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Stoney01

Member Since 23 Jul 2010
Offline Last Active Aug 26 2010 06:18 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Lucky to be alive...

26 July 2010 - 12:19 PM

Some really crazy talk on auto release tethers, have you ever seen auto inflate life jackets go off inadvertently???

I much rather face the decision on how to "manually" release a tether than have it release without warning. Approved protection equipment, must also have a double lock mechanism to comply with at least European standards.

This was a very unfortunate series of events (....aren't they all!!!) and the length on the tether or jackstay configuration is obviously worth looking into.

As for anyone thinking it couldn't happen to me.....I managed to obtain some statistical data as part of research into UK MOB incidents:

In the last 10 years (2000-09) there were 1977 lifeboat launches* in relation to MOB incidents, 698 persons rescued and 142 lives recorded as lost. Power or sail pleasure craft accounted for 1024 of these launches and 433 persons rescued. In 2009 for power and sail pleasure it was 136 launches and 62 rescued.

*maybe more than one launch recorded per event


In Topic: Lucky to be alive...

25 July 2010 - 03:24 PM

What an amazing story of both survival and seamanship, I had picked up on the initial news but to hear the full story is just something else! It's also a great testament to the dedication of our rescue services.


My wife expressed lots of concerns when we were sailing together regarding MOB's with her major concern being how to attach a line if the person in the water was incapacitated. The RYA training, usually in ideal situations is great for learning the basics but this just demonstrates that conditions are not always ideal and how the crew needed to be prepared for all such emergencies. Most of the MOB devices I found were variations on passing/throwing a line to the casualty, not that great if you are unable to grab or hold onto the line. It was following these concerns that I invented a multiple award winning device to quickly attach a line to a person (onto a strap, harness or belt). The reason for this was once the person is secured by a line you can buy time to summon help or sort out a suitable method to help them out of the water. I was also conscious that if it was just for MOB purposes then either it may not be at hand when you needed it or the person needing to use it was not familiar or competent with using it. So I designed it (Talon) as a multipurpose rescue & mooring device that could be used for a whole lot of other functions, such as picking up a mooring cleat or buoy.

I was searching for some real life MOB experiences to assess how well my invention could have assisted, which is why I found this truly amazing story. It may not have helped in this particular situation but it would certainly help in many others. Drop me a line if you need any info.

Well done to all involved, one lucky lady has a lot of beers to buy, if she has not done so already!



Here is a pic of the Talon for reference

In Topic: Lucky to be alive...

23 July 2010 - 05:21 PM

What an amazing story of both survival and seamanship, I had picked up on the initial news but to hear the full story is just something else! It's also a great testament to the dedication of our rescue services.

Incidentally, if it wasn't for some bust ribs I would also have been on the way back from Cork week myself in another Reflex 38.

My wife expressed lots of concerns when we were sailing together regarding MOB's with her major concern being how to attach a line if the person in the water was incapacitated. The RYA training, usually in ideal situations is great for learning the basics but this just demonstrates that conditions are not always ideal and how the crew needed to be prepared for all such emergencies. Most of the MOB devices I found were variations on passing/throwing a line to the casualty, not that great if you are unable to grab or hold onto the line. It was following these concerns that I invented a multiple award winning device to quickly attach a line to a person (onto a strap, harness or belt). The reason for this was once the person is secured by a line you can buy time to summon help or sort out a suitable method to help them out of the water. I was also conscious that if it was just for MOB purposes then either it may not be at hand when you needed it or the person needing to use it was not familiar or competent with using it. So I designed it (Talon) as a multipurpose rescue & mooring device that could be used for a whole lot of other functions, such as picking up a mooring cleat or buoy.

I was searching for some real life MOB experiences to assess how well my invention could have assisted, which is why I found this truly amazing story. It may not have helped in this particular situation but it would certainly help in many others. Drop me a line if you need any info.

Well done to all involved, one lucky lady has a lot of beers to buy, if she has not done so already!