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#101 midfleet

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 09:26 PM

Midfleet,

this must have been Swede 55 no. 10 or 11, built and launched probably 1976/77, then owned by Davis Jones or Chris Duer, right?

Any remarkable race results on Lake Michigan?

There are one or two 55‘s in the southern part of lake Michigan, true?

Cheers, Zebra


Every plate I saw had a 1 on it and the sail number was "S-1". According to the Coast Guard documentation site, it lists 1977 as the year. HIN listed as "FIP1186-1"

Chris Duer was not the owner. that guy just raced on the boat.

#102 Zebra

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 09:44 PM

Every plate I saw had a 1 on it and the sail number was "S-1". According to the Coast Guard documentation site, it lists 1977 as the year. HIN listed as "FIP1186-1"

Chris Duer was not the owner. that guy just raced on the boat.


Hi Midfleet,

interesting. It can't be number one, however I would be interested to learn more about other Swede 55's you know about in the US.

I know about no. 8 (US 57476, "Contessa", California), US 11 "Corsair" US 12 (1977) a 55 called "Tumlare" now in Woods Hole (?), US 8915 "Tempress"/Bird, from 1977, lost, she was displayed in NQ spring 1979) and Rosina, the blue boat with the black Carbon spar, once in Florida.

Cheers, Zebra

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#103 Zebra

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:21 PM

Gorgeous boats! I didn't know it when I took this photo but it seems it is a Swede 55, after all I did take this photo in Stockholm.



Yes, if you compare it to the original Fisksaetra Varv AB foto out of the seventies ...

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#104 Zebra

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:27 PM

There is one in Cape town and is sailed by a whole crew who are over 75. They have a small bow sprit and sail with A sails. they do pretty well. they won this weekends Comp.

Still impressed as the bowmain is 85+


She did participate twice, I think in the Capetown - Rio Race ... the return upwind trip being the tougher ride.

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#105 Zebra

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 10:33 PM

I raced the old Temptress (modified Swede 55) in a few races back in the 80's, including the Doublehanded Farallones. We won our class and hit a solid 19kts in smooth water...it was blowin. Really great boat offwind in a blow but a little gutless upwind. A more modern version with a higher ballast ratio and perhaps a bulb would be cool.


A "little gutless upwind"? Boy, come over for a ride!

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#106 Zebra

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Posted 04 January 2008 - 11:45 PM

My question to the Swede owners is about durability and upwind sailing in what most folks think is really heavy air. Living in San Francisco I end up sailing all summer in wind well above 20 knots and frequently above 30. The shape of the bay means that most of the "in the Bay" races look a lot like windward-leeward, while the "outside" races are a beat out of the bay and then a fair amount of tight and broad reaching. As a result, I'd be very interested in the following:

1) Will the Swede55 breakup or need reinforcing if sailed HARD upwind on SF Bay in heavy chop year after year?
2) What's the boat like on a run in 35knots of wind - that's a "normal" occurance in the Bay during the summer. Does it do the Rollie-Pollie? Round up?

Why don't these boats have tillers, as the smaller ones do? Just a thought.... I don't really like wheels unless you're driving a car.

Beau
[/quote]

Beau,

if it is a heavily used boat (20-30 years old) and you intend to use it for racing in heavy air conditions, you will have to check the bonding of the bulkheads ahead of the mast (beginning in the bathroom area) as I would do with any secondhand fibreglass boat. Due to her long narrow hull, it is important to keep the boat as light and empty as possible (remove anchor, no water in forward tank, sailbags, all gear midships).

I am doing the first reinforcements at a forward bulhead this spring (covering a short crack). The worst thing of the Swede 55 is the heavy stainless steel freshwater tanks below the v-berth in the front cabin. This was a cheap solution and is the wrong place. Remove it.

Question two: in 35 knots of wind and upwind she is wet with some (a lot of spray) approaching the helmsmans face. Sunglasses recommended. In waves, she is pitching. You need good, flat, flat, flattened sails to keep her V-shaped forward section slicing trough the water and not banging flat on it. You should not go upwind in waves with a lot more than 25 degrees heel.

There are few normal boats really going upwind in true 35 knot conditions (apart from the really good, and big upwind machines / modern designs with water ballast or canting keels).

The boat is tender and you have to change sails often to keep the Swede 55 really going upwind.

It hurts to beat upwind in these conditions and I have only done it during the last decades when it was really necessary.

Downhill she is delighting, easy going, exhiliarating and you can keep up the spinnaker long, some did it of to the windspeeds you mentioned (I have not done it). Swede 55 is hard to broach. But as with any rudder there is a stalling angle when you try to wheel the nose away from the wind. The long distance from the rudder to the keel helps a lot.

Few Swede 55 were built with tiller (saving a lot of weight, clutter, maintenance). For a boatbuilder/good mechanic it is not difficult to extend the rudder post through the aft deck and mount a tiller.

A metre class boat (similarly narrow but with way higher ballast ratio) will go through the wave and generates a lot more power upwind. An international eight metre is similar in size but carries a lot more sail longer, goes higher and so on).

And there are modern series manufactured cruiser/racers, which make life for the Swede 55 upwind difficult. If you have the money, a modern 40-50 footer with deep appendages will do better.

But those boats hardly have the charm and appeal of a Swede 55. So it is mostly a matter of your personal taste.

Zebra

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#107 midfleet

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 01:33 AM

Zebra, you seem like quite a wealth of knowledge on these boats. I'm really just prodding you to post again since you only seem to put a picture one at a time. ;)

#108 Slowboat

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 03:12 AM

This thread is getting good!

I'm planning to put together another Swede 55 website in the near future so if anyone knows of a current or past owner that could shed some light on these Swede's please have them contact me.

Zebra, thanks for the pictures - I looked at your website for many hours before I made the decision to purchase #9 Rosina. I'm having a great time with her, though it's project mode right now. New traveler, new cabin sole (floor) paint and more.

Thanks,

Slowboat

#109 Slowboat

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 03:16 AM

I suppose I should add a couple of images of mine:

Posted Image


Posted Image

#110 Slowboat

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 03:18 AM

And just for fun one of me repainting the non-skid on the decks:

Posted Image

#111 Slowboat

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 03:20 AM

And in the travel lift:

Posted Image

#112 Zebra

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 11:08 AM

Zebra, you seem like quite a wealth of knowledge on these boats. I'm really just prodding you to post again since you only seem to put a picture one at a time. ;)


Midfleet,

yes, I am familiar with it since 1980. And Klok made me aware of this nice conversation here at SA.
The boat is very responsive, so approaching ports or a river in suitable conditions (limited traffic and wind) can be interesting and a nice routine.

The big black sailing vessel behind is "Passat", once owned by a shipping company named "Laeisz". In the thirties, this Mr. Erich Laeisz was a protagonist in german sailing (introducting the Star boat to germany later) and a strong promoter of the traditional skerrycruiser. He and famous naval architect and boat building Henry Rasmussen (and others) would introduce the skerrycruiser to the US. All his boats (excepts one, I think) were named with the initial "P", his 30 sqm boat was "Pan, the vessel you see on the foto is "Passat".

However, the S 30, S 40 and Swede 55 are no real skerrycruisers, they are so called cruising squaremetres, a derivate of the true, old and classy ones, celebrating their 1oo year anniversary 1908 - 2008.

Have a nice "P" day

More pixels for the aficionado in the Midwest.


Zebra

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#113 Zebra

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 11:26 AM

This thread is getting good!

I'm planning to put together another Swede 55 website in the near future so if anyone knows of a current or past owner that could shed some light on these Swede's please have them contact me.

Zebra, thanks for the pictures - I looked at your website for many hours before I made the decision to purchase #9 Rosina. I'm having a great time with her, though it's project mode right now. New traveler, new cabin sole (floor) paint and more.

Thanks,

Slowboat


Slowboat,

good decision and nice fotos. You are sure with the hull number? What do you know regarding the vita of your boat? When did it come to the US, revious owners, any remarkable racing, extensive cruising?

I assume that carbon spar is a standard from another class or was is custom made (the headstay attached a little higher to the mast)?

Running no 27 for many years, I have many tools and data. Why don't you attach the proper "55" logo to your main? I can ask my local sailmaker to make it for you (for some Eurodollars) and mail it in a roll.

Good luck with refurbuishing your Swede 55. I know what it means. It is a lot of work, but nice work. Where is the boat run now?

Zebra

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#114 Zebra

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 11:32 AM

And in the travel lift:

Posted Image




mmmmh

#115 Slowboat

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 04:59 PM

Zebra - Unfortunately it's not a carbon mast. I would give my left nut for one now though. It's an anodized aluminum tapered stick. You are correct, the forestay is higher than original and the boom is a bit longer as well. The added sail area really helps out in the light stuff.

I haven't put together all the history of my boat yet. I believe she was always a west coast boat and sailed out of Alameda California. She was never raced, and when the previous owner purchased her she had a masthead roller furling genoa and a tiny roller furling main. He said it was terrible, hence the new rig. She has been up to Alaska and out to Hawaii a couple of times. The previous owner was on Temptress when she won the Pac Cup over all in '83 and enjoyed the ride so much that he bought this one. He told me that they kept the big kite up in 45-50 knots of wind one night during the race and hit 25 knots surfing down a wave - it' must have been quite a ride...

My boat was previously named Javelin (When I was polishing the hull I could see a faint outline of the old name up on the bow).

I would like to get a new logo for my main, but I keep hoping to replace it so I haven't done it yet. I may take you up on your offer though.

One question - Have you ever considered changing the rig to swept spreaders? With the new mast my boat has spreader bars that could be changed out for swept back spreaders. If I used the aft chain plates (beefed up) It would give me a sweep of 23 degrees which would be enough to loose the running back stays. Any thoughts?

Cheers,

Slowboat

And another image - almost launched

Posted Image

#116 Zebra

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 06:10 PM

Slowboat,

interesting to read. Yes, „Temptress“ seems to have been a well and boldly sailed boat, then the modern Californian ULDB Sleds came in the game ...

No comment about furling mainsails at all, and not a single word regarding this feature aboard a Swede 55. In the late 70ties, when Swede 55 was displayed at the Hamburg boatshow, I had the pleasure listining to a conversation about a mizzen mast on the aft deck ...

Regarding the logo, it would cost something and perhaps the best and reasonable way would be several Swede 55 owners ordering it. I would then ask my sailmaker plotting it etc. pp. I made a fairly detailed 1:1 (german style) drawing ...

Swept back spreader, this is a common question and I know of another owner considering it. I would not do it for the following reason: The main bulkhead takes the mast compression (down) and the pull (up) of the upper and intermediate shrouds as one unit.

The existing chainplate for the lower aft shroud is definetely not made to hold the pull of the upper and intermediate shroud.

Perhaps, after consultation of a naval architect or structural engineer, you could laminate an extra knee to the hull and deck at the desired position, but I would not do it, because the entire rig relies on the bonding of the knee to the hull. And it adds weight to the construction, this being a critical point at Swede 55.

Should you have a possibiliy to check the weight of the boat, please do so and let me know (with a remark what was in the boat when weight checking was done, fuel, water in the tanks, gear, sails ...) I have heard horrible numbers. The design was planned for net 7,75 metric tons.

A selftailing 28 Winch for the runners with 1:2 tackle to tighten, few more seasons with your boat and you will be used to the runner handling (no big deal). You can sail the boat with two, the helmsman doing the runners, your companion doing the jib sheet. Should you have friends you want to make familiar with sailing and your boat, doing the runners is a nice job to introduce them to the pleasures offshore ...

And the backstay is holding the mast anyhow. The boat has a conservative mast design, which means you need the runner to tighten the headstay in a fresh breeze. It is more a matter of nicely tuning the boat.

If I were in your position, I would keep the boat as it is, repair it where necessary and go on sailing for seasons. There will be enough to do to get it back in shape and have everything working. Plus there can be surprises (electrical issues, systems, refrigerator, pumps, engine, leaking windows), and then there is a life ashore, women (keep the portside nut!), family, the necessity to make the money before drowning it in such a nice hole like „Rosina“ ex „Javelin“ is.

I would remove those heavy bow rollers, which seem practical but don’t really fit to the design. Saving weight is good, but wouldn’t it be nice to mount all stanchions for the lifelines? How about your pushpit. I have mine at home right now, might make a good template to have a new one made if you really want one (should there be kids playing, guests or girls sunbathing on the aft deck).

Cheers, Zebra

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#117 Klok

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 06:23 PM

Hi Zebra..;-)

Yes "AS" gave us some funny situations when using the VHF in france - speaking english.....;-)))) it´s a word with absolutely different meanings...

And thx for the correction about hull no. - You are right (and have told me before..) it was a mistyping - it must be hull no. 14.

Nice to see you here - and with you we all will be much wiser on topics about these fine boats - are there anyone who knows more than you - i dont think so. ( If "Zebra" is who i belive it is..;-)
We are not going to add extra weight to Kanniga - just maybe 100 kg. for the teakdeck etc... but the owner dont wanna race her - just having her for cruising, maybe some electrification of winches etc.....'

Hope to see you soon. Did you see the Vortex..??

Pic. is from the day AS left France.

Lars


Klok,

hmmm, beautiful. I assume "Calypso" ex "As" (what a name) is hull number 14, built probably in 1977, launched perhaps in 1977 for a swedish owner who kept her in the mediterranean pretty soon. The Knud H. Reimers design, by the way, dates from July 1975 (then the drawings were finally released by Reimers, probably after production of the moulds started at Fisksaetra Varv in Vastervik, eastern seabord of Sweden)

Apparently "Calypso" was sailed extensively by some young and eager french guys (second owners, I assume), repeated trips from southern france to the Caribbean and back (this replying occasional doubts regarding the seaworthyness of the design and construction) under the name "Santé Montpellier". Perhaps I am wrong with the name. Then in the hands of a new owner, she did repeatedly take part in Nioulargue regattas. So you sail a Nioulargue classic already (few people from Denmark do that, very few lucky Danes!)

Next to it, along the jetty, is "Kaniga", no. 24, built and launched in 1978/79 (three german owners, followed now by a new owner), not so much sailed, mostly limited mileage in then baltic. Good luck with the job. Please do not add much weight to the boat (the Swede 55s are already to heavy). Perhaps the new owner likes the idea to remove as much clutter as possible: Capstans, dodgers, sprayhoods etc. pp.who needs that apart from the boating industry?

These boats should be kept like classics, pure as they came out of the yard. Why not just keeping them, maintaining and just sailing?

There were alltogether 27 Swede 55‘s being buil

Skol

Zebra

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#118 Zebra

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 06:58 PM

Ref: ordinary day in the office, Joghurt and Danes in general

Dear Klok,

thank you for the kind words. Yes it is me, Zebra ...

Beautiful "As".

As you can see from the enclosed foto, sailing is just like an ordinary day in the office: the guy behind the wheel, who considers himself being the boss (all others don’t, but are wise enough never to tell him) is fiddling at the main sheet, two crewmembers are trying to behave like people thinking (they are just transpiring) and two are doing so as if they would be working. Everybody doubts the reason for being here right now. No wind, no fellow (or colleague?) around to tease...

Nice Saturday

Zebra

PS: by the way, are you Danes still making this phenomenal joghurt? Question 2: And is it true this being one of the major reasons (among few others) you are still living in the damp meadow half way to Norway?

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#119 Klok

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 07:39 PM

Zebra

I might agree with you about changing the rig from runners to backswept - maybe it´s not a good idea - but we will work on a solution here this vinter - if it´s possible i´ll post the solution here.
I did it on my former Lotus 40 - with great succes. And she won all major races in our area - without runners.

I like that you want to keep the boat "as is" and "as it was", but i still think it´s ok to add a little extra to the old designs - and belive that the mahogany railings just add´s to make the boat even more classic and beautifull - just what i did with the former Lotus 40 too - and the constructor (who´s still alive an now a friend - agrees).
I have also - taken the liberty of "redesigning" the logo - to make that even more classic. Like or not - but thats the logo on my new set of sails. I have a small sticker on the boom.(see pic.) And the last pic... yes offcourse - inspiration for the logo, naturally my friends from Vanity V.

Last - this topic/treads really give SO much info on Swede 55 - it´s great - lets keep on..;-)

Klok

Klok,

hmmm, beautiful. I assume "Calypso" ex "As" (what a name) is hull number 14, built probably in 1977, launched perhaps in 1977 for a swedish owner who kept her in the mediterranean pretty soon. The Knud H. Reimers design, by the way, dates from July 1975 (then the drawings were finally released by Reimers, probably after production of the moulds started at Fisksaetra Varv in Vastervik, eastern seabord of Sweden)

Apparently "Calypso" was sailed extensively by some young and eager french guys (second owners, I assume), repeated trips from southern france to the Caribbean and back (this replying occasional doubts regarding the seaworthyness of the design and construction) under the name "Santé Montpellier". Perhaps I am wrong with the name. Then in the hands of a new owner, she did repeatedly take part in Nioulargue regattas. So you sail a Nioulargue classic already (few people from Denmark do that, very few lucky Danes!)

Next to it, along the jetty, is "Kaniga", no. 24, built and launched in 1978/79 (three german owners, followed now by a new owner), not so much sailed, mostly limited mileage in then baltic. Good luck with the job. Please do not add much weight to the boat (the Swede 55s are already to heavy). Perhaps the new owner likes the idea to remove as much clutter as possible: Capstans, dodgers, sprayhoods etc. pp.who needs that apart from the boating industry?

These boats should be kept like classics, pure as they came out of the yard. Why not just keeping them, maintaining and just sailing?

There were alltogether 27 Swede 55‘s being buil

Skol

Zebra

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#120 Klok

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 07:53 PM

Hi Zebra ;-)

Yep, just another day at the office..;-) - but what a day.

And yes...thats only because of Yogurt - we are here.
Did you btw know that "we who loves classic boats" call modern plastic boats for "Yogurt - bægere" (in danish), and that Ygourt are perfect for facials, cures depressions etc..;-)???

And i know - you hate my new logo..

Klok


Ref: ordinary day in the office, Joghurt and Danes in general

Dear Klok,

thank you for the kind words. Yes it is me, Zebra ...

Beautiful "As".

As you can see from the enclosed foto, sailing is just like an ordinary day in the office: the guy behind the wheel, who considers himself being the boss (all others don’t, but are wise enough never to tell him) is fiddling at the main sheet, two crewmembers are trying to behave like people thinking (they are just transpiring) and two are doing so as if they would be working. Everybody doubts the reason for being here right now. No wind, no fellow (or colleague?) around to tease...

Nice Saturday

Zebra

PS: by the way, are you Danes still making this phenomenal joghurt? Question 2: And is it true this being one of the major reasons (among few others) you are still living in the damp meadow half way to Norway?

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#121 Klok

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 08:15 PM

Zebra

We had "another day at the office" too at the Mors Cup last summer - nice day - and speaking about weight in a Swede 55..;-)) maybe crew weight could be reduced..lol

Klok

Ref: ordinary day in the office, Joghurt and Danes in general

Dear Klok,

thank you for the kind words. Yes it is me, Zebra ...

Beautiful "As".

As you can see from the enclosed foto, sailing is just like an ordinary day in the office: the guy behind the wheel, who considers himself being the boss (all others don’t, but are wise enough never to tell him) is fiddling at the main sheet, two crewmembers are trying to behave like people thinking (they are just transpiring) and two are doing so as if they would be working. Everybody doubts the reason for being here right now. No wind, no fellow (or colleague?) around to tease...

Nice Saturday

Zebra

PS: by the way, are you Danes still making this phenomenal joghurt? Question 2: And is it true this being one of the major reasons (among few others) you are still living in the damp meadow half way to Norway?

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#122 Zebra

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 08:24 PM

Hmmm,

pretty. Just four months, okax, five for Danes.

To keep up the (re)movable ballast, Klöver with Himbaer flavour seems being best choice.

I can't forget Kløver or Klœver joghurt.

Cheers, Zebra

#123 Zebra

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 08:25 PM

Hmmm,

pretty. Just four months, okay, five for Danes.

To keep up the (re)movable ballast, Klöver with Himbaer flavour seems being best choice.

I can't forget Kløver or Klœver joghurt.

Cheers, Zebra

#124 judge

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Posted 05 January 2008 - 09:11 PM

As a former owner of a BB10 I've lusted after the Swede 55 for the last 20 years, so thanks for the beautiful pics of "Calypso". She is a joy to behold and a credit to all involved.

Does anyone out there know what hapened to "Lotus" the 55 that was advertised in the SA classified's for a few months, and on Yachtworld for what seemed like a few years? Came from the North East and was a bit of a "project" boat, owned I believe by a local sailmaker. She has recently disappeared from both sites, so may have a new home. Any info?? Mark???

And I believe "Vortex" may still be in Brooklin with the Whites. [Sigh] Australia is such a long way away....... B)

#125 Slowboat

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 12:09 AM

Hi Judge,

The Swede 55 Lotus was just sold. I believe that it is going to be sailed to the UK early next summer.

Vortex is still owned by the White's and is up in Maine.

#126 Zebra

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 01:18 PM

Hi Zebra ;-)

Yep, just another day at the office..;-) - but what a day.

And yes...thats only because of Yogurt - we are here.
Did you btw know that "we who loves classic boats" call modern plastic boats for "Yogurt - bægere" (in danish), and that Ygourt are perfect for facials, cures depressions etc..;-)???

And i know - you hate my new logo..

Klok


Klok,

how could I „hate“ a man keeping a Swede 55 so well, with a mahogany footrail, good sails and much enthusiasm. Klok, I just do not agree with the idea of your own/another logo for „Calypso“. Let me explain why.

Perhaps you know that the underlined number is the „trademark“ of International Rule boats (5, 6, 8, 10, 12 mR and so on) since first World war (second Rule, dating 1919). From 1906 until WW1 these boats had letters in their main (B for 23 mR like „Cambria“, C for 19 mR like „Mariquita“, D for 15 mR like „Tuiga“, Hispania“ or „Lady Anne“, the E then for the gaff rigged Twelves ...

These International Rule or „mR“ boats are permitted to show the underlined number like 8 or 12 as members of their peculiar class (after having passed a rigorous measuring proceedure).

The true square metre boats (or skerrycruisers, as they are called), also have underlined class identifications in their main, a 15, 22, 30, 40, 55, 75, 95. They are true square metre boats according to the repeatedly revised sqm boat rules (many meetings in Stockholm).

The Swede 55 is a sqm boat derivate, a separate one design class, a crusing square metre boat and child of the seventies: risen freeboard, slightly beamier, heavier, more accomodation and with a separate rudder instead of the traditional configuration with the rudder behind the keel – the keel/rudder issue being essential for the skerrycruiser scene.

Swede 55 was introduced in 1975 with its own, special logo. I recommend to keep it in the proportions, colors and style as designed and to attach it to the main at the same place it used to be.

If Swede 55 is on her way to become a „classic“ (of the fibreglass era), we are clever to keep the boat as it is, maintaining its character even up to the sail logo. Needless to say, everybody can do with his boat what he likes ...

The logo of my main got lost after sail replacements and it meant some effort to redesign it. I encourage Swede 55 sailors to use it. Three or five owners ordering it would cut costs.

Cheers, Zebra


PS: I enclose a foto of a Swede 55 predecessor, „Fidelis“ from New Zealand, an offshore classic. Pic taken in 1966. „Fidelis“ is a modernized version of the famaous 75 sqm boat „Bacchant“ which Knud H. Reimers designed for an eager sailor from Stockholm who intended to show off during races in Marblehead in the old days. Thoothpickboatmania - to be continued ...

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#127 High Flow

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 01:49 PM

Zebra - Unfortunately it's not a carbon mast. I would give my left nut for one now though. It's an anodized aluminum tapered stick. You are correct, the forestay is higher than original and the boom is a bit longer as well. The added sail area really helps out in the light stuff.

I haven't put together all the history of my boat yet. I believe she was always a west coast boat and sailed out of Alameda California. She was never raced, and when the previous owner purchased her she had a masthead roller furling genoa and a tiny roller furling main. He said it was terrible, hence the new rig. She has been up to Alaska and out to Hawaii a couple of times. The previous owner was on Temptress when she won the Pac Cup over all in '83 and enjoyed the ride so much that he bought this one. He told me that they kept the big kite up in 45-50 knots of wind one night during the race and hit 25 knots surfing down a wave - it' must have been quite a ride...

My boat was previously named Javelin (When I was polishing the hull I could see a faint outline of the old name up on the bow).

I would like to get a new logo for my main, but I keep hoping to replace it so I haven't done it yet. I may take you up on your offer though.

One question - Have you ever considered changing the rig to swept spreaders? With the new mast my boat has spreader bars that could be changed out for swept back spreaders. If I used the aft chain plates (beefed up) It would give me a sweep of 23 degrees which would be enough to loose the running back stays. Any thoughts?

Cheers,

Slowboat

And another image - almost launched

Posted Image




hmm
i like that ass!

and the baot all togeather

#128 judge

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 02:45 PM

"Fidelis" was built by Lidgards in New Zealand in 1966, and came across the Tasman for that years Sydney-Hobart, taking Line Honours. Spent many years going back and forth.

Underwent a full restoration for the 50th in 1995 which was the last time I saw her, but is still sailing out of te RSYS in Sydney, and looking beautiful, although I never thought the mast head rig, which is original, suited her.

#129 idontwan2know

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 03:02 PM

It certainly seems like the new line of Swedes addresses the few problems with the original. Stringers to strengthen the hull, swept back spreaders to eliminate the running backs, bulb keel and a much higher ballast ratio thereby allowing more sail area. I imagine she rides better with those modifications, too.

Some really trick details as well. Love the way the lines and deck hardware are run and the website mentions a dedicated "sleeve" for the chute under the hatch. The idea of a water tank in a steel case between the keelson and keel is interesting. Not sure I'm comfortable with that.

Anyone know when the first boats will be delivered?

#130 Zebra

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 08:26 PM

It certainly seems like the new line of Swedes addresses the few problems with the original. Stringers to strengthen the hull, swept back spreaders to eliminate the running backs, bulb keel and a much higher ballast ratio thereby allowing more sail area. I imagine she rides better with those modifications, too.

Some really trick details as well. Love the way the lines and deck hardware are run and the website mentions a dedicated "sleeve" for the chute under the hatch. The idea of a water tank in a steel case between the keelson and keel is interesting. Not sure I'm comfortable with that.

Anyone know when the first boats will be delivered?


All 27 Swede 55s as built by Fisksaetra Varv 1975 - 1979 have several stringers each side. Such a narrow hull would not got without.

The first attempt of the modernized series (2 launched in 1989, one for Stockholm, one for Southampton/Hamble, both boats being now in the german baltic) were followed by one hull and deck in the mid nineties (completed by the owner, from Sweden or Finland - obviously the boat fotographed in Stockholm, shown here in that thread) and another one two jears ago (by a small boatbuilding enterprize in the northern part of the swedish island Gotland).

I sailed the prototype in the early nineties. Smashing. The boat is exciting to sail and look at. It is a different world compared to the original Swede 55, but nobody wanted to buy it, partly because of the craftsmanship and finish of the interior (which was made in light, bright but cheap looking and humidity sensitive birch. Looks like a Sauna down below.

You need to be an experienced yachtsman to handle such an overcanvassed boat with shorthanded crew, cruising/holiday conditions. So people love to look at it, but owning and handling it is another question.

The water tank in the keel is the best place - if removable for occasional keel bolt inspections. Nothing wrong with it, I would say.

Zebra

#131 Zebra

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 10:39 PM

And in the travel lift:

Posted Image


Slowboat,

here you see a custom made fitting to guide two or one fairly thick anchor ropes across the Swede 55 bow. It is still a bit heavy. Next generation could become ligher and still withstand those common little accidents that happen if you start reversing the engine a little late in ports. :rolleyes:

Zebra

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#132 Klok

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 12:22 PM

Zebra

Nice solution - looks good , clean and light.
But picture shows too, one of the minor faults about this and other boats with a forehatch - the "tape" reviels that the forehatch isent tight.??
Others beside me who have this problem - and anyone who might have a solution..??

Klok

Slowboat,

here you see a custom made fitting to guide two or one fairly thick anchor ropes across the Swede 55 bow. It is still a bit heavy. Next generation could become ligher and still withstand those common little accidents that happen if you start reversing the engine a little late in ports. :rolleyes:

Zebra



#133 sam_crocker

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 01:42 PM

Zebra

Nice solution - looks good , clean and light.
But picture shows too, one of the minor faults about this and other boats with a forehatch - the "tape" reviels that the forehatch isent tight.??
Others beside me who have this problem - and anyone who might have a solution..??

Klok


Well, even though the hatches leak, at least the icebox looks like it's keeping the beer cold.

#134 Zebra

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 01:48 PM

Zebra

Nice solution - looks good , clean and light.
But picture shows too, one of the minor faults about this and other boats with a forehatch - the "tape" reviels that the forehatch isent tight.??
Others beside me who have this problem - and anyone who might have a solution..??

Klok



Hello Klok,

puuuh, and I wanted to ask you, assuming your hatch to the front cabin would be waterproof. This being one of my projects this spring ... How is it at Kaniga?

I think it is mostly a question of finding the suitable rubber stripe to be glued under the folding/flapping hatch, a kind of rubber that will not stick to the boat even when the deck gets hot, then the "foam" in appropriatet density and stiffnes and then the material xy times xy millimetres thick and wide.

I got tired of having the bowcabin wet with damp upholstery and complaining friends. So I just taped it down, however I can't ventilate the cabin then. :(

Let us together develop a solution for this: Finding the right material and glue, tests could be made with some barrels of water while the boats are on the hard in spring.

Experts told be the design could be wrong: there should be two sealings, one for the rough water, a second behind to really seal the hatch. Sounds complicated. And if you look at the common Lewmar, BSI Moonlight Skylight with just one good sealing.

If you like the idea: a foto of what you have below your hatch and dimensions of the rubber would make a start. My hatch is already modified (sitting higher - due to wrong advice from Sweden many years ago: to long story here) and I intend to make it original again, so I can't measure. :(

Cheers,

Zebra

PS: Sometimes we are sailing to Denmark in the search of good Kloever (foto enclosed). But there are few shops near nice bays

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#135 Klok

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 02:39 PM

Hi Zebra

haha... ok i found a soft spot there..;-))

Mine is actualy not "that bad" according to my wife, (she just corrected me), and i changed the closing mechanic and the ruber sealings last summer - ( i had forgotten that - but still - it´s not the best solution and in hard weather it gives water downstairs.

In France, ther was made a cover to click on - i have lost it - but the function was ok - it was white so you nearly didnt see it.

On Kaniga - we talk about closing the hatch (it´s going to be fully repainted), and mount a new standard hatch.

The Lotus 40 had the excact same problem and we made the new hatch solution on that (the new just build).

If you need a good shop near a nice bay - just come to mine...;-))) I´ll make sure we have some Kløver on the shelves...


And we could look at a good solution for the hatch problem together.

See ya.

Klok


quote name='Zebra' date='Jan 7 2008, 02:48 PM' post='1487437']
Hello Klok,

puuuh, and I wanted to ask you, assuming your hatch to the front cabin would be waterproof. This being one of my projects this spring ... How is it at Kaniga?

I think it is mostly a question of finding the suitable rubber stripe to be glued under the folding/flapping hatch, a kind of rubber that will not stick to the boat even when the deck gets hot, then the "foam" in appropriatet density and stiffnes and then the material xy times xy millimetres thick and wide.

I got tired of having the bowcabin wet with damp upholstery and complaining friends. So I just taped it down, however I can't ventilate the cabin then. :(

Let us together develop a solution for this: Finding the right material and glue, tests could be made with some barrels of water while the boats are on the hard in spring.

Experts told be the design could be wrong: there should be two sealings, one for the rough water, a second behind to really seal the hatch. Sounds complicated. And if you look at the common Lewmar, BSI Moonlight Skylight with just one good sealing.

If you like the idea: a foto of what you have below your hatch and dimensions of the rubber would make a start. My hatch is already modified (sitting higher - due to wrong advice from Sweden many years ago: to long story here) and I intend to make it original again, so I can't measure. :(

Cheers,

Zebra

PS: Sometimes we are sailing to Denmark in the search of good Kloever (foto enclosed). But there are few shops near nice bays
[/quote]

#136 Zebra

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 04:45 PM

Hi Zebra

haha... ok i found a soft spot there..;-))

Mine is actualy not "that bad" according to my wife, (she just corrected me), and i changed the closing mechanic and the ruber sealings last summer - ( i had forgotten that - but still - it´s not the best solution and in hard weather it gives water downstairs.

In France, ther was made a cover to click on - i have lost it - but the function was ok - it was white so you nearly didnt see it.

On Kaniga - we talk about closing the hatch (it´s going to be fully repainted), and mount a new standard hatch.

The Lotus 40 had the excact same problem and we made the new hatch solution on that (the new just build).

If you need a good shop near a nice bay - just come to mine...;-))) I´ll make sure we have some Kløver on the shelves...
And we could look at a good solution for the hatch problem together.


See ya.

Klok
quote name='Zebra' date='Jan 7 2008, 02:48 PM' post='1487437']
Hello Klok,

puuuh, and I wanted to ask you, assuming your hatch to the front cabin would be waterproof. This being one of my projects this spring ... How is it at Kaniga?

I think it is mostly a question of finding the suitable rubber stripe to be glued under the folding/flapping hatch, a kind of rubber that will not stick to the boat even when the deck gets hot, then the "foam" in appropriatet density and stiffnes and then the material xy times xy millimetres thick and wide.

I got tired of having the bowcabin wet with damp upholstery and complaining friends. So I just taped it down, however I can't ventilate the cabin then. :(

Let us together develop a solution for this: Finding the right material and glue, tests could be made with some barrels of water while the boats are on the hard in spring.

Experts told be the design could be wrong: there should be two sealings, one for the rough water, a second behind to really seal the hatch. Sounds complicated. And if you look at the common Lewmar, BSI Moonlight Skylight with just one good sealing.

If you like the idea: a foto of what you have below your hatch and dimensions of the rubber would make a start. My hatch is already modified (sitting higher - due to wrong advice from Sweden many years ago: to long story here) and I intend to make it original again, so I can't measure. :(

Cheers,

Zebra

PS: Sometimes we are sailing to Denmark in the search of good Kloever (foto enclosed). But there are few shops near nice bays



Klok,

would appreciate to see a foto (not urgent, perhaps some time this spring) of the sealing and the closing mechanism.

Is that possible? :)

So I don't have to reinvent the whole thing. :rolleyes:

Might be interesting to hear from Slowboat about this issue. If it is dry and how done at "Rosina". Foto would be helpful.

Cheers, Zebra

#137 midfleet

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 05:45 PM

Zebra -

Here's the only close-up I have of Corsair.

Attached File  IMG2.jpg   1.22MB   129 downloads

#138 Zebra

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 05:52 PM

Zebra -

Here's the only close-up I have of Corsair.

Attached File  IMG2.jpg   1.22MB   129 downloads


Midfleet,

thank you, a teaser. In reply another sailing shot :)

Cheers, Zebra

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#139 Klok

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:29 PM

Midfleet

WHauu - she looks good - lift the skirt, show a little more..;-))

Klok

Zebra -

Here's the only close-up I have of Corsair.

Attached File  IMG2.jpg   1.22MB   129 downloads



#140 midfleet

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 11:09 PM

Midfleet

WHauu - she looks good - lift the skirt, show a little more..;-))

Klok


Sorry, I wish I had more. Had to go back through the picture archive to even find that. Ahh the stories we had from racing on that boat, though...

#141 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 01:00 PM

Nice. Accoarding to Wooden Boat issue 100 (May/June 1991) „Corsair“ inspired Steve White of Brooklin Boat Yard in Maine to build a cold moulded replica.

In issue 114, Sept./Oct 93 Wooden boat published an article of the history of the classic, true square metre boat.

Two beefy articles, worth ordering at Wooden Boat Publications

Midfleet: „Corsair“ has been sprayed dark blue later? I know of just two red hulled boats, all the other came in white gelcoat from Fisksaetra.

What is going on with the boat today? Cruising on Lake Erie?

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#142 midfleet

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 01:22 PM

Corsair was sprayed blue, but I can't remember what color it was before. I almost want to say yellow, so I guess red would be close enough, since I'm pretty sure it wasn't white. I believe she was brought to Lake Erie in 1994.

She is sailed & raced on Lake Erie almost every week. Probably one of the most used boats in the Cleveland / Lake Erie area.

#143 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 01:58 PM

Here is another one sprayed blue later. „Carina“, no 21 was built/launched in 1978 and after some owners/years in the Adriatic, Tunisia, Ibiza, Croatia she is now enjoyed by a german who keeps her in Southern France, partly due to be nice wines they have down there.

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#144 fdsailor

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 04:40 PM

Too much boat porn...aaaaargh! Really nice chaps, keep the pics coming

#145 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 05:03 PM

okay, more curiosity and - well, yes - .... for horny sailors in January

Does anybody now more about this one (that boat in the water, not necessarily that object on the hard) :rolleyes:

and looking forward to the toy of the FDSailors, unless it is made in southern germany :P

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#146 Slowboat

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 05:06 PM

I had considered painting mine a dark color, but the topsides are already so low I wasn't really sure about the proportions. I thought it might make the cabin/deck house look too large.

My bow roller is pretty light - it's made of all alum. There is a heavy stainless bit that was used for the old forestay from the masthead rig. I left that and use it to attach the asymmetrical spinnaker tack. We use a J-120 Asym (165 sq meters) and it works very well. My boat didn't come with a spinnaker pole or symmetrical spinnaker so I decided to go with the Asym. I'm flying it from the masthead which means you need to be careful about reaching - it's fine for downwind stuff though. I have considered adding jumper stays/diamond wires up there so I could reach more comfortably with it. We have run the big kite up to about 25 knots of wind, we were running pretty deep and hitting up to 14 knots in very flat water. In the one race I did (80 miles on the lake) we were way faster than a J-109, Bene First 42.7 and a J-105, and probably about equal to the J-120 in downwind speed. We had terrible upwind legs though and ended up getting a 3rd. Had we not got caught in a hole we would have had a chance at winning I think. I do need to get a fractional reaching/heavy weather (chicken) kite for the boat.

My forward hatch just has a heavy rubber gasket that runs around it. I haven't really put the bow under, but so far it has been dry. I do expect it to leak any day. I really like the position of the hatch though - many nights this year I fell asleep looking up at the stars through the open hatch - nothing better! A few of my ports leak and I'm planning to go after those this winter - any advice?

The other thing I’m wondering about is rudder bearings – have any of you dropped the rudder and replaced the bearings? I have a bit of play in mine (you figure after 30 years it’s time) and I’m considering doing this before she goes back in the water.

Thanks,

Slow.

#147 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 05:31 PM

Slowboat,

two fotos, one of the gasket and one of the hardware installed to pull the hatch down, would be appreciated.

I agree and would by no means give up the hatch. It should be possible to get it waterproof with some thoughts dedicated to the problem.

Rudder bearings: Take the rudder out, determine inner and outer diametre of rudder tube and post (have it done by a mechanic in case you are not familiar with precise mechanics), buy a plastic known under the trademark „Delrin“ (common industrial use, available in white, green, black, kind of selfgreasing material) any mechanic knows it. Then bring the stuff to any milling shop next corner. Buy a little more since you may have to redo the job until you have it all fitting and nicely working.

Enclosed Swede 55 No S 3 still in Stockholm, built probably 1976, modified to two metres longer mast, headstay moved forward, slightly long boom, roached main, Cover girl of the swedish sailing magazine "På Kryss" (going upwind or so), published 2007

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#148 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 05:44 PM

... and if you wife is not to prohibitive about storing substantial parts of the boat at home, okay, neither in the dining room nor kitchen, you can give your rudder the time to dry out and make the necc. measurements. And you keep having a nice boat smell in your nose.

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#149 Slowboat

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 07:45 PM

So the rudder doesn't use ball bearings, just Derlin? What keeps the rudder in the boat? Is it just the quadrant up at the top? Do you glass in the Derlin? Maybe it's all very simple once you start taking everything apart.

I'm the king of boat parts in the house - right now all the teak is in the living room (I'm building all new hatches and refinishing all the trim) The new traveler system is in the office, the winches are in the dining room...and yes I'm still married. I have an old Folkboat rudder that I've considered making into the living room table once or twice :)

I like the look of the Red Swedish boat. I kinda wish when they re-rigged mine they made the mast taller, but it wouldn't have fit under the bridges on the intra-coastal water way. Do either of you use a 155% genoa? I currently have a 135% which is good down to about 7 knots. I think a new #1 will make a big difference in the light stuff that we have a fair bit of on the lake. I wish my Main had more roach, but it's cut fairly conservatively. It's also pretty deep which doesn't help the boat much. I really want to purchase a new main, but the cash isn't in the bank right now for that (They are very expensive!). Mine is fine for cruising, but not quite up to it for racing.

#150 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 08:07 PM

[quote name='Slowboat' date='Jan 8 2008, 08:45 PM' post='1489605']
So the rudder doesn't use ball bearings, just Derlin? What keeps the rudder in the boat? Is it just the quadrant up at the top? Do you glass in the Derlin? Maybe it's all very simple once you start taking everything apart.

Yes, take it apart and you will see. No glassing at all, just assembling as is was with new parts.

Pretty simple :P

Where do you keep your boat?

Enclosed a foto of „Spilhaus III“ (not spillhouse) ex „Counterpoint“ near Capetown.

„Lets see to get the main one more row down...“

This one being Whitbread watch leader and round the world veteran Ted „Padda“ Kuttels („Atlantic Privateer“) second Swede 55, replacing his red hulled „Sweedy“ (boat no. one, which was lost previously in Mauritus).

„Counterpoint“ was built in 1982 as no. 31 by Aqva Båt Ab, a little yard in southern sweden which made a few Swede 55s after Fisksaetra Varv in Vaestervik closed. This one was made for Commander Kane who sailed the Annapolis – Bermuda race with some success under ideal reaching conditions with mostly a family crew.

„Counterpoint“ is in Capetown since 1992

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#151 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 08:33 PM

"I'm the king of boat parts in the house - right now all the teak is in the living room (I'm building all new hatches and refinishing all the trim) The new traveler system is in the office, the winches are in the dining room...and yes I'm still married. I have an old Folkboat rudder that I've considered making into the living room table once or twice "

As long as something of the floor remains visible, your marriage may not be in danger. Should she consider to move to someone with no or less parts at home, it is about time to get the parts back into the boat.

:blink:


Enclosed boat no 11 or 12 (probably 1978) previously known as „Hera“. She was aground due to a little navigational error in the Caribbean many years ago, lifted, refurbuished and painted dark blue somewhere at the eastern seabord of the US. Then sold to Europe and in Vilamoura/Portugal for a while. Recently refurbuished again by another mad man from Lisbon or nearby who seems pretty proud of his fetish.


http://www.paseosdebarco.com/

Looks nearly as nice as Elizabeth Meyers toy some years ago, eeeh?

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#152 Slowboat

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 08:42 PM

I have been looking at Teddy Kuttle's results for some time - it's great to know the history of the boat.

I keep my boat on Lake Champlain in Vermont. The lake is the 6th largest body of fresh water in the US - about 100 miles long and up to 15 wide. The boat is overkill for the lake, but it is an amazing place to sail. Generally good wind (July tends to be light), amazing sunsets, lots of mountains all around and very few powerboats.

I took this image of Burlington from my old Hinckley, but it gives you an idea of what the lake looks like - if you look closely you can see both my office and my house. The mountain behind is Mt. Mansfield, the highest mountain in Vermont.

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#153 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 09:24 PM

Nice area, your boat should fit well there.

Regarding the rudder: 1. The boat should be hanging in the travellift or you have to dig a hole below the stern to have the rudderstock sliding entirely out of the boat 2. Have someone receiving it below the boat or put something below the blade
and dismount the quadrant. As soon as the quadrant is loose, the rudder falls out of the boat.

The rudderstock is 1,18 metres, the blade 1,14 m You need about 2,40 m below the little skeg. The whole thing is heavy, about 75 kgs. Two guys required to handle the thing.

Tube diametre (embracing bearing and rudder stock) approx. 80 mm, Rudder stock approx. 70 mm

Material required Delrin: 100 mm diametre (ideally round from the shop) x approx 80 mm long - two pieces

My rudderstock is 70,10 mm diametre in the upper bearing, for some reason 70,20 mm at the lower bearing.

Outer diametre of bearing: 80,3 mm, inner diametre of lower bearing 70,3 to 7,5 mm

If I remember well, the bearings are 65 mm high.

It takes time to find out what really fits into your ruddertube and is is important that the stock can smoothly and freely revolve in the bearings (I am - being so german - at Version 5.11.Delta and my crew is fed up) but nothing is for free.
It is said that Delrin takes 1 % of water but this can be forgotten at the given material thickness.

I will tell you later where to ship the cradle of yankeebeer.

Something to entertain all those Sailing Anachists without such challenges below, "Spillhaus III" again in Table Bay/Capetown. (some straightford Yankee use to call this - well - ... Reimers just drew nice charming boats)

Cheers, Zebra

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#154 Slowboat

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 10:53 PM

Wow, great info! That is perfect. Yeah, I owe you beer.

I can also post a few more images:

Getting surveyed:
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Other side:
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#155 Slowboat

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 10:55 PM

On a truck:

Posted Image

And just to get techy, the charging system:
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#156 Slowboat

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 10:56 PM

Just launched:

Posted Image

And from the side (This angle makes the mast look pretty short)
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#157 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 11:02 PM

I had Swede 55 hull #34 for several years in the 1990's. She was the best two person cruising boat I have had the pleasure of sailing. My wife and I hit 15 knots under main alone while towing our tender one day. Yes it was windy.

I currently own a Beck & Sohne 30 Square Metre. Great single handed or double handed daysailor.


Interesting, which boat was that and where did you sail it?

And the Knud Reimers designed "Bijou" is just georgeous, sad to understand it is one of the very few 30 sqm boats in the US, although there seems to be so many occasions for tasteful daysailing.

Enclosed few pages of an article about "Vortex"

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#158 Slowboat

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 11:17 PM

I got the Swede because the purchase of this Reimers 30 fell through (I waited 24 hours too long to make my offer). I really wanted the wooden boat! You can learn more about the US Square Meter scene at:
http://www.squareske.../30m/index.html


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#159 Zebra

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Posted 08 January 2008 - 11:37 PM

I got the Swede because the purchase of this Reimers 30 fell through (I waited 24 hours too long to make my offer). I really wanted the wooden boat! You can learn more about the US Square Meter scene at:
http://www.squareske.../30m/index.html
Posted Image



Appealing. Slowboat, this is a dangerous issue.

Are you familiar with Nautical Quarterly, issue 6? It features Swede 55 US 17, I assume the later "Temptress", Sailnumber US 8915, berthed in San Francisco, became Bird, lost in a fall/winter gale 1998 in northern latitudes in the Pacific/Alaska with it's singlehanded sailing owner.

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#160 Zebra

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Posted 10 January 2008 - 05:18 PM

Re: Swede 55 rudderbearings

Slowboat,

enclosed you find a drawing of the general rudder arrangement of Swede 55. Please note that the measurements became changed: Hjärtstock = rudderpost or rudderstock has an outer diametre of generally 70, not 71 mm (this is a tube)

Rodertrumma = that is the stainless steel pipe (fairly thin sheet) embracing the hole thing. It has an inner diametere of 80 mm plus something, plus wear. It may be slightly oval in the longitudonal direction)

Second drawing, my scetch:

a) 70,3 (upper) 70,5 mm (lower) bearing (perhaps lower and upper bearings being different at Rosina as well)
B) 80,3 mm
c) 65 mm, if I remember well (to be checked at your boat) My bearing is at a shop right now. Can't measure.
d) 5 mm (flange - ring)
e) 100 mm (this is a ring/flange securing the bearing above or below the tube)

To make the installation of the bearings in the boat and guiding the rudderpost inside those bearings easier, I had little angles milled at the inner/outer ends of the bearings (see lower details of my scetch).

Looking forward to your private message regarding beer cradle shipping details.

Cheers, Zebra

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#161 Sailor90

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 01:06 AM

Posted Image

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#162 hyderally

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 02:59 AM

Attached File  DSCF1960.JPG   859.71K   28 downloads
Just a few pix of the cousin BB 10 meter out of the water to show the family resemblance.

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#163 Zebra

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 12:21 PM

The BB10 has something in common yes - for more info and spare parts have a look at: http://www.borresen.com

#164 Zebra

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Posted 13 January 2008 - 12:26 PM

This is even more boyish than most of us seem to be in 1:1 scale

B)

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#165 Zebra

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 02:37 PM

Attached File  DSCF1960.JPG   859.71K   28 downloads
Just a few pix of the cousin BB 10 meter out of the water to show the family resemblance.


Have a look at the pix of this nicely kept and refurbuished S30. The S30 cruising squaremetre was built in the same yard, Fisksaetra Varv AB in Västervik Sweden to a Knud Reimers design. Reimers himself used to sail an S30 as the "grand old man" of scandinavian yacht architecture. he was particularly pround of the seaworthyness and simplitcy in boat handling and would sail into narrow bays in the Stockholm archipelago or crowded harbours. This is no fairytale, I heard it from various sides. And he was the kind of yachtsman who would forget to return or to eat when out there sailing.

Approx. 300 boats. This is the first version with the stepped and more round superstructure offering almost full height to stand in the aft part of the deckhouse (navstation and pantry) which is not possible in a BB10.

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#166 knucklehead

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 03:16 PM

Enclosed a foto of „Spilhaus III“ (not spillhouse) ex „Counterpoint“ near Capetown.

„Lets see to get the main one more row down...“

This one being Whitbread watch leader and round the world veteran Ted „Padda“ Kuttels („Atlantic Privateer“) second Swede 55, replacing his red hulled „Sweedy“ (boat no. one, which was lost previously in Mauritus).

Zeb, in the interest of accuracy, Teddy Kuttel is the owner of "Spilhaus" in Cape Town. He is the brother of Peter "Padda" Kuttel, best known in sailing circles as the owner of "Xargo111" (Swan 65) in the 1981 Whitbread and "Atlantic Privateer" in the 1985 Whitbread. As stated "Spilhaus" is Teddy's second Swede 55, the first, with a red hull was wrecked and sunk on one of the islands north of Mauritius prior to the 1989 Mauritius to Durban race. Teddy has done many many thousands of miles with his beloved "Spilhaus" and continues to sail her actively today.

I think I might have a couple of pics of her from last year. I'll post them if I can find them.

#167 Zebra

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Posted 14 January 2008 - 03:46 PM

Enclosed a foto of „Spilhaus III“ (not spillhouse) ex „Counterpoint“ near Capetown.

„Lets see to get the main one more row down...“

This one being Whitbread watch leader and round the world veteran Ted „Padda“ Kuttels („Atlantic Privateer“) second Swede 55, replacing his red hulled „Sweedy“ (boat no. one, which was lost previously in Mauritus).

Zeb, in the interest of accuracy, Teddy Kuttel is the owner of "Spilhaus" in Cape Town. He is the brother of Peter "Padda" Kuttel, best known in sailing circles as the owner of "Xargo111" (Swan 65) in the 1981 Whitbread and "Atlantic Privateer" in the 1985 Whitbread. As stated "Spilhaus" is Teddy's second Swede 55, the first, with a red hull was wrecked and sunk on one of the islands north of Mauritius prior to the 1989 Mauritius to Durban race. Teddy has done many many thousands of miles with his beloved "Spilhaus" and continues to sail her actively today.

I think I might have a couple of pics of her from last year. I'll post them if I can find them.


knuckle, this is very interesting to note. May I look forward to some more beef? Apologies for apparent misunderstandings. Fotos of "Sweedy" and "Spilhaus" with race results would be appreciated!

Enclosed a foto of upwindsailing in measured 35-40 knots of wind some years ago after the main gave up and we had to make it to a particular port.

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#168 Klok

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 12:01 AM

Hyderally..

The BB10 is a very nice and fast boat - we have one in our club....damnd fast - but it´s more to compare with a Etchelles, and not a skerrycruiser.
I still feel that if you want a smaller copy of the Swede 55 - go for the S30 or the Lotus 40 , these are much more alike.
But if you really love the BB10 - i´ll give you something you dont see very often. Under a autum race with wind up to 25-30 meter pr. sec.(45-55 knots in gusts)
Shetlered waters in the Danish Limfjord.... just take a look at the pictures 1 you see the other boats - behind us nice.... and then the damnd BB10, first they destroyed one gennaker - then the had one small kite up...and goodbye... they told me that they surfed with up to 20 knots.... we did get them later on the upwind...the pics speaks for themselfes could give a BB10 m loer a boner..;-)..

Klok

quote name='hyderally' date='Jan 13 2008, 03:59 AM' post='1496830']
Attached File  DSCF1960.JPG   859.71K   28 downloads
Just a few pix of the cousin BB 10 meter out of the water to show the family resemblance.
[/quote]

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#169 hyderally

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 05:00 AM

Wow, "Boing!" that did it!
Nice shots of the BB 10. I haven't had mine out yet in strong winds. NIce little flat kite in the pix. I've always thought the hull resembles an Etchells a bit - only prettier and more Veed under the bow.
Gotta love the Forum. so cool to have a response from DK where the BB is from! My son spent most of a High School year living with a family in Denmark and attending classes there. He speaks it a little and will try to return for a year there in college next year. In Odense. He loved it, even the dark and wet winters! I think he liked the women.

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#170 Red Dragon

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 05:43 AM

I spent a week in Odense one time. It was really, really, really cold.

At the other end of the spectrum, that 30 square gets me all tingly every time I look at it. Slowboat knows how crazy I think that he is for letting her get away.

RD

#171 knucklehead

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 08:03 AM

As promised, some pics of "Spilhaus", the Cape Town Swede 55...
All pictures by Trevor Wilkins.

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#172 Zebra

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 10:01 AM

As promised, some pics of "Spilhaus", the Cape Town Swede 55...
All pictures by Trevor Wilkins.


Knucklehead,

whoaw, pretty boat with very nice sails. Would be nice to see and read more from Capetown.

Obviously, the boom has been extended to give the main a longer base and the headstay is mounted on the foredeck instead of going through the flaps of the anchor locker. This jib must have way more than 30 sqm. Teasing shots...

Enclosed no 24 "Kaniga" some years ago (with a less teasing cruising spinnaker)

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#173 Klok

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 01:40 PM

Hydreally..

Glad it did it for you..;-))

Even it´s embarassing to let people actually see moments where you´r "outsurfed" in a race..lol. But i tell you this BB10 from our club have won the danish championships a few times, they are really hard core sailors - and this is not the first time i have seen them surf like that - hopefully the last...;-)))).
I really like the forum too - weird that sailors from all parts of the world exchange pictures and experience just like that - but cool.
Just let your kid go back - Denmark is a nice place, quite peacefull , lots of wonderfull waters to sail - and yes nice girls..;-)

I´ll look for some other pics of the BB10 if you like.

You should take a look at the danish web page for the BB10 : http://www.bb10m.dk/ it contains enormous amounts of materials about the boat - unfortunately it´s in danish but maybe your son can translate.
They have a llot of history and trim there...

Klok

Wow, "Boing!" that did it!
Nice shots of the BB 10. I haven't had mine out yet in strong winds. NIce little flat kite in the pix. I've always thought the hull resembles an Etchells a bit - only prettier and more Veed under the bow.
Gotta love the Forum. so cool to have a response from DK where the BB is from! My son spent most of a High School year living with a family in Denmark and attending classes there. He speaks it a little and will try to return for a year there in college next year. In Odense. He loved it, even the dark and wet winters! I think he liked the women.



#174 Klok

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 02:31 PM

Zebra

I dont know if i have told you, but my boom is longer too - the bottom of the main are 5,50 meter - which i think is about 0,50 m longer than normal.
My forestay goes throug deck too - not through but in front of the anchor locker.


Nice pic og Kaniga though.;-)

Klok


Knucklehead,

whoaw, pretty boat with very nice sails. Would be nice to see and read more from Capetown.

Obviously, the boom has been extended to give the main a longer base and the headstay is mounted on the foredeck instead of going through the flaps of the anchor locker. This jib must have way more than 30 sqm. Teasing shots...

Enclosed no 24 "Kaniga" some years ago (with a less teasing cruising spinnaker)

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  • Attached File  _27.JPG   1.62MB   59 downloads
  • Attached File  _26.JPG   1.89MB   74 downloads


#175 Zebra

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 11:15 PM

Zebra

I dont know if i have told you, but my boom is longer too - the bottom of the main are 5,50 meter - which i think is about 0,50 m longer than normal.
My forestay goes throug deck too - not through but in front of the anchor locker.
Nice pic og Kaniga though.;-)

Klok



Klok,

nice sails and the Genoa sheeted so narrow , close to the deckhouse! There seemed to be wo different Genua car track directions made by the yards. One parallel to the deckhouse as you have. One, starting near the superstructure and approaching the footrail (as on my boat).

Reimers planned the mainsail foot to be 4,850 mm (for a normal roach main of 43,5 sqm) which seems to be the standard Fisksätra version. The longer boom and the roach in the main should give some extra weather helm, I assume. This being balance by the headstay moved slightly forward, I guess.

I am preparing to move the headstay foreward this spring. I had a closer look at your foto. Your headstay seems to be exactly between the aft ends of your pulpit, true?

I planned to move the headstay about 100 mm ahead of the forward end of the opening hole anchor box. That is the idea so far. Suggestions welcome. Spilhaus seems to have the same configuration as you have.

Cheers, Zebra

enclosed: the blue Swede 55 in southern france again

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#176 Slowboat

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Posted 15 January 2008 - 11:52 PM

Zebra, my forestay is 4.42 meters in front of the mast. I don't know if it's original or not (the anchor locker has been redesigned). My forestay has been raised a bit, and the boom lengthened. I don't have any weather helm issues.

Thanks for the drawings of the rudder, they were amazing. I wonder what it would cost to ship some beer over there - I will look into it.

#177 Zebra

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 11:21 AM

As promised, some pics of "Spilhaus", the Cape Town Swede 55...
All pictures by Trevor Wilkins.


Would like to rise another issue here. Swede 55 was inspired by "Siska" (yesyes, there were several), a 40 sqm boat converted to a ketch (noting new under the sun) by passionate ocean racer and sailmaker Rolly Tasker, some time in the 60ties or early 70ties.

This bold man planned or did participate in the Sydney-Hobart race: aboard a 40 squaremetre skerrycruiser. Knowing very little about this I would appreciate to get more beef and facts instead of fairytales and rumors ...

enclosed a Swede 55 bow

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#178 Zebra

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 11:40 AM

Zebra, my forestay is 4.42 meters in front of the mast. I don't know if it's original or not (the anchor locker has been redesigned). My forestay has been raised a bit, and the boom lengthened. I don't have any weather helm issues.

Thanks for the drawings of the rudder, they were amazing. I wonder what it would cost to ship some beer over there - I will look into it.


Slowboat & Klok

Due to the original Reimers design, the "J" measurement (jib base) is 4,40 metres. Apparently your headstay in mounted in the same position in the anchor box (with few holes to choose from ahead or backwards) but a slightly steeper angle.

Regarding the beer, I am not familiar what is being brewed in your part of the States. However my crew and me are ready to try unless it is Miller Light :lol: Perhaps you ship something to improve my Pidgin English.

Nobody commented the fine Lego model. Klok, it is made out of bits and pieces invented in Denmark!!! Apart from permanently smoking (a habit copied by the Queen of Denmark?) making this nice Joghurt and sailing swedish boats the Danes have Lego.

Nonsmokers Thoothpickboatgreetings

Zebra

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#179 Klok

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 12:13 PM

Zebra & Slowboat

HAhahaaaa...offcourse... it was a LEGO boat I didnt see it before now.. great job - though we have to ask those guys at LEGO to make bricks with better shape for boatbuilding..LOL.
I have here something for your wishlist for next christmas..;-))


My J measurement is by the way - 4,60 meter - just checked..at the measurebrief.


Klok


Slowboat & Klok

Due to the original Reimers design, the "J" measurement (jib base) is 4,40 metres. Apparently your headstay in mounted in the same position in the anchor box (with few holes to choose from ahead or backwards) but a slightly steeper angle.

Regarding the beer, I am not familiar what is being brewed in your part of the States. However my crew and me are ready to try unless it is Miller Light :lol: Perhaps you ship something to improve my Pidgin English.

Nobody commented the fine Lego model. Klok, it is made out of bits and pieces invented in Denmark!!! Apart from permanently smoking (a habit copied by the Queen of Denmark?) making this nice Joghurt and sailing swedish boats the Danes have Lego.

Nonsmokers Thoothpickboatgreetings

Zebra

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#180 someoldsalt

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 02:25 PM

Just wanted to say THANKS to you guys for all of the great shots and great info on the 55. So nice to see and read an experienced, intelligent and positive thread on a boat that is not the latest IRC creation...I think I need a Swede 55!!! Keep it going!

#181 Zebra

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 07:42 PM

Just wanted to say THANKS to you guys for all of the great shots and great info on the 55. So nice to see and read an experienced, intelligent and positive thread on a boat that is not the latest IRC creation...I think I need a Swede 55!!! Keep it going!



Hey Someoldsalt,

thx for the nice words. Are you serious about owning a modern cruising squaremetreboat? If so, where would you sail it? With how many crew? Draft limitations? Common wind strength? Perhaps I have something for you.

For the meantime, consider a halfmodel ... Can be nice to have some charming lines in the livingroom or office.

Cheers, Zebra

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#182 someoldsalt

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 09:39 PM

I actually looked at and considered the boat was listed on SA in New York-I wasn't quite ready for the project and she sold before I could make an offer. Now, of course, I wonder if I will find one again that is not far away. I would sail the boat on the eastern seaboard of the US-mostly Long Island Sound to Newport areas for starters maybe farther later-my use these days would be mostly daysailing and a weekend or two, maybe a longer cruise and an occasional race just for fun-good boat for that mix I would think-please let me know about the perfect 55 for very little (or no...) money that you have in your back pocket!!

#183 someoldsalt

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Posted 16 January 2008 - 09:40 PM

I actually looked at and considered the boat was listed on SA in New York-I wasn't quite ready for the project and she sold before I could make an offer. Now, of course, I wonder if I will find one again that is not far away. I would sail the boat on the eastern seaboard of the US-mostly Long Island Sound to Newport areas for starters maybe farther later-my use these days would be mostly daysailing and a weekend or two, maybe a longer cruise and an occasional race just for fun, I have two small kids-good boat for that mix I would think-please let me know about the perfect 55 for very little (or no...) money that you have in your back pocket!!

#184 Zebra

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 07:41 PM

I actually looked at and considered the boat was listed on SA in New York-I wasn't quite ready for the project and she sold before I could make an offer. Now, of course, I wonder if I will find one again that is not far away. I would sail the boat on the eastern seaboard of the US-mostly Long Island Sound to Newport areas for starters maybe farther later-my use these days would be mostly daysailing and a weekend or two, maybe a longer cruise and an occasional race just for fun, I have two small kids-good boat for that mix I would think-please let me know about the perfect 55 for very little (or no...) money that you have in your back pocket!!


Someoldsalt,

cheap or for nothing in the US? :rolleyes:

I apologize but can't help. As far as I know, even here in Europe there is a solid price tag on neglected/run down boats. Fisksaetra Varv was a reputed boatbuilder known for durable fibreglass work and the craftsmanship in wood was of scandinavian taste and quality.

For the meanwhile a foto taken few years ago in Denmark after a wet and wild ride (two digits on the speedo under heavily reefed main). Then I hadn't replaced the coveline. I try to reduce to few possible projects each winter/spring. Try :) Needless to mention for Klok, we madde the Kloevercheck in the local grocery.

Would like to make you familiar with a smaller sister of Swede 55, a boat between the 55 and the S30 as shown previously, called S40, later. She has a LOA of 14,40 and was built in small numbers in a little yard near Stockholm called Tufa Marin. I have seen a sailed one in the mid nineties with the idea to relaunch it as "Swede 47".

I will have to look for the material and find time to scan it.

Cheers, Zebra

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#185 Klok

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 09:57 PM

Someoldsalt & Zebra

Zebra just came first..;-), but i was going to say the same - cheap or for nothing - unfortunately not possible, this boat seems to increase value like some other "limited editions" - (and i recently saw, that a new Swede from Classic Sweden Yachts starts around a 7-800.000 USD..?? quite heavy, could be wrong but it was a quote from a pressrelease.)
I would say that the one sold in SA New York - lately, was less than ½ price as you should pay in scandinavia - the reason why no scandinavians did buy it, and belive me i had many people asking, is the fact you have a lot of traveling expenses + import toll and something very nasty european tax called Moms wich is + 25% extra.......?? so after all that the price would be a lot higher.

Zebra... if you dont have the papers on Swede 47 (S40), i just found them in my basement, it came in a pile of papers that was in my boat when i bought it... there are the brochures on Swede 75 too....if any interest..;-).

I can scan it and post it next week or in the weekend.

I suddenly remember the name - it´s Norlin Boats (Lars Norlin ?) in Sweden, who still advertice it, you may see it at : www.norlinboats.com

Someoldsalt

Please take a look at: www.lotus40.dk It´s not a Swede 55, but it´s a look´a like from same period with aft cabin made the same way and hull lines etc. are very much a´like, just smaller - i had one for many years named C@milla. She really won a lot of races and gave room for wonderfull vacations for my wife an I + 2 teenage daughters.
This is a boat which is fast, beautifull and a lot cheaper than the Swede, but offcourse also smaller - "only 40".

I attatch a few pics just to add more to this toothpickpornpage..;-

Klok

Someoldsalt,

cheap or for nothing in the US? :rolleyes:

I apologize but can't help. As far as I know, even here in Europe there is a solid price tag on neglected/run down boats. Fisksaetra Varv was a reputed boatbuilder known for durable fibreglass work and the craftsmanship in wood was of scandinavian taste and quality.

For the meanwhile a foto taken few years ago in Denmark after a wet and wild ride (two digits on the speedo under heavily reefed main). Then I hadn't replaced the coveline. I try to reduce to few possible projects each winter/spring. Try :) Needless to mention for Klok, we madde the Kloevercheck in the local grocery.

Would like to make you familiar with a smaller sister of Swede 55, a boat between the 55 and the S30 as shown previously, called S40, later. She has a LOA of 14,40 and was built in small numbers in a little yard near Stockholm called Tufa Marin. I have seen a sailed one in the mid nineties with the idea to relaunch it as "Swede 47".

I will have to look for the material and find time to scan it.

Cheers, Zebra

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#186 Klok

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 10:32 PM

Zebra

I found it, maybe it´s not needed to scan..you might have them..;-)
But i took a couple of photos on my livingroom floor..just for the record.

Here´s the brochures on S40(Swede 47), and Swede 75 + a few photos of a real Swede 75 i visited in Germany ( showing the interior you told about earlier).

Was it 2 pieces produced of the 75ér in all..?? - too bad, concept was good.


I love this tread ;-)) it´s growing every day.

Klok

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#187 Slowboat

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 11:01 PM

There's some info on the web on the 75.

Link to page: http://www.skippermike.de/ostsee.htm

Translated page: http://translate.goo...e...DMhd&pwst=1

#188 Klok

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 11:08 PM

There's some info on the web on the 75.

Link to page: http://www.skippermike.de/ostsee.htm

Translated page: http://translate.goo...e...DMhd&pwst=1



#189 Klok

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Posted 17 January 2008 - 11:12 PM

Hi Slowboat.;-)

I think it was Skippermike i visited in Germany - and the pics are from his boat. The sistership was for sale at the same time i was about to buy AS/Calypso - and i had to see it before i decided.


How´s everything..?

Klok


There's some info on the web on the 75.

Link to page: http://www.skippermike.de/ostsee.htm

Translated page: http://translate.goo...e...DMhd&pwst=1



#190 someoldsalt

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 12:16 AM

you guys are a wealth of information-again, thanks! Of course, I was kidding about no money for a Swede 55-I just wish I had been in a position to buy and refit the boat that was on SA!
I have never seen an S40 I wonder if any have made it to the US.
This is one thread that ought to keep going and going!

#191 Zebra

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 12:27 PM

you guys are a wealth of information-again, thanks! Of course, I was kidding about no money for a Swede 55-I just wish I had been in a position to buy and refit the boat that was on SA!
I have never seen an S40 I wonder if any have made it to the US.
This is one thread that ought to keep going and going!


Very interesting indeed, Klok and Slowboat,

will tell more about S40/Swede 47 later. It is nice to see increasing interest in these boats. Two fotos enclosed of another swedish attempt to relaunch the S30 and Swede 55 again. The S30 as Swede 41 and real daysailor/upwind machine with an elegant classy deckhouse and Swede 55 as Swede 52, adressing some of the little disadvantage as they have been touched or discussed here.

Klok, I like the classy teak look very much, but wonder how long it looks nice and how much work will go in the long run in keeping the mahogany nice and shiny? What kind of paint do you use?

Cheers, Zebra





Let's keep dreaming (this winter) and sailing next summer

enclosed Swede 41 and Swede 41/52 sailing together

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#192 Zebra

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 12:32 PM

here the 41/52 foto

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#193 Zebra

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 01:40 PM

Hello to all thoothpickboataficionados,

at

www.norlinboats.com

you will find more about the S40

The old gentleman with the red jacket and blue hat is the naval architect Knud H. Reimers.

Fotos taken apparently in the mid eighties aboard the first S40 as built by Tufa Marin at Mälaren Lake a little westward of Stockholm.


Zebra

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#194 Zebra

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 01:57 PM

Zebra

I found it, maybe it´s not needed to scan..you might have them..;-)
But i took a couple of photos on my livingroom floor..just for the record.

Here´s the brochures on S40(Swede 47), and Swede 75 + a few photos of a real Swede 75 i visited in Germany ( showing the interior you told about earlier).

Was it 2 pieces produced of the 75ér in all..?? - too bad, concept was good.
I love this tread ;-)) it´s growing every day.

Klok


Klok,

nice to find my old sales material here again. The foto on the left side shows Swede 75, as it was called then during a presentation arranged in Kiel-Schilksee in the early nineties. This being the prototype of the turbocharged Swede 55, as I used to call it. You better don't sail this boat - performancewise and regarding agility a real teaser. Details and wooden craftsmenship is less convincing. In this regard Swede 55, built by Fisksätra is way better.

The two inner fibreglass moulds of the Swede 55 were taken away, the hull built in medium tech composites with a sandwich construction towards the keel area (this being solid), 800 kgs more lead, stretched appendages, with jib and main the same sailarea as swede 55 with main and Genoa I - a sensation to sail.

The second boat went to Hamble - another story, later ...

I withdrew from sales and marketing in 1996/7. One hull/deck delivery followed in the last years, and then there is the new attempt called "Classic Swedish Yachts". I lost track and developed other interests then.

So there seem to be four Swede 55 successors - in the turbocharged version alltogether.

Zebra

enclosed a foto few years ago, when I began to remove some generations of antifouling

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#195 Zebra

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Posted 18 January 2008 - 02:09 PM

Slowboat & Klok

Due to the original Reimers design, the "J" measurement (jib base) is 4,40 metres. Apparently your headstay in mounted in the same position in the anchor box (with few holes to choose from ahead or backwards) but a slightly steeper angle.

Regarding the beer, I am not familiar what is being brewed in your part of the States. However my crew and me are ready to try unless it is Miller Light :lol: Perhaps you ship something to improve my Pidgin English.

Nobody commented the fine Lego model. Klok, it is made out of bits and pieces invented in Denmark!!! Apart from permanently smoking (a habit copied by the Queen of Denmark?) making this nice Joghurt and sailing swedish boats the Danes have Lego.

Nonsmokers Thoothpickboatgreetings

Zebra


Klok,

before coming to Denmark with my boat, we should agree on a sound penalty. I mean you sailing with a J or 4,60 m, me 4,40 - plus you having better sails, the roached main. And then the skipper smoking all the time.

Let's calculate this in Klœvers.

Zebra

You see, m upwind sails being so old, I prefer showing the Spinnaker in - yes - Rothschild colours

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#196 sam_crocker

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 06:27 AM

You see, my upwind sails being so old, I prefer showing the Spinnaker in - yes - Rothschild colours


What are those tracks toward the ends of the spinnaker pole? Is that a tuff-luff for a square sail to hang off the pole? :)

Please keep posting, I love these skinny boats. The top one in #174 is my favorite.

#197 Zebra

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 09:11 AM

What are those tracks toward the ends of the spinnaker pole? Is that a tuff-luff for a square sail to hang off the pole? :)

Please keep posting, I love these skinny boats. The top one in #174 is my favorite.



It is to prevent the spinnaker boom from chafing along the headystay - a solution of the swedish sparmaker Seldén (Gotenburg).

Nice Weekend, Zebra

enclosed a foto taken few jears ago with the original Goiot skylights, already replaced winches (Andersen 28 ST) and still the old clutter behind, which has been removed/reduced already

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#198 Motley

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 12:20 PM

Corsair,s hull is being taken down to the glass as we speak at Sailing Inc. in Cleveland
Has alot of bonding issues
Cracks in the gelcoat
looks like quite a project

I will get some photos next time I'm over there

#199 Zebra

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Posted 19 January 2008 - 12:46 PM

It‘s easy to make the boys happy. Just give them an appropriate boat.

Okayokay, that bothering life jacket mom insisted on, chaving all the time under the chin. I am wearing it only because my little brother stored in the bow has to wear one as well.

And when I am grown up, I will treat my children the same way (although this is something for girls).




enclosed Swede 55 no S.3 "Elisa" in the Stockholm archipelago as cover girl

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#200 Slowboat

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Posted 21 January 2008 - 01:22 PM

So how does the Swede 55 rate in IRC? Right now I'm racing with a PHRF rating in the high 70's (gonna change for this season).

Also, I would love to know what the original spinnaker dimensions are including the pole. Mine didn't come with a spinnaker or gear so I set it up with the bow tacked asym as mentioned in the thread above. The spinny I'm using is 165sq meters.

One more shot of the bow of mine after a few coats of wax:

Posted Image

And the 30sq I let get away (yes I still kick myself).

Posted Image




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