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Jackett

Member Since 27 Mar 2011
Offline Last Active Today, 04:49 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Something different for CA

16 March 2017 - 07:55 PM

 

 

@Happy feat

 

I think that it also depends of the juridiction. In the UK when you refurbish an old building you can go to "building control" where there will often have microfiched structural drawings that you can consult. Nevertheless you aren't allowed to make a copy of the drawings without authorisation from the original designer. And if the original designer went bust, that's no excuse for not obtaining permission. On one hand it can be a PITA to have to spend several hours writing down what you see on the drawings but it is also nice to know that your hard work is protected.

 

Given I work as a civil and structural engineer in teh UK, I can confidently state that nothin in teh above response is correct. There is no UK 'building control' which holds structural drawings for all buildings. If you're lucky the owner of the building may have some drawings, but probably not. Some councils have a central depository of drawings of buildings they own, but again its hit and miss what they have and whats been lost.

 

If someone does have drawings, they are invariably the property of the owner of that building, to do with as they please. As standard in UK (and every other part of the world I've worked in) for building and structural design contracts the finished design becomes wholly the property of the client.

 

 

They archive old submissions of structural calculations for building controls (https://www.istructe...ing-Control.pdf - guidance from Istructr-E on this). Some of these include detailed drawings, especially older ones, I once found some gems really neatly drawn by hand. If you ask nicely, they will let you access the drawings, I've never managed to make a copy though. In most places where I have worked, there was a disclaimer at the bottom of the drawings saying no copying without permission otherwise copyright infringement.

 

At least this is how it was working in the late noughties when I was there.

 

 

You were very lucky in the local authorities you dealt with. Very few (and none I've yet worked with) archive anything beyond the statutory minimum time. And what they do have rarely includes full structural drawings - as you'll see from the IStructE guidance this level of detail doesn't need to be provided for building regs approval - depending on the complexity of the building, you can get away with a few pages of calculations and some hand sketches. You just need to provide sufficient information to prove sufficiency of design.

 

But the lack of copying is nothing to do with authority from the designer, as the IP doesn't belong to them. You need the permission of the owner of the building at that time. If you have that, they'll happily provide you with copies (at a cost, of course)


In Topic: Something different for CA

15 March 2017 - 12:18 PM

@Happy feat

 

I think that it also depends of the juridiction. In the UK when you refurbish an old building you can go to "building control" where there will often have microfiched structural drawings that you can consult. Nevertheless you aren't allowed to make a copy of the drawings without authorisation from the original designer. And if the original designer went bust, that's no excuse for not obtaining permission. On one hand it can be a PITA to have to spend several hours writing down what you see on the drawings but it is also nice to know that your hard work is protected.

 

Given I work as a civil and structural engineer in teh UK, I can confidently state that nothin in teh above response is correct. There is no UK 'building control' which holds structural drawings for all buildings. If you're lucky the owner of the building may have some drawings, but probably not. Some councils have a central depository of drawings of buildings they own, but again its hit and miss what they have and whats been lost.

 

If someone does have drawings, they are invariably the property of the owner of that building, to do with as they please. As standard in UK (and every other part of the world I've worked in) for building and structural design contracts the finished design becomes wholly the property of the client.


In Topic: foil assisted cruiser

10 February 2017 - 02:31 PM

What a bunch of negative comments, on a forum claiming 'anarchy' and where you all moan about average white blobs and all boats looking

the same . . .

 

Trunk cutting through the accommodation - its a 56 foot yacht with relatively high freeboard, so I'll image it will be below the sole.

 

Rattling in its trunk at anchor? Modern roller systems are pretty good at stopping that. And when not in use it fully retracts into the case - so its not being pushed around by the watter, so what's causing it to move around and rattle?

 

Uncomfortable motion? Well any lightweight, fast boat isn't exactly comfortable. But the DSS allows a narrower waterline as you're less reliant on form stability, which should help, plus the fin may act as a good damper. Certainly the reviews of DSS in Yachting World etc. all seem to comment on the DSS improving comfort. Anyway, I thought the consensus here is that most people are wimps who just sail from marina to marina in nice weather, so who cares about comfort in rough seas?

 

No, I've nothing to do with the company, never sailed a DSS equipped boat and it may well be a rubbish boat. But based on what experienced sailors who've sailed DSS equiped boats have to say maybe this is something to keep an eye on, maybe even raise a modicum of excitement?


In Topic: My newest project

18 January 2017 - 10:54 PM

I posted that last post around 1:30 am this morning. I went back to bed and thought, "Maybe the interior drawing for LOON is lost and that's why you never see it." But I found it in the tube with the other drawings this morning. It's nothing special but I will get it scanned and posted. Maybe not today. But early next week for sure. I am also looking for the drawings of the WHITE WING 36'er. This is one of my sweetest sailing designs and it is the first time I used a pipe frame sprit 38 years ago!

 

Bob,

 

Sorry, I've been separated from my computer for a while and only just checking back in. Did you get a chance to scan the accommodation drawing for Loon?

 

I got the 'Bluewaters Cruisers' book in my Christmas stocking after you mentioned it here. Some very nice designs of yours I'd not seen before. You're just going to have to do another book, to include all those drawings you didn't fit into the first!


In Topic: My newest project

23 December 2016 - 09:30 AM

Steve:

I thought of you yesterday when I saw that lead.

Here you go.

LOON%20construct_zpsaapxcvbt.jpg

 

I looked at those designs from Mellgren and he has about every rudder style covered including partial skegs, full shegs, barn doors and even one that looks exactly like a C&C scimitar profile and he did that in 1903! In fact he takes several  whacks at the scimitar shape. He really knew what was going with reducing the root chord. I had never heard of the guy until this morning. He is in the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF YACHT DESIGNERS.

 

While there is thread drift about Loon, do you have an accommodation plan handy? I've admired photos of Loon for years, as well as the drawings you've posted here, but don't think I've ever seen anything hinting at how the interior is arranged. Until seeing this construction plan I'd not realised the engine was so far forwards so now even more intrigued regarding the interior.