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Major Tom

Member Since 05 Jun 2008
Offline Last Active Today, 05:31 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: 420 vs 505 for beginner

Yesterday, 08:34 PM

Having a boat with sails that don't go to the top of the rig is simply asking for trouble if you capsize. The mast gets stuck in the mud easier and is more likely to break.
There is no active 505 fleet in Cape Town, and there never has been. Most of them are in Gauteng where the wind is a lot lighter.
Current peak wind speed as we speak is just shy of 30 knots at my lake.

Screw the prebend this isn't race day, and so what if the mast gets stuck with or without the sail on it. If you don't know the technique of getting the mast unstuck your in trouble either way. I call it all bullshit. He's just startin out guys. He will have much less of a chance capsizing with a smaller sailplan. He will learn many of the Idiosyncrasies of the boat. Then after building confidence on light air days try out the 5 oh sails until he gets up to speed on it. And so what if there is no 5 oh fleet in capetown. He asked about the 5 oh and the 420, not racing one design.
 

Go with the 5 oh and start out with the 420 sails on it. You don't have to use all the control lines on the boat just cause they are there. Its more roomy than the 420 and once you get used to it, you can power it up with the 5 oh sails etc.

thats an awful idea. dinghy masts carry a whole lot more prebend relative to the height of the mast than keelboats, and short hoist is just going to cause hell to the sailshape with the different luff curves. At best it wont be efficient or fast, at worst it'll make it harder to learn how to make sails do you what you need them to do or even create more drag/power than forward moment...
I rest my case on posters posting crap simply because they have access to a keyboard that is connected to the internet.

In Topic: 420 vs 505 for beginner

Yesterday, 07:58 PM

Ever tried holding a 7m mast upright in 30 knots with a mast float attached at the head. No? I didn't think so.
Those thing are designed for novices to use in light wind, not in our normal local conditions.

In Topic: 420 vs 505 for beginner

Yesterday, 02:35 PM

Having a boat with sails that don't go to the top of the rig is simply asking for trouble if you capsize. The mast gets stuck in the mud easier and is more likely to break.
There is no active 505 fleet in Cape Town, and there never has been. Most of them are in Gauteng where the wind is a lot lighter.
Current peak wind speed as we speak is just shy of 30 knots at my lake.

In Topic: 420 vs 505 for beginner

23 March 2017 - 06:51 PM

One thing that never ceases to amaze me on SA, is the enthusiasm of posters who are totally clueless to the weather conditions, local classes sailed and the OPs total lack of sailing experience. The 505 is 100% definitely not the correct boat to learn to sail on in Cape Town, most of the posters on this forum would not be capable of getting a boat around a course in a normal summer south easter. 30 to 40 knots is fairly common during most of the sailing season.
I would go with Gouv's suggestion to start with and then maybe try a Sonnet, 160kg is slightly on the high side weight wise, but it will still be fun to sail in a breeze, the fastest I have been with that weight on board is over 24 knots in 29 knots of breeze! It is also extremely stable compared to most other boats.

In Topic: 420 vs 505 for beginner

21 March 2017 - 07:26 PM

You are from Cape Town, watch the footage of the start of the Caoe Town cycle race, if a bicycle blows away you are not going anywhere on a 505.
Your weight and combined weight do count against you, but it makes since you start off with something that won't punish you all the time.