50 Py26129

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Posted 29 August 2015 - 03:44 AM

Oh look a litter box and something fluffy to wipe with.

 

OK OK I'll go now  



#51 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 18 September 2015 - 12:05 PM

Ajax:

 

Have just returned from a 2.5-week cruise, the longest so far with the new head. That's about as far as one fill will go for two people in humid conditions, at anchor full time, IMO. As per Sandy's directions, we had another bucket for a transfer (for longer term storage, that is). The weather was hot and humid, and my wife had a bit of stomach trouble, so the medium didn't get dry as one would like. Nevertheless, we stirred frequently, and all smell was kept down right until the last, when a slight ammonia scent triggered us to go ahead and transfer to the long term storage bucket.

 

I then tried, for the last three days, a mixture of pine cat litter and peat moss, and I like it so far but it's only three days, and the boat is now going to the yard so I won't have a report on that for some time.

 

I think if the head compartment had better ventilation, I'd have been able to delay the transfer. I would translate that into 'if the conditions less humid' also. And if you just want to rig a ventilation fan it wouldn't be a bad thing in humidity, but I don't think it's necessary.



#52 eastbay

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 03:07 AM

Per the Ultralight Cruising thread, I have been advised that a poop tossed overboard would emit a "plume" that could be traced to a "point source" (so personal!) and defile square miles of pristine ecology; I am now looking for a lightweight, composting (desiccating) head that can fit on my boat.

 

I saw this which is essentially a 5 gallon bucket in a fancy enclosure, and without the enclosure, just the bucket looks good: lightweight, small footprint, sealable. The problem would seem to be the lack of a urine diverter.

 

Can someone with experience tell me if the diverter is critical? If so, does anyone have a clever way to make or adapt one? Getting down to the nuts and bolts ( :o) I guess that an approach might be to evacuate all liquid waste as much as possible before using the bucket..... would that work?



#53 Blue Crab

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Posted 19 September 2015 - 10:52 AM

I guess Googling is out of the question? Here ya go. Now go away.

 

https://www.google.c...=utf-8&oe=utf-8



#54 eastbay

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 01:46 AM

I guess Googling is out of the question? Here ya go. Now go away.

 

https://www.google.c...=utf-8&oe=utf-8

Gee, uh, Thanks Crab. Good links. Sorry to wake you.

 

There are a few manufacturers of toilet seats intended to go on a 5 gal bucket- it would be cool to adapt a diverter to the seat itself with a little storage tank, all one unit, so the poop could go in the bucket and get sawdusted and sealed with the lid, and the pee could lift out with the seat and be disposed of separately.

 

Otherwise even with a diverter I still have the problem of where to put the pee tank- in the poop would be unpleasant and trying to go outside the bucket would require a hole.



#55 PMH

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 02:33 AM

The urine diverter is critical. After lots of time spent sitting on ancient composting revolting heads in cabins in the woods we were totally sceptical of having a composting toilet on our boat. the owner said to just give it a try and we have never looked back. We have an airhead, emptying the pee bucket is totally innocuous (add sugar), never smells, we use peat moss as the medium. But there is no question that it takes up more room than a Groco or whatever.  



#56 Blue Crab

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 11:18 AM

 

I guess Googling is out of the question? Here ya go. Now go away.

 

https://www.google.c...=utf-8&oe=utf-8

Gee, uh, Thanks Crab. Good links. Sorry to wake you.

 

There are a few manufacturers of toilet seats intended to go on a 5 gal bucket- it would be cool to adapt a diverter to the seat itself with a little storage tank, all one unit, so the poop could go in the bucket and get sawdusted and sealed with the lid, and the pee could lift out with the seat and be disposed of separately.

 

Otherwise even with a diverter I still have the problem of where to put the pee tank- in the poop would be unpleasant and trying to go outside the bucket would require a hole.

 

 

That would hardly be cool as you'd have to deal with it every time. The cheapest way out is to poop in a bucket while peeing in a milk jug that you hold in your hand. I have a C-Head. $500. It's not $500 worth of materials but it looks professional, has some boat-friendly angles that fit and works very well, as there's little to go wrong. In 2 years the only breakdown required a re-gluing of the PVC crank handle.

 

In practice, when I have to take a leak, I use a laundry detergent jug, and dump it daily, rinse, repeat. This practice developed to avoid filling a previous holding tank with urine. In the mornings, however, after reading SA posts, I usually have to move my bowels from the chart table to the C-Head. As most know, there is often a need to pee when you poop (just as one always feels the need to pee in the shower.) The C's urine diverter sends the liquid directly into a milk jug, not mixing with the poop, and requires dumping no more often than the solids bucket.

 

This all sounds pretty simple but there is some arithmetic involved: As urine is associated with the number "1", and feces with the number "2", added together the result is "3". 3 is the very pungent, hose-permeating slurry and odor that can ruin a pleasant day, ergo [1] and [2] in separate containers ≠ 3.



#57 olaf hart

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 11:24 AM

Don't have a composting head, but have always carried a plastic hospital urine bottle with a lanyard on the handle, worth its weight in gold on a solitary watch.

Tie the lanyard to something solid, throw the bottle overboard, retrieve and it's already washed out.

#58 vjm

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 01:43 PM

Eco Vita also has a DIY option.

 

http://www.ecovita.net/privy.html



#59 Lex Teredo

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 09:39 PM

Jeebus. This whole thread is like what I imagine a conversation with Howard Hughes, circa the early 1970's would have sounded.  "I separate the urine and the feces for storage."  "I store the urine in a 5 gallon can and remove it monthly."  "I use cedar shavings to make my toilet smell delightful."  "Put the lotion in the basket or it gets the hose again."

Next Topic:  Storing fingernail clippings in the anchor locker:  just the ticket for long ocean passages. 



#60 Blue Crab

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 10:33 PM

Jeebus. This whole thread is like what I imagine a conversation with Howard Hughes, circa the early 1970's would have sounded.  "I separate the urine and the feces for storage."  "I store the urine in a 5 gallon can and remove it monthly."  "I use cedar shavings to make my toilet smell delightful."  "Put the lotion in the basket or it gets the hose again."

 

 

Feel free to use the pumpouts. This is not about saving money it's avoiding the stink. Also, one thing is certain: use the same urine collection device everytime. Please don't even speculate on how I formed this opinion.



#61 wristwister

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 11:06 PM

Maybe I'm not following here.

 

One of my boats has a porta-potti. Real quick and easy to just dump it in the toilet at the marina. No smell.

 

My other boat has a conventional pump head. I stop by the pumpout station on my way back to the slip. Real quick and easy. No smell

 

All this talk of diverting urine, dealing with bottles full of pee, dumping buckets of shit into bags and dealing with that ... I guess I'm not seeing the advantage in a "composting" head.



#62 rantifarian

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Posted 21 September 2015 - 11:38 PM

Lots of places with no pumpout option, such as a large portion of Queensland. I have been reading the thread with great interest, as composters don't seem that common here

#63 Black Jack

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 03:55 PM

I am putting in an Airhead composting head in the next month on my boat. I recently filled in the thru-hulls for the marine head. The old head was removed years ago. 

 

This is my reasoning for this composting head. it fits the form factor of my center lined head as it is forward on the keelson in the bow. Moreover i don't need to have extra holes in my boat - (less holes - less leak risks). One hose for a vent. No additional holding tank is needed, the waste can be quickly managed in one's convenience and urine goes over the side at sea. It also is quite light and made even lighter once emptied for this go fast planing boat. I am planning not to use it when i sail by myself - i have a cedar bucket for that. I am putting it in for my wife primarily as well as the men and women who want a more homelike experience while sailing the bay. It will also be easy to clean and there will less ugliness that is associated with traditional marine heads.



#64 Ajax

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 04:33 PM

Maybe I'm not following here.

 

One of my boats has a porta-potti. Real quick and easy to just dump it in the toilet at the marina. No smell.

 

My other boat has a conventional pump head. I stop by the pumpout station on my way back to the slip. Real quick and easy. No smell

 

All this talk of diverting urine, dealing with bottles full of pee, dumping buckets of shit into bags and dealing with that ... I guess I'm not seeing the advantage in a "composting" head.

 

Trying to remain impartial, I can sum up some of the pro's and con's for you:

 

Pro's:

1. Impossible for guests to clog or ruin with too much toilet paper, feminine products or other material.

2. Doesn't require any special training for guests. (You'd be surprised how confused some people are by a marine pump toilet)

3. A single bucket can last 5 WEEKS of continuous use by 2 people, daily.

4. Elimination of hull penetrations.

5. Recovery of holding tank area for a water tank, fuel tank or storage.

6. If used properly, elimination of waste odor.

 

Con's:

1. Yes, you have to dump a urine bottle.

2. Yes, you have to bag and dump the dried poop (Seriously, is this worse than dumping your disgusting porta-potty?)

3. You have to bag your used toilet paper as it cannot be disposed of in the dessicating head. (That's kind of icky)

4. On rare occasions, insects *could* get into it.

5. Requires a larger footprint than traditional marine toilets, so installation may not be possible.

6. Requires keeping "media" on-hand (sourcing peat moss, etc). whereas "duh", marine toilets use the water you're floating in.

7. Can be pricey.



#65 kent_island_sailor

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 04:51 PM

Con #3 sounds like a deal killer. NFW is my wife going to go for that.



#66 Ajax

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 04:56 PM

Con #3 sounds like a deal killer. NFW is my wife going to go for that.

 

Hell, I'm not excited about it either and I'm trying to talk myself up to a conversion.



#67 vjm

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 05:08 PM

Lots of folks put toilet paper in the composting bin, but it does fill up sooner.



#68 Ajax

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 05:10 PM

Lots of folks put toilet paper in the composting bin, but it does fill up sooner.

I'd be willing to live with that tradeoff. It's not like I wipe my ass with a phone book each time.



#69 vjm

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 05:13 PM

 

Lots of folks put toilet paper in the composting bin, but it does fill up sooner.

I'd be willing to live with that tradeoff. It's not like I wipe my ass with a phone book each time.

 

Exactly. From what I have read you just have to keep an eye out for your medium getting too dry with the addition of paper. As long as that is OK, good to go.



#70 kent_island_sailor

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 05:27 PM

I am SO tempted. My boat does not have room for much of a holding tank, the one I have now is pretty small, and I am not getting rid of a water tank for a crap tank. The Lectro-San system is another idea, but it costs big $$$.

Speaking of holding tanks, the way they set it up aboard the Torsk (old half-working sub) was the head was directly bolted on top of the tank and you just opened a big seacock valve to dump it. OMFG did that stink when you opened the valve, you had a direct opening from the tank to the head. Even worse apparently was the original system used compressed air to blow the crap out of the tank. If you used the head when that was going on .... :o :o



#71 Ajax

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 05:40 PM

Torsk??? They *still* do it that way!

 

If you still want a conventional toilet on your boat, the way to get more bang for your buck out of the holding tank is a Lavac vacu-flush. They use much less water and rely on a vacuum to whisk away the poo.

More expensive than a Lectro-San but more pricey than a Jabsco, yet still not a dessicating bucket head.



#72 bpw

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 06:44 PM

 

 

Lots of folks put toilet paper in the composting bin, but it does fill up sooner.

I'd be willing to live with that tradeoff. It's not like I wipe my ass with a phone book each time.

 

Exactly. From what I have read you just have to keep an eye out for your medium getting too dry with the addition of paper. As long as that is OK, good to go.

 

I am looking at the manual for an airhead right now and this is what they say, doesn't seem too big a deal.  In a few months I'll know how well it actually works.  So far (just a week or so) the airhead seems so much better than the old porta-potty or normal marine head.



#73 kent_island_sailor

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 07:22 PM

The Torsk heads still dump into the holding tank directly - no pump and no barrier to all the smells coming right back at you. As for compressed air to empty the tank, that would be for underway. AFAIK they pump out the same as anyone else does at the dock with a hose running ashore.



#74 Blue Crab

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Posted 22 September 2015 - 11:00 PM

LectraSan not OK anywhere that says "No discharge."



#75 Ajax

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 02:31 PM

LectraSan not OK anywhere that says "No discharge."

AFAIK, Herring Bay is the only 100% total "No discharge" zone on the Chesapeake. Are there others?



#76 Py26129

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 02:47 PM

All of the Great Lakes are "No Discharge".  ....and at $20 / pump out on the Canadian side, minimizing the number of pump-outs is a good thing.



#77 Ajax

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 02:55 PM

All of the Great Lakes are "No Discharge".  ....and at $20 / pump out on the Canadian side, minimizing the number of pump-outs is a good thing.

 

See, in your environment I think I composting head would be worth the hassles listed in my pro's and con's above.

NDZ, plus expensive pump outs? It's a no-brainer.  A dessicating head would probably last you all friggin' season.

 

Empty it once, and done.



#78 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 04:11 PM

re: toilet paper in desiccating head:

 

As has been mentioned, you can put TP in a C-head (can't speak for others). When you spin the handle, the paper rises to the top of the medium and thus doesn't incorporate. Some people periodically take the TP out, I think it was suggested to use chopsticks. mmmkay...

 

Me, I never put TP in a marine head anyway, I have had a clogged head and it was a bad experience. So I already was used to the idea of TP bagging.

 

My MO is that I have a small waste can with a pedal-operated flip-top lid. Got it at the dollar store. I guess it's about a foot tall?

1d1e37d93189469e8912f87844866bc2.jpg

I line the can with plastic grocery bag, handles hang out. When the TP fills, I merely lift the bag out by its handles, tie it off, and put in the trash. No muss, no fuss.

 

 



#79 Py26129

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 04:25 PM

 

All of the Great Lakes are "No Discharge".  ....and at $20 / pump out on the Canadian side, minimizing the number of pump-outs is a good thing.

 

See, in your environment I think I composting head would be worth the hassles listed in my pro's and con's above.

NDZ, plus expensive pump outs? It's a no-brainer.  A dessicating head would probably last you all friggin' season.

 

Empty it once, and done.

 

it probably would.  The Admiral is a bit set in her ways though and does not like the idea of a composting head.  until she uses one on someone else's boat and decides she likes it, I will not be able to convince her.  So, after go bought our boat, I "upgraded" to a 50 gal holding tank, which is good for about 1.5 weeks with the Admiral, our two daughters an me on board.  If I'm gonna pay for a pump out, it might ats well be worth the $20.



#80 Ajax

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 04:31 PM

Wow, that's a lot of shit!



#81 Py26129

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 05:22 PM

....and liquid.  There is no chance that the ladies will ever pee over the side.



#82 Blue Crab

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 08:51 PM

Au contraire. I was laid and loved by the first gal I saw pee off the backstay.

#83 Max Rockatansky

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Posted 23 September 2015 - 11:28 PM

There is a correlation: women who are ok with men calling them 'admiral' will not be the kind of women who will pee over the side.

 

Thankfully, if I ever called my wife 'admiral,' she'd knock the living shit out of me. She was also the one who removed our old holding tank and head, being disgusted with its smell and complexity. (and weight)



#84 Blue Crab

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Posted 24 September 2015 - 12:19 AM

There is a correlation: women who are ok with men calling them 'admiral' will not be the kind of women who will pee over the side.

 

Thankfully, if I ever called my wife 'admiral,' she'd knock the living shit out of me. She was also the one who removed our old holding tank and head, being disgusted with its smell and complexity. (and weight)

 

Ain't it the fucking truth! I got in some serious doo-doo on the other forum for making that comment. I tied it in to the wearing of matching Capn and Mate shirts which did not cause the amusement I'd hoped for.

 

I've had a few dropdead gorgeous women along the way but the gals I remember most fondly were the competent ones.



#85 psychosailing

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 05:17 AM

I am planning to install a composting head on my 29 footer. A good friend of mine have been cruising for more than a year with a c-head and he and his girlfriend are very happy with it.

 

The only thing that doesn't convince me about c-head is the price. 600$!! Not saying that it's not worth it, but  this makes me feel like building one myself. I am planning to use a 5 gals bucket enclosed in a plywood mount with one of these on top:

 

pDSP1-18637908p275w.jpg

They sell them at Dicks sporting goods for 13$.

 

The difficult part is the urine diverter, but my "admiral" told me she would be fine using one of these:

pDSP1-18128237p275w.jpg

But even if I trust her and I know she is a tough girl, I'd like to come up with a more elegant solution in the design, even though we'll keep GOGIRL and peeing bottle handy for emergencies.

 

Ecovita makes this urine diverter kit (sells for 199$), but unfortunately it is to big to fit in my v-berth cutout which is where I am going to install the toilet (we don't sleep in the V-Berth) it is our storage area.

 

501-PRIVY-W-TOILET-SEAT.jpg

 

There is a website that website shows a way to hack a urine diverter into a barrel/bucket, but not sure if it's going to be practical when I need to empty the shit out.

 

CIMG7975,%20420x315.jpg

 

Everything seems to push me to buy a C-Head and forget about all the hacks and complication. but those 600$ are almost one month paid doing nothing on my boat and it doesn't seem fair to me.

 

Anybody is trying to do a DIY composting head?



#86 olaf hart

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 07:15 AM

Lots of action on cruisers forum

#87 Blue Crab

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 12:47 PM

You're paying Sandy at C-Head for his cleverness and labor, and you get a presentable piece of gear.



#88 ProaSailor

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 01:13 PM

You're paying Sandy at C-Head for his cleverness and labor, and you get a presentable piece of gear.

 

You're also paying for his long experience and creativity in solving all the issues, removing all the hassle of DIY building and, long term, using a potentially (likely?) inferior product.



#89 Gatekeeper

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 02:24 PM

Agreed...I would pay the price gladly to have some thing doesn't look like a DIY floating outhouse.



#90 kimbottles

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 02:40 PM

You're paying Sandy at C-Head for his cleverness and labor, and you get a presentable piece of gear.


Also note that the two competitors (Airhead and Naturehead) are about twice as expensive.

Sandy offers great customer service and sells a very nice item.

#91 Blue Crab

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Posted 26 September 2015 - 03:36 PM

I am planning to install a composting head on my 29 footer. A good friend of mine have been cruising for more than a year with a c-head and he and his girlfriend are very happy with it.

 

The only thing that doesn't convince me about c-head is the price. 600$!! Not saying that it's not worth it, but  this makes me feel like building one myself. I am planning to use a 5 gals bucket enclosed in a plywood mount with one of these on top:

 

They sell them at Dicks sporting goods for 13$.

 

The difficult part is the urine diverter, but my "admiral" told me she would be fine using one of these:

 

But even if I trust her and I know she is a tough girl, I'd like to come up with a more elegant solution in the design, even though we'll keep GOGIRL and peeing bottle handy for emergencies.

 

Ecovita makes this urine diverter kit (sells for 199$), but unfortunately it is to big to fit in my v-berth cutout which is where I am going to install the toilet (we don't sleep in the V-Berth) it is our storage area.

 

 

 

There is a website that website shows a way to hack a urine diverter into a barrel/bucket, but not sure if it's going to be practical when I need to empty the shit out.

 

 

 

Everything seems to push me to buy a C-Head and forget about all the hacks and complication. but those 600$ are almost one month paid doing nothing on my boat and it doesn't seem fair to me.

 

Anybody is trying to do a DIY composting head?

 

Man 0 man, now you're posting links? We are the fucking choir sir. And factoring fairness in? Wot's next, the race card? Nobody gives a shit (poop intended) if ya build yer own. Anyone can, particularly now that the innovators have designed it for you. Go man go. I mean really, go man.



#92 psychosailing

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 12:45 AM

 

I am planning to install a composting head on my 29 footer. A good friend of mine have been cruising for more than a year with a c-head and he and his girlfriend are very happy with it.

 

The only thing that doesn't convince me about c-head is the price. 600$!! Not saying that it's not worth it, but  this makes me feel like building one myself. I am planning to use a 5 gals bucket enclosed in a plywood mount with one of these on top:

 

They sell them at Dicks sporting goods for 13$.

 

The difficult part is the urine diverter, but my "admiral" told me she would be fine using one of these:

 

But even if I trust her and I know she is a tough girl, I'd like to come up with a more elegant solution in the design, even though we'll keep GOGIRL and peeing bottle handy for emergencies.

 

Ecovita makes this urine diverter kit (sells for 199$), but unfortunately it is to big to fit in my v-berth cutout which is where I am going to install the toilet (we don't sleep in the V-Berth) it is our storage area.

 

 

 

There is a website that website shows a way to hack a urine diverter into a barrel/bucket, but not sure if it's going to be practical when I need to empty the shit out.

 

 

 

Everything seems to push me to buy a C-Head and forget about all the hacks and complication. but those 600$ are almost one month paid doing nothing on my boat and it doesn't seem fair to me.

 

Anybody is trying to do a DIY composting head?

 

Man 0 man, now you're posting links? We are the fucking choir sir. And factoring fairness in? Wot's next, the race card? Nobody gives a shit (poop intended) if ya build yer own. Anyone can, particularly now that the innovators have designed it for you. Go man go. I mean really, go man.

 

 

 

 

I am surprised to the reaction to my post. Who the fuck is this Sandy Madre Teresa? Why don't ask the Pope while on US soil to make Saint Sandy immediately! I said the C-Head is worth the 600 $ , what I feel it's there is no need to buy one as you can build yourself if you want (and have some more money in your pocket).

 

If you don't want then don't build it yourself and pay Mr. Sandy it's share. This is fair. The C-head is the most affordable composting head on the market and a lot of customers are happy with that.

 

Talking about innovation and design it's another story. Humanity poops in sawdust since sawdust existed only when WC toilets were invented everybody got an amnesia. "The design" is nothing new, and it can be realized cheaper for every other application. At least Sandy is clever in making a non-proprietary old-like-humanity design into a profitable business for him, with happy customers, win-win. Chapeu!



#93 Fireboat52

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 03:21 AM

I have been reading this post with a lot of interest. It is always gratifying to know that people "get it" so to speak when it comes to urine diverting, "composting" toilets. I would like to make a couple of points if I may. While the so called "composting" toilets are primarily desiccating toilets, that is to say, they remove the odor of the solid waste by drying out or absorbing the moisture from the surface of the waste, they do in fact begin the composting process. If you hold your hand at the opening of the collection container you can feel a slight warmth that is thermophilic composting taking place. Granted it is not enough to compost the waste to anywhere near completion but in fact the composting of the waste does start inside the toilet. For those who plan on composting the waste at home, this is valuable.

 

The other point that I would like to make is that cruisers (especially sailors) are typically creative, handy and many take a vow of poverty to live their chosen lifestyle. I know, I was one. They also take a special pleasure in building everything themselves, sometimes from the keelson up. I would argue that of all the things that a boater can create for his boat and on his own, the head should probably not be one of them. My reasoning is this. Having Coasties in my family, I can tell you that the USCG is only interested in making sure that you are not dumping your waste into the water where you shouldn't be. They actually like composting toilets because you really can't dump your stuff overboard without incriminating yourself since "shit floats" and checking one out is simple. If you have a holding tank, it is much easier to go below and simply dump your poop soup in the dark of the night. In this respect, composting toilets are much more environmentally sensitive.

 

That being said, the waterways are full of Police, Sheriffs and Fish and Wildlife Officers that are out to make a little money for the government and who have a much broader latitude in determining what is legal and what isn't. If you disagree with them, you can "Tell it to the judge." I think that you are on much safer ground if your head looks like a professional product with a label and instructions and of a brand or type seen more than just once. I think the skipper's talents could probably be better spent building a dinghy or MOB system, etc. Something to consider. Just saying!

 

Capt Sandy



#94 Ishmael

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 04:55 AM

I have been reading this post with a lot of interest. It is always gratifying to know that people "get it" so to speak when it comes to urine diverting, "composting" toilets. I would like to make a couple of points if I may. While the so called "composting" toilets are primarily desiccating toilets, that is to say, they remove the odor of the solid waste by drying out or absorbing the moisture from the surface of the waste, they do in fact begin the composting process. If you hold your hand at the opening of the collection container you can feel a slight warmth that is thermophilic composting taking place. Granted it is not enough to compost the waste to anywhere near completion but in fact the composting of the waste does start inside the toilet. For those who plan on composting the waste at home, this is valuable.

 

The other point that I would like to make is that cruisers (especially sailors) are typically creative, handy and many take a vow of poverty to live their chosen lifestyle. I know, I was one. They also take a special pleasure in building everything themselves, sometimes from the keelson up. I would argue that of all the things that a boater can create for his boat and on his own, the head should probably not be one of them. My reasoning is this. Having Coasties in my family, I can tell you that the USCG is only interested in making sure that you are not dumping your waste into the water where you shouldn't be. They actually like composting toilets because you really can't dump your stuff overboard without incriminating yourself since "shit floats" and checking one out is simple. If you have a holding tank, it is much easier to go below and simply dump your poop soup in the dark of the night. In this respect, composting toilets are much more environmentally sensitive.

 

That being said, the waterways are full of Police, Sheriffs and Fish and Wildlife Officers that are out to make a little money for the government and who have a much broader latitude in determining what is legal and what isn't. If you disagree with them, you can "Tell it to the judge." I think that you are on much safer ground if your head looks like a professional product with a label and instructions and of a brand or type seen more than just once. I think the skipper's talents could probably be better spent building a dinghy or MOB system, etc. Something to consider. Just saying!

 

Capt Sandy

 

Well said. And where's the tits?



#95 Blue Crab

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 11:54 AM

I am surprised to the reaction to my post. Who the fuck is this Sandy Madre Teresa? Why don't ask the Pope while on US soil to make Saint Sandy immediately! I said the C-Head is worth the 600 $ , what I feel it's there is no need to buy one as you can build yourself if you want (and have some more money in your pocket).

 

If you don't want then don't build it yourself and pay Mr. Sandy it's share. This is fair. The C-head is the most affordable composting head on the market and a lot of customers are happy with that.

 

Talking about innovation and design it's another story. Humanity poops in sawdust since sawdust existed only when WC toilets were invented everybody got an amnesia. "The design" is nothing new, and it can be realized cheaper for every other application. At least Sandy is clever in making a non-proprietary old-like-humanity design into a profitable business for him, with happy customers, win-win. Chapeu!

 

 

It might have been wiser to start yer own thread whine about the unfairness of life itself, paying innovators, and "why can't I get more free stuff like I get movies and music from the internet?"

 

A decent-looking diverter will require making a mold  ... anyone can do it ... wot's yer time worth? And there's likely some geometry involved, so you might have to make more than one. The stuff to make molds is expensive :o   and sticky :(  and smelly :angry:. And there's a learning curve doncha know. :wacko: 

 

Then, ya need an old-like-humanity stirrer like cavepersons used. Easy stuff, pvc pipe and sticky smelly glue. Probably take all day to get it just right, and you know this is going to require more than one hardware store run. Better add some beer money in too. Forget the football game, dammit, you're fukin' workin' here!

 

The vent system has (counting as I type) 19 parts, mostly pvc, plus a bucket top and a lid; the parts are pre-fitted but loose. You'll probably be able to guess what will work just by being in the plumbing aisle, cuz yer no dummy.

 

The Grand Finale is that Sandy, robber baron that he is, ships the plastic stuff in a serviceable, presentable cabinet that a reasonable woman might sit on, especially if she has to go.



#96 Ajax

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 01:06 PM

Question:

 

When the poo is completely dessicated, is the bacteria dead and gone?



#97 Fireboat52

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 09:46 PM

Ajax, good question. To answer your question. The waste is not desiccated, only the surface of the waste is dried out, and the bacteria is not dead or gone. You basically have three options; dump the waste overboard off shore, compost the waste at home and over time the bacteria will vanish or treat and dispose of the waste. By treat, I mean treat with chlorine bleach. If it takes only 10 drops to treat a gallon of drinking water, then a cup in a five gallon bucket will certainly eradicate any living organism inside the container. At this point the waste is not "untreated" waste, and most municipalities allow for the disposal of "untreated fecal contaminated waste" (read "diapers", etc) by simply enclosing it in a plastic container (read "plastic bag"). The process of treating it with chlorine bleach and securing it in a plastic bucket far exceeds the letter of the law. While it remains basically "shit and dirt", it is deader than dead shit and dirt and poses no public health threat. In my opinion, a system that is designed to use 5 gallon buckets for disposal, which are much more secure than plastic bags, is a better system. Wash hands after using the toilet or handling internal parts (or pumping out for that matter). This is common sense and standard practice in every bathroom in the enlightened world.

 

Even with these safety methods in place, I would point out that users are not likely to give themselves a disease that you do not already have. Not one like hepatitis, cholera, polio or something like that, so if they limit the use of their head to healthy crew members and don't let some homeless person or foreigner use your toilet, the likelihood of contracting some fatal disease from exposure are remote to non-existent, at the least. If they have a sick crew member, they should use a bucket and cover the waste with sawdust or peat moss and treat it with bleach). They should use it to puke in too. Yes, a person can probably get salmonella or something like that if they are careless, but they are just as likely to get that from eggs, chicken, lettuce, etc.

 

Hope you find this information useful. 

 

Capt Sandy



#98 nobody.really

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Posted 28 September 2015 - 11:29 PM

I'm trying to reconcile tossing a nearly new 5 gallon bucket and lid out every couple weeks. This means I need access to a steady supply of the things. I know tossing plastic bags in the dumpster isn't a whole lot better but it seems a bunch more wasteful to toss a 5 gallon bucket with a metal handle and lid. It makes no sense on an extended cruise. I'm not going to pack a dozen 5 gal buckets and dozen (?) cubic feet of peat moss. The whole storage of the product seems to make this only work for a smaller number of crew on shorter trips where you have access to off load or will return to home base to unload it all. If you cruise where there are no pump outs then you just have to find the room store it.

 

The elimination of the plumbing and all its problems, including odor is a big deal but thanks to this thread the parameters for when it makes sense are a lot clearer. I'm not sure it would work for me in all cases which kind of makes it a no go and I'm back where I started. Maybe a Lavac to get more out of the holding tank and try to increase the vent hose size.

 

Have i got this wrong?



#99 Ajax

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Posted 29 September 2015 - 12:19 AM

Nobody-

 

I hadn't voiced it yet, but I agree that throwing away an entire 5 gallon bucket isn't acceptable to me either.

I'm either going to dump it in a compost heap that I will start, or transfer the waste to a trash bag and clean out the bucket and re-use it.

 

Dumb question-  Couldn't you line the bucket with a trash bag or would the churn snag it and potentially tear a hole in it?



#100 olaf hart

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Posted 29 September 2015 - 12:51 AM

I am not sure that a churn is that essential to the process. Especially on a boat that bounces around a bit.

On the Pearson 424 there is a seat in the shower with a wash basin under it, plan is to use the boats motion to do the washing.




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