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#101 Johndeeredriver

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Posted 13 May 2008 - 04:36 AM

This was the only mention of these boots in this tread (as far as I could see), is it because they are not widely known, or are not good boots?
I would like to pick up a pair of these in the next few days, I will need them very soon. Sure the Dubarry's are supposed to be the best, but the Sperry's felt more comfortable, seem to have good insulation, and are 1/2 the price. I see most everyone recommends the gore-tex socks.
I am also happy I got to use the search function, and got it to work! :lol:



My friend has the Sperrys and he loves them

#102 KRC

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 05:47 PM

[bump]
I'm in the market now for a pair of sea boots. From what I've read in this thread, I'm leaning towards the Dubarry's, since it seems they make them narrow, and I have narrow feet.

My question:
Almost all of the boots I've looked at (Dubarry, Musto, SLAM, Aigle, Sperry) look like they'd be great as long as you have enormous ankles. The last I checked, my ankles don't extend halfway to my toes, like these boots do. So what in these boots keeps you from walking out of them everytime you take a step? What keeps them from falling off your feet when you're sitting on the rail? Is this an issue or are the pictures deceiving? I have skinny ankles, too.

#103 tyler

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Posted 20 June 2008 - 10:24 PM

A few people asked about gaiters. From my hiking exp. been in some serious weather(-15F 90mph), though I never jump into rivers or anything, so I can't totally speak to their waterproofness.

Outdoor Research makes the best gaiters I've ever used. On my mountaineering boots I have some that fit tightly and are insulated around the boot.
Posted Image
probably wayyy over kill for sailing

When I get around to it I need a new pair for mild conditions. Probably double as heavy weather sailing gear. Most of them are gore-tex.
http://www.outdoorre...crocodiles.html


Check out OR

#104 Carbontech

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Posted 21 June 2008 - 07:45 AM

yep, I would be interested in any tips about how to take care of the (dubarry) leather as well..

And where do you get good gaitors? I have nether seen or found them anywhere yet..



Mink oil is the best way to keep the leather boots waterproof and supple. Warm up the boot to open the pores before lightly applying the oil.

As far as loss of grip on older boots forget the solvents, they work on race tires not polymer soles. Mechanical abrading is the best way to restore grip - sand paper or a good run on concrete from an angry husband/father has worked for me in the past!

#105 roca

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Posted 21 June 2008 - 08:52 AM

[bump]
I'm in the market now for a pair of sea boots. From what I've read in this thread, I'm leaning towards the Dubarry's, since it seems they make them narrow, and I have narrow feet.

My question:
Almost all of the boots I've looked at (Dubarry, Musto, SLAM, Aigle, Sperry) look like they'd be great as long as you have enormous ankles. The last I checked, my ankles don't extend halfway to my toes, like these boots do. So what in these boots keeps you from walking out of them everytime you take a step? What keeps them from falling off your feet when you're sitting on the rail? Is this an issue or are the pictures deceiving? I have skinny ankles, too.


I have a pair of aigle gtx racer, top boot from aigle, and as far as fitting and soles grip, and comfort and lightness they are really great. I did not yet test them in tough conditions so I cannot say if and how they perform in heavy cold weather but probably good.
In any case velcro on ankle and closing make them feel like a glove.
(should I sail southern oceans I would stick to my chameau)

ciao

#106 kengu

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Posted 16 July 2008 - 09:37 AM

Why is the trend now to drop the built in gaiters and hope that other features keep the boot dry. Musto has the HPX boots with built in gaiters but is there any other choice if you want to keep dry. The bow is not too dry place to work, thus the equipment should be perfect.

#107 Oscar Whitbread

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 02:20 AM

Why is the trend now to drop the built in gaiters and hope that other features keep the boot dry. Musto has the HPX boots with built in gaiters but is there any other choice if you want to keep dry. The bow is not too dry place to work, thus the equipment should be perfect.


I agree, I have just been through the whole finding a new pair of boots exercise and there isn't much out there with the built in gaiter. I didn't really want to go for the gill/henri lloyd gaiters as I could picture myself going on watch in the middle of the night getting pissed off and fumbling away trying to find that missing gaiter.
The trend also seems to be going to the medium/short length boot, which is fine if you are wearing them inshore as you have more movement, but offshore when dry feet at 3am makes a hell of a difference, the full height boots seem to offer more protection and warmth. Its only really the full height boots that offer a gaiter like the Musto or Dubarry's. I ended up with the Chameau's as I only really wear boots offshore anyway, I have been happy with them so far and they do dry out a lot quicker than leather boots.

#108 equivocator

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Posted 17 July 2008 - 11:14 AM

It's been a couple of decades since I was a bowman and needed gaiters, but I think if you take off your boots and FW pants at one go, and leave them assembled, fireman style, with the pants over the boots, you won't ever be fumbling for your gaiters.

That said, I think the boots with built-in gaiters would have been a godsend on some of those midwatch sail changes when you came below completely soaked in spite of full FW gear.

#109 Foolish

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 06:27 PM

There have only been a couple of comments on the Sperry Fathom boots in this thread. Are there any other opinions. They are half the price of the Dubarrys, and my local dealer said that during the last round the world race, a bunch of the crew traded in their Dubarrys for Sperrys because the Dubarrys leaked!

I need to send my letter to Santa now, so he gets it in time for Christmas.

#110 JimL

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Posted 29 October 2008 - 08:28 PM

Check out this thread http://forums.sailin...showtopic=75793

There are many and varied first hand experiences with boots on this thread.

I now have my DuBarry's back and repaired, and I also have a pair of Gill with the vibram soles.
All good gear.

Cheers,
Jim B)

#111 Gription

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 02:51 PM

I dont understand why people are still wearing boots. They are way expensive, typically have shitty grip, and are a pain in the ass to take off.

I never thought gore-tex socks would cut it, but after purchasing a pair last spring, im totally sold. If its really cold...like sleet coming down, I wear cycling socks with a pair of woolies and then my goretex socks, and I am more comfortable, warmer, and maneuverable than any other cold weather boot out there. If its just wet and kinda cold, its cycling socks and the goretex socks. At $40 bucks for a pair of goretex socks, they are more than worth the one time cost of trying them out. If you try them, hate them, and want your boots, PM me and Ill buy them back from you.

Seriously stop wasting your money on those fucking ridiculous boots....just get the socks.

#112 mad

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 03:20 PM

I dont understand why people are still wearing boots. They are way expensive, typically have shitty grip, and are a pain in the ass to take off.

I never thought gore-tex socks would cut it, but after purchasing a pair last spring, im totally sold. If its really cold...like sleet coming down, I wear cycling socks with a pair of woolies and then my goretex socks, and I am more comfortable, warmer, and maneuverable than any other cold weather boot out there. If its just wet and kinda cold, its cycling socks and the goretex socks. At $40 bucks for a pair of goretex socks, they are more than worth the one time cost of trying them out. If you try them, hate them, and want your boots, PM me and Ill buy them back from you.

Seriously stop wasting your money on those fucking ridiculous boots....just get the socks.

right, pass that little tip onto the volvo and vendee boys and see how long it takes for them to stop laughing

#113 TPG

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 03:39 PM

Seriously stop wasting your money on those fucking ridiculous boots....just get the socks.


No.
And if your boots are "a pain" to get off then they're too small.

#114 pogen

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 05:23 PM

I'm having a hard time finding either boots or deck shoes in size 14.

Any ideas?

Thanks

David

#115 MarkJames

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Posted 30 October 2008 - 05:25 PM

There have only been a couple of comments on the Sperry Fathom boots in this thread. Are there any other opinions. They are half the price of the Dubarrys, and my local dealer said that during the last round the world race, a bunch of the crew traded in their Dubarrys for Sperrys because the Dubarrys leaked!

I need to send my letter to Santa now, so he gets it in time for Christmas.


if your feet aren't to big Jeantex boots seem a pretty good deal compared the Dubarry's, Musto, HL etc..

#116 3apc

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 02:33 AM

I was going through the motions of looking into boots, and was pretty much resigned to forking out 300 to 400 bucks when I saw Spreaderboots post about the Chota paddling mukluks. I took his advice for two reasons. One is that he's a bowman in the PNW, and no offense guys, but if you're in the cockpit, I don't care how good you think a particular boot is. Two is that they're a little over a hundred bucks. For that alone they're worth a shot. They are just as advertised. Basically knee high dive boots with a pretty decent hard sole. Had 'em out for Smith Island two weeks ago in the cold nasty stuff (37 degrees F and sideways hail) and they were far superior to anything else I've had on my feet to date. Last pair of boots were the Sperry's, before that were the standard West Marine tall boot. I can't compare them to the Dubarry's or the Musto's, but there are two things that make these boots work well. One is that they're tall. You can move around in them a bunch without the cuffs of your foulies riding up too high to keep the water out, which is my beef with the Sperry's. Two is they're completely no-shit waterproof. A couple of near auto-tacks while sitting on the rail and winding up knee deep in water made a believer out of me. Only knock is that they're not as warm as the insulated leather boots are (when dry that is). With good wool socks, though, they are just fine.
Thanks Spreaderboots!


Went to their website, im very interested in the breathable model...very interested

#117 BarePoles

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Posted 31 October 2008 - 03:55 PM

I was going through the motions of looking into boots, and was pretty much resigned to forking out 300 to 400 bucks when I saw Spreaderboots post about the Chota paddling mukluks. I took his advice for two reasons. One is that he's a bowman in the PNW, and no offense guys, but if you're in the cockpit, I don't care how good you think a particular boot is. Two is that they're a little over a hundred bucks. For that alone they're worth a shot. They are just as advertised. Basically knee high dive boots with a pretty decent hard sole. Had 'em out for Smith Island two weeks ago in the cold nasty stuff (37 degrees F and sideways hail) and they were far superior to anything else I've had on my feet to date. Last pair of boots were the Sperry's, before that were the standard West Marine tall boot. I can't compare them to the Dubarry's or the Musto's, but there are two things that make these boots work well. One is that they're tall. You can move around in them a bunch without the cuffs of your foulies riding up too high to keep the water out, which is my beef with the Sperry's. Two is they're completely no-shit waterproof. A couple of near auto-tacks while sitting on the rail and winding up knee deep in water made a believer out of me. Only knock is that they're not as warm as the insulated leather boots are (when dry that is). With good wool socks, though, they are just fine.
Thanks Spreaderboots!


Went to their website, im very interested in the breathable model...very interested


Dido. Seems like a hell of a deal.

#118 Foolish

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 01:59 AM

Santa read my letter and sure enough, I found a pair of Sperry boots under the tree. I've been sailing a few times in the rain and with temperatures just a few degrees above freezing. My feet were dry and warm, even though I just had gym socks on underneath. I've very satisfied.

Andhy

#119 valkyrie322

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 09:54 AM

Harry,

Im rockin the Dubarry Shamrocks for years and they are still going. My bro bought the Slams. They sucked. Leaked first time he wore them going Marblehead to Halifax. He froze his ass off. My wifes store sells the new Helly Welly..developed for the Ericsson Volvo Team. They should be in your price Range. Im going to get a new pair of boots for this season, and I will probably get these myself. Buy em at hellynewengland.com. -Paul B.



Dude, I dig the 'DoulbeHache' but seriously. If you say so?!?

flip-flops, fleece and twentyfive 12/30

#120 Harry Belafonte

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 11:23 PM

Has anyone used ShoeGoo on Dubarries? I just used some to bond on my gaiters(kind of defeats the purpose when the bottoms aren't sealed). It's supposedly waterproof, seems pretty strong so far, I'm just wondering what affect the salt water will have on the stuff. Thanks.

#121 PDG

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Posted 05 February 2009 - 11:57 PM

I was going through the motions of looking into boots, and was pretty much resigned to forking out 300 to 400 bucks when I saw Spreaderboots post about the Chota paddling mukluks. I took his advice for two reasons. One is that he's a bowman in the PNW, and no offense guys, but if you're in the cockpit, I don't care how good you think a particular boot is. Two is that they're a little over a hundred bucks. For that alone they're worth a shot. They are just as advertised. Basically knee high dive boots with a pretty decent hard sole. Had 'em out for Smith Island two weeks ago in the cold nasty stuff (37 degrees F and sideways hail) and they were far superior to anything else I've had on my feet to date. Last pair of boots were the Sperry's, before that were the standard West Marine tall boot. I can't compare them to the Dubarry's or the Musto's, but there are two things that make these boots work well. One is that they're tall. You can move around in them a bunch without the cuffs of your foulies riding up too high to keep the water out, which is my beef with the Sperry's. Two is they're completely no-shit waterproof. A couple of near auto-tacks while sitting on the rail and winding up knee deep in water made a believer out of me. Only knock is that they're not as warm as the insulated leather boots are (when dry that is). With good wool socks, though, they are just fine.
Thanks Spreaderboots!


Went to their website, im very interested in the breathable model...very interested


Dido. Seems like a hell of a deal.


They didn't make the breathables when I bought mine. Look nice, but they can't have my standard mukluks back. 9months later, and I'm still very happy with them. They've been underwater a few times along with the rest of me, and are the driest piece of gear I own. Took to wearing my wool ski socks with them, as they are just about right, warmth wise, and keep my feet from getting to sweaty. Got some heavy wool boot socks in my bag as well, just in case, but it's got to get pretty freakin' cold before I bust those out.

#122 TPG

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Posted 06 February 2009 - 01:43 PM

Huh, forgot about this thread. Might as well update.

3 years on my Shamrocks: they leak somewhere between the sole and leather.
Found this out when I was setting up the bow and was up to my knees in water.
Took the message as "time for new offshore boots"

Got the Fastnets.
These boots are warm. REALLY warm. and really comfy.
Wrap around and over toe is really nice if you're bow/general run around guy.

Full season on my Harken sneakers, once again, Shife was dead on, these kill it for around the buoys.

#123 Your Hero - Ballsey kiwi

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Posted 09 February 2009 - 04:33 PM

Got the Fastnets.
These boots are warm. REALLY warm. and really comfy.


these ones ?

Attached Files



#124 Akaron

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Posted 11 February 2009 - 09:22 PM

Got the Fastnets.
These boots are warm. REALLY warm. and really comfy.


these ones ?



Best. Boots. Ever.

#125 Your Hero - Ballsey kiwi

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 12:58 AM

check out these samoan sea boats

www.havaianas.com.br

#126 duncan (the other one)

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Posted 12 February 2009 - 02:27 AM

I dont understand why people are still wearing boots. They are way expensive, typically have shitty grip, and are a pain in the ass to take off.

I never thought gore-tex socks would cut it, but after purchasing a pair last spring, im totally sold. If its really cold...like sleet coming down, I wear cycling socks with a pair of woolies and then my goretex socks, and I am more comfortable, warmer, and maneuverable than any other cold weather boot out there. If its just wet and kinda cold, its cycling socks and the goretex socks. At $40 bucks for a pair of goretex socks, they are more than worth the one time cost of trying them out. If you try them, hate them, and want your boots, PM me and Ill buy them back from you.

Seriously stop wasting your money on those fucking ridiculous boots....just get the socks.


As a person who rarely wears boots, the main problem I find with shoes/socks is stopping the water shooting up my leg when I'm on the rail or bow (basically anywhere I'm not standing up).

Unless you've got elastic neoprene seals in the ankles of your pants, I find the usual Musto/etc velcro straps just don't seal well enough against clothing or legs.

Fortunately, I don't sail anywhere where it gets really cold, so I can cope with wet feet and soggy thermals on my lower legs..

#127 PDG

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Posted 13 February 2009 - 10:24 PM

Took a pair of foulie pants to a dive shop a while back to see if they had a drysuit bootie that could be glued onto them. Guy working the repair shop said that the diameter of the leg opening was too wide, but that if they were smaller than about 12" he'd do it.

Next pair of bibs/salopettes I buy, I'm going to see if I can get ones with a narrow leg opening, as I think bibs with latex socks that I could wear a pair of deck shoes over (ala drysuit) would be freakin' awesome.

#128 Akaron

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 01:03 AM

Took a pair of foulie pants to a dive shop a while back to see if they had a drysuit bootie that could be glued onto them. Guy working the repair shop said that the diameter of the leg opening was too wide, but that if they were smaller than about 12" he'd do it.

Next pair of bibs/salopettes I buy, I'm going to see if I can get ones with a narrow leg opening, as I think bibs with latex socks that I could wear a pair of deck shoes over (ala drysuit) would be freakin' awesome.


I think you would hate your life if you wore those for more than two days, unless you filled the socks with Tinactin. For inshore it's a brilliant idea though.

#129 USA190520

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 01:24 AM

Took a pair of foulie pants to a dive shop a while back to see if they had a drysuit bootie that could be glued onto them. Guy working the repair shop said that the diameter of the leg opening was too wide, but that if they were smaller than about 12" he'd do it.

Next pair of bibs/salopettes I buy, I'm going to see if I can get ones with a narrow leg opening, as I think bibs with latex socks that I could wear a pair of deck shoes over (ala drysuit) would be freakin' awesome.



henri lloyd shadow sallopettes have a rubber gusset at the bottom of the leg, they'd be perfect for your application

#130 Presuming Ed

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 01:14 PM

Next pair of bibs/salopettes I buy, I'm going to see if I can get ones with a narrow leg opening, as I think bibs with latex socks that I could wear a pair of deck shoes over (ala drysuit) would be freakin' awesome.


Aka waders. Much used by fly fishermen. e.g., from Patagucci:

Posted Image

Which is fine until you fall overboard - it would be much, much more difficult to get back onto the boat with them full off water.

If you want to stop water getting up your legs, have you tried gaiters?

Posted Image

#131 TPG

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 02:25 PM

Aka waders. Much used by fly fishermen. e.g., from Patagucci:


Which increase the chance of drowning.
People are found feet up in the air.

Its really a bad idea unless you plan on wearing your harness/pfd full time.
Even then not being fully sealed (a la drysuit) its still a bad idea.

#132 NAMT

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Posted 14 February 2009 - 08:25 PM

I saw a pic of Sam wearing black boots on the Vendee site two days ago but can't see what type.
Does anyone know what boots Sam wore?

#133 Akaron

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 01:05 AM

I saw a pic of Sam wearing black boots on the Vendee site two days ago but can't see what type.
Does anyone know what boots Sam wore?


probably Le Chameau.

#134 Presuming Ed

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Posted 15 February 2009 - 05:25 PM

I saw a pic of Sam wearing black boots on the Vendee site two days ago but can't see what type.
Does anyone know what boots Sam wore?


Sam's oilskins are Musto; AFAICS her boots look to be Musto as well.

#135 PDG

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 05:11 AM

Aka waders. Much used by fly fishermen. e.g., from Patagucci:


Which increase the chance of drowning.
People are found feet up in the air.

Its really a bad idea unless you plan on wearing your harness/pfd full time.
Even then not being fully sealed (a la drysuit) its still a bad idea.


I have a knife...

#136 PDG

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 05:14 AM

If you want to stop water getting up your legs, have you tried gaiters?


Nope. They work okay? They don't look like much of an improvement to me, but , again, I've not used them.

#137 TornadoCAN99

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Posted 16 February 2009 - 11:04 PM

Used my new HellyWelly's yesterday. Turned out to be light air day, but still on the cool side. Feet nice and comfy. Need to wait for full on wind day to really test 'em out.

Posted Image

#138 bow junkie

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Posted 16 March 2009 - 07:23 PM

anyone out there know if the Henri Lloyd gaiters work well?

#139 blashyrkh

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 08:19 PM

anyone out there know if the Henri Lloyd gaiters work well?



Anyone know where to get them in North America (or, more specifically Canada)?


For my next pair of boots I'm thinking of getting some insulated rubber hunting boots, and if I can find some gaiters to go with them, they'd be just about as good as Le Chameaus and only $100-150... Only problem is that the soles might be dark.

#140 Akaron

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 08:44 PM

anyone out there know if the Henri Lloyd gaiters work well?



Anyone know where to get them in North America (or, more specifically Canada)?


For my next pair of boots I'm thinking of getting some insulated rubber hunting boots, and if I can find some gaiters to go with them, they'd be just about as good as Le Chameaus and only $100-150... Only problem is that the soles might be dark.


I tried to get HL gaiters in Canada. They don't sell them here apparently. If you call HL NA, they might be able to hook you up. I just had a friend buy some in the UK and ship them.

#141 blashyrkh

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Posted 19 March 2009 - 08:55 PM

anyone out there know if the Henri Lloyd gaiters work well?



Anyone know where to get them in North America (or, more specifically Canada)?


For my next pair of boots I'm thinking of getting some insulated rubber hunting boots, and if I can find some gaiters to go with them, they'd be just about as good as Le Chameaus and only $100-150... Only problem is that the soles might be dark.


I tried to get HL gaiters in Canada. They don't sell them here apparently. If you call HL NA, they might be able to hook you up. I just had a friend buy some in the UK and ship them.



That's what I suspected. Haven't had much luck in my dealings with the folks at HL NA, so looks like I'll be talking to my sister in the UK.

#142 T22

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 12:05 AM

Got the Fastnets.
These boots are warm. REALLY warm. and really comfy.


these ones ?




Just got back from London. Happened upon a shop (at the end of the foot bridge by the London Eye) that had EVERY style and (seemingly) size of Dubarry boot and shoe, and well as many more sailing boots and shoes. So nice to get to see and try on what you want. No dealers for Dubarry in Nova Scotia now. Have to mail order. Bummer.

The Fastnets were quite comfortable in the shop, better than the 'regular' Dubarry's, imho.

#143 Christian

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 04:20 AM

Gaiters are available from any decent winter sport equipment store - and most likely at half the price

#144 blashyrkh

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 06:25 PM

Gaiters are available from any decent winter sport equipment store - and most likely at half the price


Yes, winter "snow" gaiters with inelastic bottoms, metal shoelace hooks and instep straps to go around the sole of the boot are available lots of places, but would they work with water on rubber sea boots?

I'm not sure there'd be enough of a seal at the bottom to keep the water out, and you'd have to cut the strap off.

#145 bow junkie

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 07:36 PM

that is why i was asking if the HL gaitors worked, because they are the only ones i have seen for regular sailing boots besides the Le Chameau Neptune ones with built in gaitors that the Volvo guys use

#146 Akaron

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Posted 20 March 2009 - 11:19 PM

Gaiters are available from any decent winter sport equipment store - and most likely at half the price


Besides the above mentioned problems, most winter gaiters are not membrane based water-proof breathable. In salt water they start a processes similar to reverse osmosis, and wick water in.

You can drink this water, but it doesn't keep you very dry.

#147 Christian

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 01:27 AM

Gaiters are available from any decent winter sport equipment store - and most likely at half the price


Yes, winter "snow" gaiters with inelastic bottoms, metal shoelace hooks and instep straps to go around the sole of the boot are available lots of places, but would they work with water on rubber sea boots?

I'm not sure there'd be enough of a seal at the bottom to keep the water out, and you'd have to cut the strap off.



You can get them with elastic neoprene cuffs at the bottom - and drains - remember that you need to drain the bottom of the gaiters or they will fill up with water and gurantee you wet feet...........

Plenty available without hooks and straps (even though the straps would take about 2 seconds to remove)

You don't need gaiters to be membrane based - it is the least of your worries when gaiters are needed - but I am sure there are goretex versions available.

Or buy the marine version and pay 2-3 times as much.................what do i care

i use the Musto offshore boots - with the gaiters built in - works very nicely

#148 blashyrkh

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 10:17 PM

Gaiters are available from any decent winter sport equipment store - and most likely at half the price


Yes, winter "snow" gaiters with inelastic bottoms, metal shoelace hooks and instep straps to go around the sole of the boot are available lots of places, but would they work with water on rubber sea boots?

I'm not sure there'd be enough of a seal at the bottom to keep the water out, and you'd have to cut the strap off.



You can get them with elastic neoprene cuffs at the bottom - and drains - remember that you need to drain the bottom of the gaiters or they will fill up with water and gurantee you wet feet...........

Plenty available without hooks and straps (even though the straps would take about 2 seconds to remove)

You don't need gaiters to be membrane based - it is the least of your worries when gaiters are needed - but I am sure there are goretex versions available.

Or buy the marine version and pay 2-3 times as much.................what do i care

i use the Musto offshore boots - with the gaiters built in - works very nicely



... and they cost about $400.

Do you have any examples of these elastic neoprene cuffed gaiters without hooks and straps? I haven't seen anything like that in our stores in Canada.

#149 Harry Belafonte

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Posted 21 March 2009 - 10:36 PM

Gaiters are available from any decent winter sport equipment store - and most likely at half the price


Yes, winter "snow" gaiters with inelastic bottoms, metal shoelace hooks and instep straps to go around the sole of the boot are available lots of places, but would they work with water on rubber sea boots?

I'm not sure there'd be enough of a seal at the bottom to keep the water out, and you'd have to cut the strap off.



You can get them with elastic neoprene cuffs at the bottom - and drains - remember that you need to drain the bottom of the gaiters or they will fill up with water and gurantee you wet feet...........

Plenty available without hooks and straps (even though the straps would take about 2 seconds to remove)

You don't need gaiters to be membrane based - it is the least of your worries when gaiters are needed - but I am sure there are goretex versions available.

Or buy the marine version and pay 2-3 times as much.................what do i care

i use the Musto offshore boots - with the gaiters built in - works very nicely



... and they cost about $400.

Do you have any examples of these elastic neoprene cuffed gaiters without hooks and straps? I haven't seen anything like that in our stores in Canada.


Contact Dubarry North America and they can hook you up with some of theirs. I got some through them, but I honestly can't remember the price anymore since it was so long ago.

#150 Traci

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Posted 07 April 2009 - 02:04 PM

My Dubarry Fastnets are the BEST things I've worn on an offshore race.. without doubt.. Spent too many hours freezing my pinkies off in those rubbery cheap versions and now appreciate what all the fuss has been about. Worth every cent

#151 Trimmed for speed - - -

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 07:46 PM

Based upon reviews I've found, I'm trying the Chota Lace Mukluks. Price it right at around $115.00

$350 for boots I'd see at three events (Bermuda, Mac, night races) a year is a waste, and, I rather have something out of the ordinary anyway. Dubarry's have become more fashion than form around these parts.

I post back with thoughts upon receipt.

#152 Zac

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 12:54 AM

Based upon reviews I've found, I'm trying the Chota Lace Mukluks. Price it right at around $115.00

$350 for boots I'd see at three events (Bermuda, Mac, night races) a year is a waste, and, I rather have something out of the ordinary anyway. Dubarry's have become more fashion than form around these parts.

I post back with thoughts upon receipt.


I'd agree mostly, after 10+ years on the great lakes I never owned a pair of boots except for some cheap rubber ones ($20). After sailing on the west coast now in some longer, wet, rough races, I finally bought a pair of the dubarry's. So far so good, I think the gaiter is an important point which I don't have but would help and is on my list for next time. Also, the taller fastnets are what I would I choose from now on, I have the newports right now which are fine but on the bow you want all the protection you can get.

The boots help me discover that my foulies now leak after 10 years so had to replace those. So in the end the boots cost way more than expected...

#153 DoRag

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 03:22 AM


Based upon reviews I've found, I'm trying the Chota Lace Mukluks. Price it right at around $115.00

$350 for boots I'd see at three events (Bermuda, Mac, night races) a year is a waste, and, I rather have something out of the ordinary anyway. Dubarry's have become more fashion than form around these parts.

I post back with thoughts upon receipt.


I'd agree mostly, after 10+ years on the great lakes I never owned a pair of boots except for some cheap rubber ones ($20). After sailing on the west coast now in some longer, wet, rough races, I finally bought a pair of the dubarry's. So far so good, I think the gaiter is an important point which I don't have but would help and is on my list for next time. Also, the taller fastnets are what I would I choose from now on, I have the newports right now which are fine but on the bow you want all the protection you can get.

The boots help me discover that my foulies now leak after 10 years so had to replace those. So in the end the boots cost way more than expected...


I think you will enjoy having gaiters.

#154 jlberkeley

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 09:32 PM

Tried on a pair of Dubarry Ultimas. I can see what you guys mean about narrow...do they break in at all?

#155 DoRag

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Posted 25 May 2012 - 10:51 PM

Tried on a pair of Dubarry Ultimas. I can see what you guys mean about narrow...do they break in at all?


I had my Dubarrys stretched by a cobbler and it worked some.

#156 equivocator

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 01:15 PM

About 6 years ago, I found (and bought) a pair of gaiters from HL, with elastic at the bottom, a mesh drain, and weaker elastic at the top, made of WP nylon. Non-breatheable. $40. Only purpose is to keep water from going up the legs of FW pants.

Purchased for Bermuda Race, which proved a light-air affair. Never used.

#157 DoRag

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Posted 26 May 2012 - 04:36 PM

When looking to purchase a set of gaiters you might think about the brands that offer a 'breathable' material.

Much more comfortable and suitable for offshore work.

#158 Trimmed for speed - - -

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 01:37 AM

Chota Mukluks arrived. They're very well made. Seemingly perfect for cold, wet ocean exposure.

I'll post back if there's anything negative post Bermuda, but they seem to be a great boot choice. ! Very comfortable, great fit, good hight, tough quality.

And, River Mouse Kayaks was a great supplier.

#159 Par Avion

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 01:36 PM

You wont' be sorry. super comfortable, warm, and DRY. Oh, the grip is superb too. I can't believe I didn't get these things sooner.

#160 DoRag

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 02:47 PM

Chota Mukluks arrived. They're very well made. Seemingly perfect for cold, wet ocean exposure.

I'll post back if there's anything negative post Bermuda, but they seem to be a great boot choice. ! Very comfortable, great fit, good hight, tough quality.

And, River Mouse Kayaks was a great supplier.


Do you think they are suitable for offshore work?

#161 Trimmed for speed - - -

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Posted 02 June 2012 - 03:17 AM

I do - but since I've only voyaged from the couch to the fridge, and back (several round trips though) I can't say I've field tested yet.

There's a two day regatta this weekend on the lake. 12 to 18 predicted tomorrow with 52 deg water. I'll post some thoughts back.

#162 Trimmed for speed - - -

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 11:08 AM

Well. I gotta say they're very comfotable. Pretty good grip, much better than expected even. But - it wasn't nearly cold enough. Turned out to be a gorgeous day on the water - mid 70's, 14 to 19 kts, puffs to 23. Flat water (west wind).

My feet were hotter than fish-taco at a clam bake.

For the right conditions (cold, bumpy, wet, shitty), I think they'ed be a excellent pair of warm, dry boots.

#163 DoRag

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 04:01 PM

Well. I gotta say they're very comfotable. Pretty good grip, much better than expected even. But - it wasn't nearly cold enough. Turned out to be a gorgeous day on the water - mid 70's, 14 to 19 kts, puffs to 23. Flat water (west wind).

My feet were hotter than fish-taco at a clam bake.

For the right conditions (cold, bumpy, wet, shitty), I think they'ed be a excellent pair of warm, dry boots.


That's good to hear. I need a new set, but the problem with those is that they only come in one color.

#164 stinky

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Posted 03 June 2012 - 08:49 PM


Chota Mukluks arrived. They're very well made. Seemingly perfect for cold, wet ocean exposure.

I'll post back if there's anything negative post Bermuda, but they seem to be a great boot choice. ! Very comfortable, great fit, good hight, tough quality.

And, River Mouse Kayaks was a great supplier.


Do you think they are suitable for offshore work?


yes.

#165 Left Hook

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 04:13 PM

Well. I gotta say they're very comfotable. Pretty good grip, much better than expected even. But - it wasn't nearly cold enough. Turned out to be a gorgeous day on the water - mid 70's, 14 to 19 kts, puffs to 23. Flat water (west wind).

My feet were hotter than fish-taco at a clam bake.

For the right conditions (cold, bumpy, wet, shitty), I think they'ed be a excellent pair of warm, dry boots.


Would that mean that they don't breathe terribly well?

#166 Trimmed for speed - - -

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 05:59 PM

They don't breathe all that well - but in defence, I had on some pretty thick socks since I was expecting much colder conditions. Lesson learned.

I cannot imagine any boot doing well with winter socks on an 80 degree day stuffed inside foul-weather pants.

#167 Merit 25

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 08:41 PM

They don't breathe all that well - but in defence, I had on some pretty thick socks since I was expecting much colder conditions. Lesson learned.

I cannot imagine any boot doing well with winter socks on an 80 degree day stuffed inside foul-weather pants.


No, they don't breath that well. Gotta put the right sock on when its warm out. In the cold, they're great.
Little baby powder helps too. I'll fold down the tops of mine if they start getting warm (when I should be wearing deck shoes). With the Mukluks, you don't need gaitors. That's the trade off. They're a very warm boot, but don't wear them in 65+ degree weather.

#168 DoRag

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 09:17 PM


They don't breathe all that well - but in defence, I had on some pretty thick socks since I was expecting much colder conditions. Lesson learned.

I cannot imagine any boot doing well with winter socks on an 80 degree day stuffed inside foul-weather pants.


No, they don't breath that well. Gotta put the right sock on when its warm out. In the cold, they're great.
Little baby powder helps too. I'll fold down the tops of mine if they start getting warm (when I should be wearing deck shoes). With the Mukluks, you don't need gaitors. That's the trade off. They're a very warm boot, but don't wear them in 65+ degree weather.


Where did you get your gaiters from and much did you pay for them? Are you happy with the gaiters that you bought?

I need a new pair and don't like what I see on the market.

#169 Merit 25

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 12:01 AM

I think your post was for someone else, the mukluks are so tall its virtually imposible to get water in them unless you're standing in 2' of water for an extended period of time. They come up just below the knee and have a neoprene seal at the top.

#170 10er

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Posted 05 June 2012 - 02:38 AM

Well. I gotta say they're very comfotable. Pretty good grip, much better than expected even. But - it wasn't nearly cold enough. Turned out to be a gorgeous day on the water - mid 70's, 14 to 19 kts, puffs to 23. Flat water (west wind).

My feet were hotter than fish-taco at a clam bake.

For the right conditions (cold, bumpy, wet, shitty), I think they'ed be a excellent pair of warm, dry boots.


I bet they were hot! I raced in sandals both days.

#171 Left Hook

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Posted 08 June 2012 - 04:53 PM

Never had a problem with my Dubs being too hot...

justnotsaying...

#172 crashdog

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 08:40 AM

Never had a problem with my Dubs being too hot...

justnotsaying...


i've seen way too many ponces in Dubes on a hot day, judging... (ok it was just one, but now I just avert my eyes)

best shoe on the blue marble is HH, either shorehike (the old design was better) or hellywelly. or maybe an old pair of aigles, just cut out the sides for a stylish sandal in hot weather.

Keeps the chickas away too.

#173 gybe-ho!

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 10:32 AM


Never had a problem with my Dubs being too hot...

justnotsaying...


i've seen way too many ponces in Dubes on a hot day, judging... (ok it was just one, but now I just avert my eyes)

best shoe on the blue marble is HH, either shorehike (the old design was better) or hellywelly. or maybe an old pair of aigles, just cut out the sides for a stylish sandal in hot weather.

Keeps the chickas away too.


I'm pretty happy looking at the shorts/boots combo.

Posted Image

#174 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 01:13 AM

Do we know any good on line or Aus shopping for ocean boots - my Shamrocks have done 20 000+ (last 12 on me) & I'm thinking of going the same again - I don't think I'll be doing any more cat 1 races so I'll get gaitors separate

#175 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 03:51 AM

Tried on a whole load this weekend - HL's the ankles were so big it was like wearing backless & my foot slipped out as I walked - ended up with DB Newports - apparently DB's fit the girls well.

#176 Left Hook

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 03:10 PM

Tried on a whole load this weekend - HL's the ankles were so big it was like wearing backless & my foot slipped out as I walked - ended up with DB Newports - apparently DB's fit the girls well.


That or you have man feet :P :ph34r:

#177 Ozee Adventure

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Posted 16 July 2012 - 06:49 PM


Tried on a whole load this weekend - HL's the ankles were so big it was like wearing backless & my foot slipped out as I walked - ended up with DB Newports - apparently DB's fit the girls well.


That or you have man feet :P :ph34r:

Thanks for that!

#178 Zac

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Posted 17 October 2012 - 10:58 PM


Based upon reviews I've found, I'm trying the Chota Lace Mukluks. Price it right at around $115.00

$350 for boots I'd see at three events (Bermuda, Mac, night races) a year is a waste, and, I rather have something out of the ordinary anyway. Dubarry's have become more fashion than form around these parts.

I post back with thoughts upon receipt.


I'd agree mostly, after 10+ years on the great lakes I never owned a pair of boots except for some cheap rubber ones ($20). After sailing on the west coast now in some longer, wet, rough races, I finally bought a pair of the dubarry's. So far so good, I think the gaiter is an important point which I don't have but would help and is on my list for next time. Also, the taller fastnets are what I would I choose from now on, I have the newports right now which are fine but on the bow you want all the protection you can get.

The boots help me discover that my foulies now leak after 10 years so had to replace those. So in the end the boots cost way more than expected...


Well after wearing with new foulie pants, I realized that the left boot did in fact leak! In just rain, a long day of rain, but still on rain the left boot got soaking inside. So West Marine took them back and gave me a credit for the purchase price.

Question is: Should I get the Dubarry Newports again or go for the Ultimas? Anybody have experience with both?

#179 PDG

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 06:21 PM

I've had my Chota Mukluks for over four years now. Last weekend I discovered that they still do not leak when submerged. In case anyone's interested.

#180 DoRag

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 11:53 PM



Based upon reviews I've found, I'm trying the Chota Lace Mukluks. Price it right at around $115.00

$350 for boots I'd see at three events (Bermuda, Mac, night races) a year is a waste, and, I rather have something out of the ordinary anyway. Dubarry's have become more fashion than form around these parts.

I post back with thoughts upon receipt.


I'd agree mostly, after 10+ years on the great lakes I never owned a pair of boots except for some cheap rubber ones ($20). After sailing on the west coast now in some longer, wet, rough races, I finally bought a pair of the dubarry's. So far so good, I think the gaiter is an important point which I don't have but would help and is on my list for next time. Also, the taller fastnets are what I would I choose from now on, I have the newports right now which are fine but on the bow you want all the protection you can get.

The boots help me discover that my foulies now leak after 10 years so had to replace those. So in the end the boots cost way more than expected...


Well after wearing with new foulie pants, I realized that the left boot did in fact leak! In just rain, a long day of rain, but still on rain the left boot got soaking inside. So West Marine took them back and gave me a credit for the purchase price.

Question is: Should I get the Dubarry Newports again or go for the Ultimas? Anybody have experience with both?


The answer depends on the type of sailing sunglasses you prefer.

#181 FromTheRail

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 02:25 PM

I've used and loved Dubarry Ultima's for years but found I was doing more offshore racing so sold my Dubary's on and bought some Henri Lloyd Extreme Waterproof Boots

They are the warmest things I have even worn on my feet, so much that i've not even had much use of them during our Scottish 'summer' due to them being far to hot. If your looking for a warm and dry boot I can highly recomend these.






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