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teknologika

Member Since 23 May 2007
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 10:18 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: What will win the cup top speed or manoeuvrability??

20 March 2017 - 06:54 AM

In my humble opinion, they are generally one in the same when it comes to foiling boats. The difference is being able to foil tack vs not will make a dramatic difference in the amount of time it takes to cover the racecourse distance. So in essence better manoeuvreability gives you a faster "corner" bottom end and exit speed and you are faster over all.

If you question refers to 'maximum' speed, I would also say no, unless you are talking about VMG, as most race boats rarely sail in a mode trying to get maximum straight line speed upwind or down within a race. ( The start line drag race being one notable exception in the AC courses. )

In summary, fastest average speed will win the cup, but manuvers are a key factor in determining what your average speed is.

In Topic: Team NZ

14 March 2017 - 11:45 AM

A lot of the ETNZ guys are young guys who haven't sailed in an AC before, so having them in Auckland means they're not going to feel awestruck by the event itself, or the other teams. Once they get to Bermuda, they can then switch focus to racing.


This is a total non issue, the "new guys" are multiple Olympic medalists who have already been racing against their AC competitors for years. The only difference is the price of their toys and the amount of resources they have to develop and train with.
you all forget that helming these cats is not " seat of the pants" sailing like a. 49er. These boats sail you!... the technology is measuring everything and you are sailing to the settings, target, and numbers on tbe dashboard.
There is target numbers for everything and the skipper never looks at anything accept the numbers. The tactician/ mainsheet does the numbers trimming and has all tactical options on the tablet.
These boats are heads down machines and not heads up ... accept for wind pressure and angle visuals up the course.

No. I am not forgetting that. The original point was that they would be "awestruck". Pete has been sailing AC45s for 4 years now (since the youth americas cup last time around). They haven't just been doing the Olympics, they are very familiar with the AC circus.

In Topic: Team NZ

13 March 2017 - 08:17 PM

A lot of the ETNZ guys are young guys who haven't sailed in an AC before, so having them in Auckland means they're not going to feel awestruck by the event itself, or the other teams. Once they get to Bermuda, they can then switch focus to racing.


This is a total non issue, the "new guys" are multiple Olympic medalists who have already been racing against their AC competitors for years. The only difference is the price of their toys and the amount of resources they have to develop and train with.

In Topic: Waszp vs. Moth

08 February 2017 - 07:48 AM

Waszp is still at least 2 years ahead of any of the potential opposition, with several hundred boats in the hands of owners and in many countries. So far none of the newer designs have started to deliver boats.

So what? World sailing could be made to look rather stupid choosing a youth design at the moment based on the fact one has delivered more boats to date. It would only be a relevant factor if the boats delivered were in the hands of youths, which there is little evidence of. Instead, WS should and I am sure will look at all the alternatives. The UFO seems to me to be far more suited to being a youth boat than the Waszp which is effectively a detuned Moth, even with the smaller rig option. The UFO is $3000 cheaper, it appears more robust, easier to learn on and about the same speed. It is being built by a family who have rather a good track record of scaling up to meet demand, so that isn't an issue.
 
The reality is that the lead that the Waszp has is worth no more than a few months.

+1 and nothing a ramped up manufacturer couldn't overtake.

In Topic: Waszp vs. Moth

03 February 2017 - 06:42 AM

Stepping away from intent of classes, (one design, one commercial owner vs open, multi supplier development class), to someone who has never sailed a moth, and is starting at the bottom of the learning curve both boats are, in essence, the same. 11 feet long, narrow skiffs. So the stability and manuverability are, in percentage terms very similar.

Waszp is a lot heavier. Stays hurt when you run into them so removing them is a good choice if you don't care about absolute performance.

If you compare the Waszp to the UFO you will get much bigger differences.

I would try both before you buy either, and don't rely on an Internet forum to make your buying choice if you are considering buying one.

If you are trolling and trying to start a flame war, please don't.