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seadraggin

Member Since 16 Nov 2007
Offline Last Active Jul 27 2011 07:43 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Capsize!

20 July 2011 - 03:04 PM



wingnut may have not been ideal for a mac, but to exclude them you would need to exclude all the multi's also. :unsure:

I don't want to exclude anyone, but is it reasonable to expect a crew like SOCIABLE's to risk their own lives because a boat was not adequately prepared or suitable for the race? It's one thing to risk one's own life, but another thing to risk ten others......

Do read what you post before putting it out there?

Any vessel that went to the aid of Wingnut's crew did so voluntarily, they assessed their skills and the conditions and determined that they could be of assistance.  Wingnut's crew did not "risk" ten other lives.

Of course I read it, and yes SOCIABLE did risk their lives - it is the first rule of the sea to come to the aid of a distressed sailor. This rule imposes upon us all a responsibility to one another. I am in no way suggesting that WINGNUTS intentionally risked anyone's life, but as it turns out, that is exactly what happened.

In Topic: Capsize!

20 July 2011 - 02:49 PM

wingnut may have not been ideal for a mac, but to exclude them you would need to exclude all the multi's also. :unsure:

I don't want to exclude anyone, but is it reasonable to expect a crew like SOCIABLE's to risk their own lives because a boat was not adequately prepared or suitable for the race? It's one thing to risk one's own life, but another thing to risk ten others......

In Topic: Capsize!

20 July 2011 - 01:41 PM

The displacement on the KIWI 35 is 2800lbs. An 8-man crew (at 175lbs ea) weighs 1400 or about HALF of this boats displacement - even more when considering gear, food, and water @ 8lbs a gallon)! The boat was 'customized' with an extended boom, a large roach main, and a 12' bowsprit - I wonder if that was ENOUGH added power? The draft is listed as 2-7 ft. - is a retractable keel suitable for OFFSHORE sailing? The boat had no engine - it was equipped with only an outboard motor (6-7hp, and was presumably stowed below at the time of the incident); when sails were taken down any means of steerage or control was compromised - wouldn't STORM SAILS be advised on this vessel in these circumstances? The beam (without the wings) was about 8ft. - there is very little room for a Nav Station and appropriate offshore equipment, and no room at all to shelter the crew! An experienced 16 year old can be an excellent sailor, but SIXTEEN is legally still a minor, and 16yr olds just don't have a wealth of offshore experience - did his parents exercise due diligence? (He was undoubtedly safe with this crew, but was he safe on THIS BOAT?). Should experienced sailors be allowed to race 'at their own risk' ? How 'experienced' do they need to be? (85 qualifying races? - what does that mean, does rail meast qualify? The boat was sailing in 300-400ft. of water - deep water weather is vastly different from the 30-40ft depths encountered during a buoy race; when that boat flipped, it flipped violently. PFD's and harnesses should be worn at ALL times, but very few of us actually wear them; kudos to this skipper for making sure - HE saved six lives. The simple fact is that these people were not adequately prepared for what they encountered - we all can benefit from the lessons learned, and I ask you all to stop with this bullshit and generate some dicussion on how we might adequately prepare ourselves.