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pond sailor

Member Since 03 Mar 2004
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 11:31 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Coup attempt in Turkey?

17 July 2016 - 05:43 PM

Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote.

  • Widely attributed to Franklin on the Internet, sometimes without the second sentence. It is not found in any of his known writings, and the word "lunch" is not known to have appeared anywhere in English literature until the 1820s, decades after his death. The phrasing itself has a very modern tone and the second sentence especially might not even be as old as the internet. Some of these observations are made in response to a query at Google Answers
     
  • https://en.wikiquote...n#Misattributed

In Topic: Obama's Dallas speach

13 July 2016 - 01:45 AM

 

I thought Battle Hymn of The Republic a rather strange choice given it's origin as a Civil War song......or maybe that's what made it appropriate

 

Oh, I thought they were playing "John Brown's Body."

 

Ya see, ya can learn things around here!


In Topic: Obama's Dallas speach

13 July 2016 - 12:27 AM

I thought Battle Hymn of The Republic a rather strange choice given it's origin as a Civil War song......or maybe that's what made it appropriate

In Topic: About That Robobomb

12 July 2016 - 12:29 AM

Never said it wasn't, I said he was more than a fiction author. 


In Topic: About That Robobomb

12 July 2016 - 12:16 AM

 

 

Isaac Asimov 3 laws of robotics....
 

  • A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
  • A robot must obey the orders given it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
  • A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Laws.
Until of course human is interpreted as humanity by a robot
What, is Asimov the new Moses? No, he's an author. A fiction author.
Those are his opinions that fit nicely into fantasy worlds he invented. Once we eradicate human frailties: hate, lust, etc, perhaps those rules or ones like them may extend from a human rule set that we actually follow, to a set written for machines.
Until then, the BIOS and firmwware within silicon-based sentient beings machines will be written to mimic what we do, according to rules of engagement consistent with those of the sponsors. In the meantime, we might consider starting up an Organic Lives Matter campaign. That gives us at least some time to incorporate all of the world's races and peoples into one, for the purpose of assigning equal and meaningful value.
Dr. King likely had no idea that his work - his very Good work - would someday lead to worldwide intercultural oneness in this way, brought about by the development and advancements to drones and robots. It's a true pity we can't all manage to live his dream simply because it's the right thing to do.

Lighten up, Francis. It was a funny reference.

This clearly violates at least 2 of the 3 laws in the Handbook of Robotics, 56th Edition, 2058 A.D.

 

Thanks 505

 

And he was much more than " a fiction author"

Nonfiction[edit] Popular science[edit]

Collections of Asimov's essays – originally published as monthly columns in the Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction

  1. Fact and Fancy (1962)
  2. View from a Height (1963)
  3. Adding a Dimension (1964)
  4. Of Time and Space and Other Things (1965)
  5. From Earth to Heaven (1966)
  6. Science, Numbers, and I (1968)
  7. The Solar System and Back (1970)
  8. The Stars in their Courses (1971)
  9. The Left Hand of the Electron (1972)
  10. The Tragedy of the Moon (1973)
  11. Asimov On Astronomy (updated version of essays in previous collections) (1974) ISBN 978-0-517-27924-3
  12. Asimov On Chemistry (updated version of essays in previous collections) (1974)
  13. Of Matters Great and Small (1975)
  14. Asimov On Physics (updated version of essays in previous collections) (1976) ISBN 978-0-385-00958-4
  15. The Planet That Wasn't (1976)
  16. Asimov On Numbers (updated version of essays in previous collections) (1976)
  17. Quasar, Quasar, Burning Bright (1977)
  18. The Road to Infinity (1979)
  19. The Sun Shines Bright (1981)
  20. Counting the Eons (1983)
  21. X Stands for Unknown (1984)
  22. The Subatomic Monster (1985)
  23. Far as Human Eye Could See (1987)
  24. The Relativity of Wrong (1988)
  25. Beginnings: The Story of Origins (1989)
  26. Asimov On Science: A 30 Year Retrospective 1959–1989 (features the first essay in the introduction) (1989)
  27. Out of the Everywhere (1990)
  28. The Secret of the Universe (1991)

Other science books by Asimov