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Dude

Member Since 26 Dec 2003
Offline Last Active Mar 11 2017 03:18 PM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: zero the hero

03 February 2017 - 07:57 PM

 

I am a group 3 because of my business.  I am classed in the same group as Jimmy Spithill.  Really?  This pretty much knocks me out of crewing on any amateur only event.  I am talking about going sailing and not getting paid.  Disqualified. 

 

I think it should be performance based, and the rules should account for those who are paid a daily rate to sail vs. those (me) who work on boats, race boats, occasionally coach crews, etc.  I think it could be a simple % of income.  If you get say 80% of your income to SAIL (not sand, sew, splice, etc) then you are a 3.  If you work in the industry, you could be a 2.  That way each class can set rules on how many pros, Minor leaguers, and amateurs can race.  If I built Bats and Gloves and was a batting coach for a local farm team I should not be classed the same as A Rod. 

 

I thought merely working for a company didn't put you in group 3. However, the coach part would even if it is occasionally.

 

 

I don't think this answers the OP questions. But this has been my concern with todays World Sailings definition of "Pro Sailor". I sell racing sailboats therefore I am a Cat 3 pro. I also sell Sport fisher power boats and do not know how to bait a hook. Under this example I am also a pro fisherman. This is why I feel the local fleets should define and determine the pro status. 


In Topic: zero the hero

03 February 2017 - 07:40 PM

 

Of the questions asked:

1. What can or should be done about people who lie about being paid to race when they register with ISAF Sailor.

2 The owners who falsely register sailors they pay as Group 1 sailors?

3. What are the flaws in the system?

4. Would there be a better system and if so what would it be?

 

I feel strong class rules have come the closest to answering most of these questions.

 

The definition of a professional sailor should be defined clearly in the class rules, rather than differing to an outside authority.

 

An owner driver rule along with a crew participation rule during fleet or championship regattas might solve many of these questions. For the major regattas the owner would submit his crew list, for example the crew would have had to sailed in four regattas that season to participate in the major events. Should the owner need to fill an open spot they would petition the class board to allow the perspective crew members. 

 

This concept will increase participation throughout the sailing season by allowing the lower skilled crew members to participate in the major events and keep owners from stacking their crew. Which I feel is the flaw in the system.

 

​It still comes down to getting involved with your local fleets be it one-design, handicapped racing or volunteering for race management. 

How do class rules help PHRF, ORC, etc?  Not everyone being paid to sail (to win) is sailing OD...

 

 

I consider PHRF, ORC, and ORR a class that can be governed by their local and district boards.


In Topic: zero the hero

03 February 2017 - 04:28 PM

Of the questions asked:

1. What can or should be done about people who lie about being paid to race when they register with ISAF Sailor.

2 The owners who falsely register sailors they pay as Group 1 sailors?

3. What are the flaws in the system?

4. Would there be a better system and if so what would it be?

 

I feel strong class rules have come the closest to answering most of these questions.

 

The definition of a professional sailor should be defined clearly in the class rules, rather than differing to an outside authority.

 

An owner driver rule along with a crew participation rule during fleet or championship regattas might solve many of these questions. For the major regattas the owner would submit his crew list, for example the crew would have had to sailed in four regattas that season to participate in the major events. Should the owner need to fill an open spot they would petition the class board to allow the perspective crew members. 

 

This concept will increase participation throughout the sailing season by allowing the lower skilled crew members to participate in the major events and keep owners from stacking their crew. Which I feel is the flaw in the system.

 

​It still comes down to getting involved with your local fleets be it one-design, handicapped racing or volunteering for race management. 


In Topic: Marine Surveryor

20 December 2016 - 03:20 PM

 

Your description of a "buyers surveyor" just makes me shake my head in disbelief. All the best surveyors only have one way of inspecting a vessel and that is from stem to stern, providing you with the ships specifications then listing their findings and recommendations.

 

Should you wish to nickel and dime the seller after inspections will be up to you and how much you want the boat.

 

Best wishes.

 

A buyers survey and a "stem to stern" survey are the same thing and what the OP is looking for.  The other type of survey is a limited survey often used for an insurance claim if damage has occurred.  Most (maybe all) boat insurance companies will require a recent complete buyers survey if you plan on buying a boat and having it insured.  A buyers survey can also be very useful for things other than to "nickel and dime" the seller, for instance uncovering big cost items which may not be apparent to either the seller or buyer who are both emotionally involved in the transaction.  Buying a boat without a survey has the potential to be like dating a super hot girl who seemed so normal at first but after a while and when it's too late you realize she's bat shit crazy.

 

 

Your definition of a "Buyers Survey" is different than mine. This term has been used when describing an inflated recommendation and CG violations list.


In Topic: Marine Surveryor

19 December 2016 - 05:31 PM

Your description of a "buyers surveyor" just makes me shake my head in disbelief. All the best surveyors only have one way of inspecting a vessel and that is from stem to stern, providing you with the ships specifications then listing their findings and recommendations.

 

Should you wish to nickel and dime the seller after inspections will be up to you and how much you want the boat.

 

Best wishes.