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Smallest sailboats to cross Atlantic & Pacific?


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#1 TexasSailor

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 06:15 AM

Any of you know what the smallest (shortest?) sailboats have been to:

1) Cross the Atlantic

2) Cross the Pacific

3) Sail around the world


Thanks in advance.

#2 CrazyR

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 06:30 AM

Famous small boats
http://www.microcrui...ssmallboats.htm

#3 TexasSailor

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 06:35 AM

Famous small boats
http://www.microcrui...ssmallboats.htm



Taken from the link above:

"Set adrift near Timor after the famous "Mutiny of the Bounty", Captain Bligh and a crew of 18 loyal men survived a seven-week, 3,600-mile voyage in the cramped boat to reach the island of Timor. Certainly this ranks as one of the great small boat passages of all time."

Anyone notice anything rather bizarre about this statement?




#4 sailSAK

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 07:24 AM

Do you want the smallest sailboat or the smallest bouy with a stick? Somehow these things like "Father's Day" just don't seem like a sailboat.
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Sure you can float with the wind and current, but is that really sailing? People successfully go over Niagara falls in things like that.. Same thing with these people that "row" across the Pacific and such. They never Row against the (trade)winds... To me, anyone that crosses a huge body of water, repeatedly, in anything less than 25 feet or so deserves the utmost respect.

#5 skotawm

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:17 AM

Yrvind

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Quite a lot of good read on Yrvinds pages - check them out!

#6 Heaven can wait

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 09:38 AM

Famous small boats
http://www.microcrui...ssmallboats.htm



Taken from the link above:

"Set adrift near Timor after the famous "Mutiny of the Bounty", Captain Bligh and a crew of 18 loyal men survived a seven-week, 3,600-mile voyage in the cramped boat to reach the island of Timor. Certainly this ranks as one of the great small boat passages of all time."

Anyone notice anything rather bizarre about this statement?





Now lets see, set adrift near Timor......3,600-miles later to reach the Island of Timor....Dooouhh

If only Bligh had looked behind him, he would never had needed to sail around the World. ;)

#7 hoom

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 10:12 AM

Should be 'adrift off Tonga'

#8 skotawm

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 01:35 PM

To drift 100 miles a day is quite good speed - I hope they did it in the rigth direction - wait, they probably didn't...


Famous small boats
http://www.microcrui...ssmallboats.htm



Taken from the link above:

"Set adrift near Timor after the famous "Mutiny of the Bounty", Captain Bligh and a crew of 18 loyal men survived a seven-week, 3,600-mile voyage in the cramped boat to reach the island of Timor. Certainly this ranks as one of the great small boat passages of all time."

Anyone notice anything rather bizarre about this statement?





#9 C. Spackler

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 01:50 PM

This one crossed both the Atlantic and Pacific and held the respective records for a time. It actually sails and is a pretty nice little boat.

Being a true anarchist, his last trip (uncompleted, but safe) was to be around the world with a young woman. But that's another story.

Some would argue that boats after this one became floating barrels.

"Alone Against the Atlantic" by Marlin Bree is a classic read for any sailor. Fantastic book from a more simple time.
http://marlinbree.co...antic_33621.htm

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Ref: Sailing Breezes

#10 'moondance44

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 03:04 PM

I dont think you can beat what Shackelton did for this type of thing
Elephant Island to South Georgia. Cold, Storms, navigation,





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#11 Cassius

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Posted 07 December 2008 - 10:58 PM

Here is one in fiction. In Catch-22, possibly my favorite book of all time but one, Yossarian's room mate Orr, gets shot down off La Spezia, in the Med. sea, escapes in a rubber life raft, and sails round Europe to Sweden using a tiny blue pddle for a rudder.
when the chaplin brings the news to Yossarian, the exchange goes
"Orr? Sweden?"
"Sweden! Orr!"
Sorry if Ive given too much of the story away to you yunguns.

#12 bye bye

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Posted 09 December 2008 - 07:14 PM

That's some catch, that Catch 22.




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