Jump to content


Beachcomber

Member Since 05 Nov 2011
Offline Last Active May 26 2016 02:07 AM
-----

Posts I've Made

In Topic: what is it?

26 August 2015 - 11:38 AM

...yet another worthless sportboat. I don't understand why people attach fixed ballast to dry-sailed boats that are raced around the cans.  If you want to sail a dinghy, sail a dinghy.  And if people start fitting sportboats with canting keels and hydraulic systems and engines to drive them, I will just shake my head in dismay...


In Topic: Hydroptere Set Off Today for an LA to Honolulu Record Attempt

02 July 2015 - 12:51 AM


The hydroptere is a complete failure. It has proven nothing in 30 years and has been beaten by many boats in only 5 or 10 years. It's a dead end.

 

 

Hydroptere held the Nautical Mile absolute record for 5 years, and the 500 m record for less. That's pretty impressive for a boat that's capable of sailing (on both tacks!) across an ocean. 

 

https://en.wikipedia..._sailing_record


In Topic: Team Vestas Wind getting some flak in Danish newspaper

19 June 2015 - 04:32 AM

 

 

Difference in editorial tone for TVW was the fact that a) no one died, B) there was an immediate mea culpa, c) there was almost constant  comms and transparency, and d) a detailed investigation and report came quite quickly from people known for trustworthiness and credibility. 
 
None of the crew even considered leaving because all agreed that the right guy got the blame; young Tom took off with Nico's blessing because he got a sweet offer from Oracle and Wouter got the boot.
 
Nico's crew are very loyal, and they like and trust him implicitly from what I have seen.  You won't see any of them turn down a ride on the blue boat if it materialized for 2016.

I fear that the most important safety lesson here hasn't been learned: that the most important decisions cannot be delegated to one person.  In the world of aeronautical engineering, peer review is one of the most important ways we avoid making mistakes.  And similar practices are followed in the cockpits of commercial aviation.
 

And that worked out really well for the passengers onboard the German wings flight.

 

You're only confirming my point of the importance of peer review.  And it's why the FAA in the US requires a member of the cabin crew to be in the cockpit when one pilot is out of it.


In Topic: Team Vestas Wind getting some flak in Danish newspaper

18 June 2015 - 02:02 AM

Difference in editorial tone for TVW was the fact that a) no one died, B) there was an immediate mea culpa, c) there was almost constant  comms and transparency, and d) a detailed investigation and report came quite quickly from people known for trustworthiness and credibility. 

 

None of the crew even considered leaving because all agreed that the right guy got the blame; young Tom took off with Nico's blessing because he got a sweet offer from Oracle and Wouter got the boot.

 

Nico's crew are very loyal, and they like and trust him implicitly from what I have seen.  You won't see any of them turn down a ride on the blue boat if it materialized for 2016.

I fear that the most important safety lesson here hasn't been learned: that the most important decisions cannot be delegated to one person.  In the world of aeronautical engineering, peer review is one of the most important ways we avoid making mistakes.  And similar practices are followed in the cockpits of commercial aviation.

 

It's telling that it was Ian Walker who showed how the reef didn't show up on the zoomed out map.  And I'm pretty sure he said "we [meaning himself and Si Fi] checked it out and marked it as a no go area".


In Topic: VOR Lisbon 2015

10 June 2015 - 03:01 AM

Please read RRS 18.1. The finish was a clear Port Starboard  situation. SCA was forced to alter course and possibly gybe back to port  to avoid TVW. TVW had gybed to Stbd, but couldn't make the mark staying on Stbd and the boom clearly crossed back onto port tack as they tried to cross the line. The mark and finish are irrelevant. 

Wrong, sir.  The mark is completely relevant, which is presumably why you cited Rule 18.  Here it is, with my comments in bold:

 

18         MARK-ROOM
18.1      When Rule 18 Applies
Rule  18  applies  between  boats  when  they  are  required  to  leave  a mark on  the  same  side  and  at  least  one  of  them  is  in  the zone. <Check, this is the case>

However, it does not apply
(a)     between boats on opposite tacks on a beat to windward, <Not on a beat>
(B)     between boats on opposite tacks when the proper course at the mark for one but not both of them is to tack, <neither boat needs to tack>
©     between a boat approaching a mark and one leaving it, or <neither boat leaving the mark>
(d)     if  the mark is  a  continuing obstruction,  in  which  case  rule  19 applies. <Not a continuing obstruction>

 

The bottom line is, you can't call starboard if you're going downwind within 3 lengths of any mark, including a finish mark.