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n00b

Member Since 23 Nov 2008
Offline Last Active May 16 2016 05:33 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Olson 30

10 December 2015 - 08:21 PM

 

Almost every racing Olson that I am familiar with had jockstraps and BOD installed, including mine. While the boat advert looks very nice and clearly the current owner has done a nice job with the boat, the BOD especially looks like a good design, the asking price for a 35-year old balsa-cored boat even in mint condition is not in the normal ballpark for well-maintained Santa Cruz ULDBs. You could get a well-maintained Moore 24, SC27 or Olson 30 with trailer all for around 10-15k. You can get a racing Melges 24 for 25k. Consider that *as a class* the Olson 30 was always an experimental class with a fairly loose set of One Design rules, and isn't fielding the fleets it was back in the mid-90s, so isn't going to yield stellar, level racing. When I owned my boat, all the boats were different in subtle ways and fielding the crew of 8 required to be competitive was prohibitive to the fun factor.

 

More modern boats, like *cough* the venerable and now 20-year old Melges 24 design, can basically outsail the Olson 30 in almost all conditions (except under 6 knots of breeze) and points of sail. Plus they are vastly easier to maintain, vastly more trailerable, have significantly larger upside for One Design sailing, and are much more fun to sail. Only problem with the Melges 24 is you can't sleep on it, so if you are getting the Olson 30 as an overnight racer, cool. It IS a great Hawaii boat!

 

 A well sailed O30 with the rail meat with enough wind to use a #3, about 18knts, is much much faster upwind than a M24 unless the water is unusually flat, perhaps, like in a river or something.  Light sport boats just don't do that well at all, no knock against the Melges. Waves and the lack of ability to shorten sail are the reasons.

 

 

 

We always carried the #1 upwind to 18 knots true, it pointed better and was far faster than running the #3.

 

And I completely agree that on the upwind leg, in 18 true, the Olson will be a little faster than a Melges 24. But. Once you round the top mark, the Melges will be completely gone, while the Olson might only be just barely surfing. It takes a great crew, a great driver, and 20+ to get the Olson lifting out of the water a bit downwind. Hell, this is true even for the Mumm/Farr 30, a much quicker design. The Melges is far more stable, far easier to gybe, and far quicker on any off-wind point of sail and will win when you consider both up and downwind.

 

Also, the Melges is set up for very-easy-on-the-water rig adjustment. If the wind is up to 18, it is very easy to depower the boat with a little rig, some backstay, that beautiful and bendy carbon stick, and sail the boat to its full potential. The Olson has a postage-stamp main and was always harder to balance out when changing jibs, because its a jib-driven boat like all Santa Cruz ULDBs. They are just different animals.

 

Many of the Seattle-area ex-Olson owners are currently in Melges 24s. It's not a fluke.


In Topic: Olson 30

09 December 2015 - 08:27 PM

Almost every racing Olson that I am familiar with had jockstraps and BOD installed, including mine. While the boat advert looks very nice and clearly the current owner has done a nice job with the boat, the BOD especially looks like a good design, the asking price for a 35-year old balsa-cored boat even in mint condition is not in the normal ballpark for well-maintained Santa Cruz ULDBs. You could get a well-maintained Moore 24, SC27 or Olson 30 with trailer all for around 10-15k. You can get a racing Melges 24 for 25k. Consider that *as a class* the Olson 30 was always an experimental class with a fairly loose set of One Design rules, and isn't fielding the fleets it was back in the mid-90s, so isn't going to yield stellar, level racing. When I owned my boat, all the boats were different in subtle ways and fielding the crew of 8 required to be competitive was prohibitive to the fun factor.

 

More modern boats, like *cough* the venerable and now 20-year old Melges 24 design, can basically outsail the Olson 30 in almost all conditions (except under 6 knots of breeze) and points of sail. Plus they are vastly easier to maintain, vastly more trailerable, have significantly larger upside for One Design sailing, and are much more fun to sail. Only problem with the Melges 24 is you can't sleep on it, so if you are getting the Olson 30 as an overnight racer, cool. It IS a great Hawaii boat!


In Topic: Round The County 2015

08 September 2015 - 04:22 AM

Round the County is always a great time and a great sail.