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Sailing Anarchists Affected by Cancer


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#1 Heaven can wait

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 12:09 AM

Having had the fight of my life for the better part of the last 2 years, I appreciate that I am not alone. Sailing is very much a part of my life, and to sail again competitively is very much one of my future Goal's in life.

I put it to you guys, lets hear your story and how Cancer has affected your Sailing World?? :ph34r:

#2 thatbarguy

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 12:31 AM

Can I broaden the scope here and say anyone who has to overcome any chronic condition?

I know of at least 2 guys with type 1 Diabetes in this years Hobart.

#3 sailormooon

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 12:53 AM

No story but all the best wishes to anyone who has to deal with any condition or disease....it reminds everyone else not to take our fantastic machines (bodies) for granted too.

xoxoxox

#4 Heaven can wait

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 12:56 AM

Can I broaden the scope here and say anyone who has to overcome any chronic condition?

I know of at least 2 guys with type 1 Diabetes in this years Hobart.

Go for it TBG,

Main point here is it's inspirational to those who care enough to comment, we are all affected by chronic illness's somewhere or at sometime in our lives. My story is moreso my fightback, not quite so much the illness itself.

I have a New respect and attitude to my sailing now, and it's not about winning, it's about the ability to be able to compete, and hopefully kick a few goals in the process.

#5 gethighstayhigh

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 01:06 AM

I was diagnosed two years back with malignant melanoma. Just a small mole on the back of my knee where my legs got burned surfing for many years. First prognosis was 30% chance of not surviving 5 years. Instant wake up call to think that my young kids would hardly know me etc. and that I had better start making a video letter to them so they had some record.

But when the results came back, the margins were clear and they revised the call to 99.9999999% chance of full survival even though it was malignant but we had caught it (by pure chance despite my 6 monthly visits for years) in its earliest stage. It didn't meet the usual criteria but the Doctor just felt there was something odd about it.

Makes you think hard for a while and then it's easy to slip back to bad habits. I am a real chance for another with so many moles that meet the brief.

Moral - wearing long pants, long sleeve shirts, a rimmed hat and plenty of sunscreen is not being a dork. Even if I put off others with my love handles (they do make rash vests tight!!) it is worth it to avoid another week of intense fear and a frighteningly short future.

#6 Recidivist

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 01:24 AM

My solution was to buy a 34' keelboat that I couldn't afford. Well, there was no point waiting until I could afford it ....

A couple of scares over the years since have turned out to be false alarms, so my luck is holding and I live a normal life. Echo what GHSH said about kids growing up without you - that puts a lump in your throat (but that was the problem in the first place!).

When I was a kid in SA, a fellow (Col?) launched a nice Van de stadt 30' Dogger that he built after learning he had testicular cancer. He said it focused his mind on positive things. At first he didn't expect to see it launched, but the "therapy" of building it worked. He launched it and sailed with his sons for years. I sailed with them in a race once and never forgot his story.

A positive attitude won't save everyone, but without it you're a gonner. Good luck with the 24hr race HCW.

R

#7 Glenn

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 01:24 AM

Speaking of such challanges...what is the lattest on Gary Jobson.

#8 Heaven can wait

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 02:34 AM

Just to let you guys know why this thread is important and why it has so much to do with Sailing and boats in general, this is my story.

Please note if you're a bit squeemish look the other way for the nasty bits.

I was diagnosed with Testicular Cancer in June 2003, I had surgery 1 week later. I was diagnosed with Cancer the same day as my father in law was with Bowel Cancer - 1 hour apart to be exact.

My Cancer had spread from my nether regions and had spread via my lymph nodes up to my shoulders.

I commenced 6 months of Chemo-theropy, which was reasonably successful except for numberous Tumors, that although had stopped growing were considered dangerous, and I was given the option of further Chemo or surgery.

I choose surgery as out was better than in.

Considerable concern was given to 3 large Tumors I had wrapped around my Aorta. The tumors were strangling my Aorta to within a millimetre of cutting circulation off to my legs, and life in a wheel chair was very much considered a very real scenario.

I was operated on, on the 18th of January 2004 in a 9 hour operation to remove the tumors. The operation involved removing everything below my lungs to get access to the tumor.

The operation was successful, however I ended up with numerous Blood Clots in both legs. I put on 57kilograms in 2 days as my body filled up with fluid.

My scrotum was the size of a watermelon, and didn't that hurt.

Later in the second day after surgery I was changed over from an epidural to morphine, and promlty when into Annaphalaxis (Shock), my BP went from 75/100 to 95/215, not a well boy by any stretch of the imagination, and I passed out.

The Annaphalaxis had sent my Urological System into a spin and my stomach packed up, known as an Ilious. I was given only Ice Cubes to suck on for 24days, no food, no drink just what was jammed into the tubes hanging out of my Arms, my chest and my nose.

So there I was 57kilograms heavier than 2 days prior, not being able to Pee or digest any protein, and 164 staples in my stomach that I could count.

I started to leak fluid from my wound at a steady rate, and had my dressing changed 11 times within a 2 hour period, before my Nurse rolled me over onto my side, in all my glory, and I promtly dumped 3 full buckets of fluid onto the floor. I could do nothing more that picture myself somewhere else, sailing in a race blasting along under kite as I remember rightly.

I felt like a huge weight had been taken from me as I shrank, dumping some 20litres of fluid that night.

The problem I had with such a large loss of fluid was any neutriants I had left in my body went with the fluid and I eventually slid into oblivion until I was given 2 Blood Transfusions.

I slightly improved until some 2 weeks later, when whilst being washed (I couldn't walk) my staples began to come unstuck, and within seconds my entire wound split open and started to dump the contents of my abdoman out into my hands.

I rolled over onto my back and started to feed my intestines back into the huge hole that now appeared, whilst my nurse took off to get help.

Again my family, my sailing and my boat ruled my thoughts as I tried not to look at my insides, now very much on the outside.

My Resident Doctor expecting to just re-staple a small split was stunned at the total split that had occured, and I was taken up to the OR for emergency surgery.

I found out later that my heart had stopped for 7min and 45seconds during the ensueing operation, which apparently was to give my heart and my lungs rest.

I had a weird experience that night as I saw myself from above during the operation, no white light just the Calm sound of my Specialists at work on me and soft classical music. Quite soothing really.

I wouldn't walk for 2months, and was very weak for sometime after that, but I would spend every minute I could sitting in the Cockpit of my 8metre Yacht, smelling the salt water in the air, and feel the boat under me. Just for that time at least I was elsewhere and it was nice.

As a result of my abdominal operation, I ended up with a large hernia, which consequently turned into another and another, leaving me with no stomach muscles at all and more Kelvar that my boat.

Some 1340 stitches, 164 staples later, I also lost a Kidney, and I've ended up with Lymphodeama in my Stomach and legs, which aside from being painful is just plain uncomfortable.

Throughout the whole of my treatment, the Chemo and the Ops, I owe my life to the support of my wife, my children and my sailing past and I held onto the Sailing future to come in what ever way I could.

In conclusion I was never mean't to survive my Cancer, however I only hope that my story will benefit someone, and inspire them into their own fightback.

I greatly respect Lance Armstrong as a Bike Rider, but as a Cancer Surviver he's a "pussy" - he got off lightly, however he's got me back on my bike so I guess he's inspired me.

As a matter of interest why don't you OSeas Guys create a "Heaven can Wait" for your own. Be nice if the old HcW could be international Yachtings response to a World wide concern, as we are all affected, in some way shape or form.

Heaven can Wait :ph34r:



PS. My Cancer has been expensive in so many ways. However, in order for me to get my "OSB Heaven can Wait" to the startline of my namesake's 24-hour, I need the assistance of sponsors if any of you can help me. Thank you

#9 gethighstayhigh

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 02:59 AM

HCW,

A terrifying yet uplifting story. I hope you prevail physically as well as you have spiritually. My respect and best wishes to you. Have a great race.

GHSH

#10 thatbarguy

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:15 AM

HCW

nil carborundum.

#11 Heaven can wait

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:29 AM

'nil carborundum' ???

What does that mean?...............sorry

#12 Merrill Levi

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:34 AM

Illegitimis nil carborundum - Don't let the bastards grind you down

#13 thatbarguy

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:37 AM

My bad - Latin was year 7+8... sooo long ago.

#14 sailormooon

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:39 AM

HCW,

A terrifying yet uplifting story. I hope you prevail physically as well as you have spiritually. My respect and best wishes to you. Have a great race.

GHSH

Ditto, HCW...all my love and amazement and hope you achieve your goals!!

#15 OneFifty

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:40 AM

HCW, congrats on making it this far.

Myself, benign (thank God) brain tumor removed March 16 of this year. It was a little larger than a golf ball and right between my eyes and a little back. My only deficit is that I lost my sense of smell. I was trimming genoa on my J24 as early as early May and have made a 100% recovery. I am incredibly thankful to my absolutely brilliant neurosurgeon (yes, some are much better than others) and my wonderful family and friends for their support. I really look at life differently now. Let's just say I now know every day is a gift.

#16 Heaven can wait

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:57 AM

I know it sounds a little odd, however whilst I was having Chemo, I continued teaching the local kids to sail, and also restore an Illusion Minature 12metre (Goto say one of the hardest things I've ever done, Mentally - Teach kids that is under a Chemo Haize)

I also found enjoyment in Sailing Anarchy, as although not able to compete in body, I was sailing in my mind thanks to you lot, and that was a real positive for me.

Ozrick, I got dibs on you, we will see the Heaven can Wait 24-hour through together - and that's a promise.

#17 Phil

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 05:16 AM

Got a chunk cut out of my right ear,its the first thing that gets the sunblock these days,

#18 hobot

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 05:53 AM

Cancers a facking bitch! you do not see it coming and if it's testicular (like mine was) there a period of denial hoping the swelling would "go away". I am still convinced it was from my bad habits while building boats, no respirator, no latex gloves while working with and and handling all the nasty shit that goe's with building boats. I now "suit up" appropiately when working with anything remotely scary.
I too daydreamed of boat's and sailing especially while having the chemo drip going, I also placed the thought in my mind that I was just "sick with a bad flu" and that help'd with dealing with chemo and stuff on a daily basis. Had some good doctor's along the way, my Urologist was great, upon first inspection of my swollen nut he IMMEDIATLEY said,"looks like your gonna loose it"
I had never felt blood drain from my head THAT fast before.
First chemo treatment was on a Holloween nite and all my hair was gone before Christmas, it actually fell out in a 3 day span(super freaky). not too much drama for me along the way, even though it say's orange flavour on the label the CAT scan barium still taste's like liquid chalk, the drugs they give you to fight the chemo sickness sucked, it was like being super drunk but completely having your wits about you, the pot did help with eating but i still always felt like shit and for some reason it really hurt to have a small inscion cut for an I.V. slid into the thin skin area on the top of my feet for a "6 hour lay on the table so this thick shit can have time to flow into you so we can scan you AGAIN drip".
My amazing wife fed me anything I wanted and I ended up gaining an additional 35 pounds! some friends took me sailing on Lake Union even though I was feeling crappy and i remember just sitting there feeling good, one of the few times i was happy to just "sit" and not "do" anything just be there for the ride.
Sailing/racing has always been there for me to unplug myself from everything out there and to just be in the moment. Recovery has been 15 years and counting. I did recieve 2 incredible gifts from cancer though, my two daughters, one from Russia and one from Korea and it has been a blast to be the one introducing them to sailing.

#19 GybeSet®

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 11:20 AM

No story but all the best wishes to anyone who has to deal with any condition or disease....it reminds everyone else not to take our fantastic machines (bodies) for granted too.

xoxoxox

If I said you had a 'fantastic machine' would you hold it against me.

not sure about your melon (singular) tho, need not be a show-stopper

#20 scottmax

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 11:49 AM

Hcw your storey like all other cancer story's is an inspiration. Keep up the glass is half full attitude I am sure it helps.
I wish you well and will be willing you on with all thoughts for you and your family to get you to the start line of your 24 hr race.

#21 Heaven can wait

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 01:02 PM

Hobot,

I'm probably one of the few people on SA that know exactly what you're talking about, and yes for me the question of mortality rings heavily in your head.

Yer barium cup of crap has been updated, it now tastes like really "Off" lucazade, and it's still aweful.

One of the things the Doc's don't tell you is that with Testicular Cancer, you'll spend the rest of your life travelling in aimless circles, or ride a bike really fast up mountains. :lol: :lol: :lol: :ph34r:

I have learnt to laugh about my illness, I'd be in an assylum if I didn't and if you are unfortunate to have Cancer, your sense of humour is one of your greatest assets.

I destinctly remember being plugged into no less than 9 machines, each whaling a different song or Clunk, with pipes and tubes hanging out of me everywhere, and saying to my Vascular Surgeon, "Oh well there are people out there worse off than me" - Laughing he said "Oh no there isn't" - the only problem with what he said in reality, was he was Deadly serious.

I don't know if I should be proud or fortunate however I made the John Hunter Hospital Top 10, the 9 before me died, so how good does that make me feel.

Cancer is the great fall from humility, your left grasping for any positive, you indeed thrive on every positive you can find in your life, for when you have to draw on your inner spirit, it's those positives that pull you from the Abyss that is the eternal darkness of this life's end.

Heavy - yes, so is being told that you're not expected to survive the night.

Thank you all for your thoughts to date, and to all of you Cancer Survivers, thank you for your input, it's important to me and I'm sure of some comfort to others like me.

HcW :ph34r:

#22 pq2

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:03 PM

HCW,

First of all I really admire the way you see your life and the way you are going forward with it. My best friend also my partner in the boat has pancreatic cancer and as you know this is one of the worst cancers. Its amazing how you he fight but you know, that is a fast terminal one. Now I have to buy his part of the boat because he needs the money for the his treatment. Its very hard to live this stuff, staying with his family but it remind us that in some moment we all can have this kind of problems.

LIVE STRONG!!!!

#23 Madmax

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 03:11 PM

Fuckin A.
You guys are inspirational.
May Life give you only cherries from now on.

#24 Across the Pond

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 05:29 PM

Can I broaden the scope here and say anyone who has to overcome any chronic condition?

I know of at least 2 guys with type 1 Diabetes in this years Hobart. 


Go for it TBG,


My own story doesn't really compare to what you have gone though, HCW, but I kind of know how you feel.

Five years ago I was due to go on the BT Global Challenge and fulfill my dream of racing around the world. However, five months before the start of the race I was diagnosed with end stage renal failure. I had been suffering with problems for a year or so, but hadn't been expecting things to go this badly wrong. I ended up in a bed, 37kgs heavier due to the fluid that my body wasn't processing and with a haemoglobin level of 4.7. Normally it is about 13 and you don't really survive if it goes below 4.0. Strangely, my first reaction to being told about the condition was to think about sailing - at least it made the decision about whether I would go on the Global Challenge or not.

I had been admitted to hospital on a few occasions and it was always thinking of sailing that kept my spirits up. When I lay in bed and felt the cooling breeze from the fan, I closed my eyes and imagined I was sailing under spinnaker, being driven by a Tradewind breeze and lying on deck, staring at the stars.

There then followed two and a half years of dialysis and on three occasions I went through the process of being called for a transplant and it not being a good match, though ultimately I did get a kidney on the fourth attempt. Again, I spent much of my time on dialysis thinking about the sailing I would do when I was better. The third time I didn't get a transplant was very tough - I had gone 18 months without a call. A few days afterwards I went out on my parents boat, on a beautiful sunny day. Being on the boat that day made me realise that life really wasn't that bad! True enough, six weeks later the transplant occurred.

I have no regrets about my illness and time on dialysis. Being so ill when you are 24 (or any age) really focuses your mind about what is important and what you want to do with your life. I got by by always trying to find the positive aspects of every situation, no matter how bad it was. Realising that there was always someone else in the world worse off than you kept your feet on the ground as well.

Having a kidney transplant, though, gave me a huge boost and incredible energy to get out and make the most of my life. Since my transplant I have done a Masters at Cambridge University (I failed my transfer test at primary school!) and am now a trainee chartered surveyor in London.

However, the biggest thing for me was taking part in the last two legs of this years Global Challenge. I sailed from Boston to La Rochelle and from La Rochelle to Portsmouth on board Pindar. Whilst you cannot exactly beat kidney failure (a transplant is a very good treatment, not a cure), I proved to myself that I still can take part in a great adventure such as this race. It was a very special experience.

Still I am not finished, though. Racing round the world is not feasible for me, but I want to try and help young sailors who have that dream achieve their goals. I am trying to get an offshore campaign up and running that will get a young crew together and do some of the big European events - Fastnet, Gotland, Middle Sea, Round Ireland, Round Britain and Ireland. It will give them a good CV boost for and me some great sailing. Funding, as ever, is the problem, but I will get there eventually.

HCW, apologies for hijacking your thread! However, I know what it is like to be down and how valuable sailing is in keeping your spirits up. I am in awe of all you guys who have experienced life with cancer. Your positive spirit is inspiring. Good luck with the project - you will get there!

#25 thatbarguy

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 09:58 PM

Passion is a powerfull force.

Passion for life, sailing, those around you (SM), whatever keeps you going through all the dark heavy shit until you can see the light.

I know that I will face hardships and adversity but I savor each and every moment of every day so that when I do run into trouble I know I have not wasted my time here.

Thats my take on life.

tbg.

#26 Heaven can wait

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 01:12 AM

AtPond,

Mate that's not a problem, the more stories only stimulate our minds, and makes you realize that in some way, maybe my lot in life is not all that bad.

I kinda came up with this post, not because of my own story, but moreso in reflection to those gun-ho guys who can't understand why some people just aren't as competitive as they are.

It highlights the point that not everyone around you is not there because they want to win, the very fact that they are even there is their greatest achievement in life, and I don't say that lightly.

The very nature of debilitating diseases is aside from the physical aspects, is very much in the mind, you can will yourself to win much like you can will yourself to survive.

One of the attributes that I know Lance Armstrong and others like him have permanently instilled into they're mind is mental strength. I know as I've had a number of people trying to get into my mind to find what makes me tick. I know mentally I could eat them for breakfast, but again humour wins out with me.

One of the sensations I know has been greatly affected is Empathy, especially with my children, and I've had to basically re-wire myself to try to understand, their bumps and bruises.

My local GP, who I owe my life too really, is concerned why I'm not depressed - 'You should be?' he'd say, but again keeping your mind busy is the key. Stop and do nothing, then yeah, maybe then I have a problem.

Just remember guys the next time we go off at someone, regardless of what it's for, just think about where they've come from, and how they got there - given what's happened to me, it really does give you a totally new perspective - then again once a fool always the Idiot, so flame on I say.

HcW :ph34r:

#27 jeff E of the GWN

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 12:22 PM

I had been getting bad flank pain when i turned 30, food not tasting very good ( and it was cristmas best food of the year!!) exhausted after having mediocre workouts.
but I had lost my job, and the fact i had just turned 30 and lost my job, and was feeling down and out and out in general, I figured it was life just getting me down.
a few months later the pain was so severe, I could not sit, or drive .
I worked in the hosptial and asked a few docs they figured it was a kidney stone.
So I had an ultrasound, boom cancer.
took them a few weeks to figure out what kind it was.I figured well, like many do ...i was a goner....
so six months of chemo and being a Q ball .
but all in all having woked and still working in the hospital i figured i have been so lucky.
Its been 10 years, clean bill of health . Now my dad has inoperable stomach cancer, my uncle was diagnosed with the same 1 month earlier than my dad am best frineds brother has the same cancer as i had.
its been a bad year.
so i sail my ass off, well windsurf mainly keelboating is too serious i cant handle it seems so silly to get worked up over something so,
UNSERIOUS. at times

#28 Heaven can wait

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 01:02 AM

Guys,

When I was in for my Chemo, I made friends with a retired Merchant Seaman, very much in his final stages of Cancer, and whilst I found him a remarkable man, with more 'Life' behind him than any of us could fathom, he gave me this analogy that has stuck in my head for a number of reasons as you'll see:

Cancer is very much like an Overnight Yacht Race, your tingling with anticipation and fear of expectation at the start, then as the nervous angst subsides, you focus on your routine. As the night approaches you await the darkness with determination and an air of hesitation as the cool loneliness of the unknown envelops you. For it is for the weiry Sailor that the Sun will rise in morning.

The Old Merchant Seaman died two days later during the night in his sleep. :ph34r:

#29 krispy kreme

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 02:02 AM

Too much skin cancer in our sailing society. Lost a dear friend this past winter to melanoma, have had several squamous spots removed myself. Put your sunblock on people. 'spesh those of light skin. Can you say POM's!!!!

Good on ya HCW, always wanted to hear your story, knew that there was something behind your avatar that needed telling.

#30 WestCoast

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 02:56 AM

I'm proud that our company is a sponsor for 'Sail for the Cure' here in Portland.

There are so many good people out there who fight hard that they remind us all.
I try to wake up everyday and be thankful for my health.

All ahead full speed guys and gals.

#31 r.finn

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 06:17 AM

If it were not for my unusual experience with Hodgkin's Lymphoma from 98-99 I would probably not be searching for a sponsor for the upcoming 5-Oceans Race. Gee, thanks a lot Cancer, you've ruined my life. I've been in the "persue your passions before the lights are shut out" mentality ever since, and am truely unwilling to let anything get in my way. Even Katrina, which very swiftly put out any fires I had started with potential sponsors in Louisiana. Certainly it could be worse.

“Arroser la vie”

-Ryan

#32 stardate2010

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 07:42 AM

Hi all, First post.
Was diagnosed with prostate cancer and had the radioactive seed implants done July 04. PSA was at 13 on day of surgery. Year later all is well. Never forget the day the Doctor layed his hand on my shoulder and told me. Mind boggling decisions, surgery/radiation/seed implants/do nothing and let nature take its course. Overseas working now(Iraq), building up the cruising kitty, plan on circumnavigation within 4 years or a year after I retire. Bought my boat 5 years ago, and will spend the year before heading out to outfit it. Will go out of Florida to Carib to Africa that direction if all goes according to plans. Take it one day at a time and make the most of it. Live Life to its Fullest.
Alan @ Iraq :)

#33 Heaven can wait

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 12:49 PM

Just Nice guys to have a thread that has nothing but a positive vibe to it, I'm moved by the efforts from some of you guys, and well even had a tear or two last night, nice work boys and girls, keep it up.

Almost a contradiction in terms to let a thread like this "Die", I hope not as time goes by there will be others that will draw on this inspiration, and that is good as it gets, satisfying to say the least.

Thank you.

HcW :ph34r:

#34 Jen the Wife

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 06:59 PM

Thank You Heaven for beginning this thread!

Our youngest son was diagnosed with end stage neuroblastoma at four weeks of age, May 24th 2002 9:47 AM to be exact. A grapefruit sized tumor arose out of the left adrenal gland wrapping itself around and constricting the abdominal aorta, superior vena cava, and just like an octopus grew tentacles into the small bowel, kidney, coming dangerously close to breaching the spinal column and subsequently invaded the lymphatic system.

Open biopsy to confirm diagnosis and for biological characteristics and high dose cytotoxic therapy (chemotherapy) followed immediately. Not one pediatric surgeon in Chicago would attempt surgery to resect the tumor, deeming surgery more morbid than death. WHATEVER.. Consults across America began in earnest, and finally I found whom I consider the man who gave my son a second chance at life, when no one would at Sloan Kettering in NYC.

We knew there would be absolutely no way to take care of our other two children and our sick son who was about to undergo a 12 hour operation that would most definitely leave him clinging to life for weeks on end on full life support in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at NY Presby across the street from Sloan. (By the way 16,900.00 to transport a child via ambulance across the street in NYC, most insurance plans have a max on ambulance charges ours was 500.00) So we tearfully and reluctantly left a 4 and 5 year old for months in the loving care of grandparents all of us completely cognizant it might be last time they would see their baby brother alive.

What next the acute respiratory failure due to the common cold in an immuno suppressed infant which landed the then six month old back in Pediatric Intensive Care-- and the pediatric pulmonologist who gave our boy his third chance at life? When this crazy mother put her foot down and wouldn't stop screaming until a pediatric pulmonologist was called in on his case...

Nah I’ll skip to the newly NO Evidence of Disease phase when the "routine" imaging studies; which include holding these kids down on gurneys, with minimal at best pain control, so the pediatric oncologists can take a corkscrew and 10 inch needles to their hips for bone marrow aspirates and biopsy's. And I wonder where my three year old learned the word fuck? Believe me a great majority of the kids are screaming any profanity they can bear to utter.... and the CT revealed a right hilar mass wrapped around the main aorta and numerous nodules in the periphery of the rt lung. More experimental surgeries and treatment ensued and certainly there wasn't a bat's chance in hell the kid would live to see his next birthday...

Needless to say; John did live, he did triumph and now once again seems cancer free, remnants of the hilar mass remain as well as what we believe to be necrotic or dead cancer nodules in his lungs. He'll have the "routine" imaging studies again in OCT, but from all the other "routine" testing we really have no reason to believe they will reveal anything other than stable or improved as they have for the last 18 months. Actually if you look at him today, one wouldn't have a clue the boy has ever been sick a day in his life, that is until he whips his shirt off and shows off the worn out cutting board that most would call a torso. Fourth chance at life! The fourth chance needs to last well beyond my years.

How has it affected our lives? Our sailing? Hmm one complete summer when the boat sat at Montrose while we sat at our son's bedside in NYC praying he would continue to fight the good fight, praying he would have the chance to step foot on the boat like his older siblings. But more importantly it taught us the rich value of living life today, we have a keen awareness we and/or our kids could be gone tomorrow. And most importantly our children taught us not to dwell on the unpleasent and horrorfying moments that have passed. John hates needles, he hated the tubes hanging out of chest, my other kids hated being endlessly separated from their parents, the kids and we hated our son probably would never have a chance to go to Kindergarten ride a bike etc, however, All three continuously focused on the positive, using the IV pole as a skateboard is our latest greatest turning the hatred into living life. I vividly recall shortly after one of John's chest surgeries chest tube and all the pre-walking boy insisted on crawling pulling himself to a stand to play at a lego table in the hospital. It was quite the feat for this mom to keep the drain and all the IVs up with him. As a family we gained a deep love for living life and pursuing our passions in the now.


High risk neuroblastoma comes with about a 10% chance to survive 1 year and for the kiddos who do manage to survive the treatment and cancer, has a recurrence rate of approx 70% when the survival then drops to less than 1%. I really really enjoy when the pediatrician or any other doctor informs me my kid has strep throat.

So hubbo and the two older children sail ALL summer with my complete support and as a family we cruise on our boat and all winter I lobby in Washington DC for more funding for childhood cancer and raise awareness by means of speaking engagements.

I would have never thought on May 24th 2002 that over three years later I would be grateful to childhood cancer for who I am and who my family is.

Jen

#35 Glenn

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 08:03 PM

This has got to be the best and most inspirational thread to every on SA.

I hope Ed can somehow save this, so it does not fall from the first page, and become a search item.

Next time I’m having a bad day, due to someone cutting me off in traffic, or a report not being on my desk in time, or maybe I win a Weds night race series! ….I can come back and read this, and realise that really I have never been challanged and as such I have achieved nothing!

Thanks to all those that have posted their stories.

#36 Heaven can wait

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 12:16 PM

Thank You Heaven for beginning this thread!

Our youngest son was diagnosed with end stage neuroblastoma at four weeks of age, May 24th 2002 9:47 AM to be exact.  A grapefruit sized tumor arose out of the left adrenal gland wrapping itself around and constricting the abdominal aorta, superior vena cava, and just like an octopus grew tentacles into the small bowel, kidney, coming dangerously close to breaching the spinal column and subsequently invaded the lymphatic system. 

Open biopsy to confirm diagnosis and for biological characteristics and high dose cytotoxic therapy (chemotherapy) followed immediately.  Not one pediatric surgeon in Chicago would attempt surgery to resect the tumor, deeming surgery more morbid than death.  WHATEVER..  Consults across America began in earnest, and finally I found whom I consider the man who gave my son a second chance at life, when no one would at Sloan Kettering in NYC. 

We knew there would be absolutely no way to take care of our other two children and our sick son who was about to undergo a 12 hour operation that would most definitely leave him clinging to life for weeks on end on full life support in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at NY Presby across the street from Sloan.  (By the way 16,900.00 to transport a child via ambulance across the street in NYC, most insurance plans have a max on ambulance charges ours was 500.00) So we tearfully and reluctantly left a 4 and 5 year old for months in the loving care of grandparents all of us completely cognizant it might be last time they would see their baby brother alive. 

What next the acute respiratory failure due to the common cold in an immuno suppressed infant which landed the then six month old back in Pediatric Intensive Care-- and the pediatric pulmonologist who gave our boy his third chance at life? When this crazy mother put her foot down and wouldn't stop screaming until a pediatric pulmonologist was called in on his case...

Nah I’ll skip to the newly NO Evidence of Disease phase when the "routine" imaging studies; which include holding these kids down on gurneys, with minimal at best pain control, so the pediatric oncologists can take a corkscrew and 10 inch needles to their hips for bone marrow aspirates and biopsy's.  And I wonder where my three year old learned the word fuck?  Believe me a great majority of the kids are screaming any profanity they can bear to utter.... and the CT revealed a right hilar mass wrapped around the main aorta and numerous nodules in the periphery of the rt lung. More experimental surgeries and treatment ensued and certainly there wasn't a bat's chance in hell the kid would live to see his next birthday...

Needless to say; John did live, he did triumph and now once again seems cancer free, remnants of the hilar mass remain as well as what we believe to be necrotic or dead cancer nodules in his lungs.  He'll have the "routine" imaging studies again in OCT, but from all the other "routine" testing we really have no reason to believe they will reveal anything other than stable or improved as they have for the last 18 months.  Actually if you look at him today, one wouldn't have a clue the boy has ever been sick a day in his life, that is until he whips his shirt off and shows off the worn out cutting board that most would call a torso.  Fourth chance at life!  The fourth chance needs to last well beyond my years.

How has it affected our lives? Our sailing?  Hmm one complete summer when the boat sat at Montrose while we sat at our son's bedside in NYC praying he would continue to fight the good fight, praying he would have the chance to step foot on the boat like his older siblings.  But more importantly it taught us the rich value of living life today, we have a keen awareness we and/or our kids could be gone tomorrow.  And most importantly our children taught us not to dwell on the unpleasent and horrorfying  moments that have passed.  John hates needles, he hated the tubes hanging out of chest, my other kids hated being endlessly separated from their parents, the kids and we hated our son probably would never have a chance to go to Kindergarten ride a bike etc, however, All three continuously focused on the positive, using the IV pole as a skateboard is our latest greatest turning the hatred into living life.  I vividly recall shortly after one of John's chest surgeries chest tube and all the pre-walking boy insisted on crawling pulling himself to a stand to play at a lego table in the hospital.  It was quite the feat for this mom to keep the drain and all the IVs up with him.  As a family we gained a deep love for living life and pursuing our passions in the now. 


High risk neuroblastoma comes with about a 10% chance to survive 1 year and for the kiddos who do manage to survive the treatment and cancer, has a recurrence rate of approx 70% when the survival then drops to less than 1%.  I really really enjoy when the pediatrician or any other doctor informs me my kid has strep throat.

So hubbo and the two older children sail ALL summer with my complete support and as a family we cruise on our boat and all winter I lobby in Washington DC for more funding for childhood cancer and raise awareness by means of speaking engagements.

I would have never thought on May 24th 2002 that over three years later I would be grateful to childhood cancer for who I am and who my family is.

Jen

Dear Jen,

Firstly, thank you for your support not only on this thread but in others as well, it is inspirational for me to know that my story can have any influence on someone else on the other side of the world, and that is the marvel of Modern technology.

I share very much your emotions as a parent, and can reflect with admiration for your young "John", kids are a wonderful exponent of Courage and know no limits as to despair.

Little Johns operations sound remarkably similar to my own, and I trust that one day he and I can compare the Train Wrecks of our Torso's.

Thank for your story Jen, he's a special boy, and I had a tear for him don't you worry - great stuff.



Fellow Anarchists, I believe this thread is an immensly personal topic that has far reaching undertones, not only for those who have survived Cancer in the past, but to inspire those who should have to fight the hardest fight in the future.

I am not yet a Cancer Surviver, however if any SA lurkers feel moved by what you have read, please offer some sort of posting to keep this thread foremost in the mind of all Anarchists.

Thank you - HcW :ph34r:

#37 Heaven can wait

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 12:57 PM

Yep,

C onsumed
A narchists
N eeding
C onstant
E motional
R elief

:ph34r:

#38 Bowgirl

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Posted 21 September 2005 - 12:08 PM

I have a huge appreciation for survivors since my brother married a cancer amputation survivor (also got a new appreciation for my brother, but that's another story LOL).

She is my inspiration. Doesn't sweat the small stuff and truly, it is almost ALL small stuff! Whenever I think my life is getting tough, all I have to do is think of her losing a leg at 17 and spending not one day wallowing in self-pity; watch her successfully run the household and raise 2 kids (3 if you count my brother). She gets more done in a day than most of us do in a week, and she's not the one complaining about being tired!

It truly is a complete restructuring of outlook when you're faced with mortality. There's a Tim McGraw (country, sorry guys) song out this year "Live like you were dying". Set priorities and don't forget to say the important stuff.

My own "sailing helped me survive" story, is from depression. Out on the boat and in the wind, getting a good workout in a race or just cruising ... out there all was right in the world and all the darkness would go away for a bit and strengthen me to make it through another day.

Thank God for sailing and the community that goes with it.

Excellent topic, HCW. Missed the original as I was away - quite an uplifting, teary read this morning. Thanks for bringing it back to the top, OzRick ~ and best of luck to you!

#39 WestCoast

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Posted 21 September 2005 - 07:15 PM

nice timing on the bump......Sail for the Cure this weekend! (9/25) Portland Yacht Club

We're bringing out the new Nomad to show it off in the PDX area as a sponsor for the event.

They raised a good chunk of change last year, and hopefully this year we'll help raise even more.

My cousin has been battling for a while, she is young and the Make a Wish foundation granted her a wish to go to Hawaii and that made her very very happy.

We can't do enough for those fighting!

#40 Sionna

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Posted 21 September 2005 - 07:44 PM

Thanks for starting this thread and sharing your stories. You are all couragous and inspiring.

#41 catsailor

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 12:39 AM

Leukemia at 30. Told by a dumb ass, ill-informed emergency room doc to go home and get my affairs in order.

Decided not to take her advice. Decided on a better plan.

Sold my biz, moved to San Diego, put together a phenominal medical team, became a vegan, sold the J24 (tired of going so bloody slow, and since I had cancer, I figured I had earned the right to go faster) bought a Melges 24 and set a goal of sailing the Worlds in Long Beach with my best friends (did it, even finishing top ten in a race in the middle of nasty interferon therapy when I was having more mood swings than Sybil!), sailed a maxi-cat, broke the Yarmouth Cup record on a 47' tri, fathered a healthy baby boy with my wife, and made it my full time job to be as healthy as possible while new therapy come through development (which it did, if you're a cancer survivor you've probably heard of the miracle Novartis drug Gleevec)...

8 years later, cancer free, distance racing beach cats, son is 6 and already becoming an Opti ace, living back on the east coast, still married to the most wonderful woman in the world, and taking summer sabaticals teaching junior racers during the summer. And if my clients don't like me taking the summer off... the can faaaaaaack off!

And how lucky was I to get the cancer with a regatta series attached? Very cool!

And I'm ready for more: if I can find sponsorship (anyone want to help?), we're going to sail my Inter 20 in the Tybee 500 in '06. 500 miles on a beach cat? That's easy compared to cancer :)

#42 SF65

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 02:44 AM

I think Krispy and I lost the same person.

He was a fantastic person and an inspiration of living life to the fullest. He always made me feel like one of his daughters. Although he had been going through treatments for years for melanoma and looked like he was doing well, we all knew it was a matter of hope.

1st weekend December 2004 he was doing race Committee and drinking with us at Sausalito YC

December 24 he didn't sound to perky on the phone

He spent Christmas with his family at a cabin outside Seattle

He came back to SF and was promptly admitted to the hospital

Tests showed the melanoma had metasticized to tumors throughout his abdomen

January 13th he sailed beyond the horizon

I will always miss him

#43 Don'tCallMeJudge

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 06:23 AM

Heaven Can Wait,
Thank you for the thoughtful and inspiring thread!

I was diagnosed with relapsing-remitting Multiple Sclerosis in December, 2003. There have been a number of "minor" symptoms over the past few years which I didn't understand at the time, and only began to associate with MS after I learned more about the disease, and after my doctor started asking me specific questions last year. I have had serious asthma most of my life, but that has been under control for a few years now, and it's almost a walk in the park compared to the current excitement in my life.

My first "episode" was a bit over two years ago, but we couldn't figure out what caused it at the time. Both of my feet went numb in December 2002. There was very little pain involved, although I occasionally fell because I couldn't feel my way around, but it was mostly just a strange and curious experience. A number of blood tests and neurological tests were done, including EMG shocks of the nerves in my legs. No obvious answers came up at the time, and after about a month and a half, the symptoms gradually receded (although the toes on my right foot remain numb to this day).

My second "episode" happened in September, 2003. I suddenly started having bad pain behind my left eye while I was driving to the E Scow Nationals in New York. My eyesight started getting hazy, and I was also feeling weakness in my hands during the competition. When I got home, my opthamologist did an exam, diagnosed my condition as optic neuritis (inflammation of the optic nerve), and ordered an MRI for the next day. That MRI showed a large number of lesions in my brain, and a follow up MRI of my spinal cord (done to see if there was a connection to my numb feet the previous year) showed lesions there as well, and that eventually led to the MS diagnosis.

I've been giving myself injections three times each week of Rebif (Interferon beta 1a). If you ever want some instant attitude adjustment, you should stick a needle in your abdomen or thigh or rear and inject some of this stuff. Ohyeah!
;)

While the two "episodes" were the things that brought my MS to the surface, there were (and continue to be) a number of other symptoms. I've had cognitive issues with problem solving, memory (especially short term memory) and focus. I can't remember names or faces, and I keep getting the "tip of the tongue" syndrome, where I can't finish sentences because I simply can't pull the words out. I've gone to work meetings, and the next day I can barely remember I was there, much less what happened. If I took notes (something I've started doing again recently), I don't always remember writing them. I've been dealing with serious fatigue every day for a few years. It's especially bad on hot summer days. We've all had fatigue, but this is different and hard to explain. It's kind of like an "I want to lie down on the floor right now" kind of tired. I view those symptoms as simple speedbumps. They are real, and they may slow me down, but they won't stop me.

Two years ago, I had three friends sign up for the MS Walk in my honor in three cities around the country, and I was inspired to get involved in my local walk. I was thrilled by the success of the event (and even had a much bigger team join me for this past spring's walk). I've been humbled by the support of family and friends, and felt completely energized and empowered by the experience.

I thought I already had enough on my plate to deal with, but just six days after that first MS Walk, I found a new challenge to face that was unrelated to the MS...

I was hospitalized in May, 2004 for almost two weeks. The short version is that I had GI bleeding, and drove myself to the ER. (I know that was stupid.) I barely had time to give the triage nurse my insurance card and tell her my symptoms and list my medications. 90 seconds later I was unconscious. I woke up on the table in the ER to feel my clothes being cut off (my favorite Patagonia shirt too... damn it lol), large bore IVs being plugged into both arms and an ER doc with a smile on her face teasing me, which was exactly what I needed, considering that my anxiety meter was pegged at the maximum at that moment!

After four days in the ICU, a ton of tests and procedures, and eight blood transfusions, they finally found the source of the bleeding, a very rare cancer called GIST. I had surgery early the next morning to cut out the tumor, along with a section of my small intestine. The bad news is that this kind of cancer doesn't respond to chemo or radiation at all. The good news is that my tumor didn't metastasize, but it was big enough to put me at moderate risk of returning. I missed almost two months of work last summer while recovering from the surgery, and lost 20lbs. I qualified for a double blind drug study with a drug called Gleevec, in hopes that it will keep the cancer from coming back. My oncologist and I are pretty convinced I was on the real thing (as opposed to a placebo) due to all the "fun" side effects. I took the drug every day for a year, and finished the drug part of the study this past June. I've had 5 post-op CT scans done, and all have come up "clean," with no new tumors appearing.

(To hobot: the new barium comes in a "Banana Smoothie" version.. yum, yum! LOL)

I'm now a cancer survivor, and hopefully that will never come back again. I'll be living with MS the rest of my life, however, unless a cure is found. MS is a progressive disease, and mine may yet progress in coming years, but I'm choosing to stay completely positive either way.  I'm not looking for pity. I'd rather stay focused and optimistic and surround myself with positive people and positive energy. I do appreciate the support that my friends have shared with me, and I gain strength by sharing my passion for life with them in an honest way.

In the past decade or so, I have made my own contributions on behalf of "good causes," and I'm sure many of you have as well. I have supported the American Lung Assoc., the American Diabetes Assoc., The Breast Cancer Three Day, and even the MS Tram, a bike ride across Minnesota to support MS. When I donated to that event a few years ago, I didn't have a clue what MS was all about. I just wanted to make a difference. As my father told me last year, "What goes around..."

It's amazing how many "little" things I used to take for granted. I treasure them now, and find pleasure in some of the smallest victories. Sailing has always been a special part of my life, but it now brings a level of peace and satisfaction to me that can't be beat. My sincere thanks to each of you who have shared their experiences in this thread.

#44 Heaven can wait

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 12:27 AM

DCMJ,

Nice one, and best of luck with your MS. I can't feel my feet either at times due to the Lymphodeama in my legs. At least you've got an excuse for "Crashing" around the cockpit like me, however with respect to my crew - they're just a bunch of 'Stumble Bums'.

I went for a quick 'Blat' around the waters in front of my club last Saturday, which unfortunately rammed home my physical limitations, a point that was kind of upsetting really.

In days gone by I'd be out there from 5 or 40 knots it was never a problem, however with gusts upto 38 odd knots I found my body let me down time and time again.

I'm not sure if it's just my mind telling me to be careful or my body readjusting to its new preportions, but I found myself actually not enjoying myself and more importantly "Hurting".

Have any of you Serious illness survivers had this problem, or am I asking too much of what I used to be. (In my football days I used to be able to pick up the ass end of a Mini)

Other thing too as the 'most' experienced member of our S80 crew, I usually find myself doing the most work - which worry's me now, as I'm still very passionate about the sport.

Thank you guys for up - keeping this thread as I find it the "Gold" in the rough, no egos, no hidden agenda's just straight up courage, grit and determination, and actually makes me kinda proud of every poster here, and inspirational to all, even those of us still fighting the "Good" fight eh OzRick!!!

HcW :ph34r:

#45 jonsailor

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 01:22 AM

Holly shit, some amazing stories here. Last time I will come home coughing and spluttering from boat building all day and complain.
I have had a few small scares and bits hacked off here and there....HCW, you are have really been dealt a curve ball in life. I hope it all comes to good for you and your family and all the others out there.

Keep her going mate, I wish I knew you better (maybe I do??)....funny things these Avitars?? ;)

#46 JOD

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 01:57 AM

I got diagnosed with Testicular in the spring of '02.

Got it cut off later that week (quickest 5 pounds I ever lost ;)), got off with radiation only, no spreading...pretty much as easy as it could get....

Interrupted the radiation to Sail a Long distance race, which we won.

At the time it seemd like a good idea, and I really needed to get out and do something.....

#47 Heaven can wait

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 02:07 AM

Holly shit, some amazing stories here. Last time I will come home coughing and spluttering from boat building all day and complain.
I have had a few small scares and bits hacked off here and there....HCW, you are have really been dealt a curve ball in life. I hope it all comes to good for you and your family and all the others out there.

Keep her going mate, I wish I knew you better (maybe I do??)....funny things these Avitars?? ;)

Jonsailor,

It's not quite what you are dealt in life, it's how you deal with it when it happens.

I am no stranger to "Struggling" in life, having come from a middle of the road family and having had my Sister have Leukemia along the way, you very much get a handle on the finer aspects of life.

Having had a small business, and selling your wife's wedding ring to pay the rent, you survive what ever way you can, and having Cancer is no different, albiet that the rammifications are very different.

While I was lying there in Intensive care for all those weeks, it was all I could do not to go totally mad but to think about my Wife, my Children and my sailing - anything else was overtly complicated and well, "Just depressing".

Aside from my family, it is the sailing that is hugely important to me, it's an opportunity to be elsewhere, to feel the sensation of the wind in your face, and the soothing sound of water flowing past under the hull. Just for an hour or two, you are healthy in the mind and feel it in your soul.

As many of you know the Heaven can Wait 24-hour Yacht Race is a celebration of life, the living and in memory of those we have lost along the way.

For me the race is hopefully the start of the rest of my life, an opportunity to put my Cancer behind me - closure if you will, and together my modest 8metre Racing Yacht and I can write a different more positive chapter for the future ahead.

As I think I've already mentioned without my Wife, my Children and my boat, I wouldn't be here, and whilst my wife and kids have accepted that I'm not going anywhere just yet, I owe my forgotten boat all that I can, as silly as that sounds, and together we will be on that start line in 2006.

Thank you for your kind words.

HcW :ph34r:

#48 Don'tCallMeJudge

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 05:41 AM

OzRick,
I know exactly what you mean. I don't recall the "brand name" I used before (I gagged on it), but the new Barium I've used in the past few months for CT scans is made by E-Z-EM Canada Inc. It's called Readi-Cat 2, and the "flavor" is Banana Smoothie. I make sure that I keep it refridgerated the day before I need it. (It's much better chilled!).

Unlike the old stuff, this is something I can actually drink.

#49 Heaven can wait

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Posted 25 September 2005 - 01:38 PM

Lying there awaiting my "Sew me back together" operation, I was joined by 4 or 5 theatre staff, readying me for my repair.

My bed had been accidently switched off enroute to the operating theatre and my bed had deflated, so I was plugged into a 3 phase socket in the pre - op room.

So there I was surrounded by all of these nurses, doctors and theatre staff, all quite positively making various 'funnies' before they moved me into theatre.

With a "You Ready", they proceeded to start to move me into theatre "Stop", "Stop", "Stop" I yelled, realizing that none of the staff had realized that I along with my bed were well and truly still plugged into the wall.

"Great" I said, laughing I then motioned "And you lot are going to operate on me"

We all laughed much to the concerns of the Surgical Specialists still scrubbing up. Bit of a location humour but at the time was very funny. :ph34r:

#50 Mark Mark Mark

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 02:06 PM

I greatly respect Lance Armstrong as a Bike Rider, but as a Cancer Surviver he's a "pussy" - he got off lightly, however he's got me back on my bike so I guess he's inspired me.

Not having cancer myself but having 3 very close friends lose their battle with this horrible diesese, your comment about Lance really stuck a nerve.
How can you say Lance is a "pussy"? He has done more for cancer awareness and helping survivers than you have. Just cause he got off lightly? (brain, lung, testicle) You really think you suffered more than him and all the other people affected by this horrible descese, that it gives you the right to call him a "Pussy"? All my friends suffered, and you just can't measure who suffered more. But not one of them ever made a comment that they had it as bad as the other patients and friends they made.

Get off your self-pity wagon!

#51 Heaven can wait

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 03:11 PM

I greatly respect Lance Armstrong as a Bike Rider, but as a Cancer Surviver he's a "pussy" - he got off lightly, however he's got me back on my bike so I guess he's inspired me.

Not having cancer myself but having 3 very close friends lose their battle with this horrible diesese, your comment about Lance really stuck a nerve.
How can you say Lance is a "pussy"? He has done more for cancer awareness and helping survivers than you have. Just cause he got off lightly? (brain, lung, testicle) You really think you suffered more than him and all the other people affected by this horrible descese, that it gives you the right to call him a "Pussy"? All my friends suffered, and you just can't measure who suffered more. But not one of them ever made a comment that they had it as bad as the other patients and friends they made.

Get off your self-pity wagon!

Thank you Mark for reading the very first posting in this thread, you obviously judge a book by it's cover.

I'd say anyones a "pussy" because I know what they've been through, I can walk up to a gentleman and ask him "how he's going", even though he has a brain Tumor. More often than not a Cancer Victim wants to be treated like anyone else, especially when you know them.

No self - pity here my friend, because if you'd taken the time to read on you'll find there's more to my story and others here than meets the eye.

The Heaven can Wait 24-hour for one, and I'm organising this race surviving on a pension.

You see Mark, I am one of Lance Armstrongs biggest fans, but I would advise any Testicular Cancer patient to read his book (It's not about the Bike) after they have had their Chemo, and after they have had their surgery, as Too much information or to know too much can be a bad thing, and I say that from experience, admiration and respect for what each Cancer Victim goes through.

Lance Armstrong is also very fortunate to have a body he could still use to reach the pinacle of his sport, while there are many others who won't.

You see Mark it's all relevant, it's kind of like comparing war wounds, or laughing at someone who's just fallen on their backside, knowing that the person laughing has done exactly the same thing.

Maybe I'm just a 'nothing' with just a story to tell, that's fine with me because I'm alive - my children still have their father, and my wife still has a husband.

I'd like to think that this thread is important to those who've had Cancer, those that are fighting Cancer, and those who will get Cancer in the future. It is regretful with respect to your friends and I mean that with every sympathy, however those of us that are left must go on with living.

HcW :ph34r:

#52 WestCoast

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 04:03 PM

well, Sunday of Sail for the Cure is over.

Had lots of fun, raised money for research and met more and more people.
Portland Yacht Club hosted a ton of people, dinner, drinks, and more. Very hospitable.

We took the NOMAD out for the first time in Oregon, and it was a F***** blast too.
What a weekend. No final tally on $$$ raised, but the goal was lofty, and I don't doubt we reached it :)

#53 JOD

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 10:50 PM

I greatly respect Lance Armstrong as a Bike Rider, but as a Cancer Surviver he's a "pussy" - he got off lightly, however he's got me back on my bike so I guess he's inspired me.

Not having cancer myself but having 3 very close friends lose their battle with this horrible diesese, your comment about Lance really stuck a nerve.
How can you say Lance is a "pussy"? He has done more for cancer awareness and helping survivers than you have. Just cause he got off lightly? (brain, lung, testicle) You really think you suffered more than him and all the other people affected by this horrible descese, that it gives you the right to call him a "Pussy"? All my friends suffered, and you just can't measure who suffered more. But not one of them ever made a comment that they had it as bad as the other patients and friends they made.

Get off your self-pity wagon!

Is he a pussy? no. Is he a moron, absolutely...!!!!!

uhmmm, geee, my nut is the size of a grapefruit....ehhh, it's probably nothing.

dumbass.

#54 sailormooon

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 11:34 PM

well, Sunday of Sail for the Cure is over.

Had lots of fun, raised money for research and met more and more people.
Portland Yacht Club hosted a ton of people, dinner, drinks, and more. Very hospitable.

We took the NOMAD out for the first time in Oregon, and it was a F***** blast too.
What a weekend. No final tally on $$$ raised, but the goal was lofty, and I don't doubt we reached it :)

Let us know when you have a total! Can't wait to hear it

#55 Heaven can wait

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 04:30 AM

Just two more sleeps til' the start of the "Heaven can Wait" 24-hour Trial for 2005.

Billed as the largest 'overnight' Charity Yacht Race in Australia, the 'Heaven can Wait' 24-hour Trial is integral to the smooth forward planning of the Inugural Event in 2006.

The Trial is predominately to better understand the performance of various styles of boats and to get a feel for the distances covered over a 24-hour period.

The Trial is also essential for the 'supporting Authorities' to formalise Emergency plans that are hopefully not required for the Main Event in 2006.

The 'Heaven can Wait' 24-hour Yacht Race is for the people, and hopefully will re-kindle Class and Association involvement and as an integral part of their sailing Calendars, but foremost this is an opportunity for anyone to enjoy the safe confines of Lake Macquarie and sail for 24-hours for Cancer.

Wish the Trialists and myself luck for the Start on Saturday at 1pm. :ph34r:

#56 sailormooon

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 04:42 AM

Goodluck everyone!!!!!! :lol:

#57 Bowgirl

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 11:36 AM

Awesome.

Best of luck to all!

#58 Bowgirl

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 02:49 AM

Just two more sleeps til' the start of the "Heaven can Wait" 24-hour Trial for 2005.
.
.
.
Wish the Trialists and myself luck for the Start on Saturday at 1pm. :ph34r:

One more sleep ..... that is IF you can sleep
:D

#59 Somtam Cowboy

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 04:28 AM

Thanks for starting this thread and sharing your stories. You are all couragous and inspiring.

WORD.
And l'm heading for a check up RIGHT THIS BLOODY INSTANT......!! :o

#60 yachtie2k4

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 07:23 AM

I have Familial Polyposis (FAP), it is a hereditory cancer, i found out back in 2001 when i was 15. I don`t have cancer yet, but have polyps which eventually turn into cancer, to make my time (before i get cancer)longer i had either my small or large intestine (cant remember which one) removed because there were lots of polyps in there. so now i have to get a colonoscopy (if anyone knows much about it & what you have to do the day before, it is one of the worst things you have to drink) every 6 months for the rest of my life.
my dad has it, his mum died of it, his brother died of it & one of his sisters has it.

#61 Don'tCallMeJudge

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 07:22 PM

HCW,
Good luck at the 24-hour Trial! Please let us know how things go.

#62 Bowgirl

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 11:34 PM

Wishing you good weather, and looking forward to hearing how it went.

#63 Heaven can wait

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Posted 01 October 2005 - 12:39 PM

Brief Update on the 05 Heaven can Wait Trial!

7 boats officially started the Trial at 1pm EST, 1 having to retire due to a broken Main Halyard.

As of 5.08pm "Foxy", an 8.9 metre Racing Catamaran rounded the most Southern mark of the Course, after completing 1 complete lap of Lake Macquarie.

At 5.12pm "Penguins on Parade", an 8m Sportsboat rounded the Southern mark.

5.45pm "Obsession" a Ross 830 rounded in 3rd

4th Ex - Tension a Davidson 36

As of last contact "Penguins" has caught "Foxy" and in dying winds are within eyeshot of each other.

With more of the same conditions as today, predicted for tomorrow, Lake Macquarie will again be a picture.

Finishing places tomorrow night - All good so far though guys and girls. :ph34r:

#64 Heaven can wait

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 11:32 AM

Good nightly All,

Well guys and girls, the Heaven can Wait 24-hour Trial has been run and finished with a fantastic result and experience for all concerned.

Suprisingly some of the crews not content with 24-hours offered to keep going.

The Final result 1st on Line "Foxy" (Catamaran)
2nd on Line "Penguin's on Parade" (Sportsboat)
3rd on Line "Obsession" Ross 830 (r/cruiser)

As for distance each of the above boats sailed Lake Macquarie 3 Times in 24-hours. (Around 120 nm's in 8knots AWS)

Thank you to all for your support, and we'll keenly await the real deal in 2006.

Cheers

HcW :ph34r:

#65 TD Floater

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 12:29 PM

Well done H, I'm sure I will get a ride in it next season.

#66 Recidivist

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 11:31 PM

Congratulations on a successful trial HCW. The main event promises to be a ripper!

Yachtie/Rob - tough set of cards you've been dealt, but +ve mental attitude is all important, keep it up! And yes, that flood stuff is revolting! My last CT scan was a long while ago and while I remember the milkshake as yuk, it's too long ago for a comparison. You would think that the drug companies could work on the palatability of their products - a nice chardonnay flavour, or cab sav would be OK.

Or they could adapt a premium beer to work as a contrast medium - any chemists out there?

#67 Heaven can wait

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 03:29 AM

Recidivist


Now you're talking! Perhaps a nice peppery shiraz if it's not a hot day .......

Got to admit guys, you'd think as we are already suffering enough, (because you usually don't have a CT until there is something 'well' wrong with yer inners) they would create something that actually tastes OK.

I'm with you though on Beer or Chadonnay flavors, maybe Cheese and Bickies and a nice movie as well, that'd help eh???

Rob (Y2K4) stick to your "Positive" take on your life script Bro, you're doing a great job so far, all the best. :ph34r:

And thank you all for your support with the HcW 24-hour Trial,

Cheers

#68 Heaven can wait

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 03:40 AM

I ran into a distinguished gentleman and friend over the weekend that I hadn't seen for a couple of years.

His comment "Geeze the Top paddock has been good to you!" with reference to my 6 pack tummy (Not)

"Cancer and 5 operations does that to a person!" I replied.

Didn't the poor guy just dissolve in front of me.

I on the other hand for the first time since all of this started, felt really embarrassed for his ignorance as he has always been good to me.

Ain't the truth a bitch at times??? :ph34r:

#69 Heaven can wait

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 03:17 PM

Is anyone here on SA living with Lymphodeama, like to find out how to stop leaking from the ends of my fingers and toes??

#70 Heaven can wait

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 12:50 AM

For those interested in entering the Heaven can Wait 24-hour Yacht Race in 06, please see attached.

Attached Files



#71 Heaven can wait

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 09:45 AM

Well folks I had a small achievement Saturday just gone as Steering for the first time (A Complete Race) since I was Diagnosed with Cancer some 2 and a bit years ago, I had a win.

Yep, in crappy 5-10, 20 - 25, 0 - 5knots with rain and hail, we finished second over the line and first on H'cap.

The owner was wrapped, and well for me over the moon.

Just bring on the HcW 24-hour next October I'd say.

#72 Bowgirl

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 12:53 PM

Excellent achievement, HcW !

Three cheers!!

#73 GybeSet®

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 03:24 PM

winners are grinners !!

#74 Inattentive Observer

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Posted 20 November 2005 - 08:13 PM

Good on ya, HCW!

#75 Don'tCallMeJudge

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 02:37 AM

HcW,
My sincere congratulations to you! Even "small" victories are still victories! Here's to many more for you!

#76 Heaven can wait

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 09:55 AM

Thanks guys,

Sure was kinda nice to get the Monkey off my back of sorts, and get back into a bit of meaningful competition again.

Any of you Cancer survivors got any achievement stories. Just trying to build up confidence as mine was shot until Saturday, still is, but I'll get there.

HcW :ph34r:

#77 sailormooon

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Posted 21 November 2005 - 11:13 PM

Yay HCW!!!!!!! Good on ya mate, thats awesome.

#78 Heaven can wait

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 03:09 AM

Actually OzRick, I got to say that just to feel part of the back at the club conversation was so much more enjoyable than listening to stories that I couldn't really share.

I'm noticing a different attitude also on the boat, if things don't go to plan - realistically it's NOT that bad anymore.

#79 Scarecrow

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Posted 22 November 2005 - 03:14 AM

Thanks for the great thread HCW (probably the best ever on SA). My mum is currently fighting cancer for the 3rd time in her life. She's currently undergoing some "experimental" treatment at the hospital and some "alternate treatment". Dispite a very depressing original Prognosis and a very difficult 6 months of Chemo, she's now fighting back and even sailing 1-2 a week (weather permitting). Recent tests have shown that none of her cancers have grown since they were first detected and many of them are strinking.

The message to everyone out there fighting this battle is stay positive, try everything and know our love and support is with you.

#80 Heaven can wait

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 10:08 AM

OOOps Guys, did it again, second full race steering and this time in 20 - 38 knots, at the this rate they're going to take away my disability allowance.

The Saturday race just gone was a great confidence boost as I didn't expect the "Old Bod" to cope especially given the gusty conditions we had.

#81 Bowgirl

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 11:14 AM

Keep it up, HcW ... sounds like ever-increasing stamina (and on a site with a sense of humour like this one has, that'll get you places!) :P

#82 Heaven can wait

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Posted 05 December 2005 - 11:23 AM

Keep it up, HcW ... sounds like ever-increasing stamina (and on a site with a sense of humour like this one has, that'll get you places!) :P



Cheers BowGirl, I think even my toes were sore afterwards, needless to say it was fun.

#83 Heaven can wait

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Posted 22 December 2005 - 11:17 AM

Had a run-in of a different kind this week, I was leaving a Jeweller after picking up my wife's watch, when this Bag snatching hood came flying around the front of the shop with a security guy in hot pursuit, and ran clean into my "Belly".

Made a absolute mess of his nose, and he fell to the ground like a bag of you know what.

Having a Kevlar reinforced stomach does have its benefits sometimes, or was it the fact that I weigh 125kgs.

Either way the poor lady who had her bag snatched will get it back completely intact, I only hope the 'Hood' doesn't sue my 'belly' for assult. It's got a nasty temper you know. :lol: :lol: :lol: :ph34r:

#84 Heaven can wait

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 01:31 PM

[quote name='OzRick' date='Feb 1 2006, 03:21 AM' post='611502']
Time this thread came back to the front page.

Today was my Oncology session leading into 12 months - saturday I'm 12 months from diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, and it moves me into the 1% of survivors (or 10% of the other data!)

Either way, don't matter - went sailing today, won the prize for closest to start time (0 seconds) at WAGS, and set for RFA on the tumour on my liver on Feb 21 - (google Radio Frequency Ablation for some amazing shit on where medicine is going)

Best part is I enjoy taking the piss outa Jib Man and the Melges clowns .... and I'm still here doing it!

PS If you've got a buck busting it's gut to be bequeathed in your wallet, look up your local Cancer Foundation or whatever and give it to them ..... better still, contact your local Canteen group, and organise to take the Canteen kids sailing.


Cheers
Rick



All good there Rick, nice to see your out there giving them grief, for me unfortunately I'm kinda going backwards at present. My bodies finding new ways to leak Lymphatic fluid, and my tummy scar has split yet again.

Unfortunately the heat this year is pretty hard on the old bod, and the air conditioner is definately my closest friend at present.

I'm glad to see you've made the 1%, Join the Club, I started in the 95% success rate only to faulter and end up in your likewize 1% and the John Hunter Hospitals "Top Ten".

As for the HcW 24-hour, I'm looking forward to having you aboard.

Cheers
HcW

Attached Files



#85 Sailor_Buoy

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Posted 01 February 2006 - 03:36 PM

Can I broaden the scope here and say anyone who has to overcome any chronic condition?

I know of at least 2 guys with type 1 Diabetes in this years Hobart.


Seven years ago I was diagnosed with Crohn's disease (basically your immune system is facked up and attacks your digestive system from the inside out). It came to a head five years ago when my daughter was just new and was really colicky (sp?) I was getting two hours sleep a night and ended up in the hospital for a couple fo weeks. The bastard got my colon so bad that I was bleeding enough to need a transfusion. The pain is not something I want to go through again. My wife left a couple of months after that. Three months later I started racing (had sailed since I was 9) and vowed never to let it run my life, and have been mostly successful - still ended up in the hospital a couple of times, but have avoided the dreaded surgery so far :D

These days its under control using a drug I get by infusion at the hospital ever 8 weeks. Its $4,000 per treatment, and the bastard gov't won't pay for it....thankfully I got extended medical which helps, but for now I can't buy a boat so its OPB :P

Peace and Love to all those who overcome!

#86 Bowgirl

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 11:01 AM

Feels like time for a bump.

#87 Heaven can wait

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Posted 09 March 2006 - 11:40 AM

Feels like time for a bump.



Bowgirl, you good sort you. What's an English girl doing in Lake Ontario?

Tell you about pain guys, I was walking my dogs, and the skin joint between your upper thigh and where it joins your neither regions decided to split, about an inch on my left side, then when I almost fell over, the over side went as well.

16 stiches later, and a really awkward walking style I'm back - And didn't that hurt.

#88 Bowgirl

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 03:04 AM


Feels like time for a bump.

Bowgirl, you good sort you. What's an English girl doing in Lake Ontario?

Tell you about pain guys, I was walking my dogs, and the skin joint between your upper thigh and where it joins your neither regions decided to split, about an inch on my left side, then when I almost fell over, the over side went as well.

16 stiches later, and a really awkward walking style I'm back - And didn't that hurt.

Impatiently waiting for spring to arrive, is what she's doing!
Not that it has been such a bad winter, but my sailing addiction has me into the shakes right about now. :lol:

Glad to see your spirits are still up. Tell those dogs be more gentle next time!! :ph34r:

#89 RockHead

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 04:39 AM

Damn. I just got around to reading this thread. Bless you all. My wife fell, broke her back at L1 and became paralyzed 10 1/2 years ago, while I was out racing J/24's. It totally changed our lives, obviously. Now she's the hot sailor, gunning for the Paralympics, I work from home so I can be with her and our two kids, 6 year and 4 months. One week from today, we leave MA to drive to FL for 10 days for a regatta of hers. I get a lot of satisfaction from coaching her team and doing less racing of my own. I realized that a career was overrated, I want to be with my family and enjoy what life has to offer. Now we work to live, not live to work...

We've always considered ourselves lucky that she had an instant onset, obvious and relatively limited disability. Most people don't get that, when they see the wheelchair. However, we know that the uncertainty of cancer, or the progession MS or ALS sucks so much more. I have an old friend, J/24 crewmate who survived testicular cancer "easily" about 8 years ago. In October he was diagnosed with colon and pancreatic cancers at age 39. OzRick, you've given me more hope for him in this thread than anything else I've heard or read anywhere. Thank you.

I lost a good friend to cancer in high school and a college roomate too, shortly after graduation. The big C really sucks. Y'all keep up the fight, beat the fucker. It doesn't deserve any more wins.

#90 infonote

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 11:05 AM

I don't have cancer but for those ppl who have there might be some hope.

Just install this program

http://folding.stanford.edu/

It uses unused computing power to help find cures for various diseases.

We should open a Sailing Anarchy team.

What do you ppl think?

#91 Heaven can wait

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 11:34 AM

The "Heaven can Wait" 24-hour Yacht Race later this year will have a very special team........Yep.......Team "Dribble".

But seriously I'm Racing with an all Cancer Survivors crew, we'll compare scares, tell scarey stories which just might be true, but first and foremost be there againgst the odds to compete.

I get excited just thinking about it.

Maybe ED and Dawg should get behind us and fit us out with Team shirts eh.

#92 rolltacker

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 07:25 PM

HcW, thanks for the inspiration. You're a hell of a trooper. Keep it up!

#93 NACRADUDE

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Posted 10 March 2006 - 09:00 PM

HcW, thanks for the inspiration. You're a hell of a trooper. Keep it up!



I totally agree

Three years ago I lost my sister to Hodgkin’s (twice) after battling it and the treatments for twenty years. Basically she died from the extreme radiation to her throat and lung area that caused them to deteriorate to the point of not functioning. I was there when they pulled her plug and it was a life changing experience to say the least and is a day I will never forget for the rest of my life. While she was in the hospital for the last time my 78 year old father was diagnosed with prostate cancer. After having 121 radiated pins put in his "taint" it basically took an otherwise viral man and reduced him to an old man. Now the cancer has returned in his lungs and he's most likely going to die from the treatments due to the condition the first bout left him in. He's holding his own but is slowly going down hill.

I am a forty two year old man, and being the third of three boys’ I have been on one side of the casket since I was about fourteen years old. I will say that 95% of the people in my family that I have hauled to the grave have died of Cancer. This is why I have vowed to get a checkup every year and a complete physical every three years.

#94 Heaven can wait

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Posted 12 March 2006 - 02:43 AM


..... I have an old friend, J/24 crewmate who survived testicular cancer "easily" about 8 years ago. In October he was diagnosed with colon and pancreatic cancers at age 39. OzRick, you've given me more hope for him in this thread than anything else I've heard or read anywhere. Thank you.

Mosy welcome RockHead - I had that RFA a bit over two weeks ago, and starting to feel pretty good again (actually feeling like shit, but I'll be good in a week or so!) Organised to deliver a boat back from the Gladstone race, so you can tell I am doing pretty good. Statistics are just what the pesimistic use to support the theories on how the disease progresses - ignore the stats, and just live life, it's working for me.

Remind your buddy that red wine is good for the cardio vascular system, is a good antioxidant so good for keeing tumours at bay, and just this week they've annouced it's good for your teeth / gums. Director of oncology where I'm treated, when I asked if I could have occassional red, said "don't know a doctor who'd deny two glasses of red a day isn't good for your cardio-vascular system, and if two's good, four must be excellent!" If he's into red, go buy your buddy the biggest glass bucket you can find for him to (calculate consumption and) drink from ..... :-)




Ah yes the medicinal glass-bucket of Alcohol, sounds like a plan to me OzRick and big welcome Rockhead and NACRADUDE to the Sailors with illness Anarchy Family.

Sure makes the Latest and Greatest insignificant after reading some of your posts.

Anyway Chin's up - you're slouching :rolleyes:

#95 Heaven can wait

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 11:47 PM

Congratulations on another year Heavan can Wait, and a big Happy Birthday - keep up the good important fight, as well as playing here ..... :D

Hope it's a great day. For those of us with pessimists suggesting ours are numbered, they take on special significance.

Rick



Cheers Rick, actually the "house" is off to a shocker, my son decided that he had to go feed the rabbits, right when my daughter just sat down to have some breaky.

Insueing arguement resulted in the up ended of the NEW 3 litre bottle of milk, absolutely everywhere. My parents gave me a 24-hour Clock for the big race that doesn't work.

And my car has just had a really big leak of something.

So all in all it can only get better from here on in eh.

HcW....

#96 Brise Oceanique

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 12:02 AM

All the stories have been very touching, and congrats HCW, well done! Being an ICU nurse, I deal with the very things that you all are discussing and I can say this....staying positive and focusing on what brings the joy to your life is the best medicine there is! I have cared for many patients with many tubes and I have found that it's those that are the sickest that are the most appreciative of the little things that life has to offer. I admire all of you who have had to deal with such trauma in your lives and want to take this opportunity to thank you, because it is through you that keep my eyes open to the importance of life, to not take the little things for granted. You all inspire me as you have many others! Thanks so much for sharing your stories. I wish the best for you all and may all your dreams come true! And you know what they say, sailing makes you live longer.....cast off the lines mate and get the wind through your hair!

#97 Heaven can wait

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 01:27 AM

All the stories have been very touching, and congrats HCW, well done! Being an ICU nurse, I deal with the very things that you all are discussing and I can say this....staying positive and focusing on what brings the joy to your life is the best medicine there is! I have cared for many patients with many tubes and I have found that it's those that are the sickest that are the most appreciative of the little things that life has to offer. I admire all of you who have had to deal with such trauma in your lives and want to take this opportunity to thank you, because it is through you that keep my eyes open to the importance of life, to not take the little things for granted. You all inspire me as you have many others! Thanks so much for sharing your stories. I wish the best for you all and may all your dreams come true! And you know what they say, sailing makes you live longer.....cast off the lines mate and get the wind through your hair!




Thank you B Ocean, for your kind sentiments.

The way I see Cancer is it can happen to anyone, however it is how we all deal with it that is most important.

If only one or two people can get any inspiration from what we've been thru, then this thread has done it's job. I know there are numerous Anarchists who won't even see this thread because they choose not to.

That's fine as everyone deals with Cancer or serious illness's in very different ways.

I have lost some close friends because of my Cancer, not because they think that they might catch what I have, mearly diverting any emotional ties they may have had to protect themselves, which of course is upsetting, but that's life.

I am a very different person now than when I began this journey, to be honest I tend to speak my mind more often, and remind people that whilst the small things are important, it's the big picture that matters.

I have a deep respect for Nurses, as for me I owe my life to anyone of four ICU nurses that went the hard yards with me for long periods, they never left me to fight on my own. Julie one of them stayed with me all night just holding my hand, as I poured 15 odd litres of fluid on the floor. I love my wife more than any words can say, however to know that I was not facing what I thought was oblivian on my own, remains a very emotional and truly thankfull memory I will always carry.

When one of my doctors received a message to say that my half metre wound had split open, she drove back some 300 odd Kms, and was there as I was taken to theatre, she also did nothing more than hold my hand.

As my body began to feel heavy and the brightness in my mind started to fade, she made sure I knew she was there, and I was alright.

I remember watching the operation from above, it was calm and quiet with just the faint echoed sounds of a relaxation CD woffting about the room.

I wouldn't wake up for 3 days, and apparently I had died on the operating table that night, made all the more of a shock when I read about it in one of my files some months later.

When I sprouted to one of my specialists that there are people out there worse off than me and he replys "Oh no there isn't" that is a reality check, however as I found out it was that attitude that kept me alive.

I know I've been right to the edge of this life, however I can say that I did so disassociating myself with my illness, that is, sure I have a problem but make it as bad as you can and I'll deal with that.

My life is simple now, I take each day as it comes and appreciate the little things that bring something positive to my life.

I have frustrations, my body doesn't work like it used to, I get stared at, and I have scares that would make even the hardiest punter cringe, but I'm alive, my children have a father, and my wife still has me.

I'm just hopeful that Corperate Australia will get behind me to get my yacht modified and ready to start in my very own Yacht Race along side those like me who've been there - right OzRick.

Sorry to woffle, it actually makes me feel better about myself.

#98 Irishdriver

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 04:56 AM

God bless you HCW-
You have a great spirit and Mine and my Daughters prayers are with you.

God be with you,
ID

#99 Don'tCallMeJudge

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 06:48 AM

I wouldn't wake up for 3 days, and apparently I had died on the operating table that night, made all the more of a shock when I read about it in one of my files some months later.


HCW,
Funny how that sort of thing can work. A few months ago, I got copies of my entire hospitalization file from my 2004 cancer surgery. I finally had the chance to read every page of test results and some of the doctor's comments, and was a bit surprised to find out just how much danger I had been in. I give my ICU nurses and numerous doctors major kudos for the incredibly professional and caring way they treated me.

My life is simple now, I take each day as it comes and appreciate the little things that bring something positive to my life.


I know exactly what you mean about the value of finding the silver linings. They have always been there for us to see, but now my vision is far more clear.

I may just have to look a bit closer at my fall schedule for Late September/early October. I've always wanted to travel to Australia.

#100 Heaven can wait

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Posted 05 April 2006 - 11:35 AM


I wouldn't wake up for 3 days, and apparently I had died on the operating table that night, made all the more of a shock when I read about it in one of my files some months later.


HCW,
Funny how that sort of thing can work. A few months ago, I got copies of my entire hospitalization file from my 2004 cancer surgery. I finally had the chance to read every page of test results and some of the doctor's comments, and was a bit surprised to find out just how much danger I had been in. I give my ICU nurses and numerous doctors major kudos for the incredibly professional and caring way they treated me.

My life is simple now, I take each day as it comes and appreciate the little things that bring something positive to my life.


I know exactly what you mean about the value of finding the silver linings. They have always been there for us to see, but now my vision is far more clear.

I may just have to look a bit closer at my fall schedule for Late September/early October. I've always wanted to travel to Australia.





Kudos to you DCMJ, you are always welcome Down Under, and all the better for the Big one come October.


Geeze it's hard to type with tears running down your face?




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